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The Butte inter mountain. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1901-1912, July 09, 1903, Image 1

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THE1.N. .BU E BTINTER MOUN P1TAIC
VOL. XXIII. No. 95. BUTTE, MONTANA, THURSDAY, JULY 9, 1903. PRICE FIVE CENFS.
SLIGHT GAIN IN CONDITION OF THE .POPE IS
FOLLOWED BY COLLAPSE THAT MAY .IEAN DEATH
Six Prominent Members of the Sacred College-From These May Be Chor .. a Successor to Leo XIII
.-Ceremony Likely to Occur Nine Days After the Pontiff Has Passed Away.
Monsignor RsnisL Monapfst,.. Nocella. Mi arignor De Asne'edo. Alonsignor Gaeoano Disledi. Afhaigngor Di,,.omede i'dni'i. Monignaur Afrry DeI V'al.
END IS NEAR
PHYSICIANS
CLAIM
Morning Hours Marked by
Brightness on Part
of the Patient.
VERY SUDDEN CHANGE
Doctors Are Alarmed and
at Once Call Others
in Consultation.
ALL HOPE GONE
Rome, July 9.-9:30 p. m.-After
the consultation of the physicians,
Dr. Lapponi said:
"I fear there is no hope-no hope
whatever, and yet the end may not
come tonight."
DY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
Rome, July 9.-Since his illness the pope
had not begun a day as satisfactory as
this.
Indeed, hopes of his recovery reached
such a point as to make the general public
believe the pontiff soon might be out of
danger.
No better expression of this view could
be given than in the words of Dr. Lap
ponu, uttered on leaving the sick room at
about noon, that although he did not yet
dare to hope, he had, perhaps, ceased to
despair.
Followed by Attack.
This promising outlook, however, was
followed by the startling announcement
that the pope 'had been attacked with diar
rhoea, apparently caused by the large
quantity of food he had taken, and that
tonsulting physicians had been sent for.
The patient, when he began the day,
showed only more his iron mountaineer
ibre by rising and dressing almost without
assistance, walking across the room to his
arm-chair and having his toilet fully pre
pared, even to the detail of being shaved.
Throughout this procedure the pope
showed no signs of being exhausted. In
deed, he Jokingly alluded to the amount
of nourishment which was being imposed
on him and said:
"I ought to grow fat, as I have never
had in all my life as much as I get now."
Struggle With Death.
This buoyancy of spirit was considered
to be one of the principal co-efficients in
the struggle with death, which this admir
able old man has made in the last seven
dahe doctors, previous to the alarming
attack of this afternoon, said there was
not the slightest diminution in the acute
ness of the pontiff's mental faculties, as
t own this morning in a remarkable man
Ler, when the pope insisted on going over
some of the large questions of church
policy laid before hin by Cardinal Ram
polla, papal secretary of state.
At 3 o'clock in the afternoon, although
no worse, the pope was not reported to be
any better, and then came news of the
pontiff's sudden relapse and of the sending
for consulting physicians.
Augments the Weakness.
The pope was suddenly attacked this
afternoon with diorrhoea, apparently
caused by the large quantity of food he
had taken, and to which he is unaccus
tomed, together with his extreme weak
nees. The development in turn augments
his weakness.
Dr. Pozzoni has just arrived at the sick
room, owing to the sudden change for the
worse in the condition of the pope, A
consultation will be held.
After a long conference in the night it
was decided that in case the pope grew
worse there would be a consultation, at
which at least one new physician should
be present.
Doctors Mazsani and Lapponi decided
that under such conditions a physician
whom they would prefer was Professor
(Continued on Page Five.)
THIEOORE JUNIOR
HAS CLOSE CALL
OLDEST SON OF PRESIDENT 18 MIS
TAKEN FOR A MARAUDER BY
SECRET SERVICE MEN.
COVERED WITH A REVOLVER
'Executive of the Nation Makes a Change
in Having Oyster Bay Home
Watched.
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
New York, July 9.-Theodore Roosevelt,
Jr., eldest son of President Roosevelt, has,
it is reported, had a narrow escape from
being shot as a marauder by secret service
officials who guard his father's home at
Oyster Bay.
He had been visiting the home of a
neighbor, returning to Sagamore hill about
zo o'clock in the evening. The family
had gone to bed and the house was in
darkness.
Hard to See.
The moon was shining brightly, but be
cause of the dense foliage objects even at
a short distance were indistinct.
The young man did not come up the
regular path usually used. He took a short
cut and approached from the rear. The
secret service men did not see him until
he was almost on the steps.
"What do you want ?" was demanded.
He was slow to answer and was or
dered to throw up his hands. The men
covered him until they got close enough
to recognize the president's son.
They thought it was a good joke; but
the fact that he got so close before he was
picked up by the secret service men has
caused a change by the officers guarding
the president.
One Man on Guard.
At times during the daylight and early
evening only one secret service man has
been on duty.
After midnight two men went on and
remained until after daylight until they
were relieved by the single man who took
up the day watch.
Henceforth two men will he on guard
at all hours of the day and night.
TEACHERS TAKE CANOE TRIP
Instructors Holding Convention In Boston
Indulge in Outing.
BY ASSOC1ATED PRESS.
Boston, July 9.-The fair weather which
since Sunday has favored the National
Teachers' association, continued today,
bringing great satisfaction as for this, the
fourth day of the annual convention, more
excursions were scheduled than the pre
ceding days.
While many of the trips were for pleas
ure only, a number were for geological and
other educational purposes.
One of them was the canoe excursion up
the Charles river of the department of
physical training, There were the usual
number of expeditions and at least 15 re
ceptions scheduled for today.
Today several of the departments have
practically finished their work-the ele
mentary, the higher education and the
normal.
The department of secondary education
and of scientific instruction held their first
sessions today.
The manual training, music, kinder
garten, child study, administration and In
dian departments, continued their delib
erations, while the business, physical
training and library departments skipped
a session to resume tomorrow.
The national council held a memorial
session this forenoon, at which tributes
were paid to J. L. M. Curry, president
W. M. Bradsher and Dr. E. H. White.
The association elected J. W. Cook of
Illinois as president, Henry Rhodes of
Kentucky, treasurer and two vice-presi
dents, of whom President Charles W.
Eliot of Harvard university is the first.
SHAKEN BY AN EARTHQUAKE
Most Violent Shock in Twenty Years Is
Felt at Cape Town.
Ily ASSOCIA'IED PkSFS.
Cape Town, Cape Colony, July 9.-The
most violent earthquake shock in 2o years
was felt here at noon today.
Sound Steamer Destroyed.
DY ASSOCIATED PREss,
Anacortes, Wash,, July 9.-The sound
steamer Iaconner was destroyed by fire
this morning at Sarah's Head in Bur
rough's bay. It is possible that the hull
willbe saved.
Greene Is Imperial Potentate.
DY ASSOCIATED PRESS,
Saratoga, July 9.--The imperial council,
Mystic Shrine, will meet at Atlantic City
in 1904. George H. Greene of Dallas,
Texas, was elected imperial potentate.
THOUSANDS ARE
AT SIG MEETING
TWENTY - FIRST CHRISTIAN EN
DEAVOR CONVENTION IS
OPENED IN DENVER.
Pt ASSO('IA1F Pr1I'RIS.
Denver July 9.-At the annual business
meeting of the United Socikty of Christian
Endeavor, which was held at the Brown
Palace hotel in this city, this afternoon, all
the old officers were re-elected as follows:
President-Rev. Francis E. Clark,
D. D.
Treasurer-William Shaw.
Clerk-George B. Graff.
Auditor-Fred H. Kidder.
The retiring trustees were also re
elected and presidents were named for the
various states, territorial and provincial
societies.
The trustees postponed their annual
meeting until tomorrow afternoon.
Denver, July 9.--Thousands of mem
bers of Christian Endeavor societies from
all parts of the United States ,and Canad.a,
with a few front abroad, arrived here dur
ing the day and many more are on the
way.
The weather was perfect and more than
so,ooo people attended the opening mass
m.eeting of the twenty-first International
Christian Endeavor convention this after
noon in the large tent erected near City
Park for this occasion.
Rousing Song Service.
A rousing song service, led by Rev. P.
13. Jacobs of New York, preceded the
opening of the convention, which was
called to order at a o'clock by Frances E.
Clark, father of the Christian Endeavor
movement. whlich has grown froml one so
ciety o.f 5o memtbers, organized in Willis
ton church, at Portland, Me., in s88t, to
64,oao societies, with a membership of
nearly 4,000,000 persons.
After devotional exercises led by Rev.
Dr. Tyler of Denver, a welcoming songl
was sung by a chorus of 60o voices, coml
ducted by Prof. W. J. Whiteman.
Many Welcoming Addresses.
Welcoming addresses followed, Gov.
Jaites P. Peabody speaking for the state;
Rev. l)r. Robert F. Coyle, for the churches
and Chairman William E. Sweet for the
committee of t9o3. llearty greeting was
also extended to the visitors by Dr.
George F:. Libby, of Colorado Springs, one
of the first Willistotn Elndeavorers.
Ten-minute responses were delivered by
delegates from the North, East, South and
West, and from foreign countries.
BRITONS PRAISE PRESIDENT
Lord Beresford Declares England Honors
Theodore Roosevelt.
BY AxsuOCIArED Pi.t5N.
London, July 9.-At the Pilgrim club's
luncheon to the visiting American officers
at the Carlton club today Vice-Admnir.,l
Charles Beresford read the following nmes
sage from the Prince of Wales:
'I very much regret that an engage
ment will prevent me front e.ing present.
Please assure the American naval of
ficers how sorry I am that I am unable
to have the pleasure of meeting them."
At the center table Admiral Jiereford
presided. On his right was seated Rear
Admiral Cotton and on his left Captain
Lambton, naval aide-dc-camp to King .Ud
ward.
Ambassador Choate, Senator Gorman,
Senator Depew, General Lord Greenfelt,
the archdeacon of London. Dr. Sinclair,
and Admiral Sir John Daly Rimpnle sat
at the same table.
The American officers presented were
the same as those who attended the state
ball, and among the other guests were
Captain Charles P. Stockton, the United
States naval attache: Consul General
Evans, Admiral Sir Henry Stephenvai,
Admniral Lord Charles Scott. Lord Hams.l
ton, Arthur ILee, M. P., Perry lBmeltnt,
George T. Wilson of New York. Ilantil
ton McCormick of Chicago and Louis llay
of Michigan.
The scene was picturesque and novel.
All the American and a number of British
officers were in uniform.
In proposing the toast to "The King"
Lord Beresford said it was particularly
easy to do so, owing to recent events in
whioh the king had been a messenger of
peace and good will toward all nations.
I he interest of the whole world favored
peace.
He believed the day was coming when
King Edward would be called "The
Peacemaker." The toast was drunk with
enthusiasm and then Lord Beresford
toasted "President Roosevelt," and, ask.
nlog why the president was liked In Eng
land he said :
"We like the man, we like the strong
generous man, what I may call the re!
human man. The president will do hI
level best to bring the two Ireat Eglisli.
speaking nations together in harmonious
combine, t#hlch is the same idea Kin`
Edward had on the oeeasion of his wis
to the u)idelmt of FrageL."
NEW MEAlT LAW
WORRIED GERMANY
BERLIN MERCHANTS COMPLAIN
THAT THEY ARE PLAED AT
GREAT DISADVANTAGE.
I I A Ol IAII.I) 151 .
Berlin, July q.---lhe G(;erna meat law,
' lhich went into clfect in April, is hav
Il g mIore serious COIInCel~uILet cotlllllr
cially tlhant anticipated.
As the regulalonsl require die inIIpre
lion of ments and lard to take place in
lauded warehouses before export and the
inspectinn fees are heavy, the German
mtercha;nts complain that they are placed
at a great disadvantage in transit trade.
'They had hitherto supplied Austria and
Switzerland with American ments aind
lard, sending directly from the warehouse
vilout inspection.
Where the .meat law has lieen ppilled,
I pwever, nc lgian and Dn Dutch lhil)pr
are getting all the Austrian altd Swiss
trade and (;ermany is losing the transit
profits.
'I hle rtan shippers, therefore, are
calling loudly for the abolition of the
inmlpcrtiun reitirements in the case of
elxport goouds.
TABER RESIGNS AND
FISHER SUCCEEDS HIM
Change in Office of Master Mechanic of
Great Northern--New Man Has
Had Much Experience.
.I'l, l'. 10 filt; IN1lk Mlol'N"IAIN.
g;reat Falls, July q.-Malster Mechanic
. E. Tlber of the (;rest Northern hats re
signed to lbjcitnlec genleral mi;aster imechalitc
di the Missouri Pacific, with healdquarters
;:t St. Louis. lie will leave Saturday.
Matt T. Fisher was appoinlted to the
vacatcly todaiy. Th'lle new Ilaster IIlmechan;ic
haIs been running a pa'enger enginie here
rr sine timte, but has had iample experi
lie ran the first locomotive which ever
iitered Hutte, on the old tUtah & North
'tii narrow-gauge, years ago. lie was
v'ginoer of the train which conveyed G(Ill
,ratl rant to ;arrison to drive tle golIen
ipike ulon the coinpletion of the Northern
Pacific.
I siher has hIeei master mechaniic of the
l..,lisipell division of the Northern Paciftic
:,tI is thoroughly complletent. For ; tim
:Isher was foreiman of the Great Nurth
er. at Hutte.
DILLON MEN RETURN
FROM MINING FIELD
Say Thunder Mountain Is a Fizzle and
That Wages Are Not High
Enough There.
S1'1 Al. 'I TlilE IN'T:a MO lNIAIN.
I)illin, July o.- John J. lRosenielirg and
Charles Perry have returned from the
'Thunder Mountain country hli ghly dis
gustcd After spendling two months ill the
intch-flaunted mining district, thlese Dil
lMiites declare that the whole affair is a
frost.
IRosenberger and Perry were working for
the (0. A. Snow company on Trappler's
flats, not far from Mackay. They received
$. 5o per and board and came out losing
uliieny.
'I hey say that while the Dewey is a won
,her. it is one of a' very few good minies in
the district and that the majority of those
,i ll~ntiug there have lost, as the deeper
)oIi go the less ore you get.
SUES TO RECOVER $1,500
Edward F. Webster Plaintiff in Action
Against Dugnans.
Edwarrl F. Webster today brotught suit
in the district court against Mary J. and
I igene (). D)uginan to recover $1,5oo, ill
atturiiney' ic.e of $1S0, the foreclosure of a
miirtgage on realty, interest and costs.
The complaiint alleges the defemhants,
Mtrch r7, I oi, gave him their promissory
,'cre for $1,5so, payable one year from
I:,cr and Iearing io per cint interest per
;,snum. It adds that a mortgage as se
curity n, thi east i5i fc't of lia . blo:k 7,
unitte townsite, and lot ,) and block 7, was
,.xerutel by the deftndants.
Neither the note nor interest have been
paid, it is alleged, and the plaintill wants
judgment accordingly.
Evidence of Poison.
RY ASSOC'IATED I'RISS.
New York, July 9. -The Newark, N. J.,
authoritics have found evidences of a powerful
irritant poison In the body of the late \William
J. Best, which was exhumed at Caldwell, N. J.,
and examined by County Physician William J.
McKenzie of Essex county, N. J., yesterday.
1)r, Herlbert Baldwin, chemist of the Newark
board of hltllth, made a preliminary chemical
test of one piece of the intestine that was
found still adhering to the body of Colonel
:es!, and today he announced the discovery of
t Ic videee of poison to Charies Sumncr
SeM, a see d the dead mann
YOUNG BAPIISTS
OPEN CONVENTION
MORE THAN FIVE THOUSAND DELE
GATES PRESENT AT MEET
ING IN ATLANTA, GA.
ALL STATES REPRESENTED
Grand Chorus of Six Hundred Voices
Furnishes Music for the
Sessions.
IIY AN." I1A IAIII I'1i x ,.
Atlantla, ;.a.. July o,. With an atten.l
alnce eltiInatcle at S,ooo, and dlle;ites
repiresenting almost every ectionli of the
United States and Canada, the a jth In.
nual convention of the lnternational !flIp
tint Young People's union was rcalled to
order in this city today for a four
days' a sesion by P'resident John I'. C'hap.
luanll (of Chicago.
Praise Service Held.
The ni-ing ope ,'nsssi'in w I ' precede'd icy
a praiisNe bservice, which was h'id by a
graalc chorus of 6oo voices,.
'Iihde ilelgates of thle coIvei tillt n a.(rer
welcomd by (;ov. J. M. IM. 'rrell in Il'alf
of tlie state; Mayor Il. II. Ilowrll in
behalf of Atlantall, and formeicr (;ov. W. I.
Northern inn behalf of I;eorgi;a II. V. P.
1.; EIuory W. lhout, pires.lh.t of the:
Dennison universcity, Granville, 11., re
spond'l d to the ahlress of welhcmc ' ill
behalf of the hoalrd of cicnaiigers of the
InternaIl tionall l iunlion.
'lice morning tsession of the 'convenitionl
was devotued plrincipally toi tih a lic ci
inents of various cccn ciuillc'* and g;nI 'rll
routine work and organulli/tlion.
The Call to Service.
At the afterlnoon cc .sion SIfcineer Ft.
Moiucser, I). I ., 1cator of the V\'oodward
atvenue chulrcrh, Iletrcit, Mich., spoke on
"The 'all to Service,'" aniI a :cn llress on
"T'le Motives focr Scrvicie," was deliv 'rdcd
by Rev, W. T. Stack holi,,. piccritheid
lent of the Inaptist mlissiconi, WiiiipeLg,
Mmn.
Statie, provilncia'l indl territorial mncet
ings werC Ihcl Ity the dlillercnlt orKga izai -
tions dhuring the afternoon.
DOCTORS ISSUE BULLETIN
SHOWING END IS NEAR
II ARSIi'IAI ItI Ptic Hs.
Rome, July 9.--7:30 p. m.-The fol
lowing bulletin has been issued:
"The general condition of the pope
having become depressed, a consulta
tion was held at 4 o'clock, with the par
ticipation of Professor Rossini.
"From objective examination it ap
pears that the liquid is again rapidly
gathering in the pleura.
"The sounds of the heart are weak,
without any symptoms of valvular
lesion.
"The pulse is easily compressible;
that is to say, it has 90 pulsations in
stead of 65, which is normal.
"The breathing is superficial and at
long intervals. The kidneys are not
performing their functions.
"The state of his holiness is consid
ered grave. ROSSINI.
"LAPPONI.
"MAZZONI."
5,000 MEN MAY BE IDLE
!'iltsburcg, July ,.,-- Five thol.scil ma
chiniiist of J'itlscbtrg ciacy bIe thrown out
of elmployilcellt tomlorrow, following ac
tinI to Ie takci en ioliigh. t t i t a aIllcss mc.t
ing of local iachic isc. 'cThe m i .ive
thle sanction l if thcir inational ofllicers to
strike andi will take a secret ballot to
nigiht to dcctermince whether the.y will tcc
cept an olfer by the cnill:luIccturers of ai
t7r iper cent increasei or rcct in fircc for
their demand of a it) per cent increase.
VEIN TRACING
IS TOLD IN
COURT
Much Interesting Testi
mony Given in Trial
of Nipper Case.
EXPERTS OH STAND
Mining Engineers Give
Evidence in Noted
Litigation.
The t lil of tihe Nipper mining .case, its
whiclh I'. Augutus I.icize, nomtinally rep
resentled by EI. Ilickey uial others, is the
plaittilf in interest, and the Washoc and
Anaaondla I opper Mining compalntits are
the ldefendalts, taml the first big mining
case to be tritl in a lung talll, was otn iId
earnest in Jtudge I 'laney's couirt today.
James MacFarlane Testifies.
The first witness for the plaintiff, Ex.
pert Jamies Macfarlianc, was on the stand
all forrltoan :audl part of the aftirnoon,
antd he told what he knew about the ildges
and vein, of ore in tlhe litigated propelrty,
the Nl'pper clin of the United cl ('opper
coiaapatly, nitd the (Hliet ial other claims
adjoaninug saal beltanging to it' e1 fetndants.
Mr. Matcfarlane, wlIh was Ilcinze's su
perit elident of the Nipper mine tfor somnl
time i IH 97 adl later, traced a Nipper
vcein and apex (fratl the surface of the
Nilper dwn to lhe I,.,oo level of the de
fenldallts' lpropertieas by leasll of several
highlly-colored maps durintg his direct ex
atmintationt in the forenoon.
His Testimony Differs.
In the afterallaon, undelr cross-exatllins
tion, it was discovered that his testimony
of the morning differed widely from that
given concerlninlg the shaite deposits of ore
illn a previous suit.
Ite said today that the ore vein in a cer.
tain Anaconda raise was 18 inches wide.
It was shlwo, by reftrence to a transcript
of his testimony in the other suit, that he
then said the deposit was 130 feet wide.
lie explained the discrepancy with the
statement that the developments since the
previous trial have enlarged his knowledge,
and induced hitm to believe now that the
ore in the raise is merely what he desig.
nlat(el ils a "dropjper" fromll the main iledge,
hanging fromt the hanging wall.
Questioned by Thomas.
W\Vhen the cross-exanlination of Mr.
Macfarlaine opened in the afternoon, Mr.
'l'Thuaas, for the defendants, held the
transcript of the witness' testimony in
the suait letwteentt the Washue company
anttd Ilickey and others, and askcd his
questions.
Mr. Macfarlane testifietld under questationl
that he believed he had hitherto sworn
that tih apex of the Nipper vein would
be on the hanging wall at the surface.
"What was the width of the vein at
the top of thle Anaronda raise at the west
iend of the working ?" Mr. Thomas asked.
"At that time there were not such do.
veloplments as nlow. I should q(ualify-'"
replai, the witness, when Mr. Thomas in*
terrupted hitm.
Called to Account.
"Tha;,t is not answering may question,"
(( 'ntinllie on Patla e Seven.)
BASE-BALL TODAY
Following is the score by Innings of game in progrees at B.tts this afternoons
s 2 3 4 5 a 7 b 9 R.
BUTT..E..m. [email protected]@@@ 4
LOS ANGELES 00. oo-o'
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