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The Butte inter mountain. (Butte, Mont.) 1901-1912, September 05, 1903, Image 6

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025294/1903-09-05/ed-1/seq-6/

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LAST TESTAMENT
OF LOVED PRIEST
VW LL OF THE LATE REV. FATHER
HONORE B. ALLAEYS IS
PROBATED.
DE SIERE IS EXECUTOR
Estate Amounts in All to Nearly $6,000,
including Some Mining Stock
Heirs Reside Abroad.
Judge Clancy this morning admitted to
probate the will of the late Reverend Fa
ther Honore B. Allacys, who died in this
city on August 7.
The estate left by Father Allaeys
amounts to about $5,9oo. It is divided into
two insurance policies, one for $3,ooo and
one for $a,ooo; mining stock worth $2oo;
a promissory note for $500oo, a library worth
$5o, $25 in cash and some other miscel
laneoas personal property.
On De Blere's Petition.
The will was probated upon the petition
of Rev. Father Peter De Siere, who was
named as the executor of the will without
bonds in that instrument. Father Dc
Siere took the stand and gave testimony,
after which the order of probate was is
sued.
The legatees and devisees of the will are
Leonia Allacys, a sister of the testator;
Bishop Brondell and the superior of the
St. Joseph's Orphan's home at Helena.
The heirs so far as known by the pe
titioner are brothers and sisters and the
sons and daughters of a dead brother, re
siding in Belgium and France.
The witnesses to the will were Rev.
Father Victor Day and M. O. D. Barry,
The testator was 44 years old when he
died, and of sound and disposing mind and
memory according to the petition.
To Start Prooeedings.
bY AssOCIATED Prass.
Topeka, Kan,, Sept. $.-United States
District Attorney Dean announced yester
day that he would start proceedings against
the alleged Kansas coal trust. The com
panies have been ordered to appear before
a loderal grand jury to testify.
HARNEY TAKES UP
MOTION DOCKET
CASE OF DEUMAS AGAINST HOY IS
TRANSFERRED TO JUDGE
CLANCY'S COURT.
HE CONTINUES PROCEEDINGS
Case of McCormick vs. Barnard Will
Not Be Heard Until Saturday
Next-Minor Matters.
Judge Harney held a short selidon of
his court today, during which he 'took upl
his motion docket and disposed of"a ntdm
ber of matters.
In the case of P. B, Delmest against
John Hoy, involving interests in a mining
claim, the court made an order transfer
ring the matter to Judge Clancy's depart
ment, it properly belonging there, and
having an odd number.
The case was up on an order to show
cause, the order and a temporary restrain
ing order having theretofore been issued
by Judge Harney.
In the case of John McCormick against
A. W. Barnard the court continued all the
proceedings set for today to next Saturday
at the request of the attorneys in the case.
The suit of Marshall against Trerise
was continued to that time.
TWO FINED IN POLICE COURT
Joe Spright, who was taken to police
headquarters by Cergeant McGrath and
OJfoor McGillic late last night consider
ably the worse for liquor and a bruise
about the head, paid a fine of $5 in the po.
lice court today.
He was found in the alley in the rear
of the Will House, As he was bleeding
from the wound on the head it was thought
he had been slugged and robbed, but Inves
tigation showed he had his money with him
and had probably fallen from a stairway
while in a drunken condition,
He sent the fine into police court today
not caring to face his honor, Mike Safey,
another drunk, paid a fine of $5 for his
celebration whichlanded him in the city
lockup,
BUTTE EAGLES ON
THE NEW PRESIDENT
SAY THEY WOULD HAVE PRE
FERRED A WESTERN MAN, BUT
SULLIVAN WILL DO WELL.
GENEROUS WITH HIS MONEY
It Is Said Sullivan Ia Willing to Put Up
for a Magnificent New Temple
for Use of the Order.
The Butte EagIca would have preferred
to have seen a Western man elected grand
worthy president of their order rather
than an Easterner. They accept the result,
howevgr, and are now enthusiastic for
President Timothy Sullivan of New York,
who was elected to the highest office in
the order at the grand lodge in New York:
vesterday.
"While Henry Guiting, the delegUte
from Aerie No. it, was not instructed fr
any particular candidate, it was the get
eral understanding that he would support!
some one from the West," said Charles J.
Morris, the vice president of the Butte i
aerie, today. "I understand that our dele-i
gate and Joe Lepke, the delegate from the
Anaconda aerie, both supported Mr. Pel
letier of Kansas City on the first ballot,
and then changed to Sullivan when it be
came evident the latter was the man.
"I guess the Eagles out this way would
have preferred a Western man, but all
must admit that Mr. Sullivan will make a
good president."
Tim Sullivan, as he is called In New
York, is a famous character In the politips
of that city. He is a Tammany leader aid j
has something of a political pull. He was
state senator for two terms and is now a,
congressman-elect.
There is nothing small about him when
it comes to putting up money,
He subscribed $io,ooo for the street
decorations on account of the grand lodge
and is said to have promised to build an
elegant temple ,for the order if elected.
The ~ontana delegates are expected to
return in a few days.
IIM SULLIVAN IS
NEW. EAGLES' HEAD
NEW YORK MAN IS ELECTED AFTER
A LIVELY FIGHT AGAINST
oELLETIER MEN.
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
New York, Sept. 5.-Congressman Tim
othy D. Sullivan is now the head of the
Fraternal Order of Eagles, having been
elected grand worthy master at the con
vention at Tamimany hall yesterday.
The election was a most spirited one
and there was lively campaigning from be
ginning to end. Sullivan's election had
been expected, but many Western con
tingents favored the election of Vice Presi
dent Pelletier of Kansas City and waged
a vigorous fight to place hnm at the head
of the order.
On the first ballot Sullivan polled 79y2
votes, Pelletier 729 and Henry "Hy"
Davis of Cincinnati a5o. The two latter
candidates then withdrew and the con
gressman's election was made unanimous.
Against Honolulu.
A protest was made against the votes
from Honolulu, which were represented in
proxy by the California delegates. As the
Hawaiians were in favor of Sullivan, his
adherents fought vigorously until the Cali
fornia delegates were permitted to vote
for their distant neighbors.,
Cape Nome, Alaska, and the states of
Washington and Texas went solidly for
Sullivan. The congressman drew from all
over the country, even the far Western
states sending him a good vote.
Other Officers.
W. F. Edwards of Anderson, Ind., pres
ent grand worthy chaplain, was elected
grand worthy vice president. His suc
cessor as chaplain is Joseph H. Ellis of
M~inneapolis.
' A. E. Partridge of Aerie No. : of Se
attle was elected grand worthy secretary,
Edward I. Head of jan Francisco was
elected grand worthy treasurer and "Hy"
Davis, his predecessor as treasurer, was
re-elected grand trustee with Theodore
13ell of Napa, Cal.; D. F. McGinnity of
Chicago, H. E. Norris of New Haven,
Conn., and J. J. Kennedy of Buffalo; Ed
ward Krause of Wilmington, Del., grand
worthy conductor, and John W. Sheridan,
grand inside guard, were re-elected.
CONGREGATIONAL
WORKERS TO MEET
MISSIONARY PROJECTS OF THE
CHURCH TO BE DISCUSSED
AT CONVENTIONS.
FAMOUS PREACHERS ARE DUE
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
New York, Sept, 5.-Missionary work of
the Congregational church in the foreign
and home fields will be discussed by two
conventions during October, one at Man
chester, N. H., and the other at Cleveland,
Ohio.
The American board, which has charge
of the church's foreign work, will hold its
sessions in Manchester from October 13 to
r6, and beginning October so at Cleveland
the American Missionary association, in
charge of the home field, will continue in
session through October a2. This is'the
94th annual meeting of the American board
and it will open with the annual sermon
by President Willard D. Sperry, D. D,, of
Michigan.
Rev. Moxom to Speak.
The annual sermon for the American
IMissionary asociation will be preached by
Rev. Phillip S. 'Moxom, D. D., of Spring
field, Mass,
The industrial, Intellectual and moral
education of the negro will be one of the
several important questions ibefore the
American hMissionary asociation, and
among the speakers on this and other
topics will be Rev. Washington Gladden,
D. D., of Columbus, Ohio.; Rev. Newell
Dwight Hillis, D. D., of Brooklyn, and
President C, F. Thwynge, D, D., of Cleve
land, Ohio.
William Pickens and George W. Craw
ford, two young negroes, who took prizes
at Yale this year, will present phases of
the race problem.
From All Over
(MIss Jennie L. Blowers, one of the so
ciety's pioneer missionaries in Porto Rico,
will present the work and needs of that
section. The field of the associatloa cov
ers everything under the American flag
from Porto Rico to Alaska, and all will
be considered, missionary workers being
expected from nearly all sections.
PANIC IN FACTORY
ENSUES ON SHOTS
ITALIAN SHOOTS AT BROTHER-IN.
LAW BECAUSE HE OWES
HI.IM MONEY.
TWO HUNDRED GIRLS FLY
Trample on Eacoh Other in Confusion
and Drop Stilettos on Floor-
Assailant Captured.
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
INew York, Sept. 5.-Angered because
his brother-in-law failed to pay money he
had loaned to him, AMbero Camelo has shot
and probably fatally wounded Joseph
Carlo. The shooting occurred in the hall
way of an East Ninety-first street factory
building.
Two hundred girls employed in the fac
tory were thrown into a panic by the shoot
ing and rushed out over the body of the
wounded man nad down the stairway. Sev
eral were knocked down and bruised and
some fainted.
Flies Down Fire Esoape.
Camelo went to the factory, walked to
Carlo's machine, touched his brother-in
law on the shoulder and said he wanted to
talk with him in the hallway on business.
Upon reaching the hallway Camelo sud
denly turned and fired.
A policeman heard the shots and ran up
the stairway. Camelo jumped through a
window and fled down the fire-escape.
Several times he attempted to fire at the
officer, who was coming down the ladder
after him, but the revolver failed to go off,
'Dropped Their Weapons.
Several policemen surrounded the would
be murderer when he reached the ground
and compelled him to surrender.
A dozen stilletos and revolvers were
scattered about the stairway of the fac
tory where the Italian workers had dropped
them as they ran from their machines.
MII. IManohleff Drowned.
BY ASSOCIATUD PRESS.
Sofia, Sept. S.-M. Manchieff, the mln
later of finance, was drowned yesterday
while 'bathing in the Varna.

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