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The Butte inter mountain. (Butte, Mont.) 1901-1912, September 15, 1903, Image 1

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THE BUTTE, INTER MOUNTAIN_
VOL XXIII. No. 153. BUTTE, MONTANA. TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER, 15, 1903. PRICE FIVE CENTS
MINNlE HEALY IS
TO BE TAKEN UP
SECOND TRIAL OF MINING SUIT
TO BEGIN IN JUDGE CLANCY'S
COURT TOMORROW.
RESUME OF THE LITIGATION
Publio Is Familiar With Suit Brought by
Cinlen and the First Trial Be
fore Judge Harney.
.t Is expected that the second trial of
the clebrated Minnie Healy case will
open tomorrow. The numinal parties in
interest are Miles Finlen, plaintiff, and
F. A. Heinse and others, defendants. The
real plaintiff in interest is the Boston &
Montana company, and the defendant in
Interest is the United Copper company.
The parties to the case were preparing
for trial today, and Judge Clancy will be.
gin hearing the case tomorrow morning at
so o'clock. The case will be tried by Judge
Clancy without a jury, the district court,
Judge Harney presiding, having heretofore
held the case to be one in chancery, in
which the parties were not entitled to a
jury.
The Case.
The case is one in which the public has
taken a deep interest, and with whose Is
sues the public is fairly familiar.
Finlen sued to recover possession of the
MLnnie Healy, to which he had a deed to
a quarter Interest and was entitled to a
deed for the remainder. He alleged that,
while he was working the mine In 1898,
Heinse and the latter's co-defendants went
into the property and took forcible pos
session of it, without right or title to the
property.
The defendants answered in the plead
ings that Finlen had sold his rights to
them, and had agreed to assign the same
in writing, and that he had delivered pos
session of the property peaceably.
Denied the Sale.
Finlen denied that he had ever sold his
rights to the mine or agreed to sell them,
and gave an interesting history of his
dealings with the United Copper company
people.
His transactions with them took place
in 1898. At that time he was known as
a friend and associate of Marcus Daly.
With the intention of making it appear
that Marcus Daly was supporting the
Heinze people in the latter's fights with
the Boston & Montana company in the
courts, John MacGinniss had a contract
drawn in which Finlen agreed to sell the
Minnie Healy, or his rights to it, to
Heinze and the latter's associates and to
bring a suit against the Boston & Mon
tana company to recover possession and
title to ore bodies in the Leonard mine.
To Glose Shaft.
The purpose of the deal which MacGin
niss hoped to bring off was to "close down
the Leonard shaft," as Heinze tersely put
his description of the motive, according to
Finlen.
There was a conference after the draw
ing of the contract, and at it Finlen met
the Heinze people, but refused to sign the
contract. He was on the eve of depart
ing for the East, and he left for that sec
tion of the country next day, retaining
all his rights in the mine.
He had been working the Minnie Healy
under leases and agreements he had se
cured from the owners. These owners
were John Devlin. Marion M. Dcvlin,
Mary E. Reilly and Catherine Kelley. The
three first named people owned a three
quarters interest in the mine and the
latter a quarter share.
Granted Finion Lease.
The Devlins and Mary E., Reilly had
granted Finlen a lease of their share and
an agreement to sell to him for $75,ooo000;
Mrs. Kelley had done the same with her
share, for which she was to receive
$2S,ooo. Later Finlen deposited the $75.
ooo for the three-quarters share in the
First National bank, and he paid Mrs.
Kelley $a5,ooo for her share and got
a deed from her for it.
While Finlen was gone to the East
Heinze took possession of the mine, claim
ing that he had an oral agreement from
Finlen, for the sale of the Finlen leases
and agreements to purchase to him, and
for the written assignment of the same
by Finlcn at some future date.
He claimed that, according to the agree
ment with Finlen thus declared, lie was to
pay the latter $34,ooo, half of the money
to be paid in one year and the other half
in two years.
Hcinze also got a deed from the three
first named owners of the three-quarters
share, but that conveyance was for five
eighths of the property only. He alleged
that. the deed from Mrs. Kelley to Finlen
was not good, because she had parted
with her right to make deeds of her share
to Finlen, and Finlen had conveyed the
rights to him.
Finlen Brought Suit.
Finlen brought the suit to recover the
property on the ground that it was his,
after he had fulfilled his contract to buy
from the owners, and alleged that Heinze
and the other defendants had no rights
in it or claim to it at all. Later, the
Boston & Montana company became the
owner of the mine through purchase from
him.
At the trial, as showing that he owned
the mine, Finlen testified that he paid the
expenses of running it for months after
the conference at which the defendants
alleged he agreed to sell it.
The first trial of the case was held
before Judge Harney something over two
years ago, and everybody is familiar with
the fact that the mine was given to Helnze
by Judge Harney.
Everybody is also familiar with the
fact that the supreme court reversed the
decision and remanded the case for a re
trial, and gave as a reason for the re
versal the conduct of the trial judge
during the hearing of the case. The
scandal that developed around Judge
Harney and Mrs. Brackett is too recent
in occurrence to require repeating.
SEVFN COUNTIES COMPETE
SP~CIAL TO TIIE INTER MOUNTAIN.
Helena, Sept. Is.--Seven counties of the
state have already entered in the competi
tion for the prizes offered by the state fair
directors for the best county collective ex
LOG BUILDING FOR
THE WORLD'S FAIR
H. L. FRANK SAYS MONTANA EDI
FICE SHOULD BE AS RUGGED
AND RUDE AS HER SCENERY.
LET IT BE PLANNED HERE
Thinks Local Architects ant' Contractors
Ohould Be Given an Opportunity
to Put Up a Typical Hall.
"A log building with a beautiful rustic
design, to be constructed of logs from
Montana and finished in Montana lumber,
is what we are trying to get," said H. L.
Frank of the St. Louis Exposition com
mittee to the Inter Mountain today.
"After receiving designs from the best
architects and designers in the country,
the best we could do was to receive noth
ing but stereotyped plans of such build
ings and calling for an amount far in
excess of the price we decided we could
pay.
"It has been a most discouraging prop
osition and we were at our wits end when
Senator HolTman of Gallatin county pro
posed to give Montana the chance to 'bid
on the building by erecting an edifice like
those the early residents of the state oc
cupied.
"Such a building would not only be
appropriate but would cost much less than
any of the modern structures."
Mr. Frank called attention to log build
ing at Gardiner, Mont., near the entrance
to Yellowstone park, as being an example
of what the commission had in mind
when the subject was discussed.
Buildings of this sort are to be found
in the East and are generally the homes
of hunting clubs. It is the intention of
the commission to feature the agricultural,
horticultural and educational exhibits, but
of course the main exhibit will be the
mining exhibit. This, however, will be
the work of the mining compalnies
throughout the state, and the expense of
these exhibits will be borne by their re
spective companies.
FANATICS TRIED
Labor Leaders Are Said to Have In
sulted American Flag.
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
San Juan, Sept. i5.-Large throngs at
tended the trial yesterday of two public
speakers said to belong to the American
Federation of Labor, who were arrested
for publicly abusing insular officials and
for threatening to meet Governor Hunt on
his return here with black flags and to
kill him if he refused their demands for
the improvement of the labor conditions.
One of the speakers is charged with
having declared that the American flag
was "a rag only fit to cover rascals" and
*ith making other wild remarks.
The trial is expected to be concluded to
day.
FEDERAL COURT IS
AGAIN IN SESSION
LONG DOCKET CONFRONTS JUDGE
KNOWLES WHO SETS MANY OF
THE CASES FOR TRIAL.
Judge Knowles convened the federal
court this forenoon. The calendar is a
long one and the indications are that this
session will last fully two months.
There are no criminal cases on the
docket at this time. United States Dis
trict Attorney Carl Rasch purposes calling
a grand jury before the term is over, how.
ever. Judge Knowles will summon a petit
jury about October I5.
Bankruptoy Cases.
At the session this forenoon the court
ordered that Austin Gibbons and Ties
Picotti be discharged from bankruptcy.
The petition of Frank T. Hughes for
final discharge from bankruptcy was ob
jected to and the court set the hearing
for September 17,
The objections to the petition for the
discharge of Edward L. Willey from bank.
ruptcy will be heard September at.
Set for Trial.
The following cases were set for trial:
William W. Haardt against the Oregon
Short Line Railway company, Septem
ber 16,
United States against the Bitter Root
Development company, September 16,
On the motion calendar there were sev
eral settings,
John J. Newbegin against Lulu F.
Largey, September 1j.
Butte & Boston Consolidated Mining
company against the Geyman Mining com
pany et al., September 17.
Livingston Cushing against the American
Development & Manufacturing company,
September 16.
John J. Chambers against the First Na
tional bank, September 16.
Oregon Short Line Railway company
against Joseph Shineberger, September 16,
George H. Casey against Lee Mantle,
September :6.
Lulu F. Largey against Lee Mantle,
September :6.
The following civil causes at law were
set for trial:
Joseph O. Hudnut against the Brittania
Mining company, September 3,.
Charles A. 'Moore against G. R. Nickey
et al., September a3,
TURKS SACK A MONASTERY
Berlin, Sept, 15.-A dispatch to the
Tageblatt from Constantinople reports that
the Russian monastery at Jerusalem has
been sacked by a Mohammedan mob and
that all of the monks there were murdered,
WRECKS ON FLORIDA COAST
BY ASSOCIATEDn PREss,
Hayana, Sept, I.,--The captain of the
steanme Vigilancia,, which has arrived
here, reports many wrecks sighted on the
Florida coast.
PAYNE CANNOT BE
BEFORE THE COURT
POSTMASTER GENERAL SAYS HE IS
UNABLE TO COLLECT THE
,EVIDENCE DEMANDED.
PAPERS WIDELY SCATTERED
Documents Needed in the Investigation
Are in Use All Over America
He Sends a Substitute
BY ASSOCIATE'D PRESs.,
Washington, D. C., Sept. 5S.-In accord,
ance with a decision of Acting Attorney
General Hoyt, declaring that the su.bpoena
served on the postmaster general yester-.
day to appear at the hearing in New York
today in the case of George W. 1Beavers,
the former head of the salaries and allow
ances division, postofice department, was
void, the postmnaster general has desig-.
noated I'ostoflice Inspector Lawrence L.cth
erman as his representative at that hearing.
Postmaster General Payne said today
that it was a physical impossibility to com
ply with the subpoena in any event, aside
from the law in the case.
'Ihe subpoena, he pointed out, called
for papers, dtoculentls anid records covering.
operations of his department to be pro
duced before the United States commis-:
sioner. These papers are in constant use
in connection with the investigation of the
postal service and are scattered through
out the country in the hands of the in
spectors.
Charles Robb, the assistant attorney gen
eral for the postoflice department, has de
cided to continue permanently in that
office instead of returning to his former
position in the department of justice at
the completion of his investigation.
Mr. Payne today admitted that the resig
nation of George Christiancy, the former
law clerk of the department, was submit
ted( sontie weeks ago, but that action upon
it had been deferred pIending the investiga
tion of the affairs of that department.
Beavers Case Begun.
New York, Sept. I..-Tlle preliminary
examination of George fceavers, the former
head of the salaries and allowances divi
sion of the general postoflice, ulnder the in
dictllents returned ag:ainst himt by the
federal grand jury of ltrooklyn, charging
mimi with conspiracy to defraud the gov
ernment through complicity with the
Blrant-l)ent Manufacturing company of
Watertown. Wis., was comtnenced today
before Unt.ited States Commissioner Ilitch
cock. The defendant was represented by
his counsel, Messrs. Morgan and Seabury,
who were reinforced by a third lawyer,
M.ax Stasne, who conducted the examina
tion. The defendant, looking worried,
though attempting to appear at ease, sat
behind his counsel.
Moves to Dismiss.
The government side of the case was
looked after by Assistant United States
District Attorney Wise. General Henry
T. Burnett, the United States district at
torney, was also present, but took little
part in the examination.
At the beginning of the examination
Mr. Stauer moved to dismiss the proceed
ings on grounds that the facts as alleged
in the complaint were insufficient and that
no proof had been presented for the comrn
missioners' consideration in support of the
indictment and complaint as required by
law. Mr. Stauer read a number of de
cisions msupporting his contention.
MURDERER GONE
Breaks Jail and Goes Abroad With
Smallpox Germs.
MY ASSOCIATIE I(.PRES,.
South McAlister, 1. 1.. Sept. Iz.-E. N.
Short, a deputy United States marshal of
the central district, who killed a coal
miner on a Choctaw passenger train at
WVister on Labor day, has escaped from
Poteau jail and is at large.
Short was bound over on a charge of
murder. lie was suffering from small-'
pox, contracted during his confinement,
and was not closely watched.
LOSS OF LIFE REPORTED
TO HAVE BEEN HEAVY
BY ASSOt'IAIMI) PRaSS,
Jacksonville, Fla., Sept. i5.-No re
ports have yet been received from Middle
Florida, where it is now feared that the
loss by the recent hurricane will be s
vere, Near Lake Butler two children were
killed by the tornado. At Hlale, a small
village, ao houses were destroyed and
crops ruined.
MUST BEAR UNION LABEL
Labor Organizations to Protect the Pro
ducts of Farmer.
The labor organizations of Butte will
soon make a request of the commission
merchants of this city that they handle
only farm products bearing the union
label coming from Stevensville and
vicinity.
The Farmers' union of Stevensville has
asked the co-operation of the Butte or
ganizations and the statement and request
are now being prepared for presentation.
The majority of the fruit growers of
Stevensville are members of the union.
It is the purpose of the organization to
protect the wage scale of the laborers and
to insure a fair price for the products of
the farms.
MIKE CHERRY IS RELEASED
He Started to Shoot Up the Town in
Centerville.
Mike Cherry, who was arrested last
night and thrown into the county jail on
a charge of disturbance, was released from
the jail today on the order of the county
attorney's office.
Cherry was drunk and had his fighting
clothes on, lie was accused of drawing a
pistol and shooting holes in the atmosphere
about his residence at Centerville.
The noise"and disquiet he created was
objected to by his neighbors, who wished
to live their lives in peacefulness and
quietude, and he was arrested in conse
qluence. He had sobered up today and was,
penitent, Whtlrtore his release
CANNOI AFFORD TO
SUBMIT TO TURKS
BULGARIAN GOVERNMENT WARNS
THE POWERS THAT WAR IS
BEING FORCED ON IT.
EXPECTS TURKS TO ATTACK
Does Not Believe Mobilization of Troops
Is for the Purpose of Putting
Down a Petty Rebellion.
RV AlrSO.'IATreD Pri.s,
Sofia, Bulgarin, Sept, 5S.-Following
are some of the points in the note which
Bulgaria has just presented to the
powers:
"\\'hat the Bulgarian government had
forseren, as expressed in its note of June
2q, of the development of allairs in
Turkey, has become amply verified. The
Turkish government is systematically an
nihilating the Bulgarian people.
"The muoilization and concentration of
such great forces in European Turkey,
under the pretext of suppressing the revo
lution, gives Bulgaria reason to suppose
that at an opportune moment she will be
atta;cked by Turkey.
"The Bulgarian government can no
longer remain indifferent in the presence
of such a situation, which is of a nature
calculated to bring a4hout a hostile collision
hctwceen Turkey and Bulgaria.
"If the great powers do not take mleas
turcs to give the sublime porte counsels
of wisdom and of moderation, the Bul
garian government will be obliged to take
the necessary steps to lie ready for every
(eveutuality and to not be taken by sur
prise."
Disturbances Feared.
lYV ASSOiIA':I' PEaraS.
Sofia, Sept. 1S.-The American consul
at Iteirut telegraphs that the situation
there is tranquil, although some fears are
uItertained of disturbances on the oc
casion of the feast of the cross.
The consull adds thIat a good impression
.as created by Rear Admiral Cotton's
concirelnce with Nazhimn Pasha, the acting
\ali ot lIeirut and the latter's repressive
action as already reported by Admiral Cot
ton to thie authorities at Washington.
Italian Fleet Ready.
L.ondon, Sept. is.-- A news agency dis
paitch from RIome says that the Italia.
fleet which has beIen concentratimng off tIhe
coast of Sicily is held in readiness to
leave for Turkish waters at a few hours'
notice.
CORBIN IS COMING
Adjutant General of Army Is to Visit Fort
Harrison.
a5P:(IAL 10 T11g INTER MOUtL''rTAlf.
Helena, Sept. iS.-G(;eneral itI. C. Cor
bIn, adjutant general of the United States
army, will arrive in IHelena next Montday.
lIe is on a general tour of inspection of
army posts in the West, and the object of
his visit here is to inspect Fort larrison.
General Corbhin, in the days before lie
reached field rank, was an officer in the
Twenty-fourth United infantry, now sta
tioned in Montana. Company C, in which
he served as a line officer, is now at Fort
Il:rrison. The general was with the regi
mient mi years, and the officers look for
ward to his visit with pleasant anticipa
Ions. From here General Corbin will go
ito Fort Assinniboine.
LIPTON IS ILL IN CHICAGO
Obliged to Retire Shortly After His Ar
rival in Windy City.
IIV ASnO('IAI J I tRES,.
Chicago, Sept. 15.-Sir Thomas Lipton
arrived here today from the East. With
him were Colonel Neill, the well known
yachting expert, who accompanied the
baronet to this country, and (tapt. Valen
tie Webster of the Blritish army.
Sir Thomas will spend much of his time
;here in looking over his business interests
and visiting friends. The. one formal event
arranged in his honor is it dinner tonight
it the Chicago Athletic association to
which 40 guests have been invited.
Shortly after his arrival Sir Thomas
L.ipton became ill with Indigestion at his
apartments in the Atuditorium annex and
it was found necessary t. albandon all plansu
f,or entertaining the baronet today. Ilis
illness is not serious.
SHE RELINQUISHES OFFICE
Delaware Postmistress Decides to With
draw From Field.
BY ASSOCIA'IIT D tI'RtSi.
Wilmington, Del., Sept. I..-Miss
Huldah B. Todd, postmaster at Greenwood,
Del., whose removal from office by the
postmaster general because she was ob
tioxious to United States Senator Alcle,
And which attracted the attention of the
entire country, has given up the disputed
office to Jacob L. Houseman, who was ap
pointed her successor.
HE WANTS HER ARRESTED
Aged Man Says ,Mrs. Welsh Has De
frauded Him.
An old man with white hair and
trembling limnbs appeared at the county
attorney's office today and wanted a
warrant issued for a woman whom he
called Mrs, Welsh,
The old man said he lived in South
Mdain street, and that he had been sick.
He added that Mis. Welsh came to his
house and remarked that an ill man such
as he should have chicken soup.
She offered to cook a chicken and
make the soup if lie would buy the
.featiered biped. -He agreed to the pro
pusal, lie' said, and gave the woman $5.
Site went away to buy the chicken, he
says, but she never returned,
Mr. Coleman of the county attorney's
.office said he would look into the matter,
IN .FAVOR OF THE,.TREATY
lotata, Colombia, via Buena Ventura,
.,ept. -4,--A reaction in favor of the canal
reaty has occurred in the house of repre
wentatives, but the senate is still opposed
'o it.
CARTER HARRISON
IS LOST IN BUTTE
MAYOR OF CHICAGO eRRIVES, BUT
WHERE IS THE -RF $ lION HE
WAS TO Ha  rIADI
TAKES STROI 4sABOUT TOWN
Genial Dad of 'Windy City Meets a
Lone Net per Man and Walks
Are to See Butte.
Carter hbtison, mayor of Chinago and
the big chief of the Windy City demtiocrats,
walked quietly into the Thiornton hotel
this morning, carrying a box containing a
new pair of shoes and a small hand grip.
lie was tanned brownl fromt weeks spent
in the mountains hunting, and his blue
suit looked as if it had weathered a storm
C.ARTER II. IIARRISOAN.
or two. lie was alone and not a soul was
there to meet him save the hotel clerk.
After breakfast he took a walk about
the city with a newspalper man. Hll seemed
anxious to see all there was of litite dur.
ing the short stay he lmade.
,He Has the Grip.
"I had to run to catch the train last
evening at Maonida and all I got away with
was a little grip," lie said.
"A party of miy friendls ald I have been
hunting for the past three weeks on the
Sniake and Madison rivers. We got to
Mollld just in time to see the trains pull
out. I inade a run for mine and caught
the rear car. My friends were going the
other way, and the whole bunch got left.
My baggage is downl at Monidla yet, I
think."
lie wanted to know where the mines iof
Ilutte were. Hli gaze sas directed to
Anaconda hill with its bristlig iosmoke
htacks.
"tiHess I'll walk lup that wiy." lie said,
and lie started toward Centerville.
Missed the Reception.
When lie was informed that a reception
had been planned for him last evening,
lie sauid:
"I didii't iitesl to arrive hlere until
this miornling. There inimst have been -
nisiunderstanding shout thel timne. Whelini
does the ilsayor get ildown i to i.is otlficr"
lie was informeid that the mayor uII'
ally took up the bnlrden of unicillal affairs
at in o'clock. The city hall was duly
pointed out.
"After I finish this walk I'll go downi
there and call onii him. I've lheard ai great
deal albolut Itulite and I waint to see iall I
('an of it while I aimi here. I suppoilll se
those are all coppelr miines lip there on
the hill."
He Wanted to Know.
'lThe mayor of Ch('licago wantled to kilow
all aboult the big minies.
"Lots of silver was imillned here at oline
liIe, wasi't there?" lie asked. I sulpios'
thlcy had to close ilown when the price
of silver fell off.
"This town is soniewliat different from
whlit I exlpected to see. I thought lIutie
was a caill, but I illnd it a good sized city.
Where is till the smloke that I have heard
The sun was shining brightly, and if
Itutte was a smoky city it showed ino sign
of it this morning when Chicago's chlief
executive strolled up Main street.
Butte Labor Unions.
"You have lots of labor unions here,
haven't you?" he asked. "I'v'e heard ablout
Ilntte and its great labor organizatioils."
Being asked concerning the labor
troubles in Chicago, lie replied:
"Most of our trouble down there has
been caused by dissati.faction of some of
the newly organized unions. The older
bodies have no grievances that have lnot
been settled. No, I dlon't think we have
had any more trouble this year than usual.
"The teaitmsters' unionl had thilngs tied
tp for a time, but it has taken no part in
the recent strikes. T'here was a timeIi
when soime of the smaller unions enideav
ored to get the teamsters to help thJein out,
but they hlave seen that they were being
used and have hclil aloof fromt strikes
that do not concernl .heim."
Called on the Mayor.
When Mayor Hllrrisoni returiied fronl his
walk he went down to the city hall and
visited Mayor Mullins, lie nmet the city
oflicials and spent considerable time in dis
cussing the management of municipal af
fairs :
ELEVEN BURNED
Horrible Fire in Norway Does Great
Damage.
'Y ASSOC(IATEr D 'i'.eS,.
London, Sept. uI.-A special froml Chris.
tiana, Norway, says that in a fire in sonie
business premises on Kongensgade today
ii persons were hurned to death and great
damage was done.
WEATHER
Fair and oontinued cold with frost
tonight,
RAPPING OF GAVEL
BY SENATOR CLARK
IRRIGATION CONGRESS OPENS WITH
DELEGATES FROM ELEVEN
STATES PRESENT.
LETTER FROM PRESIDENT
Roosevelt Writes of His Interest in Pro*
ceedings-Hitchcock Promises
Official Support.
I1¥ ANw,, 4 1.111 ll P IRMM,
Ogden,. IUtah, Se;pl. I.5.-- With deihlrgates
presentl f tl)lll I1 lales i west of the ,liiisi.
sippi. rlepresenting practicailly every inl
portantl coltnterciail organi.aitiotn ill the
great territory inhludl I in the semi iarid
aind iarid region of the countnry, statet andl
tmuicipal goverlmtlnts the 'leventh ses
ion of the Natiional Irria'tion ci'gll ress
ulp''ned here tolday.
The sessions will cotilllle nllil Friday,
anid dlriing that timeir IilkI11 imporlll tilllt action
is expected to hie takenlr looking toward the
reclamatiion of the va;lt UlncttIlet. terri
toriCe of the w(est tha1 b1t :tAnit the
ltluch of water to hh1,otiIn ;aIII nhear ft it.
Not sinlce the it"beginning oi t tilhe mioie
tenlt hlooking Iowiard governmenlt id ill It
vast sIhetlll of itrri;gating tlhe ril \Wes't,
has no mnuch itl.trrst Ielln ltakeni ini the
ieretilln. of the irrigaition congress, and
dtring the four Sltays ws-ii.itt4 itrigation
anlld its kindred lltshjrrtc , forestcry and
coloniatnlio. will not onlly her lisctlssed,
but practicatl illtirattitns of what irriga
tion is doingl for lthe weislt will he given.
Distinguished SSpeakers.
Amonglt Ihth speakers will I' I- ilted,
State senalltorn an.tI glovernorl,'s of a half
dozen states of the went. governtmein-t ex
lperlis in forestry ;mit irrigatiton and tiprl -
:,ntall;ive.s of i.Iny w sterll i ntllllllt. ial or
Ia liz-ationl d iit i . , linin tinl til. t .list
l)ehlg te, s .w ll ..ne to pour il,, the' cily,
every train arriving Itis nornipy uiging.
in hundreds irnler, ,l ill the wirk oI the
congI.-ess.
Although lthe irtl tetin'llt g wais . iheIhtli.l
for o:,io a. Iit. i tt -;l r citsiera.ly beyonIcld
that lil+e when President W. A, I l:lk
ascendeid the plltformr otf the Iathtrnuhle in
which thie ntitiet ill: ;are iil Ihei t ld, anl
lrlppedl for ordler. 'Ihe v.t,.,raihh, lirt.si
detlll John 1i. Wi\\'nder, 'one o tIhe clun
cillors of l'eesidth l Joseptlh Siilh, diliv
e-red a brie f invil.atolln at ilte conclusion of
which NMayor William (;tlasitso.i,, f Iigden
was itntroduced and dehliveretd an addre.sh
of werloloe oill behal;f ol |tllh.
Address of Welcome.
Mlayor William t;ilnsmsuu, in his speech
of welcome, said:
"I congratulate you and the peopile of the
arid sectiont of thie Unitted States ill being
ahle to convene ill session dinlllg Iis l cnll
Rress anlld contetiplate the enjoyment of the
fruits of lthe lnc'eaing toil and llibor of II
y.ars in lbehalf of irrigation in Ithe Unitedt
St.tes.
"For i yeairs titi irrigators of this ititi.
try havei IIICt ya;irr after year with tlC
great lobject it viewt--to setire na;tiominl
aid. El.ve('rlastingly k.e.ping lt it lhas causedl
this Rouverntlentlttt, itinlr thei leadershipl of
I'residenlt IlRooseveilt, to grant ts sevceral
million dollars a;moally. I'I'l,. most ardent
irrigaittor 'oull nit ask for :a m icr lilral
appropriation.
"A prominenltelt l i rn newspape e ipr has
nlskedi the qlurstitll, 'What is Ithe neicl of
allty ulurt irrip litill -oini gris',ts tnltw that
of (he pitlitc l;ilds for the iclhitition of
lie ati ul Wet't I wa ilt to hny there in
more tneed for i illrrigation congrics today
inrii in the futurei thll there ever was.
'T'rue, you lhav Ile monelll y aippropri;atedl by
the government, , ht it will lie the privilege
11t1il the ditty of the, t congressI to ,ee that
Ihis monetrtyis properly asedl l(d not misap.
pliedil or w:asted. Y',i ithltve gcrea: ter work
before you at thin s- .ion thhitn at iany time
during the it year:s history of the irriga
lion ct, gres". V'o Imist be able to pro
TO INCREASE FOHCE
POLICE COMMITTEE DECIDES TO
RAISE THE TOTAL FROM
46 TO 54 MEN.
The police committee has decided to
increase the police force frot 4.6 men to
54. T'he three mounted police will here
after be without horses.
The increase contemplated by the com
mittee is in reality an addition of only
two men. There are six policemen, who
have been working regularly, but who are
not on the payroll. 'The council has re
fused to confirm their appointment, and
although they are doing duty they are
doing it without pay, so far at least.
The addition to the police force has
Ihecn made necessary by the eight-hour
day now in vogue in the police depart
ment.
IMPOSSIBLE TO GIVE
JETT A FAIR TRIAL
aY ASSOCIATI'ID PasI ,MI.
Cynthiana, Ky., Sept. 15.-ln the Jett
trial today defendaant's attorney intro
ducced three citizens who testified that on
account of the inflamed state of the public
Imlind it was impossible for Jett to get a fair
trial ina this county.
PALMA EVIDENTLY POPULAR
His Tour of Cuba Is Reported One
Long Ovation.
RY ASSOCIATED PaE.eS
Puerto Principe, Cuba, Sept. az.-Presl
dent Palmsa, after he started yesterday
from Havana on his tour of eastern Cuba,
traversed long stretches of sparsely in
habited country.
At every town he was greeted by squad
rons of mounted Cubans, received ad-.
dresses from the officials and party leaders
and was presented with 'bunquets by pretty
senoritas, who made speeches of welcome.
The enthusiasm increased when the.
president entered the region in which the
administration was reputed to be the
otronaest..

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