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The Butte inter mountain. (Butte, Mont.) 1901-1912, October 03, 1903, Image 1

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THE BUTTE INTER MOUNTAIN
VOL XXIII. No. 189. BUTTE, MONTANA, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1903. PRICE FIVE CENTS
TROOPS READY
TO LAND IN
BEIRUT
Cotton Was Prepared to
Take Prompt Action
With Pillagers.
CHRISTIANS ROUTED
Fled and Left Moslems to
Ransack Their Homes
at Sweet Will.
CORRESPONDENCE OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS.
Beirut, Syria, Sept. s4.*-When the raid
of the Moslems began on Sunday morning,
Sept. 6th, the Christians fled from the
city, leaving their houses to be pillaged.
The Great Lebanon District, a Christian
province stretching down to the limits
of the city, assured them a place of
safety, and thither the Christians rushed
in a panic.
By Sunday night thousands had gathered
on the Lebanon plain just outside Beirut
and made their way up into the mountain
villages.
While the raid was in progress some of
the government officials hastened to the
scene and checked the marauders, The
full strength of the military was brought
out, the streets were soon being patrolled
and the American lquadron anchored in
the harbor, placed their men under arms,
and held them ready, for action.
As a result, no further raids were at
tempted and within a day or two all
danger had practically departed.
AFTER A LONG CHASE
OETECTIVES HAD A MERRY TIME IN
PURSUIT OF NEGRO WANTED
FOR BOLD BURGLARY.
BY ASSOCIATED PraEs.
Chicago, Oct. 3.-After Chasing Wil
liam Hayes Bonner, alias Charles Barnard,
a negro, formerly a butler in the home of
Alexander Niedringhaus, a wealthy paving
contractor of St. Louis, from St. Louis
to New York, thence to Cleveland and
from there to Chicago, detectives last
eight arrested the man.
He is wanted for the theft of diamonds
valued at $4,000 ad $$oo in cash from
Mrs. Niedringhaus.
The theft is said to have been com
Initted by Bonner while Mrs. Niedringhaus
and her husband were attending a party.
When arrested bonner had only 8i
cents and refused to tell where he had
disposed of the gems.
Detectives were assigned to find them
and it is expected they will be recovered
in Chicago.
RAILWAYS OF AMERICA
FACE A CAR SHORTAGE
Unable to Secure Sufficient Rolling Stock
to Fill Orders, Although 4lore
Cars Are Ordered,
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
Chicago, Oct. 3.-The railroads of the
entire country are face to face with what
promises to be the greatest car shortage in
their history. Despite the fact that most
liberal orders for new equipment have been
given by all the companies during the last
is months, they now find themselves un
able to accept all the traffic that is offered.
The condition of affdirs is outlined by
Vice-President W. C. Brown of the Lake
Shore, who declares the company is in
need of z,Soo box cars daily. On other
systems with a greater mileage than the
Lake Shore, larger numbers of cars are
needed for immediate use.
STABBED BY A BUNCO MAN
Denver Boy Fatally Cut on a Santa Fe
Passenger Train.
BY ASSOCIATED PmuFs.
Pueblo, Oct. 3.-H. E. Williams, a
young man on his way from Denver to
Kansas City, was fatally stabbed last night
on the Santa Fe train on its arrival here
by a stranger, who jumped off when the
train was two miles from this city.
The man had swindled .Williams out
of money and when the latter tried to
compel him to give it up the man stabbed
him in the abdomen with a knife. Will
iams is in a hospital in a dying condition.
MUMMERY ENDS IN DEATH
Chicago, Oct. 3,--IMartin Casey, 83
years old, a voluntedr fireman of old Chi
cago, is dead from concussion of the brain
as the result of an accident Tuesday when
the veteran firemen ran down Michigan
avenue, one of the features of the cen
tennial celebration, and which ended in
disaster to several of the old fire-fighters,
The aged men were pulling their ancient
apparatus down the street when several of
them fell to the pavement in an effort to
avoid a collision with an engine respond
ing to an alarm of fire, and were bruised
and injured.
ENGLISH SOLDIERY UP LATE
Boston, Mass., Oct. 3.-The English sol
dier visitors did not complete the first
day's program of entertainment prepared
for them until after a o'clock this morn
ing, yet the members of the Honorable Ar.
tillery company were up early today, pre
pared to undertake whatever their Ameri
can hosts had provided for their pleasure.
The program arranged by the host, the
Ancient and Honorable Artillery company
*f Beoston, was atrip to Provideno as guests
li the First Light Infantry of that city.
TESTIMiIONY ENDED
IN MINNIE HEALY
ARGIIMENTS ARE TO BE PRESENTED
TO JUDGE CLANCY ON
FRIDAY NEXT.
EVIDENCE OF TODAY SPICY
Three Witnesses Testify Heinze Witness
Told Them That He Would
Not Perjure 'Himself
The Minnie Healy trial came to an end
this morning in Judge Clancy's court so
far as the receiving of testimony by the
court is concerned. The trial therefore is
at an end, excepting that it must still be
argued.
The arguments will be presented to the
court neext Friday morning at to o'clock.
The court set that day and hour of his
own motion. Judge McHatten, the leading
counsel for Heinze, wanted the arguments
heard Tuesday, and Mr. Forhis, for the
plaintiff, asked that they be put over for
a week or more.
Spicy Evidence Today.
The evidence received in the case today
was exceedingly spicy. Heinse's counsel
put Patrick O'Neill on the stand to testify
that Miles Finlen had told him he expected
to transfer the mine to Heinze, and three
witnesses for the Boston & Montana com
pany, to wit, Miles Finlen, Attorney C. F.
Kelley and Dennis O'Neill, testified that
the Heinze man had told them the reason
he had not testified in the case before,
although twice subpoenaed by the Heinze
side, was because he would not perjure
himself for any man on earth.
Patrick O'Neill was a miner employed
in the Minnie Healy mine in 1898, and
he said it was during the time he
worked for Finlen that Finlen made the
statement attributed to him. The witness
first said that it was in May and then that
it was April that Finlen made his remark
about transferring the property.
Lost His Position.
Mr. Keltey, Mr. Finlen and Mr. Dennis
O'Neill all told how the witness had told
them that he had lost his job at the Specu
lator mine because he would not perjure
himself. Mr. Kelley also said that the
Heinze men had tried to negotiate a deal
to testify for Finlen for "what there was
in it for him." It likewise came out that
O'Neill has a suit against Finlen pending
now.
Patrick O'Neill was put on the stand
when the trial opened this morning, to
testify for Heinze.
What's your business?" Judge McHat
ten asked.
"I'm a miner," was the reply.
"Do you know Miles Finlen?"
"Yes."
"State if you ever were employed at the
Minnie Healy mine by Miles Finlen?"
"Yes; from October s, 1896, to August
24, s898."
"What position did you have at the
mine ?"
"I was the foreman."
"When did the operations hegin in
:898 ?"
"January 7."
"Now, you may say, Mr. O'Neill, if
during the time you worked at the mine,
you had any talk with Mr. Finlen about
the object of the work?"
"Yes."
"What did Mr. Finlen say about the
work?!' Did Mr. Finlen say that the work
was for the purpose of a lawsuit and that
he could transfer the case to Heinze?"
Judge McHatten asked.
"Did he say anything about getting
his money out of it?"
"Yes. The first time, he said he was
talking with John MacGinniss and ex
pected to turn over the mine to Heinxe.
The next time we had broken into the
Minnie Healy workings and he was more
than glad, and he said he could trans
fer the mine and get his money."
"What (lid you say about the shaft ?"
"The shaft was in bad shape, and
I asked him about fixing it. He said that
I must get along the best I could, and
that he would turn the mine over to
Heinze and Heinze could fix it."
On cross-examination Mr. Kelley said
to the witness:
"Now, when did you say you had the
first talk with lHeinze?"
"The latter part of May, 1898," the wit
ness replied,
"Didn't you testify on direct examina
tion that it was in April?"
"Yes; it was in April," the witness said,
although, as a matter of fact, he had said
it was May in his direct examination.
"Didn't you say it was in May?" the
attorney asked.
"No," the witness said.
"When was the second talk?" Mr. Kel
ley asked.
"It was in October-no, it was in Aug
ust," the witness replied,
The witness was asked if he had not
twice been subpoenaed in the case by the
Heinze side, but never placed on the
stand before, and he said that was true.
He Might Have.
Then he was asked if he had not met
a man named Dennis O'Neill on Main
street last Wednesday, and he said he did
not know. Asked if he had not talked to
O'Neill about the case then, he replied
that he might have,
Then the witness volunteered some in
formation which led to very spicy testi
mony by Dennis O'Neill, Miles Fin
len and Attorney C. F. Kelley, all of
whom took the stand to describe some re
markable statements made to them by the
witness, Patrick O'Neill.
The witness volunteered the following:
"I wa. approached on the street by a
man named William Oram, and he said
that if I testified for- the Boston & Mon
tana company in this case I could get a
good lease from that company,"
"Was anybody else present at that con
versation?" Mr. Kelley asked.
"A man named Ed, Sullivan," the wit
ness returned,
Then Mr. Kelley said to the witness:
"Didn't you tell Dennis O'Neill you
wouldn't testify for Helnze because you
wouldn't perjure yourself, and that it cost
you your job in the Speculator -mine?"
The witness admitted that it cost him
his job, but denied that he had said he,
would not psUjuro, hiaself.
P 'lDidn't you some to my office the other
(Contint.ed on Page Two,)
CHAMBERLAIN ON
DEAD_ OCTRIKE$
FORMER COLONIAL SECRETARY
SAYS ENGLAND MUST CEASE
CHERISHING TRADITIONS.
WORLD LEAVING HER BEHIND
Other Countries Grow and Prosper While
Great Britain Goes Backward
Under Cobdenism..
IY ASSOCIATED PRESS,
London, Oct. 3.-"Every other nation
and all our self-governed colonies have re
fused to accept the gospel of Cobden, and
yet, although they ought, according to its
dogmas, to be in the last stages of depres
sion and decline, they have grown during
the last so years in weal, population and
trade and in everything that goes to make
up the greatness of a nation."
That is the keynote of Joseph ChaMb.r
lain's manifesto which will be published
October s in the form df a preface to a
shilling pamphlet, entitled "Mr. Chamber
lain's Proposals; What They Mean and
What We Shall Gain by Them," by Mr.
C. A. Vince, secretary to Mr. Chamber
lain's tariff organization.
Mr. Chamberlain did not mince matters.
With aggression he carries the war into
the enemy's camp.
"Those who maintain," he writes, "in a
spirit of blind obscuratism, the absolute
inspiration of antiquated doctrines will
have much to explain."
His remarks are addressed to persons of
all political organizations since the ques
tions now raised are not necessarily mat
ters of party politics, nor indeed is it
likely that the issues will be ultimately
decided on strictly party lines."
He begins by saying:
"It is difficult to believe that the results
of the investigation will not convince
every impartial man of the necessity for
some reconstruction of the system which
has remained stationary and unaltered
for more than half a century while every
other policy has been modified and
adapted to meet modern requirements."
Continuing. Mr. Chamberlain points out
that the property of the working classes
has increased in greater proportion in the
protected countries than in the United
Kingdom and says:
"Free trade, if it had ever existed, might
have secured for us all that its promot
promised, but tree imports without fee
trade have brought us face to face with
problems which never entered into Cob
den's calculations. We know that the idea
of a united empire did not appeal to him.
and that he regarded the colonies as an
encumbrance to be got rid off as soon as
possible. The little Englanders who fol
low his lead are not likely to be moved b&
any consideration arising out of our n ,
found pride and faith in our distant kigq
men. But what would Cobden have saidl
if he had foreseen that the trades unions,
whose existence he deprecated, would hb
successful in protecting labor in a score
of ways?
WAS MONTANA MAN
REV. COMFORT, INJURED IN WRECK,
WAS ONCE SUPERINTENDENT
OF ORPHANS' HOME.
SPECIAl. TO TIE1 INTEPR MOUNTAIN.
Helena, Oct. 3.--Rev. George R. Conu
fort of this city has received a telegram
giving further information regarding ihe
injuries to his father, Rev. George Com
fort, who was one of the victims of thc
railway wreck near Bewowe, Nev., the
news of which was printed in the Inter
Mountain last evening.
Mr. Comfort's injuries consist of'a
broken arm and a crushed hand. It is
possible that the hand may have to be
amputated, but no more serious results are
expected.
Rev. George Comfort, the injured nw=m,
for many years was a resident of this state
and is probably the oldest minister that
Montana can claim as her own. At one,
time he was superintendent of the State
Orphan's Home at Twin Bridges. His
home at present is Lamborro, Pa., to which
place he was returning when the wreck
occurred.
RUTH BRYAN IS TO WED
AT LINCOLN TONIGHT
Simple Informal Ceremony, at Which
100 Guests Are to Be Present
Telegrams and Gifts Pour In.
nV ASSOCIATED PRESS.
Lincoln, Neb., Oct. 3.-Preparations for
the marriage of Miss Ruth Bryan and
William Homer Leavitt at Fairview, the
country home of Mr. Bryan tonight, are
completed. There will be zoo guests and
the affair will be decidedly informal, Miss
Bryan will meet the guests at the door.
She refuses to march to the place where
she is to stand while the ceremony is be.
ing performed and at the proper time will
simply take her place at Mr. Leavitt's
side,
Dr. Huntington, chancellor of the Ne
braska Wesleyan university, will be the
officiating minister.
Telegrams and gifts from many poll.
ticians all over the country arrived yesier
day and today.
The only relative of the groom who will
attend the wedding is his mother, Mrs. A.
L.. Leavitt of Newport, R. I, Mr. Bryan
has cancelled many lectures and pojltigjl
engagements on account of his daught.'s
marriage and will barely have timeiTto
make a short stop in Ohio while on. Is
way to New York where he will take a
steamer for his European trip.
MILES IS NOT A CANDIDATE
Says He Does Not Mean to Run for Any
Office.
BY ASSOCIATED PESS. .
Dallas, Texas, Oct. 3.-General Nelas
A. Miles made this statement last nilj:
"I am not a candidate for any
and {0on't eJpsect to be, not even for riit..
dent of the United States or governor of
Texas."
HISORIC BENTON
FULL OF PIONEERS
TRAILBLAZERS GATHER IN THE
CRADLE OF TREASURE STATE
TO DISCUSS OLD TIMES.
COME TO BUTTE IN 1904
John Caplice of This City Was Elected
President of the Montana
Association.
SPEf'IA TO TIlE INTItR MOUtNTAIN.
Fort Benton, Oct. 3.-Those of the pio
neers of Montana who drove their stakes
at this picturesque old town in the early
days, and those residents who have come
later, are uniting today in entertaining the
Society of Montana Pioneers.
One hundred and fifty of the men tiho
made the state are here today. They came
from Great Falls in a special train, leaving
that city at 9 o'clock this morning and
arriving here about to:lo. While they
are brimming over with delightful stories
of the good time they had yesterday, they
are entering into the spirit of the recep
tion here with all the enthusiasm of n lot
of youngsters. It is the happiest lot of
excursionists that ever came to lRenton,
It is singularly fitting that the loth an
nual meeting of the Society of Montana
Pioneers should adjourn its meeting to
this place. Fort Blenton has been aptly
termed the cradle of civilization in Mon
tana. This is the place where the boats
arrived. This is the entrepot through
which came many of the pioneers and
trailblazers of the state.
]leginning away back in the ohl fur
trading days with the starting of the tirst
steamboat up the upper Missouri by good
old Pierre Chouteau, head of the American
Fur company, and extending down to the
time of the completion of the Northern
Pacific Railway company, Fort llenton
was distinctly "the" townt of Montana.
Up from St. l.ouis, battling with hostile
Indians on the way, rustling firewood
along the banks, encountering unnumbered
perils, came the steamers, cutting the
muddy water of the shallow and treacher
ous upper river. They were ladesn with
supplies, mining machinery, pIioteers-the
things that went to build up Montana.
And then front here ran the stage lines
and the bull trains that c,astributed all
these over the length and breadth of the
state.
Today the pioneers are telling one an
other all about this. They are relating
with an uncouscious sadness the stories
of the time when 14 St. Louis steamers
could be seen, end to end, lying at the
Fort Benton levee, a living testimony to
t.e growth of the territory that has be
conic known as "the Treasure State."
The history of the establishment of Fort
Benton as a fortified place and trading post,
away back in the 'so's, and its christening
by Colonel Culbertson on that famous
Christmas night waon the patronymic,
borne so bravely by Missouri's favorite
statesman, was applied to the little settle
ment, is too well knlown to need repetition
at this time. Today all the visiting pio
neers could find of the old adobe fort is a
battered bastion and traces of the cruitlth
ling walls of the one-time formidable
fort.
On the arrival of the special from Great
Falls there were gathered about the depot
all the vehicles that the town possesses.
Public or private, they were there to carry
the visitors the short half mile down the
slope to the pretty little town. There were
wagons, drags, carriages, phaclons-every
manner of horse drawn etluipage.
The town itself was found handsomely
decorated with flags and bunting. The
entire population seemed to have consti
tuted itself a committee on reception. All
lBenton turned out to assist in showing
the visitors the sigh's. Some of them
needed no introduction to familiar points.
There was Colonel Sanders of Helena,
for instance. He led a party to where
he could show them a hill across the river
from which he celebrated the Fourth of
July, 1863, in his own vehement manner.
On that day he rousted out an old cannolln
at the post, hitched it to a mule awl
dragged it across to the hill to fire the na
tional salute. Without going to the
trouble of unhitching the mule he lit the
fuse. The mule objected to the sputtering
bit of fire and began to run around in a
circle. Now, it so happened that the can
non was loaded with a ball.
It is quite needless to remark that there
was consternation in the crowd. Some
one would find the muzzle of the gun
trained on nim with the full expectation
that in another instant it would go off.
The colonel led a masterly and expeditious
retreat towards the tall timber. The re
treat was in progress when the fuse
reached the charge. The ball landed
across the river in the town, but no one
was hurt.
Bernard Quinn, who in the old days was
a freighter, having several mule trains
running out 'of Fort Benton, but who is
now a dignified resident of Butte, had
many stories to tell. It is 36 years since
he visited the place. "I was here on July
3, 1867," said he, "and then I was the last
to shake hands with General Thomas
Francis Meagher. I spent the afternoon
his last afternoon alive-with him, trying
to persuade him to hire one of mly mule
trains to go on the trail of Indians who
were then, on the warpath to the south,
That night I bade him good-bye and shook
hands with him,
That very night he was drowned in the
Missouri river, falling from a steamboat.
It is a foul slander to assert that he was
iltoxicated at the time.
"I carried the sad news to Mrs.
Meagher, who wat then at Virginia City.
She was grateful' o me for my efforts in
bringing her the intelHlience and wanted to
reward me by giving me a gold and silver
mounted saddle. I declined the gift. .
am sorry now. If I had that saddle today
I would not accept $r,ooo for it."
The society is holding a 'meeting this
afternoon at the Chouteau house to wind
up its business, and early this evening the
'party will return to Great Falls, At the
meeting several new members will be
elected. Resolutions of thanks to the peo
pie of Great Falls and others who have
contributed to the entertainment of the so
.ciety will be presented by a committee
and adopted, The society is enthusiastle
in its praise of the hospitality of the Great
(Continued on Pgse Two,)
CELEBlRAION ENDS
IN BLALF OF FIRE
CHICAGO BATHE, LAME AT THE
GRAND CLOSE ENTENNIAL
OF ITS 4DATION.
MOB SURGF 4 HROUGH TOWN
Estimated T 3reatet Crowd Since
World's Gathered to Wit
nest. a Pyrotechnics.
nY ARsOC'IATF*u PI(,"s.
('hicago, Oct. ,3.---hi(' ,cago's ('entcn in
celebration hclosed Inst night iin a bllale of
fireworks whlich illumlinated the largest
crowd ever a;lselbletd on the lake front.
Estimates of the niumlber that witineser l
the greatest fireworks diisplay setl here
since the Worll's lFalir range from t,aoo,
omo to I,J5n,coo. ()ut in the lake st'rt's
of craft cruisIed :1bout, their s.ie varying
from the small rowhbot aln the diminut1ive
ynchts to the big eculrsion strant"rs,
whIich were i;packed to lihe guards.
The exhibition tKbegan whenr red auiu
white liresa roke 111out along the gover1n
i11enlt pier for the dlistanle of serveral
hlocks. IT"he expIlosiion of bolonhsi aitul sky
rockets followed immiuediately, thlie houmbs
exploding in itidair andl seatering red,
white and blle stlears hy the thouisallds.
The brilliant hioubardutieint was kept
up for an hour and a qtuarter, while at in
tervals set pihcs were fired a;1di oddities
introduceid.
Fort I)lDearornl at onle tilne al'1(a';t .le in
fiery outline. At lnother tinel ('hicago
was syintiolized as a pha loinix risintg fromlt
its ashesl. 'Thle stilat;e of liberty stiood
flrthl, a alloon arose 111il frim it hibroke
out the Americann llag.
TAKE SAFEWITH THEM
MASKED MEN ENTER A BILLINGS
SALOON - FAIL TO BLOW
THE STRONG-BOX OPEN.
MPClE.Ii 10t i Tl INT'i'. MIUti'NT 4 1N.
Bill ings, (Iet. 3.--Pour itnnke'd men at
2 o'clock this mitorning citered the Mlint
saloon, oti one of tile prilicipal streets,
and stole the safe, conltaiing $i,.oo.
Joe Weimer, brndr, the bartender, was lhe only
occlupanlt of the roomll whetl they entlerel.
They were cool and busines-like inl their
lllovemnents. "Throw up your hanllls,'
conmannded tih leader of thie quartet.
\\'eimter conlltied.
Then the other three torn, while the
leader held the Rgus, hound and gagged the
bartender and set hint to cool oft by the
refrigerator. 'They had a buggy outside
and into this they loaded the safe, weigh.
lug several hundred pounds, and drove to
the southern boundary of the city.
There they put a charge of powder tin
der the safe and tried to blow it up. 'Ilh y
were unsuccessftul i the first effort naoIl
before they could try agailn a posse was
approachinlg. l riglttened, they fled. Th'e
safe was foundtl Intact. It contaitned a
trifle more than $i,ooo in cash.
A posse is chasing the desper;do.s, blut
has not yet eoitne up with them.
CHICAGO CITY COUNCIL
IS TO CONTEST AN ACT
Legislation in Regard to $40,000,000
Drainage Canal Is Said to Be
Ruinous to the City.
I;Y A ..),O I A l F)) 'II; 1 S.
('hicag,,, Ill { Oc.t. 1. (hiea o's city
council is lprlrelcel to attack th. validity
of the act cleating Cli;icago's $0,0,,
drainage canal.
'he finanlce cornllli tter ( ti f cio'icil
ha formnally advised I'orp',ra tiwn (( .I .il
'lulmana to brinig an a'tioin in.lit' t l)I 'Itli
court of the tltate next v.w'-k. A i., r;l
ened depletion of the city's water f:idI
with a possible delicit i Ithe micving forte
behind the alderiinci and the act of tih
last legislature by which the sttliIrb, of
(Cieer, wa aldded to the sa:itary district,
hlas catUtsed the trouble.
Ily thin provisions of that act C(l;.ago
will be reqltirctl to furnish thet restli its
of t.ic:ro water ait foulr c t; s Iper 1.,,
gallons, while its own citizlns pay ten
cents. 'IThe al'drmien f:ay it wouhll mce1;rit
the expenditure of $35On,o. to extend the
mains and $00oo,oo to erect a new putlloti
ing station and that wae!r wout'l tce sl'lp
plied at less than cost.
Should the city comply with this act it
is said other counltry town:, could dcanil,
the same concession awarded Cicero. 'J his,
the aldertlen say, would be ruinous.
GENERAL ORLANDO SMITH
IS DEAD IN WINDY CITY
sY ANSO('IATEID i't t'uI.
Chicago, Oct. 3.-G(eneral Orlando
Slith, ex-vice president of the Haiti
more & Ohio railroad and a distitnguishedl
officer during the civil war, died at a
o'clock this morning. lie had been ill
for to days.
PERISH IN THE ANGRY SEA
Valparaiso, Oct. 3.-T-'wo little daugl
ters of the purser of the BIritisli steamer
I.aura IBranch were lost wheni the steamer
stranded Tuesday between Port Pringle
and Stewart's bay. All menmbers of the
crew were saved. The vessel is a total
loss.
TOBAR IS GOING TO PANAMA
BY .ASSOCIATEtD I'RESS.
Panama, Oct. 3,-Reports front Barran
quills are that General Tobar, the newly
appointed commander-in-chief of the At
lantic and Pacific naval forces, is ex
pected here with his staff.
lie is on his way to the isthmus, where
he will arrive about October 5, General
Tobar was formerly governor of Bolivar,
Bryan to Europe,
Lincoln, Neb,, Oct, 3.--W. J. Bryan will'
leave for the East Sunday and will not
return until after he has completed his
European trip. Mr. Bryan will be accent
panied by his son William, Mr. Bryan
will stop in Ohio en route East and make
a number of speeches.
LIVES SNUFFED
OUT IN &
TRICE
Cooker in Distillery Blows
Up-Several Killed,
Many Injured.
BUILDINI ISWRECKED
Searched for Maimcd in
Smoulderrng Ruins of
the Distillery.
1\ 18, I IAfItI I'HI LAR.
PcT rrn, II1., (It. j,--A. awful e:tastr,'a
pht' went'rrd atl tht. plantH ofth ti, torninpg
Iistilli gItg cij lpal y in thi txtrene t oiutltlh
t'lld olf the it . y ;It n 'll itk this mornll ng, II rl'li
whI iiitt n il tei I hii ' illllllt'lltn c'lkt r i ll the
main buihlinlg eqplded with a defensing
rIptirt, killiig sttver.ii of the etlijtyiii,
uIIInllliltlon g III;11r. r alnl d nirlell ty R Ut,lset'k
inlg thatl Ip rtion1 ,of the. distillery.
IVire.nlarmsl were, imnmrdiately sent hit
for the cntire shpartinent andI Iolice an,
:mblancetl,' werel' hucrt,]tliedl y summ~llone(d.
Iort rlulltely lthc wretk:e didi t o takt ltkire
andI the fihemen.i imlm'di;|tely assis~t'd the
di tillhry emllllol)t' whlo, had r.caplled lhe
futle if thlir It lci fortuntllllll filh)w i lk
hell.
To Cook Mash.
The ctokt r i* i sltr c~otl rivt;t le hllout
Xi ttr :I hiy In tlict ill diatlllltlr, tsled in
coki n tlhe ilre i h w. It i, tt Itrumel thatah
giCItu1t11 Wllat f itt c( t u ltl whit i the til elIil
was. lturnedt onl 1 to mak Iltoday" sla.|h the,
Uxplo)hio followed.
The c'.ok,'r wa* hutrlhd tlroultRh tihe
;irtlh w ll (l the rrI t slor' ,llrtlctulre, I
distacer of no5 feet, Thie eattire nocrth
wall of the distillery wns b~lwn downI aMl
the ,.otth untd eas.t walls wtetre also Ihadly
,lamagedt
I h,, wrrecka'g,.a .asl distibut,.d a11 ow'r the
neighhb.rhund. '1 bet distinhery manh' enlntlrH't
stimates Ih finihallcinit losa 1,o bit fully $; 7,
ntoo, R)ndI it will b,,, ,flll rks lbefore th1e
plantll caln he 'epatised mtlailtientlly to resltoneO
opleralntio . 'lhousat1a of people qutickly
gathcre, ;t tihe sce . Ito a.ist h1s the work
of. I' e €,," t.
instantly Killed,
.lalmles Mc\laiius, an en>ploye of the
plant, Iwas ilnstantly killed.
Jailes (YKecJ'e was still alive when red
mlloved, lie wall badly hbtrnI'd all over his
bodly y lithe e.,llinlg steam:l ,ltd died a few
miiitets alllter his removal It, the cottage
Ihospitial. Neil IPowell, the a'Ushistnt i'll
ginler of Ith cltooker (l3l(, v:ias then taken
(ot. lh'e was 'n.iantwly killed. George
Scialfl'r, a boy 16 years elf age, was alive
whenlt taken oit, hIt died on the way to
the hospital. Ile was scatleid all over
his body.
An unknllowiin mani Ihas i'n takein to the
hw.pital in an IncolnIciolUs condition sod
tIre seemsC', to :e no lope of hlis recovery.
Several Still Missing.
(laring to ilth uulillth'el wrerk the starch
for the nodit' li s. ati llt(ded with the utlllost
difficulty. Sevlral emlpliy .es are still mits
ing and it is f'I.ed they will be taken out
dead.
The fotlowin.lg ls a lpartial list of the
drad:
JAMI!:S II. MtcuMANU'S, ins~latly killedl
1't l k 1.. L' ., ;' ishlln enmgineer in
c',ol r room:l, Iakrii oullt deall.
JA 1 I': ()'iK SI'IVl:, bidly bU'nced all
over, "n ll diod i: n alnllncl,.
(;I t1,0ia: St II \I';FIit I', aged 16 years,
seIIlCdI over It) diel lon the way tos
thi' liho pital.
'the missing;
John W.iilI-. iu, glove'rml ntlll bstorekeeper
hiuy Il'lr lan, yveiait l: er.
I ijiirrli
IUalitel (;abin, th Il ,i4 fro.,ftured,
iurtle oin arms, It is Ithou)llht lie will re
cover.
Jalme M. M I. s, burne'd on body, not
badily, will r,' vti.r,
iGeorge C'. I ,r :ge, 71.5 W\arner avenue,
iscalIded aibut head a;l'd fGce', not se'iols.
( h,i'les l.aiii, hlanlis buredt, not serloi s.
IUnkniown nIt, not serifiiily'.
Corllillng' lihllstlSer wd$as a i arinarftively
new hlouse, ihavig eilen erected two years
ago and hi.a ita illcl'ity of 6,i).l) iu.hels per
day. It was uluilped for the mIanlufacture
of liiished product as well a. hiiht wines
andwl alcohol,
AGUMENTS OPENED
JUDGE CLANCY PRESIDES AT THS
BOSTON & MONTANA RECEIVER
6HIP LITIGATION.
The arguments in the receiverslhip ani
injunctionl suit brotught Iy Johll MacGil.
niss against the Hostonl & Montlana coin
puny and others, tried heretofore before
Judge Clancy, were pres::e ted to the court
this aftlrnoons,
Th'le arguillcents opened this afternoon.
'IThe court ruled that the plaintiffs. attor
ney, Judge Mcllatten, should have the
opening and closing of tile argument, and
tile dlefenldants' attorney, Mr. Shores, took
an exception.
Judge Clancy divided the time for the
argumlents as follows: One hour for
Judge Mcliatten to open; an hour and a
half for Mr. Shores to reply, and a half
hour for Judge Mellatten to close.
The arguments were in progress at last
accounts.
This is the suit in which MacGiinnie
sued to have the Boston & Montana com
pany restrained from allowing the
Amlalgamated company to absorb it, and to
have a receiver appointed to run the Boss
ton & Montana conSpany's business.
WEATHER-Fair tonight and Sundaº
Cooler tonight and warmer Sunday.

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