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The Butte inter mountain. (Butte, Mont.) 1901-1912, October 12, 1903, Image 3

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RED BOOU SHOE CO. RED BOOT'SHOE CO
H DOPPING IN our Children's Section is made easy-easy
IV I 5 b ao ause the prices are most attractive, va
riety of styles broad, courteous and intelligent treatment, and the most
care given to fitting properly the little feet.
If it is not convenient for you to come down send the children
-they'll get on all right. YOUR MONEY BACK ON ANY UNSAT
ISFACTORY PURCHASE.
The Women
Are AIl Talking
Our $3.50 and
$3.00 Shoes
fOR WOMEN AND there is little left for us to say, only to an
nounce from time to time new arrivals. Today
brings us a most striking and fetching style in Corona Colt. Price, $3.oo. To
those of you who are not familiar with Corona Colt we will say that Corona
Colt is one of the most pleasing bright leathers to look at used today as cover
ing for the foot. It is very soft to the foot, and usually gives more wear than
the average bright leather shoe. The one we show today is made over "chic"
smart last, with mat kid top, medium weight sole, close beveled 3.00
edges, with FASHION'S LATEST heel shape. Price now....... *
Red Boot
SALVATION ARMY
HOME TO REMOVE
RESCUE INSTITUTION WILL BE
TAKEN OUT ON WEST I8DE, IN
BETTER QUARTERS.d
MATRON OGLESBY ON' HOME
Women Whose Children Are Cared for
Do All They Can to Help-Contri
butions From the Publio.
It has been decided to move the rescue
'home of the Salvation Army to 817 West
Broadway. The new home promises to be
more commodious and more comfortable
than the present one.
The home is in good condition, as Miss
Oglesby, who is at the head of the instia
tutlon, seems to have the knack of making
the little money at her command go a long
way.
There are now ir children in the home,
Some of them are being partly supported
by the wages of the mothers, who are all
worlking,
Miss Oglesby Talks.
In speaking of this phase of the home
Miss Oglesby said: "We do not find
much trouble about the mothers support
Ing the babies. They want to do what
is right in most cases.
"There is no difficulty these days to find
Children's Week
Half Price For
GLASSES
Many people are willing to sacrifice
themselves and their children to the
prejudice of "what people say." This
foolish prejudice against the use of
glasses by children with defective eyes
often results in the greatest suffering
sometimes permanent disability of one
who might otherwise become a power
in the world.
CROSS EYES
Permanently straightened without the
use of the knife. Don't neglect your
children, but take them to
MRS. DR. FRANK
--a nd
DR. E. C. KUHLO'S
OPTICAL PARLORS
and
EYE INSTITUTE
48 W. Park St. Shodair Block
work for the young mothers, especially
if we will care for the children during the
hours they are employed. It is customary
to keep the mother as long as necessary
for the baby before she goes out to
work. She assists about the house and in
caring for the other children and in this
way feels that she is not entirely a mendi
cant.
Contributions.
"Yes, we have to depend entirely on
our own efforts in getting support for the
home. Last winter we received several
contributions of coal, which helped us
very much. The First Presbyterian church
donated two tons of coal, the Episcopal
church four tons, the Associated Chari
ties two tons. The Hennessy company
is the only regular contributor among the
stores in the city, but the public has al
ways been generous with us and the home
is grateful and appreciative.
"Yes, it is true that a large majority
of the babies are girls, a fact that I re
gret, as it seems easier for a boy to get
along than a girl. But in looking back
over the work I find that most of the chil
dren born under these unfortunate cir
cumstances are little girls."
Tots at the Home.
There were a number of wee tots about
as the matron was speaking and they were
quite orderly, fat little fellows with a
happy smile, and had the appearance of
being well cared for. It was also evident
they were ruled by a loving spirit, as
each child beamed when spoken to by
-Miss Oglesby, and there seemed no need
of chiding, as they brought into the room
with them a spirit of freedom, but good
manners.
When the home is located farther out
on the west side AMiss Oglesby hopes to
have a pleasanter yard in which the chil
dren can play out of doors. At present
'there are no very young babies in the
institution, as those born recently have
been adopted by others or the mother gone
to a distant city and taken the child with
her.
MINOR MATTERS IN
THE DISTRICT COURT
Petition for Final Distribution in the Es
tate of John Noyes Denied in
Department Three.
The petition for final distribution in the
estate of John Noyes, deceased, was de
nied and the setting for bearing vacated
today in Department 3 of the district
court.
Other matters disposed of were:
Petition for distribution in the estate
of Francis X, Girard, granted,
Settlement of final account of Archie S.
Reynold, granted and guardian discharged.
Petition for the sale of real estate in
estate of Joseph Rosenthal confirmed.
The will of T. B. Gardner was admitted
to probate with Charles A. Gardner as
executor, without bond. The estate con
slats of money in bank and ranch property.
A GUARNTEED CURE FOR PILES.
Itching, Blind, Bleeding or Protruding Piles.
Your druggist will refund money if PAZO
OINTMENT fails to cure you in 6 to 14
days. soo.
What they are labeled and
nothing else-Schilling's Best
-at your grocer's; moneyback
BIG BARBECUE Al
COLUMBIA GARDENIS
AMALGAMATED WILL ENTERTAIN
SIX THOUBAND OF ITS eM
PLOY.. TOMORROW.
PLENTY OF GOOD CHEER
Parade in the Morning, Followed by Free
Ride to the Gardens and a Ban.
quet-Details of Affair
Everything is in readiness for the big
barbecue for the thousands of employes
of the Amalgamated Copper company to
morrow at Columbia Gardens. This even
ing the roasting of the .fat steers will
begin. It will take fully s8 hours to
thoroughly roast the steers, and the fires
will be started tonight.
The affair is going to be the biggest of
its kind ever held in the state. It is ex
pected that 6,ooo men will be present to
morrow, and ample provision has been
made for their entertainment.
A dozen sheep and as many hogs will
be served at the feast. Aside from this
there will be cigars, sandwiches, apples
and liquid refreshments.
There was a busy scene today at the
baseball park at Columbia Gardens, where
the barbecue is to be held. Great pits
have been dug to roast the steers, sheep
and hogs. A table soo feet long has been
built and a big counter has been con
structed, where part of the refreshments
will be dispensed.
Joe Klafki has charge of the barbecuing.
He has a small army of men under ham
who will dispense the good things. Fully
soo men will be employed in serving the
cigars and liquid refreshments, and a big
corps will have charge of the meats and
sandwiches.
David W. Rodger will be in charge of
the dispensing department of the barbecue.
The holiday for the Amalgamated com
pany's employes will begin early tomor
row. A short parade will be had at 9:30
and the thousands will then take the cars
to the Garlens. The men will march
down to the street car junction near the
Bufte & Boston smelter, where street cars
will be in waiting.
Four bands will furnish music during
the day-the Montana State band and the
Silver City band of Butte, the State band
of Helena and the Anaconda band.
The parade will be in four divisions,
each headed by a band. Captain D'Gay
Stivers will marshal the parade, with
three assistants.
It is proposed to have a balloon ascen
sion during the afternoon if an aeronaut
can be secured. The balloonist who made
the ascensions at Helena will be here to
morrow if possible. It will be one of the
many pleasing features of the day.
When the multitude has been trans
ported to the Gardens the feast will be
ready. A big corps of men will serve the
luscious meats and another will have
charge of the cigars and liquid refresh
ments.
The committee in charge of affairs will
issue badges to all the men, and these
will admit the wearers to the street ears
and the grounds. The badges are white
satin ribbon, with the words: "Justice
and Equality. Amalgamated Barbecue."
On the bottom of the badge is the union
label and at the top will be a small Ameri
can flag.
After the assemblage has been fed there
will be speaking from the stand erected at
the time of President Roosevelt's visit to
Butte. This has been moved up toward
the grand stand. Then bench seats have
been constructed on the ground, so that
the vast crowd can be accommodated.
It is expected that the feast will last
fully two hours, and the speaking an hour
longer. Before the crowd is taken to
town the roast oxen will be finished and
the other good things will be taken care
of. The greater portion of the crowd will
be back in town before 6 u'cluck.
LOCAL AERIETONIIGH
Everything is now in readiness for the
Eagles' entertainment at Miners' Union
hall tonight, and the old birds and young
eaglets will make merry in a manner to in
spire mirth and happiness in the breast of
the most staid mortal on earth.
There has bpen issued about z,ooo invi
tations and preparations have been made
to entertain that many guests. An elab
orate program has been prepared and be
side the musical and other features will
include an address by J. Bruce Kremer.
The music tonight will be renldered by
the Eagles' orchestra, and this precludes
any doubt as to its being first-class. After
the program the remainder of the evening
will be spent in dancing and enjoying the
good things provided as refreshments.
SMITH'S RESIGNATION
WILL SOON BE RECEIVED
Within a few days the resignation of
Clarence Smith, secretary-treasurer of the
American Labor union, will be in the
hands of 'the executive board of that or
ganization. The resignation will carry
with it a request that It become operative
January i.
Mr. Smith will go to Idaho, where he
will devote his attention to the publica
tion of the Idaho State Tribune, a paper
owned by him.
There are a score or more candidates
for Mr. Smith's office, among whom are
included F. W. Cronin and John Parte
low, former secretary of the Montana
State Trades and Labor council.
Mr. Smith stated that there was no
foundation for the report so far as he
knew for the statement that the American
Labor Union Journal would be moved
from lutte to Idaho.
MRS. SMITH ADMINISTRATRIX
'Letters of administration were granted
today to Mrs. W. Augustus Smith, widow
of the late W. Augustus Smith, who met
his death in a tallyho accident near the
reservoir on September as.
A schedule of assets was presented
and contajned several items, among which
was a one-half interest in the frm of
Smith & Mattingly, valued at $6,340.o0,
and a house ejd lot at the corner of
Granite and Excelsior streets valued at
$4,000.
Bond was furnished in the sum of
$1 ,ooo. The only heirs are Mrs. Smith
and a daughter I gearS old.
FRANK LEES MUST
EXPLAIN CONDUCT
ASSAULT CHARGE PLACED AGAINST
GENTLEMAN WHO IS SAID TO
HAVE STRUCK MAIDEN.
MISS ANDERSON COMPLAINS
She Says Lees Met HIer on the Street
end Gave Her a Pair of Black Eyes
-He Is Under Arrest.
D)eputy County Attorney Coleman this
morning issued a complaint charging
Frank Lees, a man who is said to loaf
around the saloons, with assault in the
third degree upon the person of Belva
Anderson, a resident of the Little Terrace.
Lees has been in jail on the charge since
last Friday, having been arrested on that
(day by Officers McGrath and McGillic, who
had been searching for him since October
5, the day of the alleged assault.
A ,Pair of Black Eyes.
Mliss Anderson came to the county at.
torley's office this morning to give the
particulars of the beating which she
charges I.ees with having administered to
her, and incidentally to exhibit the dying
out marks of the black eye he gave her.
She says that Lees met her onl South
Wyomting street, and there assaulted her,
striking her in the face and knocking her
down, thus leaving her left eye bruised
aind swollen. The deputy county attorney
was informed that Lees has adumitted
threatenilng to beat the young woman, and
th;at hie admitted to lBarney Mct;illic that
he had beaten her.
The reason for the chastisement thtus ad
ntitistered with the hare fist was a fecling
of deep and bitter disappointment surginlg
through the breast of the defendant, Ac.
cording to the story related to Mr. C'ole
man, I.ees had boasted that he would "win
out a happy home" at No. 17, Iittle Ter
race, where the complainant resides, but
when he tried to carry his boast into ef
fect, Miss Anderson would not let hint live
at the place.
Only a Dream.
Ip other words, the roof blew off the
house so confidently erected by his imo.
_aiidation.
So. s'death, he would have revenge,
and therefore harded the girl the hump
under the left optic. The complaint will
be filed in Justice O'Connor's court, and
the deputy prosecutor will endeavor, Imeta.
iphorically speaking, to hand him a larger
bump, which will land him inl the county
jail fur a month or so.
MRS, J. S. HAMMOND
HAS THE FUR SCARF
THE HANDSONME SOUVENIR OF HEN
NESSY'S FALL OPENING HELD
LAST MONDAY.
I SEA THE ACKNOWLEDGMENT
The usual large crowd of Saturday
shoppers at Hennessy's big store was
greatly augmented by many of those who,
at Hennessy's grand opening a week ago
today, wrote their addresses on numbered
tickets and placed them in the strong box
for the drawing that took place Saturday
evening at 9 o'clock.
T'he suit and wrap department gave its
bhandsomest fur neck scarf as a souvenir
at that fall opening and naturally an inm
rimlcls amount of interest was engenlered
land {sundreds watched the closing exer
cises with deep interest.
Mrs. J. S. lltmotnd was the winner.
A very young girl, Miss Olive Marie
King, of West Granite, drew each of the
tickets, the fifth and winning one decid
ing the contest.
As each one was for herself, there was
no applause, but every person present
could see that all promises had been
carefully carried out and the generosity
of the big store was appreciated. tUpont
receipt of the souvenir Mrs. Hianmmond
sent the following letter:
Butte, Mont., Oct. 12, 90o3.
Hennessy Mercantile Co.:
Dear Sirs: I have just received the
cautiful fur scarf which I was so for
'tunate as to win on last Saturday.
It is even more beautiful than I thought,
and I assure you it will give me great
pleasure to wear it. I thank you so much
for your good wishes.
Thanking you again and wishing you
all prosperity, I am yours sincerely,
A. E. HAMMOND.
Mrs. J. S. HAMMOND,
803 West Granite.
Americans May Evacuate.
Constantinople, Oct. sa.-More claims of
the American legation have been satisfac
torily settled, the more important being
the issue of the firemen granting to Dr.
Banks permission to excavate the ruins of
Rismah in Mesopotamia.
be
,o
Rt YoutServlce
In this establishment are two valu
able things; the newest, most attrac
tive wall paper and expert workman
ship in attaching the paper to your
walls. At your service, too, is our ex
perienced skill in matching borders and
ceilings to wall decorations-an item
worth considering.
CARDER WALL PAPER CO.
C. V. IRANZMAN, Prop,
Ias W. Parlk t., King Blk. 'Phone so6.
LINOL IUM
AND ]1 Hi
fLOOR OILCLOTH
S OME FOLKS don't know the dif
ference; some merchants are not
over-particular to explain it to their cus
tomers. The house of the people calls
things by their right names. If we sell
you linoleum you get linoleum. If we
sell you oilcloth you get oilcloth. Our
cheapest grade of linoleum is far better
than the best oilcloth made. Our best
grade of oilcloth is better than a great deal
of the so-called linoleum. to o o
Two carloads just opened. Why not let us cover your
room now, before the cold weather sets In? We can do a
better Job, and it will save you much Inconvenience.
LINOLEUM PRICES ARE
OSc 75c SSc
A YARD A YARD A YARD
FLOOR OILCLOTH PRICES ARE
28c 40c 48c
A YARD A YARD A YARD
YOUR CREIDIT 18 GOOD
Mail Us Your Orders--We Pay the Freight.
Brownfield=Canty Carpet Co.
S8 to 54 West Park, 41 to 43 West Galens Street, ButteL
MARS, YOUNG AVERS
SHE ISN'T CRAZY
WOMAN TAKEN TO COUNTY JAIL IS
VEHEMENT IN PROTESTA
TIONS OF SANITY.
DOES NOT LIKE THE POLICE
Mrs. Young Says She Will Never Marry
a Man Who Wears a Star-She
Says She Is Very Wealthy.
Mrs. Evangeline Youlng, a woman who
says she was a resident of Augusta, Moot.,
and was bound for Baker ('ily, O)re., whenl
arrested in Butte, is a prisoner at the
county jail under a charge of insanity.
Mrs. Young was arrested Friday by
Policeman Pace, having arrived in this
city on Thursday. This morning she made
several demandls to be released from jail
and declared that she was not insane and
that she had broken no laws.
While she talked with an interviewer
her speech was exceedingly rational and
even sensible, although marked by a
rather emphatic and scornful manner and
considerable hostility towards the police.
Hates the Police.
"No, sir; I certainly would not marry
any man who wore a star," she declared,
and her black eyes flashed as she spoke.
Mrs. Young is about 38 years old and
seemed to be in the finest of health.
The jailers declare she is crazy and say
she asked for a pair of overalls and a
jumper to dress in when she was brought
to the jail. Asked why affe had not
"made up" this morning and why she
wore her dress skirt turned up, she de
clared that she had just arisen-it was
io:3o-and that the place was so dirty
she was loth to let her skirt down. The
clean floor of the corridor contradicted the
latter statement, however,
Lost Her Trunk.
The lady said that she put up at the
Morris house when she came to Butte,
and that she was arrested there. She also
declared that her trunk had been lost off
the stage while she was traveling from
Augusta to Craig on the railroad.
According to her story she owns mines
at Baker City, Ore., and she is going there
to work in them. The reason she got off
at Butte, she says, is because her sister
and brother-in-law once lived here and she
supposed they were here yet.
She insisted that she is not ihsane and
was indignant because of her arrest.
An Awful Threat.
"They will not even let me get my hair
comb," she said. "But I don't care if I
don't comb my hair in here, and they'll
have to pay the storage on all my things,
you see if they don't" she added.
Her case will be investigated and the
county physician will keep tab on her for
awhile and try to learn if her mind is
affected.
TO CURE A COLD IN ONE DAY
Take Laxative Bromo Quinine Tablets.
All druggists refund the money if it fails
to cure. E. W. Grove's signature Is on
each box, qe.
WE
WANT
YOUR.
We know that if you B
are not getting your
printing done by us U
you are losing some
thing, either in time,
price, quality or quan
tity. Our work is al- A
ways above the stand
ard, our price is always
fair. You won't be E
ashamed of InterMoun
tain printing, and 'it S
will make business for
you. Phone 428. S
LAWYERS ARE READY
BUT JUDGE HARNEY IS NOT ON
HAND AND 80 NO COURT
IS HELD.
Judge Ilarney was expected to hold
court Saturday, but he did not hold it.
Judge lHarney was expected to hold court
today, but he did not hold it.
Saturday was the day to which he had
previously adjourned his court several
days ago, and the lawyers were around the
courtroom then to do business with the
judicial officer of that department. An ad
journment was taken Saturday by the clerk
till today, and the lawyers were there
again this morning, but there was no judge
present.
Judge Harney is reported to be hunting
in the Sun river country. It is understood
that he expected to be back in Butte by
Saturday and resume business then, but
evidently something upset his plans.
HARRY CORTLAND'S CASE
The case of Harry Cortland, charged
with forgery and obtaining money under
false pretenses, was continued until
Wednesday by Judge McClernan today.
The case came up on a demurrer to the
complaint. At the preliminary hearing
before Justice Doran, a demurrer to the
complaint was urged by Attorney Newton,
but was overruled.
The same action was taken by Cort
land's attorney in the district court and
the hearing on the demurrer will be heard
Wednesday.,

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