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The Butte inter mountain. (Butte, Mont.) 1901-1912, September 15, 1903, Image 2

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BROBBeK
135 W. Broadway 'Phone 691 B
TOMORROW
Montana Apples; $1 00
large box, per box ...................... 1
Fancy Washington Peaches; I g 0
per box.............................. P1.1i
Mason Fruit Jars, while they last; two quarts,
dozen, $t.oo; one quart, dozen. y7c; g5C
pints, dozen...............................
Brobcek'a Best Creamery Butter;
per pound............................... 2
PERS
Marrowfat and Early June,
two cans................ ................... 2 5C
*ORN
Sweet and Tender, 25
two cans.................................. 25
SOARP
Iarry Toilet Soap, 25c
six bars.............,..................
Glycerine Tar Soap, a
soc size.................................S
SYRUP
Thtree Gallons $1.00
Table Syrup.............................
PISi
K. K. K. K. Norway Hlerring, a !
six for.................................... 2LU
IIHBBSB
Wisconsin or New York Cheese, Lf,
three pounds........................ . 50V
MRAARONI
Ten-pound 65M
box......... ............. ... 65
ASRTSUP
Snider's z-pint bottle (Special)............. e
Columbia a.pint bottle (Special)........... aoc
BRBRKFAST FOOD
Yuco, a.pound package, toe;
three for................................... 25
Ralston Oatmeal, gA
-apound package.........................IV
Carnation Wheatflake,
I.pound package............................ 25
All goods guaranteed or money back.
PROMPT DELIVERY
PRICE this week for EIEC
TRIC BELTS, the celebrated
DI)r. Judd's Belts, unequaled.
$25 Belts, $tr; $iI Belts,
$6; $6 Belts, $3. For this week only, at
NEWBRO DRUG CO., tog North Main
Street.
H. DONNELLY UUCKS
ESCAPES LEADEN PELLET FROM
REVOLVER OF JAMES LINCKE
BY NARROW CHANCE.
Robert Donnelly escaped a leaden baon
bon from the revolver of James Lincke at
the Butte concert hall on East Park street,
last night, because the latter was too ex
cited to have control of his weapon.
Instead of hitting )Do,nnelly the bullet
took kindly to the woodwork of the build
ing. At first everybody thought that it
was a blank cartridge, but the sight of a
leaden pellet stuck fast and deep into the
wall convinced them that a possible mur
der had been averted.
In the excitement Lincke escaped and
up to last reports had not been appre
hended.
Lincke and another man were in an ar
gument when Donnelly butted in to make
peace in the family, but Lincke resented
this familiarity on Donnelly's part, hence
the shooting.
ENROLLMENT OF 8,500
IN SCHOOLS OF BUTTE
Total in Public Institutions Is Estimated
at Seven Thousand and Catholic
Schools Are Full.
In School District No. z there were
6,240 pupils enrolled In the public schools
yesterday. In the Sacred Heart parochial
school the enrollment was 253, which
would havee reached the soo mark was
there room in the school for the primary
grades. The enrollment at St. Patrick's
school is close to 700, while the Catholic
school in Centerville numbers about 5oo.
City Superintendent Young states that
the enrollment in the public schools will
reach the sum total of 7,ooo.
This makes, in round numbers, 8,500
children who will be in attendance in the
schools of this city during this year.
This does not take into consideration
the Butte Business college nor the many
kindergartens and private schools in the
city.
In these various schools are instructors
who have diplomas from the highest class
colleges, universities and normals in this
country.
Superintendent Young anticipates the
most successful year ever known in the
schools of the city.
CANNOT GRADE UNTIL
PROPERTY OWNERS WAIVE
City Is Unable to Begin Grade on West
ern Territory, as People Who Own
There Hold Back.
A year ago it was voted to extend the
city limits to include territory on the West
Side. This was done that the residents
out that way could have the benefit of elec
tric lights, sidewalks and water.
In order to extend the waer mains the
street must be graded. The engineering
department has been endeavoring to secure
waivers of damage from the property hold
[email protected] in the district, but so far only one has
signed,
The petition of the property owners for
improvement was received by the street
and alley committee. It will be granted as
soon as the grades are established in the
streets affected,
HARRY COURTLAND ARRESTED
Detective Murphy last night arrested
Harry Courtland, charged with obtaining
money under false pretenses.
Courtland is said to have represented
himself as an agent of the Brotherhood
of Railway Employes in Butte, and to
have collected quite a sum of money
from the employes.
Suspicion was not directed toward the
man until a few days ago, and Murphy
started an investigation which resulted in
the arrest yesterday.
DEMANDS CERTAIN LETTERS
The Boston & Montana company has
filed a demand upon Mayor Pat Mullins
to produce certain letters relating to his
alleged option to purchase the Comanche
saine in the sult which he brought against
the company. The letters cover a period
between April a, 1893, to the same time
the following year.
ARMY MANEUVERS
AT RILEY ASSURED
GOVERNMENT WILL RENT AN EX
TRA TRACT OF LAND FOR THE
11,000 MEN GOING.
CREW IS NOT. TO BLAME
Massachusetts' Men Exonerated for Ac
cident to Battleship-News of
the National Capital.
Ity AS.oeCATE PRt:sS.
Washington, Sept. ts.--Preparations for
the forthcoming army maneuvers at Fort
lkiley, Kan., were announced at the war
department yesterday. The maneuvers are
to begin on or about October is and con
tinue until October 27. They will be par
ticipated in by troops numtblering more than
l r,noo men drawn from the regular serv
ice and the National Guard of several
states.
It was found as a result of last year's
maneuvers that for the maneuvering of
large bodies of mcn the present reservation
is Inadequate anM the war department has
succeeded in obtaining the written consent
of several land owners adjoining the reser
vation whose aggregate holdings amount
to about 44,249 acres, to the military au
thorities entering upon and occupying their
holdings whenever it may become necessary
to do so in the prosecution of the man
euvers this year, at a nominal rental of s
cents per acre. By this mteanms, it is stated,
the war department has secured a section
of country which alnturds almost every
kind and variety of territory that could
be desired in practicing for the field opera
tions by the troops.
Massachusetts' Accident.
The finding of the court of inquiry rela
tive to the grounding of the battleship
Massachusetts on Egg Rock shoal. French
man's bay, on August sa last, has been
received at the navy department. The bharl
exonerates the officers and crew of the
-Maasachusetts and recomtnends that no
further proceedings he had in the matter.
The board finds that the ship grounded
in a dense fog, which'prevented the de
termination of the ves.sel's position front
observation and that an accident to the
starboard engine and the consequent reduc.
tion in speed, the patent lug furnished the
only means of determining the distance
run. The patent log, it is said, is inot re
liable at slow speed.
No Such Ruling.
Secretary Crtelyot said yesterday that
his attention hal been called to a state
ntent to the effect that a rule h;Itd bhenr
adoptedl by the depa:rtment of lcot litcrte
and l;alhor providling that boats working in
lharbors aind poirts shoull not le navigated
more than m1 hours coutitnuouuly out of
every 24.
lie said that somteone had evidently been
misiniformed, as no rule h;ad been adopted
or considered, and that there was no rc
striction whatever on the numbnler of hours
a steamer should navigate, provided she
had suflicient crew to inlsure safety.
Orders $4,000,000 Deposited.
Secretary Shaw yesterday designated
aboutt So national banks in various parts
of the country as depositors of public
funds and ordered about $.1,ooo,ooo de.
posited with them. Very little of this
money went to banks in the large cities,
the money going chiefly into the agricul
tural sections and the southwest.
The banks selected cover the country
from Maine to the Pacific coast, Maine and
Florida, each receiving relatively a good
share. Most of the distribution was in the
cotton and grain growing districts.
FERDINAND GATTAN HAS
BROUGHT TWO SUITS
Seeks to Recover Five-Eighths of the
Butte Placer Claim and Interest
in the Minnie Bell.
Ferdinand Gattan has sued George C.
Wurm, Mrs. Wurm, John Gerrick, R. G.
Collins, C. A. Daly, Joseph Gerrick and
the Vermillion Placer company to recover
a five-eighths of the Butte placer claim
upon his paying five-eighths of $6,ao.
lie alleges the defendants agreed here.
tofore to sell him and John Gerrick the
whole claim for the amount stated, Ger
rick to have three-eighths of the claim,
but afterwards refused to complete the
contract.
lie also brought suit to compel A. D.
Dorn, T. S. Rodda, Joseph Anderson, the
Gerricks, Collins, I)aly and he mining
company to deed to him a five-eighths in
terest in the Minnie Bell, Grade, Castle
Gate, Raven, Hlome, Lyon and Buckeye
claims for five-eighths of $42,750, setting
up allegations of a similar uncompleted
contract for the transfer of this property
to him and John Gerrick.
BAPTIST CHURCH MEETING
Ladies' Aid Had Helped to Decrease
Congregational Debt.
Enthusiasm manifested itself in the
growing condition of the Baptist church in
this city at the business meeting last night.
It was clearly shown that the Ladies' Aid
society had greatly added to the interest
In church work and done much to make
entertainments for the dhildren and mem
bers most enjoyable and that they had
aided in decreasing the church debt.
In the report of the leader it was shown
that the society of Young People had in
creased.
Before Newsboys' Club.
Mme. Anna Gorman spoke before the
Newsboys' club last night on cigarettes.
This was followed by chorus singing and
solos, with a few recitations by members
of the club.
C. S. Passmore also talked to the boys
on "Irrigation."
Defendant Appeals.
In the case in Justice Danzer's court
in which Dr. Grace Cahoon obtained
judgment for $275 damages against the
Northern Pacific Railroad company on
account of an injury suffered by her
through the train service between Butte
and Norris, the defendant has appealed
the case to the dictrict court.
Booth to Seattle.
Attorney E., S. Booth, lawyer, has gone
to Seattle on legal business connected with
the attempted deportation of Montana Chi
namen. IHe represents several Celestial.
whose right to live here has been attacked,
and will be occupied at Seattle for sev.
eral days, probably,
SENATOR CARMACK
EXPLAINS POSITION
SAYS HE MEANS TO STIR UP DIS
CUSSION BY PROPOSAL TO RE
PEAL AMENDMENT.
PROBLEM MUST BE SOLVED
Says Enfranchisement of the Negro Was
a Mistake for Which No Repara
tion Can Be Made.
DY ASsO.rATRPD 'RERs.
Memphis, Tenn,, Sept. Is.-United
States Senator Carmack explained last
night that his purpose in proposing toin
troduce a bill at the next session of con
gres for the repeal of the fifteenth
nmelnrment, thus disfranchising the
Ii gro, is simply to open a discussion
which will contribute to a solution of 'he
race problem.
'lTo Senator Carmack's mind the surest
plan of solving the negro question, as it
affects the white race, both socially and
politically, lies in the negro's elimination
from politics. Should the fifteenth amend
mlent be repealed the question of treat.
ing with the negro woutl lie left to the
st:Itei. Another view entertained by Sen
ator Carmack is for the separation of the
races,
itnt how to proceed, or how long it will
take, lie does not attemplt to say. He be
lievcs, however, that the races would be
better conditioned if they were separated.
lie believes the black rac' is a failure
andtu that it owes what little it has
achieved to its associal;on with the white
race.
As to the enfranchisetment of the negro
inmmediately after the war between the
states, the senator regards as the mistake
for which the repearl of the fifteenth
atendmlt ent would be only partial repara
tiotn.
LARGE FORCE OF MEN
MUST BE KEPT IDLE NOW
Setting of Minnie Healy May Set Aside
the Leonard Mine Restraining Order
Hearing Indefinitely.
It is reportedl now tha:it the restrain
ing order, I)i Ri up laitg ,rstopes of ore
ini tile I.eonard mr ine r. which was lately
securcd by the United Copper tpenp!e
against the Io+rton & XlMontana comipa:ny,
will have thil efTect of throwin,. out of
employment t large' nutmber of mien.
The h}:tri tg of th. rc'trainin~g order
was once r'.t for tomorrow, lbefore Judge
Clancy, bhit thli trial of the Mini ie lIcaly
case will srt it imile. It w:as conlfidlently'
-lieved that the iorrhir woituld the ill
staltlly ilismisse... atinl the stopes released
upolln the hea;tring, a;s the ore I idits affTect
id by it are. uuttide th. injtju ctiin area
establ;ished l i. rtofore by the supreme
court and are cert;ainily the property of the
lioston & Montatna companty heynnml dis
There will be tin hearing for somte time
now, probablly. :nd therefore the stol.ie
hmust rcmu:in idle, and a large force of
minirs, who had been at work in them
hteritlour re atln were being held in retadi
ness for work in them, will have to be
discharged. The delay in the hearing
will work a hardship on the miners, who
would have beentt at work soon were the
in juntctiol atnnulled.
BIRTHDAY OF FRANCES
WILLARD TO BE MARKED
Local W. C. T. U. Decides to Honor
Memory of Great Temperance
Worker-Routine Reponts.
At the meeting of the W. C. T. U. yes
terday at the home of M'rs. Woodhury in
North Hlenry street, it was decided to
celebrate the birthday of Frances Willard,
September 28th will be set aside for this
celebration and a special program will be
prepared for that purpose. The meeting
will take place at the residence of Mrs. 1.
T. Brazier, 17 Fast Fremont street.
The superintendent of good literature
reported yesterday that 38,945 leaflets and
398 magazines had beenl distributed dur
ing the past year. Other departments of
the work were also reported as in a flour
Ishing conditiuon and the members feel that
much is heing accomplished through the
local union. :f
BIG DANCE AT THE GARDENS
Affair by B. & M. Band Is to Be an
Event of the Season.
It is promised by Mr. Treloar that the
ball to be given by the Itoston & Montana
band tomorrow night is to have the finest
dance music ever furnished at a dance
given in the pavilion of Columbia Gardens.
A special program of music will be fur
nished and cars will be run at short in
tervals to accommodate the large crowds
who are expected to attend this ball. In
arranging entertainment for the young
folks of Butte it has been found that noth.
itg gives so much pleasure as the dance.
With this in mind the Boston & Mon
tana boys decided to make this ball memor
able because of the fine music to be heard
there tomorow night.
TO CONTINUE THE DANCES
Society Still Desires to Enjoy the Hall
at the Gardens.
It has been decided by the Butte Stl,
Railway company to continue the da 4
at the Gardens, Tuesday and Friday e
ings,
Tonight there will be in attendanct. j
number of the society people of the cty
who have arranged to have small dancing
parties there.
These latter have preyed popular dur
ing the whole season and it is with regret
that the devotees of society realize 'tat
the Gardens must soon close because ,he
cold weather is so near at hand.
MITCHELL WILL HANDLE .IT
To Take Charge of Strike in the Denver
Distriot.
Denver, Sept. is.-The News today,
says:
"President John Mitchell of the United
Mine Workers of America will probably
be In Denver the latter part of this week
to aid In bringing about a settlement be
tween the coal minors of this district and
the coal opmertors. One more attempt at
conciliation 'will be made by the miners
and if that falls a general strike will be d
clared at once. If one is declared Mr.
Mitchell will stay here to manage ,It.'
SEE CITY ON WAY
TO ATTEND MEET
DELEGATES TO IRRIGATION CON
GRESS TAKEN ABOUT BUTTE
BY LOCAL COMMITTEE.
THREE STATES REPRESENTED
Men From Minnesota, Noath Dakota and
Montana Enjoy Hospitality of
Business Men and Others.
Delegations to the Irrigation congress
which convenes this morning at Ogden
passed through Butte en route. Minnesota,
North D)akota and Montana were well
rleprcsented, and President H1ill of the
G(reat Northern provided two special Pull
ma1n for the delegates. The cars were
attached to the regular train that arrived
In Butte yesterday afternoon at 2:45, and
as the train for the south over the Short
Line did not leave until 4:45, the delega
tions arriving were given a ride over the
city in a large street car provided by
Manager Wharton.
Met at the Depot.
The delegations were met at the depot
by Manager Wharton, Mayor Mullins, W.
It. Mcech of the Great Northern, Chairman
Clark of the hoard of county commission
rs', United States Marshal l.loyd, J. T.
(O'lrien, secretary of the Business Men's
association; C. S. Passmore and other
ummbers of the Business Men's associa
tion and members of the press.
'The delegations were composed of the
following gentlemen, all heavyweights in
the world of commerce and finance:
Minnesota delegation in Great Northern
slecl,e r Wenatchec-George A. Archer,
Colonel 1). W. Hlaisted, Professor Thomas
S;haw. ThI(odore I. Smith, W. A. Somers,
I'vertt It. Kirk, Benjamin F. Beardsley,
a;d Wilbur II. Howard of St. Paul,
Colonel C. If. (;raves, Major J. II. Upham,
Oscar Mitchell, Ion. Ray T. L.ewis, Dr.
M. 11. Cullum and Major 11. V. Eva of
DI)utlh, Ii. V. Jones, David Percy Jones,
Jh's: E. Northrup, Ernest F. Smith, John
Leslie and W. C. Nye of Minneapolis,
ICra G. Valentine of Breckenridge, E. )D.
'hills of Crookston and Colonel IH. H.
Ilarrison of Stillwater.
North Dakota delegation in car Flat
heald--I. C. Plumlcy of Fargo Forum,
Colonel W. II. Robinson of Mayville, Hon.
It. J. Tl'urner, coummis:ioner" of agriculture
a:d labor. Itismarck: Professor D. E. Wil
lard, geologist at agricultural college of
Fargo, and lIon. N. G. l.arimore of Lari
tilore.
Montana Delegation.
Montana dele.gation in Great Northern
sleeper Flatheald-lIon. 1. T . . Everett and
wife of larlcm . W. II. Sands and wife of
Chinook. Matt I)evin, Ii. 11. Ewing. Wil
liam Rolberts. Herbert Strain, C. II. Camp
hIIll. Ira Myers, S. RI. Edwards, I. S.
W\\dbury and II. O. Chowen of Great
Falls, E. R. Clingan of Ielt, Cyrus W.
Itabb, United States geodetic survey; Mor
ris ITien. United States geodetic survey: H.
N. Savage and Joseph Barlow Lippincott
of WVashington.
A DELIGHTFUL SUMMER TRIP.
If you are going E:.at this summer why not
see Salt Lake City and )Denver and the elegant
scenery through Colorado along the lines of
tie Riu Grande system? You can't beat it for
excellent service and good accommodations.
fitnly one change of cars between Butte and
('licago and St. Iouis. Write for rates and a
cr.py of "With Nature in Colorado." G. W.
Fitzgerald, general agent, Butte, Montana.
Excursion Rates to Gregson Springs.
Every Saturday hereafter, until further
notice, the It., A. & P. Railway will make the
following round trip rates to (;rleon Springs:
.\naconda to regin anll return.......... Soc
Iittle to Gregum and return..............Soc
Tickets good on all trains from noon Satur
days until noon Mondays.
Butte, Mont.
Capital......... $1ooS ee,see
Under state supervision. Five per
cent Interest, pr.yable quarterly, paid
on deposits.
Money to Loan on
Real Estate
1. AUG. HEIN7E.......Presideni
A. 1. CI IArNTS............... Cubist
DALY
BANK AND TRUST
COMPANY
OF BUTTE
Established Mi88. Incorporated soao.
Capital.. .$100,000.0O
General
Bank.ing Business
JOHN D. RYAN.........President
OHN R. TOOLE......Vice-President
C. C. SWINBORNE..........Cashier
R. A. KUNKEL.... Assistant Cashier
W. A. Clark. J. Ross Clark.
W. A. CLARK & BROS
BANKERS
Transacts General Banking Business.
Buy gold dust, gold bars, silver bul
lion and local securities.
Boxes for rent in safe deposit vault.
Sell exchange available in all of the
principal cities of the Unitels Statei
and Europe.
Special attention given to colle.*
tions.
ALEX J. JOHNSTON,
Cashbie.
The First National Bank
Of Butt.
(etablished styg,)
Capital - * $200,000.00
ORNBRAL BANKING
Drafts drawn on all princlpal cities of
the world sad letters of credit stued
ANDREW 1. DAVIS.......President
JAMES A. TALBOTT... .VieePres.
3. B. WEIRICK.............Cashier
1. S. DUT'ON.....Assistant Cashier
STATE SAVINGS BANK
John A. Crelghton..........President
G. W. Stapleton........Vioe-President
T. M1. Hodgens.............Cashier
J. O. Hodgens.......Assistant Cashie*
R. B. Nuckols....... Assistant Caseblh
Under state supervision and Jurladie.
tion. Interest paid on deposits.
Sells exchange available In all the
principal cities of the United States
and Europe. Collections promptly at.
tended to. Transact a eneral bankilng
businesu.
Directors: 7. A. Creighton, Omaha;
C. W. Stasleton, A. H. Brrret, E. D.
Levitt. S. V. Kemper, T. M. HodgAns,
J. O. Hodgens.
Corner Main and Park Streets, Butte.
C. R. Leonard, Pres. T. R. Rinds, V. Pres,
Fayette Harrington, Cashier.
Silver Bow National Bank
CAPITAL S100.000.0
This bank solicits accounts, oflers
prompt end careful attention to business of
customers. Collections promptly attended
to and remitted for on day of collections.
Sell foreign an I domestic exchange, trans.
acts a general banking business, pay in.
terest on the deposits.
Directors -Charles R. Leonard, P. AL
Heinse. S. Marchesseau, A. Balmforthb .
A. Louis, C. W. Newton, T. R. Hinds, Johb
MacGinniss. Payette Harrington.
NORTH COAST LIMITED
Observation Cars
Electrio Lighted
Steam Heated
BUTTE SCIIBDULB
WESTBOUND.
Ta'ns, ARRIVL. DEPARL
Na r-Niors Coeas
S Limited...... rs p.m. Isp p.
5e. r-n ru lingeon
En a.. etse p.m. s-e p...
Express........ rs Isp m. ........
ASITBOUND.
Trsfa. iARRIVE DEPART.
a N o. Nrth Coass
ham pnd e at
Cre for r ecet
tion c passe.
N o. _-_-_oi e 2oo PAo p .p . tI*
tt apress .............Ta I Iea
Paul and Eastern point, to th r st
N o. . - N oB u C oant t ._ r sa, from clK
it anada .-Burlin ton Expres from elle .
sad uttle to Stings an sU Ad . & .L
pcSot.
No_.7 --Bittq._ nr Loostl eterts from Butt
for Mi soukl .amiltos auad 8W intermmediat
points.
No. 8 -Biltte Etoo Loes, erom Hamlltoe
and Ph.tpsburg.
No. 3-Los eonoeetls fro Twia City
Express from Pa. aul and all Z.st.'n poins.
Alder -ony l Norris bro leve BUt
pointu on ori. Trains on these branehe d
uno raDun .! h. - Rn, .
General Agent, corer Mal. din ý1r ., stre
IN GOINi EAST
Please do not overlook the
frequent and excellent service
via the
Chicago,
Milwaukee & St.Paul
Railway
Four daily trains St. Paul to
Chicago, including the Pioneer
Limited. Three Omaha to Chi
cago, route of the Overland Lim
Ited.
P.H. SCANLAN, C. A.
Helena, Mont.
W. B. DIXON,
N. W. P. A., St, Paul.
Six Million Dollars vpent br the
U.P. R. R.Co.
In improvlng what was orlginally the
fnest track in the Wst.
RBSULT
A comparatively straight and level
roadbed, ballasted with dustless Shes,
man granite, rendering possible the
highest rate of speed, together with the
nreatest degree of safety. The magal.
nde of the work must be seen to be
appreciated.
WHAT DOES IT MEAN?
Solid comfort, seeurity and pleasure to
our patrons.
ARE YOU GOING EAST?
If so you cannot afford to so via as
other than this ROYAL HIGHWAY.
Further information on applloation per.
sonally o: by letter to
H. 0. WILSON, 0.S. L,,
Butte Montanaa
These Cars are on the new
"Great Western Limited"
Every Night between Chloago,
St. Paul and Minneapo.e.
If you wish to travel In the most
comfortable way, nothing can
approach these rooms. The price
of a berth Is only $2.50, or 50c
more than a berth In a standard
Pullman Sleeper. All tollet neces.
slties--hot and cold water, electric
barth and ceiling lights and elec.
tric haircurler
heaters.
For further
Information
apply to J. P.
Elmer, Gen'
Passenger
Agent, Chl.
setsas t new, cago, llI.
The Best friend
The Northwest
Ever Had
"The Road That Made tih
Northwest Pamous."
LEAVE BUTTE. .
For St. Paul, East and West,
daily .ARRVE BUTk. 8:os. ..
From St. Paul, East and
West, dally ........ t t :4ss.
From St. Paul, Eaat and
Weat, dily .......... 4
FULL IN FORMATION FR. M
City Ticket Office, No. i4 North Mats
Street. Butte. W. R. MEECH
S C.P. and T. A.
I e
Pullman, Dining and
P Library Car Route to
SALT LAKE DENVER
KANSAS CITY OMAHA
CHICAGO ST. LOUIS
and All Bastern Points
Short Line To
Colorado, Arizona and Mexico
San Francisco, Los Angeles
(Ocean or RaIL).
PORTLAND'
and A1i Pacifi c oast Po0ats
ARRIVE. DEPART.
No. p....6:40 p. m.lNo. 8.*...44$P.ts.
No. 7....a145 a. m.rNo. so.... s:o . 1.
Ticket Office 105 N. Main Street
Butte, Montana.
H. 0. WILSON, GENERAL AGT.
Denver & Rio Grando
and the
Rio Grande Western
Travel During Pall
and Winter Seasons
The Journey to the East via Salt Lake
City and along the shores of the Gret
Salt Lake through beautiful Glenwood,
Colorado Springs and Denver is one of
uninterrupted delight in 'winter as well
as in summer. In fact, the fall and winter
seasons add but a now grandeur and charm
to the travel scenes and infuse an element
of variety and beauty to the unsurpassable
wonders along the Rio Grands Western
and Denver & Rio Grande lines. Through
sleeping and dining car service. Person.
ally-conducted weekly excursions. Eon
fates or information apply to
G. W. FITZGERALD,
General Agent
Ticket OMce0 -47 E. Broadway, Butts
Atchison,Topeka &
Santa Fe Ry. Co.
SANTA PE ROUTS
3 Trains Daily
From Denver to Kan,as City and Chl.
cago. Also the direct line to Galves.
ton, El Paso, City of Mexico and the
mining camps of New Mexico and Ari.
spns.
For particulars about REDUCED
RATES EAST this summer apply tq
C. F. WARREN,
Geoeral Agent 41s Dooly Block, Salt
Lto City, .t

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