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The Butte inter mountain. (Butte, Mont.) 1901-1912, August 05, 1903, Image 3

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025294/1903-08-05/ed-1/seq-3/

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IN THE CLUTCHES
OF GRIZZLY BEAR
ROSSLAPNO MAN HA8 A THRILLING
EXPERIENOE IN WILOS OF
BRIT4SH COLUMBIA.
ATTACKED WITHOUT WARNING
BnAo Knooks Down His Viotim and
L.acerate Him in a Shook.
Ing Manner.
Ferguson, B. C., Aug. s.-George Bain
of Rossland reached this camp after a
bard journey of as miles, suffering ter
rible agony - from wounds Inflicted by an
infuriated grissly bear.
With him was John Kennedy. They
outfitted here some days ago for a trip
in the Hall's creek direction. Mr. Ken
aedy gives the following account of the
affair I
"We were making for camp at the Jewel
cabin, going through very dense brush. I
beard a bear cuffing her cubs, as I
thought, near us. We had no arms of
any kind with us.
"I was ahead, and after moving along a
few steps I heard a rush, and, turning,
saw the grizzly fling herself on Mr. Bain.
She rose on her haunches and struck him
on the head. It was a fearful blow. The
blood fairly spurted in the air.
Falls at Once.
"Bain fell at once and the bear snapped
him once or twice on the arm. I was
certain he was killed. As he lay quite
still the bear turned from him and did
not appear to have noticed me, as she
plunged at once into cover again and
went crashing through undergrowth and
logs in the direction nearly opposite to
that from which she had come.
"I don't know why she attacked us, but
I suppose she thought her cubs in danger.
She had cuffed them to make them keep
out of eight. We did nothing to provoke
her attack.
"After a few minutes Mr. Bain revived.
It was an awful sight. His scalp on the
left side was torn and ripped from near
the nape of his neck clear over his face.
It hung down like a horrible bloody mask
over his face.
His right arm was pouring blood from
several wounds. The brute had driven her
.teeth through the thick part of the palm
of his hand and between the bones of his
forearm. I fixed his scalp as best I could
and bound up his arm.
Push for the Cabin.
"After resting a little we pushed on for
the cabin. Bain was bleeding a great
deal, but pushed on through three miles
of mountain over rocks and windfalls.
"He never uttered a word of complaint.
We reached the cabin about 7 p. m. Luck
ily Captain Davey of Camborne was there.
The captain knows as much as a surgeon
about wounds. He and I did the best we
could for Mr. Bain with the rough appli
ances we had.
After a painful night for Mr. Bain, who
all along bore his terrible pain like a man,
we started for Ferguson this morning.
Bain stayed in the saddle the whole trip of
na miles.
"I am afraid his left eye is injured and
may have to be taken out. He says he
can see all right with it."
HAS HERD OF 40 BUFFALOES
Medora Man Is Selling Bulls and Cows
at Very Neat Figures.
SP'ECIAL TO TVIl INTER MOUNTAIN.
Glendive, Aug. S.-Howard Eaton of
Bledora still owns the largest herd of buf
faloes in the world, despite the fact that
he has made several sales lately.
He sold one bull and four cows to Paul
McCormick of Billings recently, and last
week sent a bull and two cows to Winni
peg, where they will be put into the public
zoological gardens.
There iF money in raising buffaloes.
Eaton gets $6oo a head for his bulls and
$4co for the cows.
He has 40 in his herd at Medora and
they increase with a reasonable degree of
rapidity.
CHINESE VICEROY IS SCORED
Official at Kwang Si Alleged to Have
Spread False Reports,
sY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
Victoria, B. C.,Aug. 5.-High authorities
and militia officials of Kwangsi have been
denounced to the Chinese government by
the new viceroy for sending false reports
of the rebellion in that province, which Is
regarded now as alarming.
A number of sympathizers of the rebels
attacked Anjen Hsien in Hongchu pre
fecture, but owing to a lack of sufficient
arms and ammunition could not effect a
capture of the city.
The citizens were also practically with
out arms and the governor on hearing
of its danger sent a large amount of war
munitions to them to beat off the rebels,
but the escort was defeated and the muni
tions captured by the rebels, who then as
saulted and captured the city.
HELD ON MURDER CHARGE
Four Negroes Taken After Body of
White Man Is Found.
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
New York, Aug. S.-Following the dis
covery in the Harlem river of the nude
body of a white man with a cut on his
head, four negroes have been arrested
on a charge of murder.
One of them has told the police he met
the white man in a Harlem saloon; that
three others came in and saw him show a
roll of bills and that one of the crowd
brought a flash of liquor into which he
poured a quantity of snuff.
He left the party and later says he met
one of them carrying in his arms the white
man's clothes.
Nurse Commits 8uloide.
New York, Aug. S.--+Mabel Main, aged
'4, a student at a training school for
purses here, has committed suicide, be
cause of the alleged objection of her pa
rents to a contemplated appearance on the
stage. She is said to have been the daugh
ter of a banker in Falmouth, Jamaica.
i wawsk 4 e - Schilling's
NWri t'a he prces always
t ,y6tu groce1'i.
dbway ~Y~
WILLIAM E. COWBY
IN SCHWAB'S PLACE
New York, Aug. 5.-The resig.
nation of chares M. Schwab
eas preedent of the tUnited
States Steel corporation was
tendered and accepted at a
meeting of the directors yester
day. Wlliam L Corey was
unanimously elected as his suc
cessr.
Mr. Schwab's resignation
caused no surprise in financial
circles, where it had for some
time been foreshadowed.
The new president was for
years one of Andrew Carnegie's
ablest lieutenants and is now
president of the Carnelie Steel.. .
company, one of the snheidiary
concerns of the United States
Steel corporation.
The new president has entered
on his duties, and it may be
said that with his election the
steel oorporation has begun a
new policy.
There will be less centraliza
tion of power and less responsi
bility in the work of the va
roe commdittees.
Mr. Corey will
devote hib entire
attention to the
pretical and tech.
nielt ides of the
steel and iron in
dustry and will re
eelve material aid
from the advisory
commaitee, whose
mensem are spe
iaelly well qualified
to act in that ca
pacity.
No other import. WILLI,AM E. CORRY.
ant changes were
announced in the personnel or policy of the corporation. Mr. rirck continues as
a member of the finance committee, of which George W. Perkins is chairman.
PROMINENT MEN
WILL BE PRESENT
IRRIGATION CONGRESS TO BE HELD
IN OGDEtN, UTAH, PROMISES
TO BE INTERESTING.
VALUABLE PRIZES OFFERED
Agricultural Department Promises to
Have Noted Scientists at
the Meeting.
BY ASSOCIATE.D PRESS.
Ogden, Utah, Aug. 5.-The eleventh na
tional irrigation congress. which will meet
In this city, September '5, promises to be
the most prominent and most interesting
Irrigation convention ever held in America.
Hundreds of telegrams and letters have
been received from prominent iersons in
all parts of the country promising attend
ance or support.
Letter From Roosevelt.
President Roosevelt has written a per
sonal letter to Chairman Kiesel of the
executive committee, promising active aid
and support and stating that he will be
represented by a member of his cabinet.
Numerous valuable prizes are to be of
fcred for exhibits of fruits and cereals
grown under irrigation.
Senator W. A. Clark cabled from Eu
rope yesterday offering a $5oo loving cup
for the best exhibit of green fruits, and
Colonel Fred Pabst of Milwaukee tele
graphs that he will offer a cup of the same
value for the best barley exhibit.
Takes Especial Interest.
The agricultural department at W'ash
ington is taking special interest in the
soming session, and Secretary Wilson says
he will make it a point to have as many
scientists of the department attend as can
be conveniently spared.
Western roads will make reduced rates
for the convention.
GOVERNMENT ENTITLED
TO REDUCED RATES
DY ASSOCIAT1 D PRESS.
Washington, Aug. 5.-The secretary of
the war department has approved the find
ing of the advocate of the army, that the
government is entitled to reduced rates
over tracts of land grant railroads, when
operated by other railroad companies.
The Astoria and Columlbia river rail.
road operates its lines over js miles of
the Northern Pacific railroad in Oregon
under a trackage arrangement, and re
fused land grant rate to the war depart
ment.
The attorney-general has been asked to
bring suit to recover the charges which
the government has paid.
GENERAL CORBIN TO
STEP OUT AUGUST 15
BY ASSOCIATaD PaRSS.
,Washington, Aug. 5.-Major General
Henry W. Corbin will relinquish his duties
as adjutant general of the army when the
general staff law goes into effect, August
aS, and an officer of the adjutant general's
corps will be assigned as acting adjutant
general.
RAILROAD BRIDGE DYNAMITED
Conditions Become Serious in Salonica
and ,More Trouble Is Feared.
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
Salonlca, Aug. 5.-A railroad bridge at
Ekesson, 87 miles northwest of Salonica,
and a railroad store house at Bonitza
have been dynamited.
The telegraph line between Salonlca
and Monastir has been cut.
The greatest uneasiness exists in the
highest and best informed circles and a
renewal of the bomb throwing outrages
are feared.
The government Is taking extraordlnuaa
precautions.
Jury Falls to Agree.
SY ASSOCIATED PaEse,
Casper, Wyo., Aug. S.-The jury In the
ease of E, S. Murphy, charged with the
murder of a sheepherder, named Frits
Kassahn, reported at 6 o'clock last even
Ing, having failed to agree. Eleven of the
men stood for convlction and oas for a.
quittal.
ANCIENT VILLAGE
SITE IS EXHUMED
REMAINS OF PREHISTORIC TOWN
ARE DISCOVERED BY AN
OHIO SCIENTIST.
BROKEN POTTERY IS FOUND
No Doubt That Indians Fortified the
Town to Protect Themselves
From Predatory Tribesmen.
Chillicothe, Ohio., Aug. S.-Dr. M. C.
Mills, curator of the State Archaeological
society, has discovered that there is a pre
historic village site on the G;artner farm, a
few miles south of this city.
lIe has made excavatins which disclose
many valuable relies of the ancient people
who wandered over the country ages ago.
The site is a little elevation near the
Scioto river and commands a splendid view
of the surrolnlding country. The place
was undloubtedly clhos,.c Iby the Indians
with a view of fortifyinlg themsclves from
thle attacks of predatory tribes.
Bones of Game.
l)r. Mills has opened .1, pits which were
used for storlntg food and ill sottme cases
for burials. In these were found charred
corn and hbeans, which leads the arch
aeologist to infer that thle mIound builders
ktnew something of agriculture, dispelling
the popular theory that they aubslisted cn
tirely ott fish and game.
lUlnes of elks, deer, grey fox, coott and
ground hog were found in pIroftusion.
Many of the bolrts h;ad been skillfully
fashioned into fishh-ooks atnd various
charmls.
Broken Pottery.
lroken pottery of varied designs, beau
tiful necklaces of delicately colored sea
shells and polished beaver teeth, weaving
instruments, including needles and small
hobhinsl of stone, anil many other imple
ments were unearthed. Several skeletons
and specimens of carved bones and pipes
were also procured. All in all I) Mills
believes the village site to he one of the
richest archaeological "finds" of the day.
German Syrup.
We want to impress on our readers that
Boschee's German Syrup is positively the
only preparation on the market today that
does relieve and cure consumption. It
contains the specifics, such as pure tar,
extracts of gums, etc., which have been so
hihlly endorsed for the cure of coughs,
colds and consumption by the great medi.
cal congresses. The consumptive, whether
his disease is in the throat or lunis, must
have rest at night and be free from the
spasm of dry and racking cough in the
morning. The diseased parts want rest,
healing and soothing treatment, and the
patient needs fresh air, good food, etc.
German syrup will give free and easy ex.
pectoration In the morning with speedy
and permanent relief. Small bottles, as
cents: regular size, containing nearly four
times as much, 7s cents. Newbro Drug
Co. and J. T. Finlen Drug Co.
DESCENDANTS OF JOHN ALDEN
Relations of the Famous Pilgrim Gather
at Plymouth, Mass.
BY ASSOC'IATED PRESS.
Plymouth, Mass., Aug. 5.-Between 7to
and 80o descendants of the Pilgrim Joht
Alden, immortalized by I.ongfellow, have
gathered in Duxbury at the second annual
reunion of the Alden family.
,Representatives from every town in the
old colony, every New England state, New
York, New Jersey, Maryland, Indiana, Il1.
nois, Wisconsin, Kansas and California,
are present.
Exercises are being held at the Alden
homestead, built in the seventeenth cen
tury by Jordan, grandson of the famous
Johan and his equally famous wife,
Priscilla.
BULGARIANS BURN A VILLAGE
Government Building Is First Destroyed
With Dynamite.
av ASSOCIATED ,pRESS.
Constantinople, AXug." s.-Hilmi Pasha
reports that a band of Tso Bulgarians
fred the Turkish village of Dollinga, and
Ramna, in the Monastir district, destroyed
a government building, a telegraph office in
the village of Korovosho, with bombs, and
burned granaries belongist to Turks and
Greeks in the vlla.es through whlch they
'2u111"6.
RUNNING RABBII
GOES TO REWARD
BEST BELOVED CHIEF OF THE
FAMOUS BLACKFEET DIES
AT RIPE OLD AGE.
ONCE A GREAT HORSETHIEF
Reformed in His Old Age and Died a
Good Indian - Was in His
Greatest Battle in 1862.
Browning, Aug. 5.-Old Running Ra,.
bit, a famous chief, died here on Jluly :
.it the age of go years. Last winter he
nihl his people here that he would depart
lot the happy hunting grounds of the In
ithan at the beginning of the ha)ing sea
lHe was recognized by the Blohod Indians
is their most falmous chief, and he was the
ls.%svssor of many medals of hlonor for his
-ervices rendered, as he was at all tilmes
Irlnldly to the whites.
In Great Battle.
In the fall of s86a, at the age of 0q, he
Sis in his greatest battle, when he fought
:igainst a combinationl of the Snakes,
'hleyennes, Rahoha and Black Horse
lands.
ThI. fight took place on the open prairie,
with no shelter, and after fighting a day
of ftirce fighting and all kinds of traps to
capture him, he was wounded, and Morn
ing Eagle, a lifelong friend of his. used
all his cunningness and saved hitm by car
rying him off the fiheld.
Reformed.
In the clays when it was an honor in
the Indiani' mind to steal horses from
other tribes old Running Rabhit was the
most successful of them all. Ilut since
t(14rs none can say aught against him.
Ills face showed that his heart was
.o,.I. and many are the kind things told
;I,,out this line old chief of the lilackfeet
tribe.
ABOUT THE TREASURE STATE
Funeral of Mrs. Tremblay.
•$111 IAl. TI1 TillE INTFIt M(O'N1AIN.
Missoula, Aug. 5.--The funerrll of Mrs.
Minnie C. Trembllay was marketl by the
Iprofusion of floral offerings. Rev. Father
Pl'ddino officiated at services held yester
da:y morning in St. Francis' Xavier church.
T'he pall-bearers were I'. M. Reilly, W. Q.
Raift. A. J. Violette. I). T1. Curran, E. C.
IMulroney iand Joseph Menard.
Rev. Mr. Rickman Resigns.
Ni'l- IIs, 111 TlE INI I.R MtO'NIAIN.
Sticeensville, Aug. 5.--Rev. W. R. Rick
man has resigneild as pastor of the Steven
ville Ilapitist church. lie will dlevte his
ittnti.ni. to Ilauiltuon andui Corvallis herc
fitter.
Hampton's New Job..
t ..l,. IAI. III 11: INII' M iiI' lIAIN.
Ilhlena, Ault. S.- -Alfredl Ilaillpton, for
merly Chinese inspiector in (Ireait Full,
lhas bleenl appointed chief insplector of
Chinese for Montana and Idaho, with
headsluartlrs in Helena.
Oscar Garrett Dead.
NiI (IAI. 'i) liII IN lR Mli'N IAIN.
Ict'zinan, Aug. 5.--( icar Garrett,
In, hew to C. 1). Pease, is dead at the
I'4acse residence in Bridglr canyon. h'Ihl:
in lllins will he sentl to the hoime of tie
.ir.-lItN, Ilarrol , W is.
Smallpox in Billings.
'Ir IAI. T)O I IIE I I'i" MSIl'NTAIN.
Itillinigs, Aug. i.- William laines, em
played bly l)aii I.alntcy, is quarantinedl at
thel latter's honie, outside the city, with
s.uIllpox. Hli case is said to hbe serious.
Cornman to Be Promoted.
FSilI. III 1111" IN. 11iN MliI'NIAIN.
.Missotlla, Aug. S.--Lieutenant Colonel
laniel (' iortmanl, commandinaillg oflicer .it
I"oli Missoula, leaves for the cast this
ws-k on a leave of aihscce. VWhln lie rc
tinlis to work, he will lie a colonlel.
George Warren Dead.
tI'l. . IA, 10 TII INIPR Mi I 'NIAIN.
Phlilipsl.urg, Aug. 5.-(-eorge Warreln,
iirmerly of Ilutte, where he was eli
-l'lyed in the Lexington mine, is ildead.
IhI got on a spree Sutday and died from
the lffects of drink.
Mrs. Nason Dead.
SPtl'lAl. TO TIIK INTIL; MOilNTAIN.
Hlelena, Aug. s.-Mrs. Edith A. Nason,
w ho died yesterday Inorningl, aged 27, was
huried this afternoon from the home of
her father, J .F. Maddox. Rebv. J. PF. Mc
Naiicec officiated. Interment was In For.
ctvsile.
BUNKERS BURN TO GROUND
Oregon Coal &, Navigation Company
Loses $15,000.
BY AMO(CIATIED I'RI:uS.
M;arshfield, Ore., Aug. 5.--The Oregon
(oal & Navigation bunrkers at the libby
illne were burned to the ground last
evenling, entailing a loss of $I5,ooo. The
fire caught fronm one of the slack piles
anIl spread so rapidly that all efforts to
save the bunkers were futile.
COP r/ # "
TOeUSNING ON PAINTI
W\e can supply an article that is with.
out a sulperior. Unequaled for walls,
floors and touching up generally. Beau.
tifies and preserves and Is highly
economical. The best to be had for
the money. The sun can't blister in.
coin's paint. Durable, effective. Try
a gallon, only $1.75, ready mixed. Goes
farther; gives better results than oth
crs.
CARDER WALL PAPER CO.
C. V. RANZMAN, Prep,
Sll W. Plrk St.. Kls Bilk 'Pbhol seo
ELEVEN ROOM SIZE MADE-UP
Carpet Specials
The year's most favorable carpet opportunity, comprising new
carpets ordered and left on our hands by a failure to comply with
our terms, and one or two carpets made up from the remaining
yardage of discontinued patterns, in all, eleven carpets and eleven
of the year's biggest bargains for those whose rooms they will fit.
If you have a room to carpet, of any of the sizes mentioned, you
will find this to be the $75,000 Clearance Sale's most Inviting
and persuasive carpet proposition . .0 . . 9 ' .9 A 4
Eleven Great Carpet Temptations
1 room ,lonaro's ingrain, size 12x12.5; worth
$16.50, for ................................ $ 12 asb
1 room ('olumbia ingrain, size 12x14.6; worth $13 5
1 room Stinson Bru,,els, sizo 10.3xis.2; worth $1825
$22.80, for ....... .......... .............
1 room Wilton velvet, size 9x12; worth $19.75
$25, for................ ..................
1 room Smith's Axminster, size 10.0x10.9; worth $19
$21 .00, for .... .. .... ... .............. ..
1 room I)olon's velvet, size 11.8x10.10; worth $2 75
$26.25, for..................................
1 room Stinson's velvet, size 10.6x11; worth $2175
$26.60, for... ... ........ .. ............. $.
1 room l,Dunlap velvet, size 11.8x14.0; worth $22 50
$28.20, for................................ ..J
1 roomn extra Axminster, size 10xl14; worth $26 75
$82.150, for .................................
REMNANTS
All leaasts of Jap aid Cbie IMattig Fiber aid Ilgraib Carpets at
HALF-PRICE
Mail Us Your Orders--We Pay the Freight.
Brownfield=Canty Carpet Co.
S8 to S4 West Park, I1 to 43 West Galena Street, Butte.
REPORT OF THE STATE
TREASURER FOR MONTH
Sl'Ia IAl. I'O t IIN IN' .k MLOt NTAIN.
IleIth.a, Aug. 5.- State Treasurer A. 11.
Ilarret hasn comllelated 'lis report for Jutly.
It shows that the cash balance in the
fItds aggregatedl $484..190.58 oat that day.
'I he receipts for the nlontth amounted to
$118,5.3,.55, while there was iaid out dur
inKg the satIe timeattt $S65,837.48. The'
ana,ount Itlid otut of the general fundtt dur
ig the montlh waia $1a(7,6i..:.37. AmlOllng
the receipts of the montth wat $25,oata,
which came from the United States gov
ertnnae.tt for the state agricualtutral college.
Practically all of the available nmoney
in thlle fndsl from which Investmentt can
he made Is retainaal for thile purpose of
taking till hbaontis t'hat have lhern pur
chaseltd by the slate, but have not yet
bein delivered. At this time there is
only shout $1a,ooo availtable for invest
ltnetlt.
The following figaures show the condll
tion of the permanent school, university
school of miniles anll state normal bond
futls at the endl of the montlth:
Permanent schools - Jlonds, $393,338 ;
warrants, $78,146.63; cash, $115,208.32;
total, $586,692.95.
'Permanent university--Bonds, $4,S0oo;
warrants, $22,871.92 ; cash, $6,056.23;
total, $73,a928.a5.
School of mines building, interest andl
sinking-Warrants, $S,775.53; cash, $13,
082.79; total, $14,858.32.
Normal school-Warrants. $Sat,at.86;
cash. $6,845.54; totatl, $.5.(j,6.63.
University-Warrants, $19,oa6.a9; cash,
$6,845.54 ; total, $Sa,906.63.
ADVERTISED LETTERS
Letters advertised at Butte, Montana, for the
week ending Jutly 31, a190a
A.
Mrs. IBen Anderason, Celeste Albertini, II. C.
Arnold, Matt Aantoine, Robert 1i. Anderson,
Stefan Angusich, Silas Archey (4), Adams &
Francis.
B.
S. II. Burcham, Samuel Beards, R. Ward
Brooke, It. J. sanigs, Ilessie I. Blackwell,
Clharles X. I.ond, Etienne Benjamin, Emil
liettins, E. It. Ilerkhimrr, Ella C. Ballard,
Giacumoo Bertone, Fred G. Blickell, J. II.
Ilurns, Nellie Itradsaaw, J. II. Bradley, Albert
lBailey, ilartlett & McFarland, Charles It.
Brown.
C.
lHugh M. Concannon, Harold A. Caldwell,
Julia Casey, Louis I). Carson, Mrs. Mattle F.
Curtis, Mrs. May Cameron, Miss Olive Cole
(4), Thomas Carlan, John Congdon, J. S.
Coleman, James Connors, Victor It. Coffman,
W. S. Cummings, Cook & Co., William Cur.
less.
D.
Ella Davis, Frank Dunn, George Deerwester,
II. Duncan, Nettie Dykes, W. R. Davis, Mrs.
Richard Dunstan.
E.
Mrs. Hattie Easley, Dave Edwards, Mrs.
Robert Edwards.
F.
Emel Finnevid, J. A. Fellows, Pearl Fuller,
Peter Farrell, Robert Ferrell, James Fonyer
(2), Patrick Farrell.
CG.
Olive Gill, A. Goodboo, Mrs., L. Glab, George
Gray, J. H. Garner, M. M. Garler, Thomas
Goldsworthy, William Gill, William George,
Joseph Goodman.
H.
Albert S. IIexun, M. Hlark, Dan Haggerty,
Mrs. Dora Huge, Lidie Hall, Felix Hlughes
(j), G. A. leberlcla, Horaw lHauelton, John
II. lfagler, AM. Ifantafa, Mary ilendricksoln
Annie IHlllywo,.., Ruth Ill.rnhecrk, Mr.. Wil.
II,., Ihoward., I. II. Ilhloian, J-rtephine
IlHuslr.ton, Hlarrllnn's Opmeun. Antildatr (o.
3.
K.
Mi,.. lhanna Knloka, Mi. lhal Kelly, Mra,
John Kelly, II. V. Kra.t. Maynme K. Illrhe
Mr*. Ill,. KEva.chcvd, l it.ve Kah,, W. J.
Klllay.
1..
Ih. rnard J. Lavelle, I. E. I.lly, 1.i1 i I.in g,
Mi I.l, Ida Link, JaI.ne. Little, )J,hI .. I. ewl
Marie I..ullse .elluc, SMrs. Maulua .ed,, '.
L.ady, Mary l.llatlh, Joe Il..l ii,.
M.
Maie --, Anna Mahier, Ii. I. MaIrtine,
Mrs. E. Moncrlelf, F. I.. M.,ke, Ida Magnus,
Mrs. Ka:ti MI.lou.tghney, Jhn II. Mi.ri.y,
frne lEli. Moo,re, lana Mairun.p, J. Miller,
James Mullin,, Jim Murray, Mollie .Mulligan,
Nra Masterun,, l'. J. Mirlssey, P'. I. Mar.
yalt, Ritchard Moran, S. Mt.u.hunme, Willianm
Miler (4, illlie Weeks, James Madll.on,
Jaimes Murphy, Hlilly Murlphy, "Thoma. Mur.
iphy, Marlin Murphy, John Mattison, 4nlltOe
Marchetti, Lizzie Murphy, Mrs. A. W. Miller,
(harles Murry, K. A. Manning, Ella Marks,
Gieorge Morn, ;e,,rge G. Marshall (a), Harry
Martin, Jul.,. A. Miller, Jenny Matthews,
Myrtle A. Maltthew., Mr.. Marie Merit, Mat.
thew Mar..hall, Maggie Murray, A. J. Martin,
Jhlin Monley, Julohi Mlntgoirery, Frank A.
Manley.
Me.
Alex J. Mcllonell, Frank C. McDonald, T.
I. McConnell, T'l'm Mc;rath, Miss A. M. Mc.
Giee, Julion I). McKay, ('hinl McLaughlil,
Hugh MfcLod.., Angus McMa.ter, 'lT'reha Me.
Nulty.
N.
(eorge Neal.(on, N .y I. Nasnoy.
0.
Katie O'lltrie, Mike ('lIrien, WV. . ('Bltrie
(), Mrs. Mary O'Connell, 'Traice (J'll.nnell,
Isavid ('Leary, Jeremiah O'Leary, Diennil
(ONeil.
P.
ilarbara E. Pepworth, Mra. Edith P'urnettt,
Mrs. Kriltina i'ersson (c). J. C. t'igens, J.
'riky, Johln Pratt, J. C. Pinkerton, Maud C.
'eters, S. A. Plummer, Mrs. Thomans Pitta'
Mrs. W. II. Pierce, W. J. Porter, Amelil
I'edrotte P'angrafiil.
F. L. L. uatson.
R.
BI Reese, George J. Rockwell, Harry Rivers,
Harry Rosenhaum, James Ryan (a), Roy tRea.
ler, Tom Richardson, Mrs. T. Rainford.
S.
Mr. Schultl, Syndicate Mining Co., K. ..
Sellershn weeney, hn Sweeney, James E. Sheehan, John
Sheehan, James Skedd, Maud Stewart, Mrs. A.
J. Sterling, A. T. Stelle, W. C. Sullivan, Mra,
Pat Sullivan, S. M. Stewart, W. Egbart Smith,
John F. Smith, Julius E. Smith, Clay W.
Smith, Carrie Smith, George Smith, W. J.
Stone, John J, Sinnett.
T.
Mrs. Anne Toen, Mrs. Bertha Taylor,
George Tucker, George R. Tompkins, John
Tunell, James Tayler, Mrs. Mame Taylor,
Obren Tusup, Ruby Taylor, Charles A. Turner,
James F. Townley.
V.
Arthur Vernon, U. 5, Naval Enlistmeat
Office.
W.
W. Wilson, A. S. Warren, Charles Watsoln,
Clara Willson, E. Willson, F. C. Wallace. (Jull
Wilson, Henry R. Wilson, Krlmbel Wallen.
stein, J. D. Wood, J. W. Ward, Julia Walsh,
John Wilson. Mrs. M. E. Walker, R. J. Wil.
liams, Thomas Williams, W. I. Wright, (?
Welling.
THIRD AND FOURTH.CLASS MATTER)
Connelly & Carroll, Mrs. H. C. Campbell,
Miss Linnie Collett Madame E. Graham, Mas
Kallectt, George W. Lowel, Mrs. C. Rabar,
]. Ryan, J. H. Smart, Charles D. Strong, LI.
lian Truro, James Wilks, A. P. Stone, Walte
Whitson, Eva Williams, H. S. Young, D.
Joseph K. Young.
GEORGE W. IRVIN, Postmuaste.

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