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The Butte inter mountain. (Butte, Mont.) 1901-1912, September 28, 1903, Image 1

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THE BUTTE INTER MOUNTAIN
VOL XXIII. No. 184. BUTTE, MONTANA, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 1903. PRICE FIVE CENTS
JUDGE M'HAIIOK
GIVES EVIDENCE
HIS VERSION OF THE CONFERENCE
OVER MINNIE HEALY AT THE
HEINZE OFFICE I1 IN.
HE WAS HEINZE'S ATTORNEY
Judge Clancy Admits the Testimony Pro
visionally-Result Will Not Affect
McHatton's Fee.
Judge Mellatton was the heavy witness
,at the Minnie Healy trial today. He went
on the stand very soon after the morn
ing session of the court, and he gave a
detailed description of what occurred in
the office of the Montana Ore Purchasing
company on November at, 1898, at the
meeting there between Miles Finlen and
F. A. Heinze, A. P. Heinze, John MacGin
niss and the witness, at which Heinze al
leges Finlen transferred his interests in
the Minnie Healy mine to Heinze by oral
agreement.
Judge McHatton testified under the ob
jection of Finlen's attorneys, who held that
McHatton had been Finlen's attorney dur
ing the time of the occurrence of the mat
ters in dispute, and that all of Finlen's
statements to McHatton then were privi
leged communications between attorney and
client and should not be revealed.
Judge Clancy overruled the objection
to Judge McHatton's testimony provision
ally. He said that he .would admit the
testimony for the time, but would hear a
motion to strike it out afterwards.
He Was Heinze's Attorney.
Judge MlcHatton denied that he had
acted as Finlen's attorney. He declared
he was Heinze's attorney.
He admitted that Finlen asked him to
protect the latter's rights in drawing the
written form of the contract with Heinze,
but said he had told Finlen that he could
not and would not act as Finlen's attorney.
Judge MclHatton testified that Finlen
had once repudiated the contract to him
in the months following the conference
at MacGinniss' office.
Judge :McHatton was asked if he had
any interest in the outcome of the suit
between Finlen and Heinze on trial, and
he said he had no interest beyond a pro
fessional one. He averred that it would
not make a cent's difference to him
whether the suit was lost or won.
Judge McHatton also testifified that once
at Helena, in the spring of s899, Finlen
told him that Finlen was coming over
to Butte to take possession of the Minnie
Healy claim, and that Finlen said he
would put his life against the issue.
When the case opened in the morning
Judge *McHatton called E. L. Mahoney,
Hcinze's aforetime foreman at the Minnie
Healy mine, to the stand to answer a few
questions about the Minnie Healy time
checks.
"I desire to recall MIr. M~ahoney for
a question or two," said Judge McHlatton.
"Very well," said the court, and the
witness took the stand for the fourth
time.
Spoke to A. Heinze.
"Mr. Mahoney, you said you spoke to
iMr. Arthur Heinze about the time checks
and the time of the men at the Minnie
Healy. How did that come about?" Judge
MclHatton said.
"On the 15th or 16th of February, 1899,
at a in the afternoon, I was standing at
the blacksmith shop in the northeast cor
ner of the works at the Minnie Healy mine
when a gentleman came in the door. It
was snowing hard and the man asked who
was foreman.
"He happened to lie talking to me, and
I told him I was foreman, lie told me
he wanted the names of all the men
in the mine. I asked him who he was.
He said he represented the Hennessy
Mercantile company.
"I told him neither the Hennessy Mer
cantile company or anyone else could get
the names of the men. I told Mr. Heinze
about the matter, and he told me to send
the time checks to the Montana Ore Pur
chasing company's oflice," the witness re
plied.
First Such Order.
"Did you ever receive any instructions
before that to send the time checks to
the Montana Ore Purchasing company's of
fice?"
"No," the witness said.
There was no cross-examination.
The witness left the stand, and Judge
MclHatton was sworn as a witness and
took his place.
"Judge 'Mctlatton, where do you live?"
Iir. Leonard, the judge's associate counsel,
asked.
"Butte," returned Witness McIHatton.
"How long have you lived here?"
"Eighteen years,"
"What is your business."
"I am an attorney at law. I have prac
ticed my profession all the time since I
have been here, excepting about seven
years, during which I was a judge of this
court," Witness McHatton replied.
"Did you see Miles Finlen on or about
the Ist of November, 1898?"
Mr. Forbis, for the plaintiff, Finlen, in
terposed an objection, saying:
"We object to the testimony of this
witness. We object to his giving any
testimony, He was the attorney of Mr.
Finlen. Any statements made to him by
Finlen are privileged, and he is not per
mitted to reveal them, It is agreed, I
believe, that Judge McIlatton acted as
Finlen's attorney, and it was not de
termined whether Judga 'MeHatton was to
be Finlen's attorney temporarily or per
manently. All confidences between them
were privileged, and the witness should
not be allowed to testify to them."
Mr. Leonard took the ground that all
the testimony showed that McHatton was
attorney for Heinze and not Finlen,
"lIe may have acted for Finlen in the
Boston & Montana company suit, but not
otherwise. There was nothing in the testi
mony to show that McHatton was the at
torney for Finlen, You may cross-exam
ine the judge and determine the .matter
that way," said he.
Crost-Examlnatlon Immaterial.
Mr, Forbis replied: "So far as the
cross-questioning of Judge McHatton is
concerned, I do not think that is material.
"We find the testimony shows positively
that Judge McHatton was the attorpey f9r
FiPlen. His name is attaehed to toie eoar
plaint in the B. & M. suit*us Fittlrn's a.
torney. He was a friend of IItnae, of
(CaUtinaued on Page LTw.)
HUNDREDS FALL BY
TURKISH MUSKETS
SULTAN'S MEN SURROUND 200 FAM.
ILIES AND PUT THEM ALL TO
HORRIBLE DEATH.
REFUGEES NUMBER 50,000
Condition of People Driven Out by the
Janissaries Deplorable--Hundreds
of Houses Burned.
RY ASSOCIATED PRFES,
Monastir, Macedonia, Sept. a8, via Sofia,
Bulgaria, Sept. 28.-It is estimated that
5o,ooo villagers of the villayet of Monastir
are now refugees in the mountains, and
mostly all of them are in a terribly desti
tute condition.
They escaped front the It villages
which have been wholly or partially burned
by the Turks, which contained to,3o8
houses, of which 9,688 were burned.
At Malkattrnovo only too Bulgarian
families remain, out of .50oo.
A body of 2oo families fleeing toward
Bulgaria from the villages in the l.osen
grad district were surrounded by Turkish
troops in the mountains and all of them
are alleged to have been slaughtered.
COOPER TURNED OUT
Delphy in Chair Of Cas
cade Commissioners
-Make Answer.
SPErIAL TTO THE INTER OU'.tNTAIN.
Great Falls, Sept. 28.-There was a
turn-over in the board of county commis
sloners this morning. As a result Frank
B. Cooper is no longer chairman of the
board. W. D. Delphy, the democratic
member, holds the position. The whole
thing is the result of the Roalswick-'Tri
bune libel suit, which resulted Saturday
in a verdict for the Tribune.
Chairman Cooper during the progress of
that case gave testimony which was con
strued to mean that he was the only abso
lutely honest member of the board. There
Iupon Messrs. Roalswick and Delphy
fumed.
This morning these two gentlemen held
a meeting of the board of county commis
sioners. Mr. Cooper was not there. It
was moved and seconded and carried
unanimously that the office of chairman
of the board be declared vacant. Then in
similar manner Mr. Delphy was elected
chairman. Messrs. Roalswick and Delphy
feel better now.
Attorney George H. Stanton, who was
counsel for the Tribune in the trial of the
case, announced today that he would bring
impeachment proceedings at once against
Roalswick. When this was reported to
Roalswick this afternoon he expressed an
eagerness to have the impeachment pro
ceedings brought as speedily as possible
and prosecuted as vigorously as Mr. Stan
ton knew how to prosecute.
It is also announced today on behalf of
Roalswick that he will appeal from the
decision of the trial court in the libel case.
INJUNCTION IS ISSUED
,NAPTON GRANTS RESTRAAINING OR
DER AGAINST FRENCH GULCOH
DREDGING COMPANY.
SPECIAI. TO THE INTER MOUNTAIN.
Anaconda, Sept. 28.-Inr the district
court this morning Judge Napton issued
a temporary restraining order in the case
of Jacob Barnowsky against the French
Gulch Dredging companyq.
The case is one wherein the plaintiff is
an insane person, and through his brother
sues the mining company to recover $os,..
ooo alleged to be due for values taken
from the ground upon which the dredging
company is now working.
The plaintiff claims title to the ground
and asks for judgment in that amount. The
plaintiff now alleges that the dredging
company has, since the filing of the action,
taken out about $30,0oo00 in gold.
The plaintiff asks that a permanent in
junction issue, and Judge Napton has
cited the defendant company into court on
October 6 to show cause why the injunc
tion now temporarily restraining them
from further work on that ground should
not be made permanent.
This property is the one ion. WV. R.
Allen is in charge of and of which he is
the principal owner.
DETECTIVES HERE
Northern Pacifio Takes Every Precaution
to Baffle Blackmailing Dynamiters.
The Northern Pacific Railroad company
has a large force of trackwalkers and de
tectives patroling the road on both sides
of Butte in an endeavor to apprehend the
dynamiters who have been attempting to
blackmail the road. Every precaution Is
being taken to protect trains, and little
iear is expressed regarding a repetition
of former outrages.
VARNISH FACTORIES IN
WINDY CITY ABLAZE
Flames Turn Neighborhood Into a Fur
nace and Members of Fire De
partment Are Injured.
Chicago, Sept. :8.--The factories of the
Standard Varnish company at Twenty
sixth street and Armour avenue were dam
aged $350,ooo by fire today.
Members of two fire companies nar
rowly escaped death or injury by the fall
ing of the floors and several firemen were
painfully hurt.
The flames shot ft feet abolve the struc
tucre Olt then relea Ed by i9 different ex
plosiodp turned tlijsstreet into a sea of
tires
AFTER 50 YEARS
Deer Lodge Man Entertaine Friend He
Has Not Seen for Half a Century.
Deer Lodge, Sept. 28,--County Coma-la
sloner Henry IoffTman is entertaining Pit,
and Mrs, David ShatTer of Lewistow'..
Mr. Shaffer and Mr. Iloffman were boy+
together in Ohio and were fast friends.
They have managed to keep in omi
munication with one another since they
parted, but for exactly So years they dill
not meet.
After this half a century of separatioin
they first saw each other at the Dee.
Lodge depot yesterday when, in respotn.s
to Mr. Iloftman's invitation, Mr. Shaffer
and his wife camne here.
KIDNAPPING FEARE .
Guards About Residence
of Nebraska's Govdenor
-Alleged Plot.
Iv 4vsOCIATt:I) i1 54.
lincoln, Nb., Sept. 8.,- A guard (i
maintained around the governor's mansioti
as another attempt to steal one of Gover
nor Mickey's children is feared,
The four smaller children are not per
mitted to leave the house tunless they art
accompanied by an older member of th:
family.
The penitentiary is being searched fot
traces of the plot that is supposed to havw
been formed for the purpose of getting re
venge upon the governor.
The police have a description of thpgr
convict who made the attempt and' rn
searching for hint.
BUTCHERS TO STRIKE
PACKING PLANTS OF COUNTRY MAY
BE TIED UP-LOCAL BUTCHERG
7) CONSIDER TONIGHT.
aV ANSOIt'A'fI':m PN1SM.
Chicago, Sepl. .8.--- Every packing hou,re
plant in tle n.'ited States is threatene:d
with a tic up by a general strike of butch
ers and afniliated workmen for the tirst
time in history unless the owners yi~ld
to the dtnmads of the Amalgamated Mont
Cutters anld lutcher Workmen of America.
While the packers are willing to pay the
wages asked, a hitch in negotiiations has
arisen over the demand -t the packers
that the butchers increase their amount
of,work.
Every lodge of butchers in the coulitry
has been asked to vote on the demlai:ud
of the packers and meetings will be hc!"t
for the purlpose throughout the countr?"
today.
If the vote shall be unfavorable, it is
likely a general strike will he ord:red.
alTecting motre than 50,000 lllmen.
There will be a special meeting of the
Butte Iutchers' union held Wednesday
evening, when the matter will be brought
up for discussion.
If the nmeat cutters of the country vote
against the demand of tle packers, not
a pound of meat from the big establish
mlents will be cut.
The local butchers have not given the
matter murch thought as yet. The matter
was brougtiht to their notice through a
collmunicationl recently received from the
head of the Amalgamated ,Meat Cutters
and Butchers' union. The request was
that immediate action be taken. Accord
ingly a special meeting was called,
It is not thought that the lcalt cutters
of Butte will have any trouble over. t1e
matter. If the packers are firm ip: tlýir
dematlds it is likely that the questiot': rjll
be referred to an arbitrationl commitfee.
JOHN DOE ARRESTED FOR
BEATING UP JACKSON
He Is Said to Have Struck the Complain.
ant After Indulging Too Freely
in the Red Liquor.
,John 1)oe was arrested this morning on
a warrant sworn out by ld Jackson,
charging him with assault and battery
upon the person of Jacksont.
The men had imbibed rather too freely
of red liquor and a quarrel resulted in
which a fine yoang pair of black eyes an.t
a combination of hurt feelings were the
outcollie.
The fight occurred at the corner of Park
and W\yoming streets.
ROW OVER CRAP GAME
RESULTS IN STABBING
Missoula, Sept. a8.-I'om \Vhelan was
stabbed last night by John Williams in
a row over a crap game in the Hlawthorne
club, a resort for colored men. Biqtllh in
are negroes.
The weapon used was a pocket knife.
It entered a little to the right of the lower
end of the breast bone, the blade passing
between the ribs.
Whelan suffered considerable loss of
blood, but the wound is not regarded as
dangerous. Williams is under arrest.
ALL BIDS ARE REJECTED
Livingston, Sept. 28,--At the meetlpg
of the library board on Saturday nigbt
bids for the construction of the Carnegie
library were opened. There were but two
subhnitted.
Shackleton & VWhiteway of Butte bid
$10,7oo, while Wrage & Lundburg of
Bozemtan offered to do the work for
$Sa,ooo. As only $1o,ooo is available
both bids were rejected.
Another call for bids ,to be opened oa
October ig, will be issued.
CABLE CAR RUNS AMUCK
Chicago, Ill., Sept, aS.-Teti persons
were injured, two seriously, in an accifent
today on the Halsted street cable line.
A train ran away and for two blocks...
from Sixteenth street to Eighi~enth satre
--lnperiled.the lives of many:persons,,
It is said-the train was in enargetdr
new grlpman.
.Two .wagons were struck by. the train
before it came to a stop,
IS AFTER MILITARY
Cripple Creek Court Serves Habeas Cor
pus Writ on General Chase.
BY ASS.tIAiTED PRIeSS.
Cripple Creek, Colo., Sept. 28,--District
Judge Seeds today served writs of habeas
corpus in the cases of President C. G.
Kenuison, \V, F. Davis, Patrick Mullaney
sand Thomas Foster, union miners, who
are prisoners in the military guard house.
The orders direct that the men he pro
duced in court Irii.ay morning,
Attorney John Mi. Glover presented the
pti:t on for the prisoners.
t;eneral Chase is the only respondent
lamted in the writs.
HE SAW KID CURRY
Sheepherder Declares Ban
dit Rode by Him Near
Canadian Line,
Eit IAI. llTO TII INT e 1lI) NIAIN.,
;reat Fahlls, Sept. .8.- Kid t urry, riding
a pinto pony anid 1headling west, w5as -erll
uip near the Canadian line about a week
ago. At least John l'Tsler, who cares for
m tl tendrh certain large floh ks, ;l.srts t1hat
he saw him, ald Pelslkr adds that this is
n1 idle sheepherder's vision, eitlher.
For somle reason tile Iws of \hat
I'vesler saw dI i lii nt travel fast and hecee
it only reached here today through the
ndi mli of a ip t ullt tllry weekly iiews
paper. Pesli r's story is tlhat lie had just
Sit Co'olie "'way rounld 'ei" l aInd was sit
tiog dlowni tio restI when a stranlger on it
pilto Ibrone apprcached anid a.ktd for
somethinlg to eat. Iossler gavet hinl a
halllnoutt and is ihe did so i recolegnized Itie
straniger as Kid t urry. The mnan sat with
himi for hal 1111 hour or so, IthIen mountedlltt'l
th pinto alnd Iorped away to the west.
BISHOP DENIES IALE
RT. REV. SCANNELL EXPLAINS HIS
ATTITUDE REGARDING TYPO
GRAPHICAL UNIONS.
O)mahba, hi.. Septl. A. - The Rev.
Iishop Scantell of the thna)lia diocese: of
the (Catholic clihurch today Imade ia sttae
nmet in reply to that of I('resildentul I.ym'l
of the Typogrlaphical utliotn, who defended
its Catholic iletbhers who have taken the
obligations of that utitn, Bishop ;Scin
tell said:
"My attitude in this mlatter has bee
a tasurnder. t td, if not misrrepresented. The
Typographical union ihas not been con
demned in this dIocese, nor has its iltem
Iers Ibeen reftused the sacramenett. A re
porter caelll to nmy residence recently,
showed ,l e a t.lnewspapelr containing atl
oat hI said to have bhIet taken by the mellt
hera of the Typograplhical union and asked
my opiniopl regarding it. I told him in
sullsta;t re that the oa:th in its lnalturl and
obvioust seInse could not be lawfully taken
by any atholic. l'hat was my whole ac
tiou ill the 0muter. My opinion regarding
the wording of the obligation is ul:
changed"'
TILLMAN ON TRIAL
FACES JUSTICE AT LEXINGTON FOR
THE MURDER OF GONZALES
EMPANELLING JURY.
if y A ;-I.(si I iA uI I ll it ic-,
Lexi. gol., S. (., Sept. arc, J. II. Till
mllln, former liettelnadnt governor of South
t uiruliua, was arraigned in the circuit court
of L.exilgton cl nltly to answer all indlic
neent charging himt with the murder of N.
G. G;onzales, editor of the Columbllia State.
The trial is Ibeing coitluctcd on behalf
of the ,tate by Solicitor Thurmold, assist
ed by five ;ttoriceys, while it lawyers,
with J tilgc Croft as chief cotnisel, alppar
for the ldefense. Judge l:ran;k I. (arry is
presiding.
The empatllllitlg of a jtry was begun
immediately after the arraiginment.
MRS.DAVIS BETTER
Report of Condition of Widow of Presi
dent of the Southern Confederacy.
JiY AS.O'tIAt' I D Plt eSts.
.tufTalo, .A. Y., Sept, 28.--Mrs. Jel'tfrson
Davis passed a comfortable night and her
condition today is much improved.
J. A. Payes, her son-in-law, and his son
have arrived at Castle Inn.
tHer relatives and friends are now hope
ful of her recovery.
COMMANDER HUGHES OF
THE NAVY IS NO MORE
ItY ASSOCIATED PlIESS.
Washlington, Sept. 28.--Rear Admiral
P. II. Cooper, commanding the northern
qtuadron of the Asiatic fleet, has advised
the navy department by cable of the death
yesterday at the Yokohama hospital of
Collutandcr EI. M. Ilughes.
lie was assigned to duty last November
on the Asiatic station in command of the
gunbloat Annapolis.
lie entered the service in t866 and for
conispicuous service was awarded an ad
ditional nutimber in grade.
CANAL MATTER HANGS FIRE
Washington, Sept, 28.-The following
bulletin today was posted at the state de
partment :
"The, department of state received to
day at I:12 p, m. a cable message from
Minister I3caupre, dated September 27, 8
pm. . lHe reported that there had been
no chahge in the situation in respect to
the canal matter. A second debate on the
bill repoited by the committee is expected
within a few days, and It is thought it may
b.e: defeated,. The- present outlook is for
-soime a:uttedments of the reported bill."
GUARiS ALONG lIHE
LINE OF RAILWAY
9., A. & P. FEARS STRIKING 6WITCH
IMEN MAY MAKE EFFORT TO
TIE UP THE ROAD.
NO DEPUTIES ARE DETAILED
Under Sheriff McGarvey Said to Be Un
willing to Aid Company in Pro
tecting Property.
"Ve rce workhiintg a full crr.' if s~tih'tl
Iitmei ocn lhe hill. Ino ovrt ;cl h;a Icile 1t
tetiuptetd by the meII wih1o have ijiti, ,r
t1heir ftienlt, today tll1 tu ' itr lieinu,
um1intailinld ttld we ext ictn oi Iroubtle,"
vaitl i;tieral nMaatRicr .I. .. I)Ical of Ithe
Hut te, Aa.ci lila & Ilacitic ri ilh:v this
illorttiltg.
~1i1t. I lan o1i1e frieii l A. lco.inda thllis
trliergll 11 hlook over the vnnationltli t!tu
to direct thIe arrattgttilciiti thlat irelit bci11
carriet nllg it o lttr'vrl ti l la dely ill Ilhe
hillttill ll rrlin.e from th il ety to I.. nti]a.
l|e ltit, lir1t herte very t:iy ,iter I le
ltittulbl' bI'epaiU. I hu S,.tarily, i Itheit 1th
tiouble wa.v at iii ltiiht tnld the h illoil
Itrattc, Nhr. Iea hai tiiiell lilt thirge if
a lieu liiiive attl iviited iin litiiltp It tit
Heavy Guard.
A hea.vy yguald is hring .=;inninheid hy
the It., A. & P. alnU iti ihI ht f itiv y ot
the hilit litri a 111I Iraln thcure to t oI ,cker.
Thi.s i5 lhone h n(·lellll' ll lthl'.;elli lhnl tha ltw re
11nm de by tlhe ine w hlo w allke: d untl iiiIl their
fric 'ln 1to tic Up Ir tlic. It w ouh ,i he . c
,laratively I.oy trit l y trll it by lllllitii
anll cnttilt, dlerstityitg II tec. , I'rack ,I
talnmlperin wih lhe, equlpmu,1I .
Atitttt iii tt tlel lc u em lo..d iill the 1i.i
11tI thlh ' i i b iiln uailllulilltii ttrd. l
Illiarset i t he lIhr.i1i 1 ty l it e ' tr11" t it oll
ifor tht uvat. i thint th et lhe shrI lifsi i ofii
luittj il pr'vvt titit i th dlIrii lion ol
prIlill rti . Il hri r it Ity ahfll i, t .ti ti t ty e
tril1r.l atl mjil;, 1tiht " .theitack flitti tt
,e l tlizf yi tt ch It e tl t it ,t in thiflci ral i.
issu ,l, but tl e~.r (' In Sher. ,rial l t , h alrvey
tleplhoned', lhaiL he" hadl reIvoked' the',. conll
m1issions. Tw'vo chelutiis vwvr,. ,.nt to lhe
hill as llulrds, but1 Ibhey, aiflrr ..layingl thele
l'ol ;I tim.,, qllil and, wenll hilc-k wilhu111
McGarvey Unwilling.
TIhe I1t, A. & '. ilticeers say thlut l)rputy
Sheriif I'etltiLr teisied w. illinq: it aissist
its ulphllitsK the law antld srevetslilt. s sv1.t
n tsl., but that the under sherit shlowedl
niot the stlighttt tlispaositiou to do aty
thitn.,
"lonwevsr." say these olicers, "we alre
qlite llde liio ploltect our piropl'rty alld hlve
takeii steps to tIo so without relying oii
the slherifls uoflirc. (Oll, for siur eliorts
itt thlat dirictioii ]heer cottaihly woilsi
Ilave Ibe5l b lte l ilt tet , tolt tveilt otr
runitngll; tile Ira its.
''The wuhole dillictlty is blI twee tthe
striliinst metn indiuidlally anii the .ult
pisily. ThI'e ssw ilti'htl 's iltion h15i1 not atni
lhorizCed tl walkout and thle muit who
hllv,+ tikitt tIe jtlaiei iif the i tes ( whli
hatve iquiit are :il iillll lbt i r . 01o the tituli tll.
Ilire is tlht ixluliittiss of the trrolle os
oi,' Iy the uitie.rs oI+f shie uiltiiely:
Troublo Over McKeogh,
I'p ,to tth, little of th shultdowu in July
st ImiII iTisiiu di J, k. IcK (,T, I was nill
tlloywed as shwithI firetimai on the hill.
With-.l he wis laid oilie Is as tuhd that his
laysltf wuis husriiaostcsit. Nervertelhss., hle
presesnid i imtself tsvvral datyit i1'o and
dellllllmjild woirk.
lhe had a t.dk with Mr. lDiati, in widh
he a . lrlted tlllltll it' h :ld tlei ill-utise' ,. 'r.
flus did iIt ignres suitih him, but itffered
to Isivi' MclKitsgh work for ;i inttlh i,,
sitotlier cvpatsity, at lite aid of which silt,
if ,MNliectsh lslshavld him-lf, li wi*' ts
he reiist-sted. il lceltssh, it i's said, thedt
biseelle ver'y tha usive.
I ttt diii alitey al tr this i t hlais his as
llllp to or;ali/e walk tult t d ' ilehegl titn
of Iis friettls wait.ld spoi lite , sltlssluy
aild dieowiilei tsit mat'. rt'inttlssltet-ssttt
slslll reluselu ts ts',ilu r the ci:,Oilispritis
r'ffir sy .,lir. lvanus. J'hsit dlsaisl wusa
deili cd.
Twenty Quit.
Then it w5r0 tl la:t FtIii, tiliss :20 of tht:
IltIu I, isic luditg ss ltttllihs:t of sxllsa ils -i t
regularly etmphttyd, tsit. liolluwis g cthis
'lsthl lh t'r t o "i t t l it 'is Ilit' cts ijtI ty" atll
"tie lp lhe riad."
The sits-ti wlho have sluit liiake lip ii very
small liortins of sho.s' eshlioyeid. WVhlii
the cohlalUy is runitng full force it Ihsis
alout 55o Illsit working its these capaci+'i;s
on its payroll.
'hust I Ise sitsin s wiso have gollss out arte
ot'ly 4 per en:st of ste total isultitiert vi+
Iloyed.
ARMENIANS RIOTOUS
Cossacks Obliged to Fire
on Crowd at Shusha
Over a Church.
tsY 'S iO'l TAJ5!l P I't. Ss.
Tiflis, Russia 'J'ra;llls-Caiucasii, Sepllt.
28.--The traisfecr of the Arsmenian cihurch
at Shusha to the Russiais ilthorities, ac
cording to the imperial ldecree issued June
25, ihas been atteinded bIy i confliCL be
tweelt Armesnians altld Cussacks.
Excited Armscstias maisde a dlemonstra
tion in front of thie rcsidesic e of the
governor and stoned a detarosenit of
Cossacks who attesmpted to dijpes- themi,.
Small crowds on the balcontis andtl roofs
of houses in the neighlborhood wcre given
a volley from the Cossacks.
According to the official accounts two
Cossacks and one rioter were killed, but
the Armenians in the darkness carried off
a number of wounded pIersoais.
Sissilar rioting on the piart of the Ar
menians occurred recently near Ehlizabethl
Poland at Kars.
WEATHER-l'artrl cloudy with possiblle
shiwer 'TursT .tiy \\Te ,.lyrt. e Utt.0i uolcr to.
niiht and tomorriow.
S IALT SIE. MARIE
IN HANDS OF MOB
ARMED MEN SURGE THROUGH THI
'STREETS SMASHING WINDOWS
AND ROBBING STORES,
MILITIA MAY BE SENT OUT
Local Authorities Utterly Unable to Cope
With Strikers, Who Demand Pay
-All Well Armed,
Detroit, Mich., Sept. 28.--A dispatch
just received from Sault Ste. Marie by
thoe News says tie rioters are attacking
the militia at the works. The soldierI
who are being bombarded with stones
and all sorts of missiles had refrained
from firing up to the t:me the dispal, Qf
was filed.
.;iull Ste . Ma.a. Sei1t. .'i.--A Imilh ol
thlt dii hlrera.l iphliy.s IIf the CoL,.'ll
dillitdl I. tlk S liirlc ii i ciillpi;t lhy whnlll hIriig
rull 'rtri IoTl the lri'(lleirss £l dnrtull tlheir
llia L'tisd tl %:4gth. toda~y ;.tI hto=kt :m1\i1y
fri lii ill the i' r ai t a lll ll - i tl , ui iif
yr',ial pl. ierq c-onhl actsl anal smlzedwd.+
f.i uy w. ulow ill t hu timii.l iiu nl alilu
hi bi l ii .lt t mi flllll) , ill lhl ('i iladr i,till
SonI, , t.1lia.rU ld tIllII i tle stre'et t'llrn 1IIII
hIi t*iiiiid hil that t li t i tctliurs ; Iat iiutiiiIr
itiuiil jiuiii tfiu i it id wirv i ily lru+teiitii
IIItil ild inil litlllh.r l- iihlse bly a lefvir
iise i t uille 1I tIle rlilplll; ty). 's ouliciall,
isiji lntil'ui iu l th ihti 'a ifrnt ti ttiiihrt at
;II'.l, +fi l. '~(lll(~ 11.11 ~ 1 ). 1(
liii tld. luuu it a l avl iuuiul liy'',. Il iu itd' I~h
tll.Ul1 11IIP (ICl I))· 1 Hll'r;)(~· r (11(llli''+.+l t llhllm.,
I st tlh. dl,,,r w+;, de~fended. by th,,sl \\h,)
hli ii it a ith Ny.' r 1, llilnI, IiuiiLe of whiih,
hoiw< lil' li to k t ct',il .
'i hlii liailuvwai i. hir ilf WV. 11. l'lulllllllr
t t. t i, 1',, r k I u r, ie i Iti bt nih (lt hl ;iaul
i if giui ui il i, iulh' i il ,t-k waiii
h l, l i, l.l h it ', all Ih u;liillii l ui
thallt washill hei s ii'nl.
1 ii viiiih rl , h v iilhd uu i I I hi ir lla
,,liui ln i f ll lilillhi liu d IIl at. ll . i. llld l
Ihe' ritBtlll ;ital lllr, mii hlitii, lh r Ilo ;ll
iiillil hi uliliii),t ii rash. l t ohlir chlll ifr
Iliii .cllcitt' ii l t ill, f;liiiay. i . ll 1il ll
'rowlie of .lli l e.L, l, thl e I trceti o nlh
t.h , ( •orlinu Slll it s io iiiirir t rly terrorizel .
liol n iy ofll¢.inl to esh t'll heir chiecks fier
llll cet, ll n. l l ith ,l llar.
I rolwds of h , idlle Ieill tihe streets anll
the (iiiinadian n .is, Ic mplenlltely. terrortiz, d.
A mn eil tg ll the l ollilllyel., of the co-ll
patty was hettl Ildiny and its proceedlingsi
werre said to e of th1 e most heated cliar
aeter. 'I he particular grievance which
ctslll to have inflamedllll the Ilen to acrts
iof disorder w ,i~ the promises of pay to
daly whllie tlihe uli who lade tile h romllns,
the enipllllrs heliev.e, knew they could nut
be fulfillied. Alter thie meeting the arnt
went in a bady to thel offices of the com
paiy, delriui nliid to get their mlil.ey or
get ",slifaction.ll" Ias tllhey put it. lhl tlhe
doori oif lthe hn es which were guarded
by lthe plice theI followinlt g notice was
"Rtlircer anid playiiily of the ('onasolidaJted
lkt.e Superior comp-ny;
"'I he president and directors in New
'iulk have hliei iliatle to raise ilte money
Io pay hitay the wages .1ll4l salaries now
ldue the IIIon IIand .llicters of lthe rolupan;y.
Advice, receivedl from New York thisi
nilornig indiate that outr presiidenlt alind
directrs haIlve a pla tolll raise thle nl ey
lneiice'ss'y to not oily ipay the iit but to
starit up lilte v,orkis Rit neiisll tIo romiseC
,'ice s. I h l pinel hasi the endorsement
lanid promised ppoil rt f Sit Wilfrid
Iatrier, relll l ieilr oif Canada, anllld the lion.
It W. ti sll, prie:ir of I itrlli'io, and it is
explcled to Irllo lurIe the 'eitessary moneyli
inide iof 3f day .. While we regret very
toluch lth iniability of thle company to pay
todayl, lthl fact remaiins that there is no
monlley Ito p;y iilith. 'heret .uel.s to be
only nei thiing left for haitin to doi and that
is to accept offersu to work elsewihere, leave
thlir checks with fricils, responsibile ait
tirneys il" business i le', to collect for theme
when the coiiialny pays. Iiear in mind
that youi r wages will hlave to lie paid ultli
iately aniid 'onll<illtue a jl st obligation
againstI the eomillpany which all the property
iiid other iassets will lie liable for."
iThis noiite, instead of allayitng thie ex
ciltement of the crowd, estimiated to tUnl
ber 1,5., ad them furious, and despite
the h1orls of tile police, slies and other
missiles .,;ioi l fill ed I liet: air, directed at
tile iidluws of the ofiilet buildings, inside
of which could l' e ehi the I ulliciall of the
company.
Some one theni tiurned in an allarmlt of
fire, andl when the firemeni responded isev
eral streams of walter were turnetd on the
crowd anitd they were driven front the
building.
The attacik on thite stret cars followed,
and in ordler to avoid a clasih all the
ars ont the Canadian side were ordered to
tile balln.
Anlother nilectintg i lof the men has been
called for this afterinoon, biut the authori
ties have given orders that tno fiurther
mietinigs are to be held, and tile upoilitj
11d mlilitia will atttemlpt to prevent any
public culet igs,
In the confliet betwtieit the mob and the
police pllro nien Ilit1letwio , anld Stinsonl
were seriously injured. Two other police.
lmiin weret injuired lmore or less seriously.,
Carratlh Receiver.
IiV ASOI'iA'TED:II I'e.Sa.
New Ilaveni, Conn,, Sept. 28,--John (G.
Carrnthi of Philadelphia, president of the
international T'itle & Trust company, was
today appointed receiver for the Consoli
dated Lake Superior companlly bly Judge
Plate in the United States district court.
lis bond was placed at $o10,000. Judge
L.ynde Harrison of this city, counsel for
thle company, said the conpainy consented
to ithe appointlcrlit of the receiver,;
AT TWIN BRIDGES FAIR
-P' lil, I 1i "iii 1ii 1 1 tIN aIO NO NTxAIN.
Twin Bridges, Sept, 28.---Fuilly 5,000
visitors attentded th" fair hero yecsterdlay.
They camtue from Dillont, B3utte, Virgitula.
City aitnd mtl y other ptices, and mtade up
the largest growd ever asse.imblaled here,

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