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The Butte inter mountain. (Butte, Mont.) 1901-1912, October 26, 1903, Image 1

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THE BUTTE INTER MOUNTAIN
VOL XXIII. No. 188. BUTTE MONTANA, MONDAY, OCTOBER 26, 1903. PRICE FIVE CENTS
__-- _________ ------ -' ~,. ' -~=-=T;-t~.~. ~ I--.` I I .Tll~ur -- _ -- - ...IzzI`, ,.... .
ASSEMBLY AND A
THE UNION
ARE ON
Silver Bow Trades and La
bor Body Indorses the
Miners' Action.
AS TO BUYING STO(K
Committee Will Arrange
for Mass Meeting--Peti
tion to Governor.
The Silver Bow Tra.es and Lab.or as
sembly at its meeting last night indorsed
the action of the Miners' union in offering
to buy the little block of stock now held
by John MacGinniss in the Boston & Mon
tana company. The assembly decided to
support the miners in every way possible.
The motion to indorse was talked over
briefly.
The assembly has decided to hold a pub
lic mass meeting tomorrow or Wednesday,
when the industrial depression which
threatens the state will be discuoand.
The following named men were ap
pointed as a committee to make the ar
rangements for the mass meeting.
f. J. Geraghty, Butte Typographical
union.
Frank Doyle, Machinists' union.
Mike Dempsey, Miners' union.
Mack Hendricks, Teamsters' union.
James P. Murphy, Miners' union.
W. W. Erler, Barbers' union,.
F. W. Cronin, Cooks and Waiters' union.
Vincent Doody, Butte Office Employes'
union.
Frank Reber, Clerks' union.
Peter Stevens, Blacksmiths' union.
Joseph Corby, Stationary Engineers'
union.
Patrick O'Leary, Painters' and Decorat
ors' union.
Gus Frankel, Workingmen's union.
Barney Lindsay, Stationary Engineers'
uniozn
A sub-committee was appointed to look
up a place to hold the meeting. The main
committee is in session this afternoon at
* o'clock at 34 North Main street.
It is understood that the committee can
secure the Auditorium for Tuesday or
Wednesday nights. It has not yet been
decided definitely which night the meeting
will be held.
Among the things talked of by the com
mittee is the sending of a great delegation
from Butte to interview Governor Tooie
concerning the calling of a special session
of the legislature to pass adequate laws
by which the present crisis in the industrial
affairs of the state may be averted.
It is purposed to send 5oo men to
Helena as a committee from the vast arilmy
of workingmen of Butte. This imposing
delegation will call on the governor and
present a petition for the special session
of the legislature.
PLEADS NOT GUILTY
Isaac Gravelle Answers to
Dynamite Charge in
District Court.
SPECIAL TO TIIE INTER MOUsNTAIN.
Helena, Oct. 26.-"Not guilty," respond
ed Ike Gravelle to the question of Judge
Smith today when the alleged dynamiter
was asked to plead to the information
charging assault. He was remanded for
trial He has not been able to furnish
the $2,ooo bonds exacted.
Tomi Ross, who said he participated in
the memorable battle of Manila bay under
Admiral Dewey, pleaded guilty to burglary
in the first degree in breaking into R. C.
Wallace's store recently and stealing some
ar'icles, The court in coi.sideration of
his record let him off with 18 months in
the penitentiary. A man by the name of
Maurer, alleged to have been Ross' com
panion in the crime, pleaded not guilty.
FAIL TO FIND POISON
IN FALK'S 'INTESTINES
IMr. Hall Begins Suit Against Father of
Dead Man, Who Had Her Charged
With Son's Murder.
SPECIAL TO TIIEINTER MOUNTAIN.
Great Falls, Oct. a6,-The examination
of the stomach and liver'of A. W. Falk,
who was exhumed to see whether he had
been poisoned by his mother-in-law and
his wife, as alleged, resulted in the failure
to find poison. Coroner Gordon, who is
a physician, claims that he read of a case
wherein the poison was found in the lower
bowel and for that reason lie ordered the
body again dug up and that organ re
moved for examination. Meanwhile Han
nah Hall, Falk's mother-in-law, is in jail
here and her attorney will probably seek
to get her out on a writ of habeas corpus.
She commenced a $So,ooo slander suit
today against Julius Falk, father of the
dead man, and Harry Falk, the latter's
brother, who signed the complaint against
her, charging them with slander.
Elkins Is Better,
BY ASSOCIATED PRES,.
Philadelphia, Oct. a6,-The condition
of William L. Elkins, the multi-million
alre, who is dangerously ill at his home
here, is reported today to be slightly inm
proved. The report that surgeons had,
found it necessary to amputate the pa
tient's leg in order to check' the spread
of gangrene was positively denied.
ALDERMEN ENTER I
VIGOROUS DENIAL
RYAN AND HEANY SAY BELMONT
MiNE HAS NOT BEEN FLOODED
FROM THE CAMBERS.
HAVE CHARGE OF THE LATTER
Brand as Maliciously False Rumor Set
Afloat to Effect that a Bulkhead
Has Been Blown in.
A rumor published this morning emanat
ing from the Heinze headquarters to the
effect that the Belmont mine was being
flooded by water from the Cambers work
ings, has called forth a vigorous denial
from Aldermen M. Ryan and Patrick
Heanny, who have the Cambers under their
care.
The story alleged that a bulkhead be
tween the Cambers and the Belmont had
been blown out and the water allowed to
run into the Belmont.
In speaking of the affair today Messrs.
Heany and Ryan stated that they had
owned a lease in the Cambers, which ex
pired recently. Atfer the expiration of
the lease these gentlemen were employed
I by Mr. Gillie to take care of the workings
I and protect the property.
1 Mr. Heany was highly indignant when
shown the statement alleged to have eman
ated from Max Fried, to the effect that
the bulkhead had been removed by the
r Cambers people.
"You can say for myself and Mr. Ryan
that we brand the statement as an unquali
'. fled falsehood. We do not know who is
it responsible for it, but whoever he is the
above applks to him.
"\VWe have watched this property care
fully and there has been no one down
there to molest that bulkhead, and if it
I has been removed it was done from the
Heinze side. We have been tanking water
all the time and none of it has gone into
the Belmont. You can make this denial
as strong as you please.
"This report has been circulated mta
liciously, and we wish to brand it as alb.o
; lutely false."
CREW SAVED, BUT THE
BARGE HAS GONE DOWN
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
t- Port Huron, Mich., Oct. 26.-After
lying helplessly about in Lake Huron all
night in a ,furious storm, the b;,rge .;race
' Whitney, which had broken away from
the steamer M. Sicken, went on the beach
k seven, miles,above Fort Gratiot lighthouse
n at daybreak. .The crew was saved. The
t vessel is breaking up.
CROWO ASSEMBLES
TO HEAR HEINZEAT
COURT HOUSE
ig F. Aug. Heinze got out handhills today
ad announcing that at 4 o'clock he would
i nmeet the Miners' Union commtittee on the
steps of the courthouse "to listen to any
proposition they may have to make to him
as the representative of John Mac(;in
niss" and "to explain to the public his
views of the situation."
As the Inter Mountain goes to press a
large crowd is assembling in front of the
courthouse. The street crowd from the
0 front of Miners' Union hall is going there
in a body.
PEARSON HAD THE BEST
OF ITALIAN TROUBLE
Although It Appears That the American
Consul Was Wrong in Offering Af
front to Italian Railway Man.
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
Rome, Oct. 26.-From the political in
quiry it appears that Richmond Pearson,
formerly United States consul at Genoa
and now minister to Persia, as announced
Saturday, was fined in default $60 and
$15 costs for insulting an Italian rail
road official on December 20o, zgoo, was
completely within his right in complain
ing of the behavior of the railroad official
referred to, but it is alleged that Mr.
Pearson was himself wrong by insulting
the official.
Mr. Pearson claims the immunity en
joyed by the diplomatic body, but it seems
when the incident occurred he had not
yet been appointed minister to Persia.
It is also asserted that his letter to the
United States embassy here, asking to have
the sentence annulled, is in such form
that it cannot be shown to the Italian
minister for foreign affairs,
EXTRADITION TREATY TO
INCLUDE BRIBERY CASE
United States Seek to lMake Agreement
With France by Which Rogues May
Be Dragged Back to Justice.
Paris, Oct. 26,-Carrying out Instruc
tions recently received from Washington,
Ambassador Porter has begun negotiations
for an additional clause in the extradition
treaty between the United States and
France to cover bribery. The formalities
will take some weeks, but the informal
conference indicates the willingness of
the French officials to make the desired
extension.
It is doubtful, however, whether they
will be willing to make the clause retro
active so as to include bribery committed
before the clause goes into effect. The
ambassador is seeking to expedite the nego
tiations, and the French authorities are
manifesting a desire to fully meet the
wishes of the United States.
To Otart Cotton Mills.
Liverpool, Oct. a'.-The newly arriv
ing cotton from America is being rushed
to the mills as rapidly as possible. Busi
ness is being resumed throughout Lan
cashlre, where the mills reduced their
time of working to four days per week
since August last, ,
LAIKEIEW HOUSE IS
TOTAL LOSS BY
FIERY DEMOI
Blaze of Mysterious Origin
Destroys Roadhouse
Out on the Flats.
Between it 'and ta o'cldock last' night
the Lakeview house, three lunarters of a
mile north of the Ninc Mile house, was
destroyed by file.
The origin of the blaze is a mystery.
No one was known 1o te iabout the place.
Joseph Swazey, the occupant, having left
early in the evening to go to town. There
are no ranches or buildings in the im
mediate vicinity, hut the rrsidents at a
distance saw the hl:ee and horried to
the scene. They arrived too late to do
any good--the hotel an,. harn were both
destroyed before they got there.
The L.akeview house was a popular
roadbottse, hailt wtrout live years ago.. T'tle
tew buildiug t ok in tile famuous old log
house that stood an the sight. 'There
have been aeveral owners of the place.
but a few tmonths ago Joseph Swazey land
his associates sold it to .Mlalcolm .c
Ilonald.
Swazey conttioned to occupy the house
and he owlned the contents, as well as the
barn full of hay, all of which ace de
stroyed. The loss on the house is about
$t.oloo, partly covered by insutrailce. Mr.
Swazey's loss is about $1,8oo, a small part
of which is said to be covered by insur
ance.
The l.akeview house site is en the line
projtected by the 'lttshttlrg & Mnttttllllt
complny. Amntin real estate men it is
reported that the property was to pass to
the hands. of thait company to hb 'used in
connection with its plan to build up a
pleasure resort ill the vicinity.
RECEIVER IS INDICTLD
Gigantic Land Frauds in
Oregon Said to Have
Been Unearthed.
nV AWSOi0lAth . I,'I,:.
t Portland, Ore., (Ict. 26.---'I lhre 'nitt01
States grand jury today returlted an indict
mnetlt against Asa II. Thompson, rccivcr
of land office at l.a Grande, Ore. The in
dictment charge"s T'hompson with soliei4
ing il oney to influence his oflici;l decisdoti
for approval of homenstead applClictiu,i,
which had been held up for insouliciency
of proof.
T'lhere are three counts in tlhe indlict
lenlt andl almong the wit lcnses :i!l:aillst
Thompson is ('hatles Cunittng1hamti, a well
known stockmlan otf Eastern O(regon. It i,
alleged tu:at Thlompson approached C'u.
nlinlgh:h l alld olfiered to nthave iL O i0 ap
plications approved ill eo·aidleratii nif
$500oo. The other cotunts concelrn the a!,
leged dealilng with Asa Rnaymind to whoan
hie is allheril to liav: i oltferel his ,rrvi ,
y for $5 i the ase ca of eachl application.
I The interior departnt bnt h:s uul a
C general agenlt ill this state for tmany
months past inve.stigating alleged frauds
in the entry of public lands.
PRESIDENT WILL SEE
THE MINERS OF
THIS CITY
Mlalcoln Gillis this afternood i received
the following telegram from Presidet
Roosevelt's private secretary:
"Washilngton, Oct. z6.--'l'he president
will be glad to see you and conmmittee
a here any day you select in Novembgir.
d Please advise me what dlay would lie
d most convenient for you.
SWII.LIAM I.OEB, JR."
a This is in line with the invitation the
- prseident personally extended when haje
S last May to Mr. (;illis atndt Frank Doylc,
president of the Silver iow Trades and
SLabor assembly, to visit hli with a comi
inittee of other representative Butte labor
- ing ment in Washington this fall.
s The names of the colmmlittee have not
t yet 'been selected.
DEMURRERS HRD
Judge McClernan overruled two de
murrers this morning in criminal cases.
The first was that of Attorney Newton on
behalf of Harry Cortland, charged with
forgery.
A demurrer was also entered to the
complaint, charging Anita Miller and
Grace Johnson with grand larceny.
Attorney Thresher argued the demutrer
at some length, but the court overruled it.
No time was set for hearing in the
case, and it will not be heard until a jury
is selected, The attorneys for the defend
ants offered to produce them in court next
Wednesday, but the court could not
promise a hearing on that date.
The complaining witness in this case,
Davis by name, is reported seriously ill
in the county jail, aond the county phy
sician has recommended that he be re
leased. This will probably be done.
STEERAGE PASSENGER GONt
He Quarreled With 'Italians on a Ship
Far Out at Sea.
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS,
Philadelphia, Pa., Oct. s6.-The steatm
ship Nordland arrived today from Liver
pool with Thomas Hall of Manchester,
England, a. steerage passenger mispg.
Hall Is said to have quarreled with
Italians and his disappearance was noted
a half hour later. The commissioner of
immigration Is investigting the c.g ,
IWO BURNEO IN BAD I
FIRE IN HOTEL
IN MISSOULA
Historic Mix House, Gar
den City Landmark,
Destroyed by Fire.
S I 'l It. 1( O I N' i lit 1i NI\IN.
Ibtter tkllownll tI l th ie Mlix I(lhouse, cornier
,of Woo\ly ldt Sprtuce i treetiI, llnr of the
landma1rks of Misso.la, wlas dtroyed hy
lire tIlty in .i of the w rt t t etilll'gra
tilo s iell in lMir:eIuta ill sevtrill )arMr.1
Lut1ckilyl tlh fire occurrtedl i t ll day tim, 1
otherwise thisi dirpa-ftch miight haveI to
record a loss of life.
,4An it w;as tllhere twere a nIuntrI r of
Iallrrow' elltapre.s, anlt o ' malI, lIho jttumped
from li stlttllc cll story wilndlow, lwas so haIlly
iritirrd t l h; it, he n; Iy die.
'rlle vlihlit g was entirvly of frame and
provted it Ile highly intilufl;.lah.
Soon aifter the firea was( discovered' ill
Uft b venl.t11 , a here it ,haI lr'.t.ulIbty
bIen ii sm'o:1 !cri ;, 1ll nightl it hurst
lthrougKh the rroof lll gainedl ltrmltlndousy
:headway.
lThe fire dep:tmlllU't ,as pronlmply fnu
lit, ' . 'II ll " .l l I I' ' h ( 1 It'll rl feoiu lIl
lthe scene i;n ll iby hard worIf iat'd a y
.joitling b1uihlilngs. and even some .ti the
w.li of tile dtouo d strcltrek,
1100. jlThere was $.s1 ..:. iltlrncl tke
$to,aoo on the buihling and $. goo on
t1 e frlitritltre. T'elt b tilding w: h a two' 1
.tlor)y frame and was built malIy y'ars
ago h; Mr. Mi, a pione,'r, amt fd 11th 1h 1
'1' i il'-re was lirsºt di lcoverell' : 1,nt ,I
ah IU. an rl in a relrll kalll ,: ,horl tim e thle
1,(I( ingU w .as il ui , only. part of thfle
1' old "::st bI ihliln-s er. cte'd il these path.
Stie 4Y or moHERIFF SEIZES TUNO 11 IT
w ne weer still ii lth ir ronuns ,.hi hlad
" rrw., t rcaplers. F'cw if 11ny saved even
: ,i- < thin.,. .. 11. larm .lt, a I nsla
t rer, jontl,'tl from hiai roost ill Ci.r , co-,1
:1ln lilt lm en w t "re h1t l'ly in, to h is r , ;,utt.
HIe, !,'nca e davedl :4,1 cxcits d ill the
Ile tVe,. k on a ! take in tu 1i l1 and
wa'I inj:ir, I inttrnall/ ant1d abhIII tIht'
! a ll. 'l he t i ,lat nt of hi , injurres is not
Ity a straI'; (: c"incidcei. the very room
Sc mtplt h; I';arrult was partially saved
nl 'l.w r "il;op . . h,: wi', pulled frfnll lar
hell andl token it, a pluce of safely.
Mr. (' rlri, relpresentiug the lh1tte
Miner, wa'. g;vin material for a story, a,
hr I had i close cal. He loII t all his
cl :'ling, his blr.e and $.1o in :ash, which
he forgot in his hta lte tfo depart.
burne, uhout the hadu amd face.
DOWIE'S COACH AND
HORSES ATTACHED
DEPUTY SHERIFF SEIZES TURNO'.JT
FOR RILL OWED BY THE ELI
JAH ORGANIZATION.
cva short liurk. Today begins lh tst wkly
of taile iIa;'s reT o the io work° ire thioai
city.
Ant iii ttachlIilt was sarve d tolay tils
was tc ing drlvy a pal t the Ial ifth Avciien
wioth a dclaty sllrikli juipged oii t drivs
r'sw seat, ecrv~e d thi atact hlllcnt a pii tler
roaci stll tme. odailh cogach alt Iiealltl wlll
idroi ttah it m.s serve1 ataychm, ist
saj to he for $r,oo a and was sthe ure by
Att rngy Ribgirt E. Erty, th is claVi be
ingh for deputyrvices irllid d in dfcleing J.
eruthr iat, serson of White lain, a former
ioanite wio a th convicted for allowinl
his child to dier $withot dical w as.suitance
in his morning address today, )ow ic
said that he had nti right to the Inati of
l)owie, and that lie did not know who his
father was. The occasion for the state
menit was certain letters published by a
mIlorning niewspaper purporting to show
that 1)~wie had caist off his own father.
Years ago .)owie said Ihe had a painful
revelation mnade to him that John Murray
1)owic, to whomll the letters were written,
was not his father. lie said thle clder
IDowie handed hitm certain docuiments oni
which he would sWpeak tonight.
Dowic declared that he was glad the
matter was out, as the letters had bteen in
the hands of certain persons for years.
During his address lie again denounced
.the newspapers and demanded the estab
lishmnent of a censorship to protect clergy.
men, politicians, judges and businss men
from newspaper attack.
The house to house visitation, in Jersey
City by thle D)owtitcs was begun today.
SENATOR IS TO WED
Atlanta, Ga., Oct. 6.--T'lhe Journal is
authority for the announcement of the.
marriage tonight in this city of Unite;l
States Senator William M. Stewart of
Nevada, and Mrs. M. A. Cone of Madison,
Ga. The marriage, according to the
Jeurnal, will take place In the parlors of the
Piedmont hotel and will be performed by
Dr. H. L. Bradley of this city.
TO FORM A CABINET
FOR AUSTRIAN EMPEROR
Budapest, Oct. a6.--Emperor Francis
Joseph has entrusted Count Stephen Tizza
with the task of forming a new cabinet.
Count Tizza is a son of ex-Premier Cole.
man Tizza and Is thoroughly loyal to the
emperor, with whose views he lreee.
PRESIDE i ý G'S
VERSION OFi LK
MINERS' UNION OFFICIAL TELLS OF
INTERVIEW WITH CLANCY AT
LATTER'S HOME.
HIS HONOR IS MISTAKEN
Uinion Men Did Not Ask Him to Remain
in Butte Six Days or to Negotiate
With John MacGinniss.
"I notice that Jud ile Clancy has an inter
'iw ilc the MiJ nr this rlli'ilt g," said
I"d LongI presidenIt of the Milllers' aunion,
tclthy. "in which he says that thle eat.lltlit
t It'lroli t iout u1lnii't askedl hilnt to slay il
Itil six di aytt.
'*Th . facts of the maunter are that the
\lintrs' union olitmiuittee did trot ask him
to stay six dllys or aniy other milmber of
Idays. VWe asked hint to stay until this
Irblnhil hal, beent settledl, adl he said he
would. Ills lislin l g itaclkle andl other lug
gage wasC in lithe ilr at the time already
packed, (iur ontly requellst of hii wits to
cIlalin t in ltltte; we didn't ask hit to Iuse
his iihtiiicr wit Ii Jiohn Maet inunisn to sell
his u.loIk in the hi oslctc & Montana 1 t comi
pallly.
No Definite Answer.
"\\'r still hopz dl thaiit M rt;inucisc would
return ald lhal hle w.cuhl lmeet the colmuitt
'e" iril tih .Milvners' lunion. In the Ievent
ldge iC (',nuy wais out of totl 1 am11 Mac;
c,iiinii. a'iel ul hI: k, t l did no knoiiw
ithx i hc -r 114t hIe cr u hl dispose of tlihe
slck whil'e the suit wa .s peinding. We,
askeil juildge tilluc) it MIartiutiis' ctouil
,hl 1h11,, t a lih t gi ve tis lit) delilliie ianswer.
"\\t had m, ntllh on at o asklltg Judge
'L1c.r l lto asist uc i ll i negot iationslll with
lhuo Ml actiiiisc, nor duld me. \'c went
to Judgeil I' l; icy's hliouse for ll e li sole tir
pose of uskin; hium i -say ill ih1l lte, willt
%wh t' h c xplll- pr' std ll- p1urpose of remain
ing here our bosinsw, a ilh him was lilt
No Violence Contemplated.
"We dlii nult say that flit mliners had
iad " its their i1indls 1o tcake lith' imatter
ioth thtir own htands anild settle it peace
hilly if pasc.iicl and fli b ly if net'xesary.
'e had niii such intention,, adtl I can speak
for the Miners' l union si i far at-, to saxy tlot
we lii lll ot i ll t duin hiave' iot ciitlie plalt'
using fiorct'e."
Judige I laicy in the, interview iltc
li-tctled say, that hie dIlosn't mind in the
hIi;nt Ile little extiletllivit incidn'lt to
Illtttiiug c.',oc lilet it o if eipll cloyliiltl.
" lTieri sceiis to be cu.cidcranhle of an
x l. ilv inti," ithe judge is uitnted is sxay
ing, "hut it di ' n'lt e'xcite ii si l n iclh us
sum p dli' might slppuste. I hiave baeen
in similar excitemiutsi h.eofre in iiy ex
perie,'cre, both here tu i1i Missouri, where
I cameii frul."
"lI'hien hlis hlonor states that the 1guardsc
about hlis house amtl the rcxolver in his
otcii were thru',t upouc him by it well
ca illci 4g iand z.eclous it fietl.
Fears Fanatics.
"I cxill c:." :a dled the jl;udge in his in
Icriie w, "that pluhamp it is xic, for a
11:111 io l iy p ,itii l It to h ctvt khne a wxiapcni
lhai dy ill dint's sori as it ecc. I hcavi' in
ch:' of ratali.n;d I I III, beU the'e cii al
'ways " ccl' n iary ,161411s u, ci;clcci thati it
,icl'd he I wI'll to giuid . gi aic l tl."
.udt- Icla ry coul,) a well di ,lp.ii n
illh ucaids :l ; l hii , rrvhtcv r, lar there is
041 Ialh r lirgacli/:ilicol 111 the coilllrry that
is ix s free Iron "tr:ivy i t lilt,';us" Ias lit
Niltl ' M '!.r' mci.n. 'I i iin hi t hI , l
llrv aivihe l laillb ' tllunan in the \\'est sill all
i1e saie linhwi' Ihe UoI ll ive.
It is 'the boo anil ,iL'w elf Ilde union
ism in lti" .ocky 1uicntaii i tegiclc ian dl
lthc Urcu ixuho hcave lihi hiallling of ilts
;illaairs have itc: full cc1tlidclcvc lilt cooll
No ;clt of hcaxixlex-c'c, or viulienee wouhlI
i{be countena'uc i cc d by lithe Miers' union of
lintle, cilt its ol cli'trs till see io it that
life sd property will be ehil .sared.
UNABLE TO FIND J.
MACINNISS IN
SALT LAKE
Where is Johit Macttinnins?
WVhho kiows the answer?
.\ dispatch from Salt J.ake last nigot
said that ihe had arrived there, registered
at the Wilson hotel amil denied his iden
ti't, o rIeporters. A forimer utllte ac
quaintancee recognized him and sent this
infortmation to Ittie :
Later the Associated PIress sent out the
report that on his arrival ill Salt Lake
Mae'c(;inniss had gone at onice to the holle
of a friend in that city atnd had reftused
to dislicuss the conditioni of alTairs iin ilutte.
The agent of the Associated PIress at
Salt Lake this afternoonl sent the follow
ing ncssage to tile inter Mountain in reply
to a rcquest for an interview with Mac
Gilniss:
"Heen after Mact;inniss all day. Not
able to find hilll."
HE IS TO BE SHOT ON A FRIDAY
Ogden, Oct. 26.--At Farmnlgton today
Judge IHolapp sentenced Nick ilaworth
to be shot on Friday, December it. IIa
worth about four years ago killed Thomas
Sandall, watchman inl a store at Layton.
Haworth was one of the prisoners who
escaped from the penitentiary two weeks
ago and 'was recaptured after four days'
liberty.
Hail in Buffalo.
BY ASSOCIA'I'FD PtiES,.
Buffalo, N. Y., Oct. a6.-Bail has been
falling here since day break but disap
pears almost as fast as it falls, Snow fell
at a number of places in the state today,
the first of the season.
Fire in Celtic's Hold.
Liverpool, Oct. a6.-A quantity of cot
ton, leather and general merchandise in
the fourth hold of the White Star liner
Celtic, which arrived here October 24 from
New York, caught fire today, but the
flAmes were soon extinguished.
MINERS' UNION
RECEIVES A
REPORT
.Committee Tells of Flight
of MacGinniss and the
Situation Now.
TALK WITH CLANCY
Union Hears Report to the
Elffect That His Honor
Will Remain Here.
The lluttre Miiter' union hell a special
mlrcltilg this a fterltotnt to recrivv, the re
part of tile eontlit tee which haid eret,
sit to intterview Johnt Matl ;intias trelt
live to -rllinllg hi little lnock of stuck il
the' Iitaia n & ilIatatt t .onmpanttty.
The cnulluitt r reported that Mael;lino
niss had left town ttddlenly, Saturhday
tevernig, and had not beiten heard of siace.
It was sutllpposed that ie was lit Salt I.take.
The emutittee had e alled upon Judge
( aney tand had asked himt tu postpone his
jiakrabbit trip until the appeal to the .tt
preme court could ie miadle. Judge t'lanlcy
hadII col nted to sta iy ill Butte for a timlte.
'T'here was a large ahttendaltre at the
mt vitl tg, which w;ia still in progrbs when
this editioan of the Intter Mhuutaitn went
BOLD BANDITS BLOW
OPEN SAFE OF A
BIG BANK
SHERIDAN, B. C., VISITED BY GANG
OF QUiIET AND BUSINESS
LIKE THUGS.
IY ASSO('IATtPD PRFRI.
Portland, Ore., Oct. a2.--A special to
the Evening Telegram from Sheridan, R.
('., says: At 3 o'clock this morning banll
,its enler'ed the banking house of Scog
uills & Wortman at this place, blew open
Ithe s(le with giantl powder, secured $7,ono
iln cin and made tlhe.ir escape before the
slee,ping residents of the town, could be
lThe bank is situated in a brick huilding
il the renter iof iown and was established
12 ye;ars ago. 'Ihe iprincipal depositors are
Ithe, farmerl s of thle surrountdinig country.
',isiderable busiiness had been transactedl
on SattrLrdlay and it was generally siupposed
thai;t a large Ii)IInIt of coinll was on hand.
Thle iroberls tlioo thel mlost ollpportune hour
Ifoirtheir work as the town was deep in
hslmber Iand envelopied a ni a ieiise fog.
Ni, watlhallll was 1on duty as there never
hI;as ICbeet ally ilid I guarding property.
Were Quiet About It.
The quiet mainer in which the men
worked enabledI tlhem to force the doors of
the bank amI drill a hole ,tar the combhina
tion sufliiieciily large to ilnsert a heavy
charge of ygianlt owider and blow the door
of thlie safe fromi its hiniges, but not heavy
enouglh to wre.k the buiihling.
Th'Ie suhock of the explosion awakened
Mayor E. II. lKa:kin, who lives over his
lstore ihia.notally erouss the street from the
baink, Eakii, from his window, saw a mian
standinlg a short distance from the bank,
isho a brighl t light showing through the fog
fromll the bank butiling, 'The party who
was evidently standing guard, quickly
joined his comupaujions and the entire party
jumped into a rig and started to drive to.
ward the south.
Took Shot at Them.
In an instanut the mayor realized that
the bank had been robtbed. lie secured a
rile an:d fired three hots at the men as
they disappeared down the road. The firt'
ing of the rifle aod the screams of Mrs.
Eakin aroused the citizens and in a few
mIioincIts a numiber of armed nien were on
the streets.
A hurried inspection disclosed the fact
that the robbers had made a clean job of
their work and had taken nothing from the
safe but money. Many valuable papers
were left intact. Outside a sledge and a
couple of picks were found. One of the
picks has the stump of the Southern Pacific
utpon it, showing that these tools were evi.
deintly stolen from the railroad.
The bank officials at once notified all
points that could be reached by telephone
north anli south, and Sheriff S. W. Sitton
arrived here at 8 o'clock from McMinn..
ville and began an investigation.
DOZEN INJURED WHEN
TRAINS COME TOGETHER
Delaware & Lackawanna Passengers in
Collision-Only Two 'People Are
Seriously Hurt.
aIY ASSOCItA'iTED PRESS.
New York, Oct. 26.-A rear end cold
lision between two Delaware & Lackwanna
trains occurred today at Orange, N. J.
Of the dozen passengers only two were
seriously hurt.
Both trains were crowded. The rear
train, the Barnardsville express, crashed
into the Orange accommodation, having
come rapidly around a sharp curve and
the engineer being unable to slow up.
The rear train is the same express that
crashed into the trolley car loaded with
school children at Clifton avenue in New
ark, last spring, killing nine persons.
Snow in Pittsburg.
Pittsburg, Pa., Oct. a6,--The first snow
of the season fell today, Light snow was.
general in this district.

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