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The Butte inter mountain. (Butte, Mont.) 1901-1912, August 04, 1903, Image 3

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EARCHES FOR
HIS LOVED
ONES
Illinois Clergyman Try
ing to Find His Father,
Mother and Sisters.
20 YEARS SILENCE
Preacher Was Placed in
Asylum When a. Child
and Lost All Track.
Sv ASSOCIATED PRUS.
New York, Aug. 4.-In an endeavor to
mnd his mother, father, brother and two
sisters, whom he has not seen or heard of
for so years, Rev. Thomas Ringland of
Ferris, Ill., has notified the police he will
pay a liberal reward for information that
Would aid him in his search.
Rev. Mr. Ringland, when but to years of
age, in t88r was placed in a New York
asylum by his parents, who were poor.
Through the agency of the asylum he
was apprenticed to an Illinois farmer. He
remained there several years, and finally
decided to become a minister, He entered
a Methodist church in Ferris, of which he
is now pastor.
After a long search it has been discov
ered that his father returned to his old
home in Ireland in i88s, taking his two
little girls with him.
It could not be learned what had become
of the mother.
INDORSE ACTION OF ALLIANCE
Citizens of Oenver Approve Move Against
Agitation in Colorado Springs.
BY ASSOCIATED PrESa.
Denver, Aug. 4.-At the meeting of the
Citizens Alliance, called for the purpose
of indorsing the action of the Citizens'
Protective League of Idaho Springs, Colo.,
in expelling from that city :4 members of
the local miners' union the day after the
blowing up with dynamite of the converter
house of the Suna and Moon mine re
cently, resolutions were-adopted com
mending the course of the Alliance of
Idaho Springs, and the law officers of
Clear Creek county, "which, while involv
ing a technical deviation from the letter
of the law, became nevertheless necessary,
owing to the exigency of the case."
The preamble of the resolutions charge
that within the organization of the West
ern Federation of Miners, there exists a
strict, oath-bound inner circle ready and
pledged to commit personal violence, mur
der and destruction of property at the be
hest and mandate of their leaders, who, in
turn are a law unto themselves and recog
nize the rights of others and by unlaw
ful means seek to control some of the most
important interests of the state."
The resolutions conclude with an ap
peal to those in authority to arrest and
prosecute all persons who unlawfully
carry deadly weapons concealed about their
persons.
The meeting was held behind closed
doors, admission being by card and the
representatives of the press being ex
cluded.
It was stated, however, by officials of the
alliance, that more than 7oo persons were
in attendance.
EARTHQUAKE DAMAGE SMALL
California More Frightened Than Hurt
by the Shooks.
BY ASSOCIATED PREPS.
San Francisco. Aug. 4.-Reports re.
ceived from different portions of Cali
fornia say that but little damage was done
by Sunday night's seismic disturbance, al
though it was quite severe.
The trembler was centered at San Jose,
where numerous windows and much crock
ery was broken. Mrs. P. M. Lusson, a
sufferer from heart disease, died during
the shock.
Lick observatory reports the shock the
heaviest in the history of the place.
The indicator of the seismograph was
dislodged and no record obtained.
In San Jose, the shock lasted from a to
30 seconds and was from east to west.
The time of the shock, as given by Lick
observatory, was o :49:24 o'clock.
Three shocks were felt in the Yosemite
valley.
TO INSTALL A NEW HEAD
Or. Edwin Hughes Will Take Presidency
of Depauw University.
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
Richmond, Ind., Aug. 4.-Elaborate
preparations are being made for the inau
guration of the new president of the De
pauw university, Dr. Edwin Hughes of
Boaton, Mass.
The exercises will continue through four
days.
All the college and university presidents
of the country will be invited to be pres
ent, and several of them will be among
the speakers.
FINANCES IN TANGLED SHAPE
Jaoob Eppinger Tells of the Affairs of
Eppinger & Co.
BY ASSOCIATED PRESs.
San Francisco, Aug. 4.-Before Referee
Green yesterday Jacob Eppinger was ex
amined regarding the affairs of the bank
rupt firm of Eppinger & Co., of which he
was the nominal head.
After testifying that the firm was or
ganized in 1868 and that he had done most
of the buying of grain, he declined to state
Above nobody's reach
Schilling's Best are not best in
the sense of extravagant; true
and full-strength; cheap.
Your grocer's; moneyback.
wh haid charge of the finances of the firm.
Referee Green held that in view of the
fact that Eppinger has been indicted by
the state court and the court is advised of
the fact, he would sustain the witness in
refusing to answer.
Eppinger said he could not tell why a
balance sheet of the firm's affairs had not
been made since :888.
He was able, however, to ascertain
within $Soo,ooo whether the firm had
made or lost money in any given year.
He could not say how much he had
drawn on personal checks, but thought at
was over $S1o,ooo.
Regarding speculations in his name,
which he said were intended for the benefit
of the firm, he testified that since 1897 he
had lost $s8j,ooo, the losses since Sep
tember last aggregating $57,ooo.
He borrowed $jo,ooo on his life insur
ance policy of $so,ooo and gave his wife
$5,ooo of that.
He borrowed $7,ooo from Rosenfeld &
Co., $5,ooo from Wells Fargo bank and
$7,0oo from his wife.
Eppinger explained that his son, Joe,
had drawn about $t,ooo a month over and
above his salary, which had been charged
to him to the amount of between $6o,ooo
and $7o,ooo.
MOUNTAIN THEATER OPENED
Foreste Form Background for a Unique
Playhouse in Har Range.
Berlin, Aug. .-High up in the Hars
mountain at Hexentansplats, near the
little village of Thale, a few days ago
there was opened a regular mountain
theater.
The Hexentansplatz is a high plateau
from which one can look down on laugh
Ing valleys with clusters of green fields,
charming cities and numerous small vil
lages. The stage built on the plateau is
of fair dimensions.
It is erected near a mountain ravine
which with its forests in the background
forms natural scenery.
The seats for the public are arranged
in amphitheatrical fashion, descending in
rows from the stage. Naturally, of course,
in this unique mountain theater one must
forego everything remindful of modern
comfort, although the wooden seats are
not bad.
The stage is separated from the public
by only a small space, so that performances
must go on continually without stopping.
The only artificial scenery is a small
peasant house, the side scenes being
formed by the natural forest.
A festival play entitled "Walpurgis," by
Ernest Wachler, is presented before the
thousands of summer guests who are now
visiting the lovely Harm. It is an allegori
cal play, glorifying the old German legend
of "the Walpurgisnacht," made famous by
Goethe and Heine.
The play is opened by an address by
Herr Daghoefer, who, with the other
artists, are from the court theater at
Weimar. The chorus is composed of
young people from the neighboring vil
lage of Thale, who also do the dancing.
At the end of the performance fires are
burned on the top of the mountains.
WANTS WOMEN INSPECTORS
Seoretary Coetelyou to Make Another
Trial in Immigration Work.
Washington, Aug. 4.-Secretary Cortel
you of the department of commerce and
labor decided today to make another test
of the women immigration Inspectors at
New York, but under different conditions
from those which governed the trial that
resulted in failure last spring.
In the modified form he has strong
hopes that the scheme can be worked out
successfully.
Five matrona will be appointed whose
duty it will be to board incoming ships
along with the immigration inspectors.
They will devote more attention to friend
less young women who are coming to this
country in search of employment.
MAKE BIG MONEY IN MELONS
Growers in the Coachella Valley Have
Good Clean-Up.
Los Angeles, Cal., Aug. 4.-Forty thou
sand dollars is the clean-up estimated to
have been made by the melon growers in
the Coachella valley this summer.
The season there began nearly two
months ago and is now practically over.
It was from the Coachella district that
Chicago and New York received their
first cantaloupes this year.
The first of the melons were shipped
by express, but as the fruit began to
ripen more plentifully shipments by
freight were made. This was done as an
experiment and has proved so satisfactory
that next year it is thought the entire
crop will be forwarded by freight.
Raising melons in the Coachella val
ley began last year, but further than to
demonstrate that the fruit could be pro
duced in that sun-dried country, there
was not much to be gained by the
growers; in fact, the experiment is re
ported to have cost $5o,ooo.
Most of the melons last year were
shipped by express at such a high rate
that there was no margin for profit. A
number of Japanese were imported at
considerable expense and they had no
sooner arrived than a hot wind swept
away a good part of the crop and the
Japs had to be sent home at the expense
of the growers.
This year the melon men were not only
favored with good weather, but superior
transportation facilities.
The Rock Island carried 42 carloads
of cantaloupes to eastern points and as
many more carloads were distributed on
the Pacific coast.
The fruit was landed in Chicago just
six days after date of shipment. It is
said that the first carload of melons that
went east netted the grower *s,soo.
It Is expected that next year the crop
will be double what it was this season
and arrangements have already been made
to ship the melons in trainload lots in
stead of in carload lots, and this will still
further cut down the transportation ex
penses.
Alleged Forger on Trial.
BY ASSOCIATED PRESa.
San Francisco, Aug. 4.-The trial of
W. H. Dillard began yesterday in the
United States district court before Judge
J. J. Dehaven. Dillard is a negro and
was formerly a messenger in the internal
revenue service. In that capacity he is
charged with having uttered false Chinese
certificates of Chinese residents on which
he had, according to the charge, forged
the name of John C. Lynch, the collector.
Ruling on Water Rights.
BY AaBOCIATED PRESs.
Cheyenne, Wyo., Aug. 4.-The state su
preme court has handed down an im
portant decision in the matter of Inter
state water rights. The court held that
the priority of rights rule applied and that
the district court of Sheridan county has
jurisdiction to enjoin the diversion of
streams in Montana where such diversion
injures a prior user of water in Wyoming,
VOLCANO SUFFERERS
IN PITIABLE SHAPE
Persons Made Homeless by Eruptions of La Soufriere
Alleged to Be Visited by Disease and Starvation.
CORRarPONDoNca Or THl. ASSOCIATED raSga.
Kingstown, St. Vincent, July so.-The
Sentry publishes an article today calling
public attention to the miserable condition
of many of the sufferers from the late
eruptions of the Soufriere.
"The condition of the stricken families,"
says the Sentry, "who are sick, starving
and penniless, excites the pity of the hard
eat hearts and fires with indignation the
minds of those who are aware that this
unfortunate, nay, disgraceful, circumstance
is the result of the acts of a despotic gov
ernor-in-chief, who treats with contempt all
opinions not in accordance with his own.
"In spite of the advice of men whose
knowledge of the islands, physically and
otherwise, placed them in a position to be
his excellency's advisers in such a matte.
as a settlement of these people on suitablg
lands, Sir Robert Llewellyn located 6o of
the starving families on an unhealthy spot
of Amos Valeland without placing at their
disposal a foot of cultivateable land, no
rations and at a time of the year when
the prospect of obtaining sufficient employ
ment for a livelohood was the faintest.
"The result Is that many of these people,
weakened by constant hunger, have fallen
easy victims of malaria, which exists In
STAND BY FRANCE
IN CANAL MATTER
PEOPLE OF COLOMBIA NOT OVER
ENTHUSIASTIC OVER THE
PANAMA ROUTE.
Ba AssOCtAT.D PRESS.
New York, Aug. 4.-Pedro Velez, a
member of the Colombian congress and
one of the committee of the house that
has charge of the Panama canal treaty,
will sail for Colon today, after a stay of
several weeks in this city and Washing
ton.
After visiting his home in Cartagena he
will go to Bogota to take part in the canal
debate.
Studies the Conditions.
During his stay Velez has carefully stud
ied sentiment relative to the canal and will
use as a guide in the deliberations of con
gress the information he has gathered.
Regardless of the great advantage of the
Panama route, he says those who favor
it over the Nicaragua waterway are greatly
in the minority.
Veles does not expect an early vote be
cause of protracted debate and numerous
amendments which will be offered.
"I cannot tell how I shall vote, but if
I were to judge according to impressions
received here from a generality of the
press, my decision would be decidedly
against the treaty.
Friendly to France.
"If the present treaty negotiations with
the United States should come to a stand
still, I feel our government and people
will not in any case try to bargain or sac
rifice the French people, with whom our
relations always have been cordial.
"The canal will be a benefit to Colombia
and to the world, but the sentiment here
does not tend toward the advantageous
circumstances that would induce to
strengthen the desire of coming to .more
intimate and fraternal relations."
Roosevelt Sends Check.
Pittsburg, Aug. 4.-A check for $soo
has been received from President Roose
velt for Theodore Roosevelt Signet, the'
boy born to. Mr. and Mrs. William H.
Signet of McKeesport, several weeks ago,
and which is the aoth child born to Mr.
Signet. The money has been placed in a
bank to the credit of the baby, the interest
to accumulate until he is at years old.
NEW SETTLERS ARE FEWER
Railway Officials Show Only 130,000
Took Farms In Northwest This Year.
St. Paul, Aug. 4.-E-stimates made by
officials of transcontinental railway lines
show that the total number of settlers
passing through St. Paul for the North
west this year was g3o,ooo, a decrease
from last year. Of these 85,ooo went to
points in Minnesota, North Dakota, Idaho
and Washington. The rest went to the
Canadian Northwest. The traffic was
divided about as follows:
Northern Pacific-To points in the
Northwestern states, 45,000; to points In
Canada, so,ooo.
Great Northern-To points in the North
western states, 3o,00o; to points in Can
ada, 1o,ooo.
Other lines-To points in Minnesota and
North Dakota, 1o,ooo; to points in Canada,
a5,ooo.
The movement was not more than two
thirds as large ,. last year, owing to the
fact that the prace of land has risen to $18
and $ao per acre.
THE PANSY.
I love the humble wayside flowers,
The roses' blushing beauty,
The stately lily, fair and tall,
Gives thoughts of love and duty{
But when my heart is lone and sad
And dark thoughts fill my fancy,
The flower that cheers and comforts most
Is aye the lowly l'ansyi
I lilt to mine each smiling face,
go shy, so sweet, so tender,
I fancy they have suffered, too,
Such comfort sweet they render.
I mind the days of shade and shine,
The nights when tempests reigning,,
The patient Pansies bowed their heads,
But none were heard complaining,
And when the morn in splendor brok
With softer breezes blowing,
The gentle Rowers, refreshed and fair,
With brighter tints were glowing.
I know they feared the chilling blasts,
The drenching rain and dew,
The Master Artist spared them not
To paint the colors trust
And thus it is with life I ween,
From dawn till day is ended,
The weal and woe, the calm and strife
Like Pansy tints are blended;
With days of toil and nights of pain,
And times of Joy and sorrow,
With cherished hopes of promised gala
That are in grief tomorrow,
But Oh, I know the Master's hand
Each touch in love hath given,
To make the patient heart reflect
The rainbow hues of heavent
--Cincinnati Enquirer.
the stagnant pool near which they have
Ievil lodº;ed. "Nor are these tile only
tItch of refugees thus deprived of the hu
a11n comforts which belong to themt
through the funds that were subscribed by
i .sympathising world in their behalf.
"Others, though better located, are suf
tiring front want of food, the employmlent
.tfordled on the estates nearby being in
arlquatc to keep them, and there are now
large numbers of these half-naked labor
ters still living under the temporary shel
ters at Colonnaric, under dirty, tattered
ttnts which were erected in the celtter of
lt.aroulec for a twelvetlonth.
Disease and Immorality.
"These temporary shelters are har
Iinugers of disease and immorality.
"lit the face of all this misery a sum of
$t 1,.ooo to the credit of the Soutlriere re
litf fund was recently remitted fromt this
gwverlnmrnt to England at a cost of $S,ono
to be invested, it is said, 'for the perma
n1nt interest of the colony,' as if the work
,f relieving itmmediate distress had been
complleted."
The Sentry expresses the hope that its
exposure of conditions in St. Vincent may
h..l to the matter being taken up itn the
ittitith parliament.
BAN ON EXPLOSIONS
FOR 4TH OF JULY
ST. PAUL OFFICIALS ARE DETER
,MINED TO SAVE THE YOUNG
STERS FROM HARM.
BY ASSii'IATED Il(R1SS.
St. Paul, Aug. 4.-O()wing to the results
of the celebration of last Fourth of July
and the reecklessness displayed In using
blank cartridges, bodmbus, pistols and other
nIiscamakers, Corporationu Attorney Mich
ael has drafted an ordinance which it is
said the city council will adopt. declaring
that all these forms of Fourth of July
amusements are prohibited.
The ordinance will not only pIrohibit the
use of these explosives on the Funrth, but
dealers will be prohibited from carrying
Ilen) ill stuck for a monuth previous to the
Fo'urth.
Violations of the ordinance are imade
punishable by heavy fines.
hctors, city oflicials and others of Iin
Hluence are said to be back of the measure.
IS WANTED FOR TWO DEEDS
Alleged Murderer of Couple of Deputies
Taken at Sheridan.
SPEP.IAL TO Till{ INTI.M MOI'NTAIN.
Sheridan, Wyo., Aug. 4.-Boone Potter,
wanted in North Carolinl for a doublle
murder, was arrested here Monday night
by Marshal Grinnell.
Papes found oil his person establish the
identity of the suspect.
Putter is charged with killing IlDepty
SherilTs Ilannell aln Ilrownes of \Valant.l
county, North Carolinla. lie will be held
for the southern authorities.
SEIZE PASTOR AS A LUNATIC
Illinois Officials Lock Up Rev. Benjamin
Wiseman for Inquiry.
Springfield, III., Aug. 4.-Rev. Ben'jamiin
Wisemian, who has held a number of
important pastoral charges in Illinois and
at Kansas City, Mo., was ,broaght here
tonight by Pawnee ollicials and locked, up
im the county jail. An inquiry into his
tsanity will be held in the county court.
WViseman left his home at Zenolia this
morning while laboring under the delusion
that God had directed him to deliver a
il'iritual message to save a sinner. lie
walked ao miles before heing taken into
custody.
W\iseman is a fine looking mIan and'
talks rationally on all stnljeets except re
ligion. lie has held pastorates at Girard,
Ioodlhouse, Morrisonville and other points
in Illinois. lie is employed by a theo
logical publishing house of Kansas City.
ENGLAND CULTIVATES FRANCE
Work of -Bringing About an Entente
Cordiale Is Advancing Rapidly.
London, Aug. 4.--Wlihle the king is in
Ireland the work which he began of bring
ing about an entente cordiale between Eng
land and France has been advancing stead
ily in London. About o70 members of the
French senate and chamber of deputies
have been paying a visit to the English
capital at the invitation of a number of
members of the British parliament. The
visitors have been entertained in the house
of commons, lunched at the Mansion
house, and dined en famille by various
Englishmen who own London houses best
fitted to give continental guests an idea of
what Englishmen of wealth anrl taste can
do in the way of entertaining their friends.
TOUQSINQ ON PAINTS
We can supply an article that is with
out a superior. Unequaled for walls,
floors and touching up generally. Beau
tifies and preserves and is highly
economical. The best to be had for
the money. The sun can't blister Lin.
coln's paint. Durable, effective. Try
a gallon, only $z.7l, ready mixed. Goes
farther; gives better results than oth
ers.
CARDER WALL PAPER CO.
C. V. ?ERANZMAN, Prep,
isr W. Park It.. Kong Blk. 'Phone toG.
ELEVEN ROOM SIZE MADE-UP
Carpet Specials
The year's most favorable carpet opportunity, comprising new
carpets ordered and left on our hands by a failure to comply with
our terms, and one or two carpets made up from the remaining
yardage of discontinued patterns, in all, eleven carpets and eleven
of the year's biggest bargains for those whose rooms they will fit.
If you have a room to carpt, of any of the sites mentioned, you
will find this to be the $75,000 Clearance Sale's most Inviting
and persuasive carpet proposition .4A JA 4$ .i 4
[leven Great Carpet Temptations
1 room lienaro'ds ngrain, sire 12x1l2.5; worth $ 725
$10.50, for .............. . ....... .............
1 room Columbia ingrain, size 12x14.0; worthi,7
1 room, Sanford Ilrnssels, size 9x13.3; worth $ 475
$17.65, for................................ $ 1
1 room Smith's Blrussel, size ti. 3xll.5; worth
$21.85, for .. .................... ...... ... .
1 room Stinson lrunsels, size 10.3xl2.2; worth $1825
$€22.80, for ....................... . .... .
1 room Wilton velvet, size 9x12; worth
$25, for.................... . .. .......... .19.
1 room Smith's Axminster, size l0.d x o.0; worth $ 9
$20.00, for ................................
1 room i)ohl,on's velvet, size 11.3x10. 10i; worth $21l75
$20.2(L , for .................................
1 room Stinson's velvet, size 10. .6xl ; worth $21t75
$26.0 60, for ............................... ..
1 room Dunlap velvet, size 11.8xl4.8; worth $22
$28.20, for................................ $ (
1 room extra Axniinster, size 10x14; worth $26s75
$32.50, for................................ G
REMNANTS.
All ealauts of Jap aId China Iatling Fiber and Ingrain Carpets at
HALF-PRiCE
Mail Us Your Orders--We Pay the Freight.
Brownfield=Canty Carpet Co.
48 to 54 West Park, tS to 43 West Galena Street, Butte.
ROOSEVELT PRAISES
CATHOLICS' WORK
PRESIDENT SENDS LETTER TO THE
CONVENTION OF AMERICAN
FEDERATION.
BY ASS(CIAI Y.l RIi `'i,.
Atlantic City, N. J., Aug. 4. -At the
third day of the rconvent'ionl of the Allieri
can Iederation of Catholic srcieties the
following nlmeage from Pres.ident loose
velt to Presideint Monohan was read:
"Oyster Bay, Aug. .1. My I)ear Sir: I
have received your letter anlld have also
spokenl personally abouti the matter with
tHishop McFaul. I regret greatly that it
is out of ouir power to accep(t your very
kind invitation.
"I believe most hea:rtily in the work you
are doing in your Aumeric-an Federation of
Catholic .ciieties ndl it would have Iben
a peculiar pleasure to have ace-pjted your
invitation.
1 Im well aware of what your society has
accomplished for the socil Ibetterment,
not only of Catholic, but all our people, in
proamoting the unificatlon and naturaliza
tion of out countrymen landl in working
for morality and decency, ,especially in
thle intimate home relations upon which
rests the ultimate well Iteing of the entire
state.
"Wishing you all success and congratu
Ilting you on what you have donle in the
cpasr, I a1 wiLth gre:at regard, sincerely
yours, THE ODORE I", I(OOSiEVELT."
Delegate Joaquin Herron of Porto Rico
addressed the convention.
lie said that in his country there were
but 95 pritets for nearly a million Catho
l;cs.
lie asked the convention to ask the
American governmaent for an order direct
ing that the t' 1- to the lands of the
church in Porto Rico be placed In the name
of the church as, although the church was
in possession of the property, the title
had never e'en placed on record In their
favor.
ABOUT THE TREASURE STATE
Indorse Martin.
SI'PEIAI. TO TIHE INfTEr MOUNTAIN.
Glendive, Aug. 4.--John Martin of Burns
creek has been indorsed for county com
missioner by the republican central com
mittee,
Mrs. William Selaby Dead.
SPEC'IAL TO THE INTEr MOUNTAIN.
Missoula, Aug. 4.-Mrs. William Selsby
died yesterday of cancer in the Sisters'
hospital. She leaves her husband, residing
here, and a grown son, living in Hamil
ton.
Victim of Lightning.
SIrECIAI. TO THE INTER MOUNTAIN.
Glasgow, Aug. 4.--Charles Meyer, a
Missouri river rancher, was killed by
lightning Sunday while riding the range.
His horse was also struck dead.
Lightning at Helena.
SPECIAl, TO TIHE INTIER MOUNTAIN.
Helena, Aug. 4.-The county courthouse
was struck twice by lightning, which played
several freak tricks about the city.
OASHED TO EARTf
BY CRAZED HORSE
ANIMIAL MADDENED BY EXPLOSION
RUNS DOWN AND INJURES
CHILDREN.
IIV AS'II IA IID I'1115 s,.
Nrw York, Aug. 4. - Several chilirea
hiave Ien injurrl, one probably fatally, by
a runawa;y horse, which was maddIened at
the Cexplosion of firework, se't off by
D)every enthuhiasts wlho were raising a
banner at TwIenty-eighth stre ,t and I.ighth
avenue.
The former police chief's neighbora in
that section had turncdl ollt in great num
hers to help raise a banner setting forth
his claims as candidate for the mayoralty.
Fireworks were plentiful and the e-:
citelmenlt was at its height when a plasinl
cab horse took fright at the explosion of
a blomnb.
The animals dashed wildly through the
crowd anul on the sidewalk, where many
children bstood. They were knocked in all
directions and three fell, seriously in
Jured.
Most of the others received minor hurts.
The acciden, t put an effective check to
the ceremlonies.
My boy, when 4 years old, was taken
with colic and crampls in his stomach. I
sent for the doctor and he injected mor
phine, but the child kept getting worse.
I then gave him half a teaspoonful of
Chamlberlain's Colic, Cholera and Diar
rhoea Remedy, and in half an hour he
was sleeping and soon recovered.--F. L.
Wilkins, Shell Lake, Wis. Mr. Wilkina
is bookkeeper for the Shell Lake Lumber
Co. For sale by Paxson & Rockefeller,
Newbro Drug Co., Christie & Leys, New
ton Bros.
NEGROES TO DEMAND RIGHTS
Colored Men of New York Form an
Association for Protection.
vY ASSOCIATID PRESS.
New York, Aug. 4.-The Afro-American
Equal Rights league of the state of New
York has been organized at a meeting ls
Saratoga.
Officers were elected and the president
was empowered to appoint one person
from each congressional district to form
an executive board.
Associations are expected to be formed
in other states.
TO DISCUSS LOCAL OPTION
Temperance Advocates tb Gather at
Hamilton Tomorrow.
SPECIAL TO THE INTER MOUNTAIN.
Hamilton, Aug. 4.-A convention to con
sider the advisability of conducting a local
option campaign in Ravalli county will be
held at Hamilton tomorrow. Thomas H,
Reed of the American Anti-Saloon league
will speak.
Servian Offloer Arrested.
BY ASSOCIATSD iazsa.
Belgrade, Aug. 4.-A Servian officer has
been arrested here on the charge of selling
the mobilizing plans to a foreign power.
It is believed he has several accomplices.
A rigorous nlavestigation is proceeding.

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