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The Butte inter mountain. (Butte, Mont.) 1901-1912, October 01, 1903, Image 10

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AS F, OF L. ADDRESS
TO THE WORKERS
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE EXPREASE8
JTSELF UPON THE "OPEN SHOP"
VERY STRONGLY.
SCHEME IS IMPRACTICABLE
,Impossible That Union and Non-Union
'Men Should Work Together in
Complete Harmony.
DY ASSOCIATED Parse,
Washington, Oct. I.-The executive
council of the American Federation of
Labor last night issued an address to "Or
ganized Labor of America."
The address says: "The executive
council of the American Federation of
Labor has recently addressed organized
labor by a circular on subjects including
bills which will be introduced in the forth
coming session of congress in the interest
of the wage-carners of our country and
which were committed to us by you
through your representatives at the last
Aomerican Federation of labor convention.
Since then the executive council has held
several sessions and of all legislative meas
ures the eight hour and anti-injunction
,bills have received our special attention.
"Because of the wonderful improvement
in the methods of wealth production, by
which the needs of man and the luxuries
of life can be created in a work day of
eight-hours, we demand enforcement of the
eight-hour day, not only in private employ
nient, but also on work performed by or
on behalf of the government, whether cm
ployment be directed by contract or by
sub-contract.
"While we seek to avoid and avert
strikes and industrial disputes, any at
tempt to cripple the right of labor as a
last resort to strike in defense of our
rights, simply means labor's enslavement;
for industrial tranquility by agreement
through the method of conciliation and
fair arbitration is only possible and attain
able when the workers are organized, and
have the liberty to exercise their conutitu
tional rights. The writ of injunction ino
Its proper sphere is a right and protection. t
it was never designed for the purpose to a
which it is now put in industrial disputes. c
"There is not now upon the statute v
hooks of any state or upon the statute
books of the federal government, a line a
upon which authority is given the courts c
for the issuance of injunctions such as have t
been issued in industrial dislputes. a
"It is not the use; but the abuse by the
courts of the writ of injunction against 1
which we protest. which is in direct con- ,
flict with the rights guarantteed to our peo- t
pie by the constitution of our country.
"An organized body of workmen can
only enter into an agreement with ent
ployers and faithfully abide by and carry
into execution tile terms of such arraLnge
lment when all the working metn of all eml
ployer, at least in any given plant, are all
tlembers of the union.
"The so-called 'opcen shop' makes agree
ment with the employers impracticalle if
not imlpos.ible, for the unlionl cannot he re
sponsible for the inon-unionists whose con
duct often renders the terms of tile agree
ntent inetffective and nugatory.
"The agreement or joint bargain of or
ganized labor with employers depends for
his success not only upon the good will of
the union and the emp,loyer toward each
other, but that neither shall be subject to
the irresponsibility or lack of intelligence
of the non-unionist or his failure to act in
concert with, and bear the equal respon
sibility of, the unionists.
"The right of the nlo.unionist to work
when, where and for what he pleases car
ries with it the logical right of the union
ists to work or refuse to work when, where t
and for what he pleases, and with whom he
ihleases.
"To a non-unionist, despite that which
hii; advocates say for him, catnnot he at
tributed the virtue of helpilng his fellow
workmen or contributing toward the estab
lishmient of imore rightful relations be
tween working imen and their employers.
No force but that of persuasion and moral
and ittelligent influhtetce should be exer
cised to convert the non-unionist to ImeIn
hership in our organizationls; but it is
hurtful from every viewpoint and to every
enlightened interest, to advocate the 'open
slhop.'
"As the immortal Lincoln said: 'This
coumntry cannot long relmain half free and
half slave,' so say we that ally establish
mnent cannot long remlain or be successfully
operated part union andl part nlon-union.
"In connection with the meeting of the
executive council and by appointment, a
conference was held with the President of
the United States for the purpose of dis
cussing labor legislation. The eight-hour
bill was considered at length, the president
stating that his mind had not changed on
that form of legislation since he had fa
vored it as Governor of New York state
and, therefore, he was favorable to the
passage of the proposed act.
"On the anti-injunction bill, in re
sponse to questions submitted the president
replied that the subject would have his
most careful and earnest attention.
"Other important questions affecting
legislation were taken up and on behalf
of the International Bookbinders' union,
the Miller case was discussed. The execu
tive council brought to the president's at
tention the manner in which his decision
had been quoted and in addition to the re
lationship of Mr. Miller to the Book
binders' union as brought forth in the
charges against him, the 'open shop' idea
was carefully considered. Replying to
statemtents on the subject, President Roose
velt set forth that in his decision he had
nothing in his mind but a strict com
pliance with the federal statute including
the civil law and that he recognized a dif
ference between employment by the gov
ernment circumscribed by these laws and
any other form of employment and that
his decision in the Miller case should not
be understood to have any other effect or
influence than affecting direct employment
by the government, in accordance there
with. He furthermore made plain that in
any form of enmployment excepting that so
circumscribed, he believed the full em
ployment of union men was preferable,
either to non-union or 'open shop.'
"In view of the publicity given this sub
ject the executive council of the American
Federation of Labor takes this opportunity
to say that trades movement stands for
strictly union shops, experience having
proved that, where the 'open shop' system
as been tried, reduction in wages and
profits have ensued with general disaster
to the industry practicing that system and
therefore declares that the best interests
of the labor movement calls for the em
ployment of union workers and discourages
in every way, shape and form, the de'
teriorating effects which follow the recog
altlon of the open shops.' "
FIVE KILLED AND
MANY MANGLED
EXPRESS CRASHES INTO A STREET
CAR-WET RAILS FOOLED
THE MOTORMAN.
EVERY MAN IN CAR IS HURT
Motorman Saw Danger in Time, but the
Wheels Slid Over Slippery Track
in Front of the Express.
DY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
Chicago, Oct. t.--Five persons were
killed and a score of others injured in a
collision between the Wisconsin Central
limited passenger train, which leaves here
at 6 o'clock and a Forty-third avenue
street car, at Fifty-second avenue last
night.
The street car was crowded with passen
gers returning from the Ilarlenm race track
and every man in the car was injured.
The motorman had received the signal
to cross and had just reached the center
of the track when the passenger train
crashed into his car.
None of the passengers had time to
escape.
The dead--F. RO(E''TS.
W. GRIIFFIT'I, Kansas ('ity, helper at
Hawthorne track.
JO)SEI'lI IIU'UTI.IR. colored.
J. WILLVIAMS, jockey. who rode sec
,nd horse in last race at Ilarlem.
JAMES GAI.I.AG;IIER, Ilmhnira, N. Y.
Injured-Frank Gray, I.exington, Ky.,
badly cut and bruised.
I.ouis Struby, leg broken and badly in.
jured.
J. M. Corrigan, arms and legs cut.
J. Markely, badly cut and bruised.
Charles Ross, severe scalp wound.
John Kilroy, motorman, Ilo ised aInd cut.
Dennis Enright, conductor of demol
ished car, ankle broken.
John I.uley, ladly bruised.
All of the injured, with the exception of
Kilroy and Enright are employed at the
local race track.
The blame for the accident is laid by
Motorman Kilroy upon the wet rails of tie
track. He saw the danger in tilme to
avoid it, and applicd the brakes: but the
car slid along the track with locked
wheels.
The passenger train which was running
at a high rate of speed, struck the street
car near the center. cutting it sittare.ly ii
two. It was reduced to splinters anal in
an instant the force of the collision was
such that several of the injured were
hurled high in the air adl two met thetir
deaths by striking ttri ground after heing
thrown uponi the wreck.
While opening a box, J. C. .Mountt of
Three Mile Iay, N. Y., ran a ten penny
nail thrluglh the fleshy part of his hand.
"I thought at once of all the pain odl
soreness this would cause i'e," he says.
"and inummeldiately applied (Chamberlain's
Pain Italn and occasionally aftcrwsards.
To my surprise it removed all paiin and
sorencss and the injured parts were soon
healed." For sale by Paxson & Rocke
feller, Newlro I)rug to., Christie & Leys
anud Newton Bros.
FAMILY REUNION TURNED
INTO A FAMILY FUNERAL1
Train Plows Into Group at Depot and
Five Are Dead and Several Others
Seriously Injured.
SY ASS,,,ATtI RttEst.
Philadelphia. Oct. I.-A merry party
composed of about a dozen persons was
run down by a passenger train last night
at Sharon lill, seven miles south of this
city, on the Philadelphia, Italtimorc &
\Vashington railroad, killing live and in
juring three others.
The deaId-l)AVID) FARRO)N, SR.,
aged 60.
I)AVI1) FARROtN, JR., aged t2.
JANE W. BtW\VN.
JAMES Tt)VWN, aged 25.
JANE (CARK.
The injured-Thotmas Brown, aged g8;
seriouls.
Martha J. Farron, aged Ir.
Miss Clara Osgood, aged 40o.
The accident occurred in front of the
Sharon Hill station. The party was
waiting for a train. There had been a
family reunion at the Farron home, and
several members of the family accone
panicd the guests to the station.
The l.amokin accommodation usually
passes the station on the fourth track.
This was known to some of the party and
when the train was heard coming in the
distance, nearly every one passed over to
the third or fourth track.
Defore any one could give a warning
the accomnuodation train came rapidly
down the third track and plowed into the
group.
WOMAN'S AUXILIARY ELECTS
New Haven, Conn., Oct. 1.-The
Woman's Auxiliary of the Spanish War
Veterans elected the following officers last
night:
President General-Mrs. Isabelle Alex
ander.
Recording Secretary-General - Mrs.
Clara Bailey.
Treasurer General - Miss Margaret
Bright. All are of Cleveland.
Mrs. Isabelle Worrell Ball was asked, in
a resolution, to resign from the order.
She refused and was expelled.
Last night she intimated that she will
take legal steps to compel the officers of
the order to reinstate her to membership
again.
PRINCE HENRY AND CHICAGO
German Solon of Royalty Congratulates
City on 100th Birthday.
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS,
Chicago, Oct. i.-Prince Henry of
Prussia, who was Chicago's guest last sum
mer, has telegraphed his congratulations
to Chicago on her tooth birthday in the
following words to Mayor Harrison:
"Mr. Harrison, Mayor of Chicago
Received with heartfelt thanks invitation.
Best wishes for the celebration, Success
and prosperity for the future of the beau
tiful city of Chicago.
(Signed.)
"HENRY, Prince of Prussia."
The message was in English,
SPECIAL RATES TO FAIR AT HELENA
From October 4 to g, Incisive, the Northern
Pacific will sell special excursion tickets from
all points in Montana to Helena and return
at one and one-third fare. Children over five
and under twelve, half rate. Tickets good re
turning up to October Is. W. H. Merrimsa,
general agent.
DIYORCE EVIL AND
HOWARD'S REMEDY
CHICAGO PROFE8 OR WOULD EXEIR
CASE GOVERNMIENT SUPERVIB
ION OVER MARRIAGE.
LAW CANNOT DO IT A.
Besides 6trict Statutes, Howard Would
Inaugurate a Campaign of 7
Education.
v A^SSOCIArTED IRPSS.
Chicago, Oct. I.--Governmental jutis
diction of marriage is the solution of the
divorce evil advocated by D)r. George E.
Howard, professional lecturer in history
at the University of Chicago and formerly
head of the department of history at Le
land Stanford university.
Professor Iloward publicly annoucrcea
his theories in a work of three voluntel,
entitled "A History of Matrimonial I rti;
tutions," which will soon he publiscred
from the university of Chicago press. Thh
first step in the solution of the divorce
problem is described by Dr. Iloward as
follows: "Every county in the United
States should Ie divided into districts for
each of whichr a registrar should be ap
pointed. It should be the duty of the
registrar to license, solemtnizce anld register
ill marriages cuntlacted undlr civil pro
cedure in his district alnd to license, regis
te:r and attrnd all marriages solemnised
tby religions celcbrthti n.
"'lh'i !awma:ker cannotl reach the root
of the divorce evil, We tihnd the causae
for divorces plarted deeply in the social
system, part iin false sentiment regarding
marriage anid fanmily. aol this can only be
removed through mort rational education
and somlll sort of governmenllll'clt supervisloin.
"We can by t·lrful irtll unliforml statutes
render cr,lditionls favorable for refornm.
"'There is in this country a sad lack of
appreciation of the furnctions of marriage,
Not :s riIach care is exercised in the
unionr l of human tinglgs as in the breeding
of fine animals."
I'ianro ttning $..5ii, at Orton Bros., sag
North Main street. 7 /
PLACED ON RAILWAY
ROBBERS THOUGHT TRAIN WOULD.
KILL VICTIM-HE LIVES TO
GIVE OUT A CLEW.
ItY AS -)'IAI ll: I'Rl'S5.
Ins Angeles, ('al.. let. I.--A special
from N.;oe,, Ariz., says J. W\. Dooley, a
r;llalh owuer, .a;ts ku-ockl on the hiad
an1 robbed by highwaymen l:tst night.,td ndI
those who ennnctitted the decd carried his
holy to tihe railroad tracks nearby, where
they left him in all unconscin s condition;
exlectilng him to be killed anti his remains
so, nutilatel as to conceal their crime.
I)ooley was struck by the first train
which passed anlld dragge loo feet. hut
miraculously escaped itnstalt death. .II I
was picked ill) by the traint tew and car
ried into flishec, where he was placed, in
the hospital.
(Ine arm and a leg had to( be amputated I
and he is injured internally. At last ,nc
counts he was reported to he dlying, but 1
had recovered conslcilousnless bh.g enough
to tell hiis story and give the poliec a clew.
SPIES TAKING NOTES OF
BATTLESHIP IN BUILDING
Ordered From New York Navy Yard
After They Had Obtained Facts
Concerning Warship.
IVy .A55s, IAT'h l) PIRESS..
New Vcmrk. ( et. I..-It is reported flo.ui.
the New York navy yard that two strangei.s
who obtaine-l admission under the regular
visiting cards have been surprised while
taking notes on the ntew battlcship Cult
n'rticut now heill;g built.
()lhe 11llll was ustig a glass and dictating
notes to his colllpanion.
The matter wasi reported by a foreman
anul the visitors were requtested to leave
the yard inlmediately.
EDWARD L. DWYER BANKRUPT
Discharged for the Second Time Withid
Four Years.
It' A.SSOCIATED PRESS.
New York, Oct. I.-Edward L. D)w) r
a promoter and once the husband of the
Duchess Castaluccia, has been discharged
from bankruptcy for the second time in
four years. His liabilities amounted to
$374,835, while his assets were limited to'
his clothes. When he went through bank
ruptcy in 1899 his liabilities were $252,
085, with no visible assets.
His fortunes were, lie said. at so low an
ebb that in z9oo he enlisted in the United
States mlarine corps.
Engaged to Wed.
BY ASSOCIATED PtlRs,
New York, Oct. I.-The engagement is
announced of Miss Euna Wallace Ruther
ford, the youngest daughter of the late
Alexander H. H. Rutherford of San Fran.
cisco and Mrs. George Crocker of New
York, to Phillip Kearney, son of Senator
G, Watts Kearney of Washington, D. C.
To Save German Recruits.
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS,
Berlin, Oct. I.-A fresh decree of Epat
peror William is in preparation forbiddenI
the ill treatment of recruits. Public fqcl'
ing on the subject is rising on account,
of the numerous instances of abuses whiph
have been reported during the last fortifi
cation,
Old Officers Re-Elected.
Portland, Ore., Oct. 1.-At the annual
meeting of the board of directors of the
Oregon Railway & Navigation company,
all of the officers were re-elected.
CHEAP RATES TO DENVER,
On account of the annual convention of the,
Brotherhood of St. Andrews the Northern
Pacific have arranged a special rate of one fb#t
plus $2,oo from all points in Montana west of
Billings to Denver, Colo. Tickets on tle
October 5, 6 and 7; good returning up "to
October 31. This makes a rate of $3a.oo fron
Butte and Anaconda. W. H. Merriman, gen.
eral agent,
ROUND TRIP $2.95.
Excursion to Helena during Montana State
Fair via Great Northern railway. Tickets,
good going October 4 to so, inclusive. Good
returning until October ia. At city ticket
office, 41 North Main street. W. R Meebl,
C, P. * T. A.
LIPTON FOR NEXT
BRITISH MINISTER
SENATOR IKEARNS GAY4 THE IRISH
SPORTSMAN WOULD WELD
ENGLAND AND AMERICA.
HAS DONE MUCH FOR BOTH
Lipton Is Almost as Popular in This
Country as He Is at Home and Is
Man for the Place.
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
Salt Lake, Utah, Oct. s.--"If King Ed
ward would bring still closer together the
l.nglish and American people, and if he
would weld more firmly the commercial
relations existing between English and
American people and maintain cordial re
lations of every character, he would make
Sir Thomas Lipton his next ambassador
It the United States," said United States
Scuator Thomas Kearns today in speak
ing of atnd lamenting the death of Sir
Michael Herbert.
"Sir Thomas Lipton has done more
during the last Ig months to increase the
good fellowship and genuine friendship
x tisting between the American and English
people," continued Mr. Keazrs, "than all
of the men and women on the British isles,
and he has done it without design or
knowing it, and it has been done not alto
gether by his yacht races. Sir Thomas is
a typical representative of the best class
of EIngland's citizenship, lie is one of
the most polished diplomats I have ever
met, and I have met about all of them at
Washington. He would msake a great suc
cess as ambassador from England and I
hlpe King Edward will realize his oppor
ttnity."
GROVER CLEVELAND WILL
NOT VISIT THE SOUTH
IIY ASSOCIATED 'PRE:SS.
Pine Bluff, Ark., Oct. I.-In response
to the invitation to visit the Branch Nor
emal school here in the event of a southern
tour by him, former President Grover
Cleveland has written to Isaac Fisher,
president of the college, as follows:
"The reports published in the press that
I was soon to pay a visit to the South are
entirely without foundation. I have no
such intention, though I know that I
would enjoy such a trip."
SHERIDAN FULL OF PESOS
Transport Carries 2,000,000 of the Coins
to the Philippines.
ItY ASSOCIArTED p'+ivat.
San F:ra'lisco. Oct. 1.--The suiperinten
dent of the mint has just delivered to the
a ar department 2,noo,ooo pesos for the
Philippines.
Thie coin was taken from the mint under
military escort and transferred to the
"lransport Sherman, which sails today for
Manila.
KILLED BY BROTHER-IN-LAW
rFatal Shooting Results From Disagree
ment in Family.
IY A.S.i) IA..tD P'R .SS.
New Orelans, La., ()ct. I.-A. P.
Rabito, a will known wvho!c.ale and retail
fish dealer, has been shot and killed by
his brother-in-law, Albert Nool. The
sh!oting grew out of fantily troubles.
HE HAD COMMITTED SUICIDE
Iti / .5SO' IAT it Il'P .S,.
t.'owlcs, Neb., Oct. ..-- The dead body of
'Iot.: Madisonl, the stpposed slayer of the
Smith county. 1iars., family of tlhree
w'mentll, \was foundll in the field lear here.
I ic had been shot, supposedly, by himself.
iet had apparently been dead a number of
.lays.
Butte. Mont.
Cepitanl.........soooooo.s
Under state supervision. Five per
cent interest, ptyable quarterly, paid
os deposits.
Money to Loan on
Real Estate
I. AUG. HEINE,..........Prsadent
A. L. CI h.ArNT.,...........as r
DALY
BANK AND TRUST
• COMPANY
OF BUTTE
Established s88s. Incorporated toos.
CapItal...$100,000.00
General
Barrking Business
OHN D. RYAN .... ...President
OHN R. TOOL ..... Vice-President
C, SWINBORNE..........Cashier
R. A. KUNKEL.... Assistant Cashier
W. A. Glrk. J. Ross Clark.
W. A. CLARK & BROS
BANKERS
TransOts General Blanking Business.
Buy gold dust, gold bars, silver bt.
lion and loeal securites.
Boxe for rent In safe deposit vault,
Sell exsoilan available In all of the
principal cltes of the United States
and Europe.
Speial attention given to coswe.
tions.
ALEX ., JOHNSTON,
Cashimr.
The First National Bank
Of Butt.
Iatablisbhd tllpf
Capital * - $200,000.00
aSNBRAL BANKING
Drafts drawn on ant pril.ppal aitee of
the world and letters of credit isned.
ANDREW J. DAVIS ... ...Prlsdeat
JAMES A. TALBOTT.....Vice-Pres
3. B. WEIRICK .............Cashier
J. S. DUT. N.....Assistant Cashle
STATE SAVINGS BANK
John A. Creighton ......... President
0. W. Stapleton ........Vie-President
T. M. Hodgens............... Cashier
J. O. Hodgens.......Assistant Cashlie
R. 8. Nuckols.......Assistant Cashic:
Under sette supervision and furidio.
tion. Interest paid on deposits.
Sells exchange available in aet the
principal cities of thn United S ate:
ad Europl. Collections promptly at.
tended to. Transact a general banking
business.
Directors: J. A. Creighton, Omaha;
C. W. Stepleton. A. H. Barret, K. D.
Levitt S. V. Kemper, T. M. Hodges.,
J. O. Hodgens.
Corner Main and Park Streets, Butte.
C. . LeonarJ, Pres. T. R. Hinds, V. Preas
Fayette Harritnton, Cashier.
Silver Bow National Bank
CAPITAL. St00,000.03
This bank policits scoounts, offers
prompt n.d careful attention to business of
customers. Collections promptly attendel
to and remitted for on day of collections.
Sell foreign and domestic exchange, trans.
acts a general banking business, pay in
terest on the deposits.
Directors-Charles It. LeenarJ, F. Aug.
Heins. S. Marchesseau, .,. Balmforthb K
A. Louis. C. W. Newton, T. R. Hinds, fobs
MacGinniss. Fayret. Harrington.
NORTH COAST LIMITED
Observation Cars
Electric Lighted
Steam Heated
BUTTE SCHEDULE
WESTIO U.ND.
I
Trains. ARRIVE. DEPART.
No. a Nurth, Coas t
Limited.......I 7:3o p.m. j 7:4o p.m.
No. 5 .11 r lingtoni I
iExpress....... I a:oo p.m. I a:to p.m.
No. Ij--Twin C i tyl
Expre-s.......! j :3o a.m. I.
EASTBOUND.
I I
Trains. I ARRIVE. , DEPART.
No. a-North Coast I I
,imitcd...... I 1:45 a.m. I t:55 a.m.
Sleeper for I
this tunin open J
at 9:.o for re-.
ceptionof pas. I
sngersc .......
No. 6-J t rI ington I
Expres....... [ jt:3o p.m. I 1t:4o p.m.
No, 24--Twin C i t y
Expresu ....... I ........ I is:45 p.m.
No. I -Northi Coast Limited, from St. Paul
and Lastern points, to the Pacific coast.
No. 2-North Coast Limited, from the Pa
cific coast to St. Paul, Duluth and principal
Eastern points.
No. 5-Burlington Express, from Kansas
City and all B. & M. R. R. points and all N. P.
points west of Billings to Seattle and Tacoma.
No. 6-B-urlington Express, from Tacoma
and Seattle to Billings and all B. & M. R. R.
points.
No. I--l.ocal connection from Twin City
Express from St. Paul and all Eastern points.
No. 14--l.ocal connection with Twin City
Express for St. Paul and all points East.
l'assctngrs for Twin Bridges, Sheridan,
Alder, Pony and Norris branches leave Butte
on No. 14, and arrive in Butte from these
points on No. 13. 'rains on these branches do
not run on Sundays. W. II. Merriman, gen.
eral agent, corner Main and Park streets.
ELECTRIC
LIOII[D TRAINS
The Pioneer Limited St. Paul
to Chicago, and the Overland
Limited, Omaha to Chicago.
Both trains run via the
Chicago, Milwaukee &
St. Paul Railway
Each route has a number of at
tractive features. The principal
thing to insure a quick and
comfortable trip is to see that
your tickets read via this route.
P. H. SCANLAN, C. A.
Helena, Mont.
W. B. DIXON,
N. W. P. A., St. Paul.
Six Million Dollars Spent by the
U.P. R. R. Co.
in Improving what was originally the
Snest track In the West
SREBSULT
A comparatively straight snd lee
roadbed, ballasted with dustless Shae
man granite, rendering possible the
highest rate of speed, together with the
reatest degree of safety. The magi.
Jude of the work must bh seen to be
eppreolated.
WHAT DOES IT MEANt
Solid comfort, eeourity and pleasure to
our ptronks
ARE YOU GOING EAST?
I tso you cannot afford to ' via
other than this ROYAL IGHWAY
PFrther information on application pear
snually oc by letter to
H, 0. WILSON, O. 1. L,
Butte, Montana
These Cars are on the new
"GreatWeaten Limited"
Every Night between Chicago.
St. Paul and Minneapolis.
if you wish to travel in the most
comfortable way, nothing can
approach these rooms. The price
of'a berth Is only $2.,50, or 500
more than a berth in a standard
Pullman Sleeper. All tollot neces
sitles--hot and cold water, electric
berth and ceiling llghts'and elec
trlc haircurler
heaters.
For further
Information
apply to J. P.
Elmer, Gen'l
Passenger
Agent, Chhl*
ses .routDw cago, II.
I 0
The Best friend
The Northwest
Ever Had
"eThe Road That Made thi
Northwest Famous."
LEAVE BUTTE.
For St. Paul. East and West,
daily ............6:o a. a.
For St. Psal, East and West,
"aW . " A i t d" ' oe o. m.
From St. Paul, East and
West, dail ....... 1.:4s s s
From St. Paul, Eas ad
lsbklt O~l.e. 4r Norths N t.
...k.. w..yN... .
_Pullman, Dining and
SLibrary.Car Route to
SALT LAKE DENVER
KANSAS CITY OMAHA
CHICAGO ST. LOUIS
And All Bastern Points
Short Line To
Colorado. Arizona and Mexico
San Francisco, Los Angeles
(Oceas or RaiZ
PORTLAND
aRd All Pacifle Seoas Postts
ARRIVER DEPART.
No. p....6:4o p. m.Ne. "....4=45.S.
No. ....s s45 O. m.INo. ro.... ssos a. o
Ticket Offlee 105 N. Main Street
Butte, Montana.
H. 0. WILSON, GENERAL AGT.
Denver & Rio Grando
and the
Rio firande Western
Travel During Pall
and Winter Seasons
The Journey to the East via Salt Lake
City and along the shores of the Grejt
Salt Lake through beautiful Glenwooa
Colorado Sprin s and Denver b one o
uninterrupted i ht i winter as we
as in summer. In fact the fall and winter
seasons add but a new grandeur and charm
to the travel scenes and infuse an element
of variety and beauty to the unsur asssble
wonders along th Rio Grande Wester
and Denver & Rio Grande lines. Throug_
sleeping and dining car service. Person.
aly-.on~dctcd weekly excursions. FoP
or ao W.aFITZGERALD,
General Agent.
Ticket Omefie--47 I. Broadway, Butter
Atchison,Topeka &
Santa Fe Ry. Co.
SANTA PB ROUTE
3 Trains Daily
From Denver to Kanae" City and Chil
eago. Also thi direct line to Galvee.
ton, El Paso, Ci of Mexico and the
minalg eamps ofNew Mexico and Ar.
sons.
For particulars about REDUCED
RATES EAST this summer apply to
C. F. WARREN,
Iemra aI ant Doolv BloIk, SaM

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