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The Butte inter mountain. (Butte, Mont.) 1901-1912, August 19, 1903, Image 10

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PAYS THE COUNTY
A FRIENDLY CALL
WOMAN WITH A QUEER GRIEVANCE
ENTERTAINS THE BOARD
OF COMMISSIONERS.
PAY THE ATTORNEY'S SALARY
She Is a Taxpayer, Indirectly, and Says
the County Ought to See
That She Has Plenty.
The county commissioners had a peculiar
vIsitor this morning in the person of
Annie Peters.
She said she was a member of the
Women's Protcctive association, and that
she could not and would not work. It
was gathered from her remarks that she
felt it the duty of the association to pay
her room rent and find a ,boarding house
where life would he made pleasant.
The commissioners desired to know
what they had to do with the case, tra
Ia la, in the spring. or In the good old sum
mer time, either, but the woman's ideas
were a trifle misty ont that point.
She felt that they ought to do some
thing, and, inspired by that fedling, she
occupied one of the easiest chairs in the
conulissioers' room for four hours and
answered questiuns aith a smile, hut very
little connection.
So Has Everyone.
She said she had troubles, and they told
her that that was not singular, and re
ferred her to County Attorney pIreen. Site
srorned the al( icre, addnhling that she paid
her rent and her liadlady paid a license,
and between them they paid the county
attorney's salary.
She isai complimiicntel on the unusually
connected character and irrefutable logic
of the statement. Th'en she was intro
duced to a newspapcrman and asked to
relate her woes to him. Once more she
uttered scornful words, meeting the new
suggestiotl with evcin greater hostility.
Sometimes She Does.
She said she read the papers every day
and knew all about what they published.
"Ah, youl read them every day ?" said
the new'paperman.
"No," said the lady, amending her re
mark. "I read them w hen I can afford
to get theml for nothing."
It was suggested that the assertion
Seemed to lack point, as she ought to
afford to y'et theml for Ilothing any time.
Her explanation was not clear, and with
* bright smile site switched off and said
she would like to own a paper and publish
It every day. She would print many
thing, and never tell lies. The view was
expressed that the thing could not be done,
but she was confident.
Like a Fan.
From this subject she alruptly di
verged and said:
"I make my face like a fan."
"Why?" she was asked, and she poured
out a voluble explanation that failed to
explain.
The commissioners finally gave up try
ing to urderstand what she wanted, on
account of the way her statements jumped
around w itholut coherence or point; but
she did not depart.
FINE FRUIT FROM MONTANA
Excellent Specimens for the World's Fair
on Exhibition.
Copper is not the only product of
Montana.
There is on exhibition in the office of
C. II. Edwards, secretary of horticulture
in this city, some fruit that is a wonder.
One Jar is filled with gooseberries, each
of which is an inch in diameter.
Countless jars of other small fruits have
also been prepared for exhibition. T'his
display is being gotten ready for the
Wdrld's fair at St. Louis.
'Mr. Edwards returned last night from
a short trip to Missoula, where lie went
to look over fruit to be bottled for the
fair.
Tomorrow he goes again into the Bitter
Root valley, and intends to biring back
several specimens of the fruit product
of that wonderful valley.
As he was appointed head of the horti
eultural department of Montana for the
World's fair, Mr. Edwards is giving as
much time as lie can spare from his
duties as inspector of fruits for this city.
POISONED BY EATING FRUIT
Miss Agnes Lang, Formerly of Butte,
Dies at Baker City, Ore.
Attorney Roy S. Alley received word
this morning that his wife's sister, Miss
Agnes Lang had died at Baker City, Ore.,
yesterday.
Miss Lang was poisned by eating fruit.
The details of the sad alTair are not
fully known by Mr. Alley.
Miss Lang formerly lived in Butte and
was well known here. She left for liaker
City about one year ago. Mrs. Alley was
with her.
PRIZE FOR SUGAR BEETS
BY ASSOCIA'ITE I'RI:S5,
Ogden, Utah, Aug. io.-C. iH. Ilave
meyer of New York, on behalf of the
American Sugar Refining company, has
offered a cup valued at $5oo for thde best
exhibit of sugar beets raised in the arid
or semi-arid regions to be shown at the
National Irrigation congress at Ogden next
month. Commander lootlh Tucker of the
Salvation Army ha accepted all invitation
to appear before the congress and speak on
"Colonization."
Pay $25.00 Down
Balance $10 Month
GET ONE OF THOSE LOTS IN THE
McQueen Addition
Opposite new smelter building. Steel work now being
erected. City water.
This Is the_ Te THOMPSON CO
Place... 15 West Broadway, Butte, Mont.
NOTICE THE SIGNATURE
4i. p d at.. I&ee 2
UMA i erh S s at
swa . €*
The holograph shows how Mfayor Patrick Mullins of Idaho identified hlimself as Ike
man .iho s-,ore he was a resident of Idaho.
SPEND THE DAY
OUT AT GARDENS
4MEMBERS OF ANACONDA CATHOLIC
BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION
GIVE A PICNIC.
MANY PERSONS IN THE PARTY
Time Is Spent in Viewing the Beauties
of the Butte Beauty
Spot.
A long train of cars brought over from
Anaconda this morning several hundred
nlbc.ruls of the Catholic IBnevolent asso
ciation of that city.
They came to enjoy the "trces and
grass and things" at Columbia gardenls.
Once on a time Anaconda was the Isum1
mer resort for Ilutttitvs, but that is past.
Today Butte offers to the people of
Anaconda free enjoyment in the finest
gardens ill the West.
Manager J. R. Wharton has ever an eye
to the comfort and pleasure of others.
lie has succeeded in making these fre
quent excursions from the smelter city a
feature of the social life.
Hundreds of women and children are
brought here and carried to the gardens
at such reasonable rates as to make It pos
sible to all.
The Catholic Benevolent society is an
auxiliary of the Ilibernians and one of
the largest and stronget women's organiza
tion in the state.
Many of the membnlers of the Butte
branch joined the Anaconlans at Colum
bia gardens today and participated in the
jollification.
TO COMPLETE THE VESSELS
United States Shipbuilding Company to
Resume Activity.
Wasthington, Aug. .---Acting Secretary
Darlitng has received a telegram front the
countsel of the United States Shipbuilding
company, of which the Crescent Shipihuild
ing company is a part. stating that the
company hlopes eventually to be abile to re
sumle work ont the cruiser Chattallnooga and
the torpedo boats Nicholson and O'Brien.
The acting secretary has replied the dhe
partmtent will he interested to know when
ever the company finds itself in readiness
to resume this ,ark.
The contracts for all three ships have
been cancelled, and a hlbard of othicers or
dered to appraise the work done.
It is believed the vessels will be con.
pleted at government yards.
FAVORS ROAD EXTENSION
Leader of Opposition in Ontario House
,Makes Significant Address.
BY AS.Ol'IAI I:D iI'K15 S.q
Ottawa, Ont., Aug. 19.-R. I.. Borden,
leader of the opposition in the house,
made a speech yesterday in which he an
nounced the tpolicy of his party in oppo
sition to the Grand Trlunk Pacific propo
sition.
Mr. Borden said that lie favored the
extension of the intter-co',it1 road to
Georgian hay and the purec ase of the
Canadian Pacific Iy the govt. I.ment over
which all roads would have rt. iing rights
and the government line to have rights
over the Canadian Pacific road to WVinni
peg.
lie favored inlprovemenlts of the water
ways and the better equipment of Mon
treal ports.
Clubhouse Is Looted.
IsY ASSU('IATIF) PIIIi:S.,
New York, Aug. i9.-Thieves entered
the officers' clubhouse in the Brooklyn
navy yard and stole nearly all the silver
ware. A committee of the club is Inaking
an investigattion.
MAKES PLEA FOR
HOME INDUSTRY
ALLIED PRINTING TRADES COUNCIL
OF BUTTE SENDS OUT A
CIRCULAR.
A LESSON IN RECIPROCITY
Asks Business Men to Give Work to
Those Who Spend Their
Money Here.
The Allied Printing Trades council of
Butte has sent out a circular to the Butte
business men requesting them to have
their printing done at home where they
make their money.
It is a protest against the practice of
some who send their work to eastern
houses.
Following is the circular:
No other word in the English language is so
powerful, that carries with it such sublime
inspiration, as the word "llome." Its sweet
ness indeed can be compared with paradise
that is promised to those worthy to enter after
life's struggle.
Upbuilding of Homes.
So whee an organization feels the need of
sending out missionaries for a cause that
means the upbuilding of homes in this eems
mnunity, it ought to receive the commendation
and heartfelt thanks of those who dwell here.
The Allied Printing Trades Council of this
city has realized the fact that a critical blow .l
bring dealt to the workers of their corps by
people doing business in Butte, in sending
their printing and binding to Eastern houses,
who have no interest in this city save to
jeopardize the homes of those who come to
enjoy the sweetness thereof.
Iloime industry is the battle cry of the coun*
cil, antd to further the project a committee has
been applinted for the purpose of educating
those who are not aware that Butte has able
mechanics and well equipped workshops to
meet all requirements In printing and binding.
It behooves every citizen who has the Inter.
est of this great camp at heart to encourage
home industry.
Quite frequently it is charged that the cost
of production is in excess of that which ecm be
procured in the East.
To that permit us to say: We all concede
the fact that goods must be shipped from the
E:st, necessitating freight charges, together
with the increased cost of living in this local
ity, mnakes up the argument.
Mcchanics are not better paid proportion
ately than in the East.
Cannot Afford It.
S.urly no business man can afford to send
his work to outside houses when it can be
idJtoe as good at home. Clear as it is, yet we
findl men who would rather help uninterested
parties in this community, than help home
industry and themselves.
('an anyone suggest one instance where a
community has ever prospered that had as its
k undati,n the helping of another community
by sending their work tthere.
As men who have conme here to build homes,
to putrclase home products, to encourage home
ird.utry of every kind and at all times, to hurl
deliance to outside invaders, we ask the
merchant, the business man, banker, profes
sional man, and all citizens who have the in
terest of this great city at heart, to take cog
nizance of this urgent appeal. Respectfully,
liunte Industry Committee.
JOl N J. I'LEGER, Chairman.
J. II. DALY,
JOHN SWINTON.
Following is the circular:
No other word in the English language is so
powerful, that carries with it such sublime
inspiration, as the word "lHome." Its sweet.
ness indeed can he compared with paradise
that is promised to those worthy to enter after
life's struggle.
Upbuilding of Homes.
So when an organization feels the need of
sending out missionaries for a cause that
means the upbuilding of homes in this eem*
niunity, it ought to receive the commendation
and heartfelt thanks of those who dwell here.
The Allied Printing Trades Council of this
city has realized the fact that a critical blow is
beting dealt to the workers of their corps by
people doing business in Butte, in sending
their printing and binding to Eastern houses,
who have no interest in this city save to
jeopardize the homes of those who come to
enljoy the sweetness thereof.
Ilonme industry is the battle cry of the conn
cil, and to further the project a committee has
rbeen applinted for the purpose of educating
those who are not aware that Butte has able
mechanics and well equipped workshops to
meet all requirements in printing and binding.
It behooves every citizen who has the inter
est of this great camp at heart to encourage
hom.e industry.
Quite frequently it is charged that the cost
of production is in excess of that which cta be
procured in the East.
To that permit us to say: We all concede
the fact that goods must be shipped from the
a:lst, necessitating freight charges, together
with the increased cost of living in this local.
ity, makesn up the argument.
Mechanics are not better paid proportion
atily than in the East.
Cannot Afford It.
Surely no business man can afford to send
his work to outside houses when it can be
dolne as good at home. Clear as it is, yet we
ilnd men who would rather help uninterested
parties int this community, than help home
industry and themselves.
('an anyone suggest one instance where a
community has ever prospered that had as its
fh undation the lhelping of another community
by sending their work there.
As men who have come here to build homes,
to purchase home products, to encourage home
industry of every kind and at all times, to hurl
dtlerilllce to outside invaders, we ask the
tmerclhant, the business man, banker, profes*
hional man, and all citizens who have the In
ttrest of this great city at heart, to take cog
nizance of this urgent appeal. Respectfully,
Holumie Industry Committee.
JO(i N J. I'I.EGER, Chairman.
J. If. IDALY,
JOHN SWINTON.
ELKS OF SOUTHERN MON
TANA HOLD THE SERVICE
Gather From Many Cities to Attend the
Funeral of the Late Jesse T.
Hall at Virginia City.
SI'EC IAL TO TrIE INTER MOUNTAIN.
Virginia City, Aug. 19.-The funeral of
,the late Jesse T. Hall of Virginia City was
held this afternoon in the city hall.
Services under the auspices of the Elks
were attended by members of the order
from all over Southern Montana. Inter
ment was in Hillside cemetery.
The pallbearers were: Henry P. Ben
nett, Twin 1Bridges; C. Harry Gohn, Pony;
ha II. French, Virginia City; Walcott
RIaymond, Sheridan; Fred Huber, Dillon;
W. II. Hernden, I.aurin : J. A. Knight, Vir
ginia City and It. Knox, Morris.
There was no minister, the Elks ritual
being read.
DISASTER TEACHES A LESSON
New Regulations Regarding Tunnel
Promulgated in Paris.
BY AsSOCIATED PREss.
Berlin, Aug. pg.-Lessons taught by the
recent disaster on the Paris undergrounr
railway are being applied by toe ministry
of public works.
Orders have been issued to the officials
of the Berlin underground and overhead
railway to light all tunnels by wires wholly
disconnected with the motor current, and
to install apparatus enabling train hands
to break the traffic current anywhere and
thus stop trains approaching the scene of
an accident
The officials are also ordered to ciase
overcrowding cars.
BUTTE TEAM WINS
OPENING DOUBLE
BUSCHE ANO O'CONNOR TAKE TWO
GAMES FROM HILUMAN AND
BAILEY OF HELENA.
BUSCHE IS IN FINE FORM
Local iMen Should Win First Honors at
the State Tournament of Tennis
Players at Great Falls.
SPECIAL TO TIlE INTER MOUNTAIN.
Great Falls, Aug. 1p.-Today's tennis
results were:
Single..
BusMch of Butte from Tipton of Hel
ena, 8-6, 6-0.
Bailey of Helena from Wood of Great
Falls, 6-0, 6-2.
Hillman of Helena from Smith of
Great Falls, 6-0, 6-1.
Hillman of Helena from Bibbert of
Great Fails, 6-1, 6-1.
Ooubles.
O'Connor and Busche of Butte from
Hillman and Bailey of Helena, 6-4, 6-8.
The attendance at the tournament Is
good today and the playing fast. The
opening singles this morning between
Ilusche and Tipton were the fastest ever
seen on the local courts.
Busche is showing up in championship
form. lHe should easily win first honors
this year.
The Butte team, in the doubles, easily
outclassed the Helena boys and won in a
walk.
The tournament began yesterday morning at
the grounds of the Great Falls Tennis club,
Fourth avenue north and Fourth street, and
will be continued for four days.
Botkin a Champion.
Montana local enthusiasts will be interested
in knowing that a Montana man has won the
championship at the recent St. Paul tourna
ment. "Biss" A. W. Botkin, formerly of Hel
ens, defeated C. S. Bixby in three straight
sets, 6--, 6-a, 6-3. The St. Paul Dispatch
contains snapshots of Botkin in familiar poses
on the court, and in commenting on the match
sayst Botkin becomes city champion by virtue
of all around tennis superiority. His playing
is characterised by good network, excellent
volleying and strong crosscourt strokes."
The team in which Botkin played also car*
ried off the honors in doubles. Botkin went
to St. Paul last April and is employed by one
of the railroad companies. While a resident of
Montana he was recognized as one of the fast.
est players in the state, having held the state
championship several years ago, and at the
state tournament in Butte in spot played in
the finals with Carr B. Neel, formerly of this
city and a player of national reputation.
Last evening after the play of the day, the
members of the local tennis clubs entertained
the visitors with a reception upon the lawn of
the Conrad residence, the reception being the
first entertainment to be given by the local
clubs in honor of their visitors.
Tournament Drawings.
For the tournament the drawing resulted:
Singles-George Busch vs. Ren Prosser,
Butte Tipton vs. Arthur Crowfoot, L. R. Fogle
ve. Thomrs Bailey and C. W. Tenney vs.
Harry Wood. BDyes: C. P. . Fowler-D. L.
Dolsen, R. .. Robbins.Lleutelant Swarts, B.
'B. Kelly.B. M. Burrell, Will Strong-B. O'Con.
nor, Mf. B. Smith-Cliff Hillman, A. D. Vib
bert.
Doubles-Busch and O'Connor, Butte. vs.
Hillman and Bailey. Helena: The first match.
Byes, Kelley and Crowfoot, Great Falls; Bur.
rel and Dolsen, Sand Coulees Fowler and
Newton, Great Falls; Tipton and Tenney, liel.
ena; Wood and Matteson, Great Falls; Strong
and Prosser, Helena; Fogle and Vibbert, Great
Falls.
In the singles played yesterday forenoon,
Burrell defeated Kelly 6-:, 6-4, and Bailey
defeated Fogle, 6-o, 6-o.
MONTANA NATIONAL GUARD
IS TO HAVE A FIELD DAY
Company C at Big Timber Will Invite
Other Troops to Join in Rifle
Practice and Drilling.
SPECIAL TO TliE INTER MOUNTAIN.
Big Timber, Aug. sg.-At a meeting
last night of Company C, of the First
Regiment, Montana National guard, it
was decided to hold a field day in this
city within the next month.
Companies from adjacent cities will be
asked to participate. The officers of C,
W. J. Hanna, Kake White and C. M. Ser
geant, will be in charge of the affair.
The ordinary events of a field day will
be supplemented by rifle practice and com
petitive drills in the manual of arms.
NO INDICTMENT AGAINST HIM
Governor Refuses to Honor Requisition
on Man Charged With Abduction.
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
Harrisburg, Pa., Aug. sg.-Governor
Pennypacker today refused to honor the
requisition of Governor Yates for the re
turn to Bloomington, Ill., of Sidney Smith,
a Pittsburg newspaper writer and artist,
to answer a charge of abduction of his own
child, for the reason that there is no in
dictment against Smith.
ATTACK DYNAMITE MAGAZINE
Bandits Near the Manchurian Frontier
Routed by Cossacks.
DY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
St. Petersburg, Aug. :g.-A dispatch
received here from Port Arthur says a
band of natives recently attacked a dyns
mite magazine near the Manchurian fron
tier station, and attempted to blow it up.
A detachment of Cossacks captured twenty
of the bandits, but the majority of the
band escaped.
For the Sleepless
Horsford's
Acid
Phosphate
Just before retiring, half a tee.
spoon in half a glass of water
soothes the Nerves, nourishes the
body and gives refreehing sleep.
A Tonic and Nerve Food.
VEiERANS' RANKS
GROWING THIN
GRAND ARMY PARADE IN SAN
FRANCISCO IS PATHETIOs
SIGHT.
LAST MARCH FOR MANY MEN
But Few Years Remain for the Heroes
Who Offered Their Lives for
the Union.
DY ASSOCIATED PRE1S.
San Francisco, Aug. s9.-The parade to
day of the veterans of the Grand Army
of the Republic in this city will be long
remembered by the thousands of persons
who packed the streets along the line of
march to witness it.
Not a few of them recognized that for
them this meant the passing of the heroes
of many a bloody struggle in defense of
the union for all time in a collective body
so far as this city is concerned.
Devoid of All Pomp.
Devoid of all pomp and panoply of the
warlike host which marched in all the pride
of strength and youth in yesterday's
parade, there was something pathetic in
the thinned-out ranks of the veterans who
macihed today, which touched the hearts
of all who saw them.
Bowed with the weight of years, worn
out and weary, but animated by the Area
of an unquenching spirit, this remnant of
a mighty host which had carved out vic
tory for the republic on the hardest fought
battlefields the world has ever known,
marched proudly along, the last of an un
conquered band of heroes.
They looked the part they had played as
makers of history in this country of their
birth or adoption, as the case might be.
Marks of Shot.
Proudly they marched with the battle
flags waving above the swaying ranks
flags which bore the marks of shot and
shell in many a fierce fray, comrades to
gether now as they were then.
With military precision these old soldiers
of Anteltam, Vicksburg, the Wilderness,
Gettysburg and Appomattox swunp into
line at the appointed hour ready for the
command to march.
Headed by the detachment from Illinois,
commanded by Benson Wood, the Grand
Army detachments appeared In full muster
at their appointed stations ready to move
with the main column, which bta-ted
punctually at so o'cock on the route of
mardh.
The mounted staff of the department
commanders and all the mounted esoorts
were formed into platoons of eight files
front, the distance being regulated at four
paces.
Formation Well Maintained.
This formation was well maintained all
through the parade and the sam can be
said of the different posts wich were
paraded some 16 paces apart with about
double that distance between the depart
ments.
A platoon of police led the column, com*
manded by Chief Wittman and followed by the
drum corps of the National Association of
Civil War Musicians.
Next In line was chief Marshal Edward S.
Solomon and his staff.
The personal escort of Commander-in.Chief
Stewart was composed of George H. Thomas
Post No. a, Department of California, A. D.
Cutler, commanding.
Accompanying the commander-in.chief was
Quartermaster General Burrows, Judge Advo.
cate General Beers, Adjutant General John W.
Schall, Chaplain-in-Chief Shuey and Inspector
General Walsh, with members of the executive
committee.
, iwinois in the van.
The several departments of the O. A. R. fol
lowed with, as mentioned before, the Depart.
ment of Illinois in the van.
Following came Pennsylvania, commanded
by Edwin Walton, then Ohio, Commander
Yengling; New York, Commander Noster;
Connecticut, Bilkley; Massachusetts, Com
mander Judd; New Jersey, Commander Long;
Maine, Commander Chamberlain; Rhode
Island, Commander Hudsonr New Hamp.
shire, Commander Parker; Vermont, Com
mander Penfield; Potomac, Commander Crm
bail Virginia and North Carolina, Com
mander Has.; Maryland, Commnander Stahl;
Nebraska, Commander Eatill; M ichigan, Co
mander Van Raalte; Iowa Conmander Say
mond; Indiana, Commander Grubbse Colo
rado and Wyoming, Commander Vaughn;
Kansas, Commander Souith; Delaware, Com
mander Baugh; Minnesota, Commander Ma
ben; Missouri, Commander Sterrel; Oregon,
Commander Turneri Kenlucky, Commander
Forlee; West Virginia, Commander Moore;
South Dakota, Commander Reed; Washington
and Alaska, Commander Kavanaugh; Arlan
sas, Commander Avery; New Mexico, Com
mander Edwards; Utah, Commander Clark;
Tennessee, Commander Patton; Louislana and
Mississippi, Commander Keating; Florida,
Commander Chase; Montan, Commander
Wisner; Texas, Commander Seltoni Idaho,
Commander Whittier; Georgia, Commander
Fitzgerald; Alabama, Commander Allisonm
North Dakota, Commander Rowe; Oklahoma,
Commander Green; Indian Territory, Com
mander Rose; California and Nevada, under
command of Maj. Gen. W. R. Shafter, brought
up the rear.
BEGINS LIFE POOR, DIES RICH
Peon Who Discovered Valuable Mine
Dies in Mexico.
BY ASSOCIATEDn PaESS
Chihuahua, Mex., Aug. :.--Pedro Al
varado, a multi-millionaire mining man,
is dead at Parral.
It is said that six years ago he was a
bare-footed peon working in a mine at 30
cents a day.
He discovered the Pal Milto mine, and
his wealth Is now estimated at $85,ooo,ooo.
He had no faith in banks and it Is said
that silver bars worth a great sum are
locked in a steel cage in his palatial home
near Parral, constantly guarded by a
strong force of men.
A year ago he made his first trip over
a railroad, chartering a special train from
this city and bringing with him a body
guard of zoo men.
He was charitable, disbursing his
wealth among the poor of Parral and sur
rounding country.
COAT OF TAR AND FEATHERS
Private Detective Is Roughly Used by
Crowd of Young Men,
Hilllboro, Ore., Aug. zg.-D. J. Tromley,
who claims to be a private detective from
Michigan, was taken from the city jail last
night by a crowd of as young men and was
tarred and feathered.
Tromley, it is alleged, has made him.
self obnoxious to the women who reside
in the vioinity of hie boarding house and
has otherwise conducted himself so as to
cause his arrest,
After he had been starred Tromley was
told to leave Wllsboro and not to return.
The Hub
Clothing Co.
77-79 East Park St
Closing
Out
The selling at this store has been wur
usually large. The completeness of our
showing and the great variety of bargains
offered has demonstrated the advantages ia
buying here.
Broken Lots Must
Go Now
The prices speak for themselves. If you
can find your size-which is very probq
able-you will get a bargain worth looking
after.
Remarkable Offering of
Boys' Suits
For this extra special offering we hase
taken all the boys' a-piece suits, formerly
sold at $4.5o and $3, and placed them oq
sale for
$1.00
Cleaning Up the
Men's Hats
We Intend to close out every haj we
have left, and to do it quick we have cu
prices again. All the $3 men's hats, In.
eluding Fedora, Graeco and other shapes,
On Sale Now
$1.35
Extra Speolal
Today
Men's 4nest quality balbriggan and me*
dium weight underwear, sold formerly e9
y5c, on sale now at
35c
Why Not
Buy Men's and Boys'
Collars at 4c
A special lot of men's s c linen collars,
all sizes and new, clean stock, on sale no*
at 40 each.
Greatest
Underwear
Offer
Sacrificed for quick clearance: Includ
ing our best men's Atlas underwear, a
fancy striped wool, formerly sold at $S.25.
On sale now
65c
Men's
Shirts 50c
In order to close them out at once we
place on sale our men's negligee and lauga
dered shirts, formerly sold at 95s and $s,
at Soc.
Clearance
Of the Balance
Left of this stock must be accomplished
at once, therefore we made more great re
ductions in prices.' The remainder will
now go at a mere trifle of the first cost
The Hub
Clothing Co.
77-79 East Park St

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