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The Butte inter mountain. (Butte, Mont.) 1901-1912, November 05, 1903, Image 1

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THE BUTTE INTER MOUNTAIN
VOL XXIII. No. 197. BUTTE, MONTANA, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 1903. PRICE FIVE CENTS
I-- -- -- -- - _r_ ________________ ________ _____________
MARINES LAND
TO PROTECT
CITIZENS
Commander of Nashville
Has Been Obliged to
Take Hand in War.
FORCE IS INADEOUATE
Nashville's Men Will Have
Great Difficulty in
Restoring Peace.
ATTITUDE OF POWERS
England Believes That the
Rebellion Is Business
of United States.
aY AISOCIA'IED PRFFS,
Wahington, D. C., Nov. 5.-The navy
department has received a cablegram
from Commander Hubbard of the Nash
ville dating that he had again landed
forpes from tlht ship to protect life and
property at Colon.
Great Anxiety Expressed.
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
Colon, Colombia, Nov. 5.--9jo0 . m,.
Much anplety prevails in all quarters here
today. It is recognized that the crew of
the Nashville would be quite inadequate
to cope with the situation ashore should
serious disturbances occur, and the arrival
of the Dixie is anxiously awaited. It is
hoped she will reach Colon soon, but there
is no knowledge of what may occur before
that. The Nashville is now preparing to
again land a detachment of blue jackets.
The commotion ashore is intense.
Gen. Pompillio Guterez, one of Colonm
bia's best generals, arrived here today
front Cartagena on board the Austrian
steamer Jenny. This has intensified the
situation imnmensely.
No good results followed the confer.
ence last night at Panama of the repre
sentative of Colonel Torres, in command
of the detachment of governnent troops
which recently arrived here from Savy
nilla on the cruiser Cartagena. with Gen
eral Tovar, the commander-in-chief or
those forces.
Although Colon was perfectly quiet last
night the foreign residents here continue
to seek refuge on board the ships in the
harbor or in the buildings of the Panama
railroad, which, as ant American concern,
will be protected by the forces of the
United States.
Consul Starts for Panama.
Asheville, N. C., Nov. 5.-Hon. H. A.
Gudger, consul general to Panama. who
(Continued on Page Ten.)
TO MEET PRESIDENT
SIX LABOR MIEN FROM BUTTE ARE
CHOSEN TO GO TO WHITE
HOUSE ON VISIT.
Upon invitation'of President Theodore
Roosevelt, six members of organized labor
of Butte will dine at the White house on
November S8.
When the president was in Butte last
spring he expressed himself as being
pleased with the royal reception he was
accorded. At that time he expressed the
wish that he might show his appreciation
of the hospitality shown himt by enter
taining members of the Butte unions at
the White house in Washington.
Recently Secretary Loeb wired Malcolm
Gillis concerning the invitation, and asked
that the men be named and a time set
when they should visit the nation's capital.
Mr. Gillis answered that any time after
November IS would be agreeable to the
Butte delegation, and Secretary Loeb Inm
mediately set the i8th as the dlay when
they shbu}d visit the president at the
White house.
The men who will partake of the presl
dent's hospitality are: Malcolm Gillis,
past president of the Butte Stationary len
gineers' union; Ed Long, president of the
Butte Miners' union; Dan McDonald,
president of the American Labor union;
Frank Doyle, president of the Trades and
Labor assembly; M. R. Dempsey of the
'Miners' union, and J. W. Gilbert of the
Butte Workingmen's union.
The party will leave Butte Friday or
Saturday of next week and will be in
Washington a day or two before the day
set for their reception at the White house,
A stay of four or five days will be made
in Washington, during which time they
will be guests of the president.
Secretary Loeb will see that the party
is entertained during the stay at the
nation's capital,
ESTABLISHES 'A PRECEDENT
SY AS0OCIATED PRE88.
Bloomington, Ill,, Nov, 5.-A Jury In
$ie 'McLean county circuit court today
gave Oscar E, Green of Sabrook a verdict
of $5,ooo damages, He sued to recover
money lost on the Chiaago board of trade
and an important precedent is established
lch may enable all future losers in this
rm of transactions to recover. The de.
nse claimed that there was a bonafide
le of grain, while the plaintiff argued
t only options were purchased.
DELEGATIONS CALL
TO INTERVIEW
GOVERNOR
.MEN FROIM BUTTE, ANACONDA AND
GREAT FALLS IN CONFERENCE
WITH CHIEF EXECUTIVE.
MR. TOOLE DOES NOT SAY
WHAT HE MEANS TO DO
Another Petition, Asking for a Special
Session of the Legislature, Is Being
Circulated Today Among the
Business ,Men.
SPR('IAL. TO TIlE INTER IMOUlNTAIN.
Helena, Nov. S.-So far as action by
the governor on the petitions for a special
legislative session is concerned, there is
literally nothing doing at the executive
office today.
That the governor has not yet made up
his mind on the sutject is the latest ad
vice which comnes from the state house
this afternoon.
The chief event of the (lay in the shut
down situation was the arrival of delega
tions from Butte, Anaconda and Great
Falls, representing the business interests
of those cities, to urge (;overnor Toole,
in the interests of the state's well being
and prosperity, to call the extra session.
The Great Falls committee was to have
arrived early this morning, but it was on
the delayed Great Northern train and only
reached the city at a p. nm. Sometime
after that it went out to the state house
to have its interview with hie state's chief
executive.
The Butte delegation arrived earlier in
the day and went out to the state house
shortly after a o'clock. The Butte business
men in the party were A. F. Bray, W. 1).
Thornton. J. ID. Slemmons, D. J. Charles,
W. D. Horgan, Henry Mueller, Dr. T. J.
Murray, Andrew J. Davis and R. H. Pax
son.
(;overnor Toole received the party in
his office and had a conversation of some
length with the various members, but did
not commit himself one way or another
as to his intentions.
The Anaconda delegation had an inter
view later.
Similar delegations from the business
interests of Missoula and Bozeman are
expected today or tomorrow to call on the
governor for the same purpose.
Effect of Shutdown.
SI'ECIAT. TO THil INTER MOUNTAIN.
Dillon, Nov. 5.-The effect of the shut
down in Butte and the visit yesterday of
Short Line oflicials will be reflected in a
material manner the middle of the month
when one of the daily passenger trains
(Contintued on Page Eight.)
RUBY RIVER RANCHER
IS HELD UP BY
BANOITS
SPECIAL TO THEIP INTER MOUNTAIN.
Virginia City, Nov. s.-Marvin Eby, a ranch.
man living on the Ruby, notified the sherifl
today that four men had held him up last
night as he was driving home. lie said he
was proceeding alonlg the lower end of Wall
street, just below Chinatown, when four men
jumped in front of his team and ordered him
to throw tip his hands.
When he told them who he was the would
he highwaymen said he wias the wrong man
and allowed him to proceed. It is presumed
they were after someone they had heard would
be passing along there with a large stun of
money.
Eby is not alte to furnish a very clear do
scription of the men who gave him a fright,
and the sheriff has little to wurk on in the
shape of a clew.
POORH IN CUSTODY
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
Seattle, Wash., Nov. 5.-Frank B.
Poorh, president of the Citizens' Light &
Power company, recently organized as a
rival of a company of the same name
which incorporated in New Jersey, was ar
rested this morning on a bench warrant is
sued from the court of general session,
New York city, charging him with grand
larceny in the first degree.
SUPREME COURT ON THE
COOK AND BRAY SUIT
James Plain Is Dead.
SPECIAL. TO TlHE INTER MOUNTAIN.
Helena, Nov. S.-The supreme court in
an opinion prepared by Commissioner Cal
loway affirmed the decision of the district
court of Silver Bow county in denying a
new trial in the case of the city of Butte
against I,. E. Cook and A. F. Bray. The
city brought the suit against Cook, a sewer
contractor, and his bondsmen to recover
$a,8oo which was paid to Mrs. Margaret
Joyce for damages she secured int a suit
for $5,ooo for falling into a trench. The
city lost the suit, as the lower court in
structed the jury to return a verdict for
the defense. From a motion denying a
new trial the plaintiff appealed with the
result stated.
WORK OF EMPANELLING
A JURY IS TO BEGIN
The work of empanelling a jury In De
partment III. of the district court will be
gin next Monday and the court expects to
get down to business on Tuesday. There
are a number of capital offenses to be dis
posed of besides a large accumulation of
misdeameanor and felony cases.
James Plain Is Dead.
Great Falls, Nov. S.-James Plain, the
Greart Northern fireman who was injured
In the wreck six miles west of Minot4when
a train went into the litch, is dead, accord
ing to advice. received here, He lived at
Williston.
HEINLE AND MEN
UP FOR CONTEMPT
CITED TO APPEAR BEFORE FEDERAL
COURT IN MONTANA CAPITAL
TO ANSWER CHARGES.
TWO ORDERS ARE VIOLATED
Judge Knowles Characterizes Offense
as Serious in Setting Matter for
Trial in Helena.
That F. Augustus Hteinze and his dyna
miters have for once prestumed too muoch
upon the leniency of the courts of this
state was shown this mtorning when the
leinze attorneys appeared in the United
States courts and asked that a stay of
execution of the order of survey be
granted.
The proceedings that developed during
the hearing were sufficient to cost
vince the court that Heinze had not only
ignored the court's order, but had been
guilty of most outrageous disregard for
the order of injunction covering the terri
tory in dispute in the Michael Devitt
claim.
Former Governor Smith appeared for
the Johnstown company antd requested a
stay of execution of the order of survey
as ninde applicable to that branch of the
,M. O. I'. company, as they wished to apply
to the United States court of appeals for
a writ of certiorari.
Affidavits Read.
Immediately after Mr. Smith had made
his request for a stay of execution, Mr.
Forhis, representing the Butte & Boston
eonlmpany, read three affidavits certifyhit
to the dynamiting of the entrances to the
Michael Devitt.
"We have heen accused of doing the
dynamiting, your honor, and if it Is true
we should be severely punished," said Mr.
Forbis.
"This is a serious matter," said the
court. "It involves the violation of this
court's order. It is not necessary for the
court to make any threats as to what it
will do, but I will transfer this case to
Helena, where this question will be heard.
(Continued on Page Nine.)
HAS FILED ANSWER
TO THE SUl BY
H, H, HANSEN
Dolman Says Doctor Is to
Blame for Death of
Mrs. Belcher.
A sensational answer was 'fled today byL'
the defendant in the suit of Dr. H. H.
Hansen against Carroll G. Dolman, the
young lawyer, as administrator of the es
tate of 'Ella E. Belcher, deceased. Han
sen sued Dolman to recover $5oo, which
he alleged was owing to him for medical
and surgical services rendered the de
ceased, Mrs. Belcher.
The answer denies the debt, and charges
Hansen with fraud and deceit. It says that
Hansen did not perform $Soo worth of
medical or surgical services or any serv
ices at all.
The answer says that Mrs. Belcher had
cancer on the 8th of July, )goz, and that
she employed Hansen as a surgeon and
physician to attend -her; and that the lat
ter agreed to pay all hospital fees in the
case.
The complaint adds that it was neces
sary to remove by a surgical operation the
parts affected by the cancer, and that
Hansen agreed to do that, but that he
made a "pretended surgical operation"
upon Mrs. Belcher, but "failed and re-.
fused to remove" the parts.
It continues with the allegation that
Hansen "wrongfully and fraudulently
stated and represented to the said E. E.
Belcher and the said B. B. Belcher, that
he, the said Hansen, had by the said pre
tended surgical operation" removed the dis
eased parts from the body of Mrs. Bel
cher, "when in fact the said Hansen had
not removed the said parts or any part
thereof from the body of IMrs. Belcher."
The defendant goes on to allege that the
removal of the diseased parts from the
body of Mrs. Belcher "was a part of the
necessary surgical operation which the said
Ii. H. Hansen agreed to perform as herein
alleged, and that by reason of the failure
and negligence of said plaintiff to com
plete and carry out his agreement as afore
said, the said disease increased and the
said cancer spread to other parts and por
tions of the body of the said E. E. Bel.
cher, during the time she was under the
smedical and surgical care and treated by
the said Hansen and subsequent to the
said 8th day of July, 9go2, and that the
said failure and negligence of the plaintiff
to perform the said necessary surgical
operation on the said E. E. Belcher, this
defendant is informed and believes, and
therefore alleges the fact to be, caused the
death of the said E. E. Belcher, and she
died on or about the loth day of January,
1903."
The complaint says that Hansen failed
and refused to pay the hospital fees.
As a second cause of action the com
plaint alleges that Hansen was engaged
by B. 3B. Belcher to attend upon Mrs. Bel
cher as a physician and surgeon, and that
his "pretended" services greatly added to
her suffering.
It also says that Mrs. Belcher had prop
erty of the value of $8,ooo, and that while
she was sick, Hansen induced her to make
a will to his advantage, and that when she
grew better she had to make a new will In
order to dispose of her property as she de
sired to do.
It adds that this greatly added to her
physical and mental exertions, "all caused,
by the fraud of the said H. II. Hansen,",'
and "hastened the decline and death of the 4
said E. E. Belcher."
The defendant asks that the suit of Dr.
Hansen be dismissed, and that he be al- I
lowed his costs. Attorney Thomas Morrin
represents Dolman,
BUTTE CHARACTER
OVER THE OIYVIDE
MRS. CHARLOTTE KNOWLTON,
FEMALE LETTER CARRIER, IS
GONE TO REAP REWARD.
WELL KNOWN ABOUT SECTION
Rialp or Snow, Cold or Hot, She Mounted
Her Wagon and Carried Mail to
Suburbs of the Camp.
iMrs. Charlotte W. Knowlton, who for
a number of years has been in the employ
of the government as mail carrier between
butte, Walkerville and Mteaderville, died,
yesterday morning between ia and sa
o'clock of pneumonia.
Mrs. Knowlton was well and strong Sun
The Late Mlr. Charlote ... Know.ton.
It day and performed her duties as usual, hut
o on her return home at the endt of the day,
1. she complained of being ill. She went It
bed and rapidly became .worse until the
end camile.
TMrs. Knlowlton was lornl in 'anadtla near
Lake Megog. in May, . ia.tut, ad carue to
Montana with her husbndll in iH85. She
came of good old Scotch stock and was :1
woman full of vigor and industry.
Left a Widow.
When her husband, Alfred Knowlton,
died in t892, Mrs. Knowlton was left with
a family of three to care for.
She secured the contract for carrying
the mails between Burlington, \'alhervillc
and Meaderville, and had been eingaged inl
that occupation for about nine years.
There are many people in this city who
) will remember Mrs. Knowlton as, clad ii
furs on bitter cold wintry dlays. shll would
mount her wagon and start out for the
cheerless dtive to the little town of Bitur
lington. Snow or rain, she never disaii
pointed the eager watchers for mail a;t tllh
little postoflice when Blurlington was ImIti,
bered among the silver camps of the state.
When that postoflice was disconktillcd
after the silver panie Mrs. Knolwltoin re
tained the Meaderville and Walkerville
routes, and later carried the mail to the.
Nine Mile house and that vicinity. Of
late she had been only serving the towns
of Meaderville and Walkerville.
She Relied on Herself.
Mrs. Knowlton never sought help
from any one in caring for her bushiness
and fed and hitched her own horse whnc
she started out mornings.
It is said of Mrs. Knowlton that she felt
the responsibility of her position, and
many tines when on the road with the
mail would not turn out, but dermanled the
right of way for her equipage loaded with
the United States mail.
One day as she was turning into the
alley back of the postoflice on a fast trot,
a Chinaman started out of the alley with
his wagon. Mrs. Knowlton immediately
produced her police whistle antd blew the
signal for a right of way. The China
man thought he was up against it, and
baeked his horse through the alley for the
distance of a block.
Many times while on the road her horse
has run away and smabhed things, but thit:
mail was never late.
Last Female Carrier.
With the death of this lady goes the last
female mail carrier in the state. Mrs.
Knowlton's record is the longest of any
known woman carrier in the West, anl,
there have been few instances in the United
States where mail routes have been served
by a woman.
Mrs. Knowlton leaves three children,
one a son, Alfred, who lives at a233 ast
Silver street, the late home of the de
ceased; Mrs. George W. Smith of Dawson
City, Alaska, and Mrs. C. D. Estcy of San
Francisco.
Mrs. Knowlton was held in high esteem
by all who knew her, and her calling,
though of a vigorous, trying nature, had
not removed the inbhorn tender sympathies
of womanhood, and she was a devoted and
kind mother. At the postoftice she was
held in high favor by all who knew her,
and there is general regret at her demise.
The funeral will take place tomorrow at
it a. n. from the family residence.
"HOLY ROLLER" BACK
BY ASSOCIATED PRas.9,
Corvallis, Ore., Nov. 5.--Creffirld, the
leader of the "holy roller" band, has re t
turned to Corvallis and has taken his ste f
tion once more among his followers. He I
returned accompanied by Frank lHurt, one h
of the "rollers," who is now barboring t
Crrield in his home. There is much in. v
diloation here because Creffield has once I
more taken up his residence in this sec- n
tion.
HUMANITARIANS IN SESSION
BY ASSOCIATED PJ'SS,
Cincinnat,, Nov, .--At today's session
of the American Humane society the ad- sa
(Iress of E. K. Whitehead, secretary of f;
the Colorado Bureau of Child and Animal r
Protection, on the annual starvation of c,
cattle on Western plains elicited a lengthy a,
discussion and eoo,ooo copies were ordered b
printed for aeneral dlstrbutiosb c
STENCH OF JUDICIAL
CORRUPTION IS
TERM USED
CITIZENS OF COKEDALE HOLD BIG
MASS MEETING AND SIGN A
PETITION TO GOVERNOR
DENOUNCE THE COURTS
OF SILVER BOW COUNTY
"Purging the State From the Stench of
Judicial Corruption that Heretofore
Existed in Silver Bow County,"
Rung the Petition.
RPI'('IAL TO Till INTRIIt tIII'NrAIN.
Cokedale, Nov. 5.--l anttl cothlsiasstlr
Imeti.tg yesterlday aflteIIIrnn t which
the whole town appHieared to Ie present
in Milners' Union hall. uth citizcns adopt
ed ringing reusoltiti, calling upotin tihe
governor to toluon thl e legi.Il;tre in
special sessionl for tIhe e;Inactllll of n
fair trial hill and other Oner, l lis that
will tend to purify the jludicial atmollphere
of Silver liow County.
W. H. Willinam was chaiiriman of the
mceeting alnd Adolphl Ja1co.s seretla y. A
tnumber of prtim i 't spectlcs were en
tlhun iastically dhlivel..l ;ni d t(e.eived in
lthe *.,iei tl.iler. the lpeople if t'"o e
dule were just gIetling realy for a pel iod
of gou[ lime. \ I tIe re..llplioll of the
coking plant tilier a tultldown of icveral
years, and were deeply disapipointtel hy
the .shutdoiwi in htth, which snuspull.l
aill o.perations Iherte.
The re.oltition adoptlled sere siilgned ,iv
ii r'oll ittltei l'ittluiitiIiIg of Sain Mi ( il
tiell, Drank Aliasl aili Adolph Jacobsi and
will lie forwiardeld to (ilov.elnor T'Il'O fot ol th
with.
The re,,nhtim.s follow:
"W he'i reais, 'I h presenit iildistriail crisisl
ill the state of Ollttlm h 111' afie('t',il the
town oif ('ukels;dal, whichl was jist reI'v
cling its old- tlle pirosperity alfter being
los'edl down for eight year,, and
"Wher'as,, The prseut n shutiown in
directly doe to t the elosig of the Ann
corndna smelters, a.oil the closinig of -said
smelters is due to Iheli hb: ar., prejundice
of the collrt's of Silver Ilow i ntyllll ; an
"\Whcreas, It is the e ntionit.l of the(I
citizens of I'ickluileli' thui a fair trial bill
s'hould hl e enlert.cl; therefore, IhI it
"l(nsovrll, l That we, the citizens of
('cketl;-le, in niuhs mleetinlg aiseiiublied, re
ipe 'tfully and earnestly re.ieltl tihat Gov.
J. K. Toole of the stite ii Montansat rcall
a special (sesion of the legislitore for
tile iuripoe of l enacting ia fair trial bill
and purging 1lthe state from the stench of
ithe julliaIi u riuptiitn that has hert. ofore
txisted itn Silver Hoiw county."
IMPORTANT DECISION
ON THE DESERT
LAND CLAIMS
N'I , (I IM ' f1111 INTI'I M t 'NTAIN,
lIt lIna, Nov. 5.- 'rhi rrcgister siud re
cciver of the Ilelena land oflice tday at -
ini- linon d an iliportait rtling llecctbig
desert land claims. Edg:ar S. Allen con.
tested the entry of Alonllzo t. Ilansonl to
16o acres. As there is scime tilmblr on the
claim Allen contended it wasi a thubcer
dather than a desert claim. The I.ttd of-.
fie lrheld, however, thalt as ai Iimajor porticon
of Ihe land was desert anid witlhout tilber
it slhould be hrel to be a desert claim iIl
tile Imeaniing of the laW.
12 OF MOMMSEN'S CHIL
DREN ATTEND FUNERAL
Crown Prince of Germans Lays a Bou
quet on Bier and Dignitaries of
High Degree Kneel Down.
BmY AsaO(JIA' LD I'lti'.Sn.
Ierlin, Nov. S.--The funeral of Prof.
Monamson, the historian, took place today
at the Emperor William Metmcorial church.
A great tlnumber of scholairs, ambassadors,
cabinlet miniisters and foreign delegates
were present.
The crown prince, Frederick William,.
r( presented tile emperor. The emperor
scent a bouquet of chlrysatllhenumis, which
the crown prince laid at the head of the
bier.
Prof. Motmtsen's children, of whom 2z
of the 16 are living, occupied the chancel
with the grand-children. Frau Mommtnc,
the widow, was too ill to attend.
The octogenarian artist, Mensel, one of
the first surviving contemporaries of
Mommen's early imanlhoud, occupied a
front seat.
DUDLEY'S DEATH WAS
PURELY FROM ACCIDENT
BI'ECIAL TO tTE'le INTER IMOLNT'AIN.
Dillon, Nov. 5.-.'The death of W. J.
Dudley, the miner killed in the hnldian
Queen mine yesterday, resulted from un
avoidable causes, as the coroner's jury
which looked into the case last night re
turned a verdict that death was due to
an accident. Coroner M. A. Walker held
an inquest at the mine last evening. D)ep
uty State Mine Incspector Berry went out
to Birch creek this afternoon to inquire
further into the cause of the fatality. Dud
ley's funeral will not be held until advices
have been received from his relatives in
the East. His mother lives in Maine. He
was about so and served with the First
Montana regiment in the Philippines as a
imember of E company of Dillon,
CONSERVATIVE RETURNED
TO THE BRITISH HOUSE
London, Nov. 8.--Lord Balcarres (con.
servative), eldest son of the Earl of Craw
ford and Balcarres, has been re-elected to
represent the Chorly division of Lan
cashire In the house of commons on his
appointment as junior lord of the treasury
by a majority of 1,4s8 over the liberal
candidate. James Lawrvasr.
ROLANDO SAYS
HE 01DD THE
STABBING
Italian Confesses to Part
in Murder of Holland
in Centerville.
HIS STORY OF CRIME
Says Holland and Sullivan
Wcre Trying to Hold
Hlim Up Then.
GIVES HIMSELF UP
Fugitive Surrenders to the
Authorities-Accom
plice Also in Jail.
Iictitittk 0leihdot, who 1tahbed Detl)ui
Ilhlland in death land seriuurly .tmudedI
lit 7
I)OMINICK ROL.4NhO. .'
lohn Sultivtti last night in Ccntervilly,
tvet himself up llthis morninlg ti; the offi
traN and is now confined ill th: countly
jtil.
tie admits that hie sttlabbed JIInlald and
Sulltivalu, utll avers that it was done in
self dtfttnse,. lie declares that the men
were tbout to take his money from hilm.
This statemenit is stoutly denlied by Sulli
valln, who tahlkkedlo e the Inter Mountaitn
this mtoriting tbtnit the affaitr.
Sullivan's Version.
Atccnrdlig to the story told by Sullivan,
Ihie three iteni left ithe Toptlc tsaloon in Cen
terville lshortly hefore 6 o'clock last evycn
ing to goe to Walkerville where Holando
seid they crtd halve a good time. Ilol
lnld iand It(oltltd left iirst andt Sulliilnn
caille at fIw asecotlds later, collming up with
the two ott top of the Centerville hill.
"We walked along togetlher llltil we got
near thel catable trestle," said Sullivan.
"llere we stoppeld atl d I told Dennis that
we would better ,not go over there with
(('enlentei l 1m Page '.iglht.)
JUOl GBOYLE REFUSES
TO FINE WOMEN
IN HIS COURT
His Honor Says Mayor's
Closing Order Will Not
Bias Decisions.
Judge Boyle stated today that the women
of the prohibited district brought into his
court, for violation of Mayor Mullins'
closing order, would not he convicted.
"1 think it would work a great hardship
on these women," said the judge this morn
ing, "and I shall not impose any fines for
alleged violations of the closing up order,
"A great many persons have called at
my office about this matter and I have an
swered them all that I do not care to di.
tress these women. So long as everything
goes along peaceably, they will not be
Imolested."
MRS. SOPHIA KEENAN IS
CARRIED TO HER GRAVE
The funeral of Mrs. Sophia Keenan was
held this afternoon front the Methodist
Episcopal Church, South, Rev. Mr. Berger
officiating.
Those acting as pall bearers were J. W.
Kemper, Edwin Thomas, Oscar Ritter,
Frank Vaughn and William Betters.
The funeral was under the auspices of
the Knights and Ladies of Security. Large
delegations from the Florence Crittenton
circle and the W. C. T. U. were also pres
ent, Mrs. Keenan having been a promi
nent member and worker in these organisa
tions,
W-EATH Ri--Weshinnton, Nov. 5,
The weather indostions for Montran to*
morrow are: Generally fair, with poee
eibly local showers In northern art eof
"'- WI

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