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The Butte inter mountain. (Butte, Mont.) 1901-1912, November 06, 1903, Image 1

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THE BUTTE INTER MOUNTAIN
VOL XXIII. No. 198. BUTTE, MONTANA, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 1903. PRICE FIVE CENTS
HODGE TELLS
DASTARD'S
DEEDS
Miner Relates How He
Was Nearly Blown to
Atoms by Miners.
NO WARNING GIVEN
Giant Powder Exploded in
Rarus and Devitt by
Reckless Men.
FEARFUL RISK TAKEN
Many Miners Might Have
Perished--None Re
ceived Warning.
When courts do not decide In accord
ance with the wishes of F. Aug. Heinse,
anarchy prevails underground in the
vicinity of the Heinze workings.
Recent developments at the Rarus and
Michael Devitt properties make this plain.
That miners in the Mountain View, the
adjoining property, were not caught as
mice In a trap and done to death, that blood
did not flow and that the cage in the
Mountain View shaft did not become a
funeral car, is not the fault of Heinze or
the murderous thugs who do his bidding
underground.
With reckless disregard of the conse
quence to their brother miners in the near
by workings, the Heinze agents on Tues
day night, as already related in *the col
umns of the Inter Mountain, and in the
United States court, by directing foul
gases into the Mountain View sought to
drive -out the miners there employed, or
kill them, and then blew up all the con
necting workings.
Dynamite Used.
Dynamite was used with a free and care
less hand. Knowing well that the tre
(Continued on Page Three.)
GOVERNOR, HAS NOT
RENDERED DECISION
IMR. TOOLE STILL UNABLE TO SAY
WHETHER OR NOT HE WILL
CALL THE ASSEMBLY.
SEVERAL PETITIONS ARE IN
New Lists of Names From Men All Over
the State Who Want the Legisla
ture to Discuss the Shutdown.
SPECIAL TO THE INTER MOUNTAIN.
Helena, Nov. 6.-Governor Toole put In
another day without making known his
intentions upon the proposition of calling
a special session of the legislature. At a
late hour this afternoon it was announced
at his office that no conclusion had been
reached.
Petitions were received today from
Havre bearing 5oo names, from Little
Chicago, a suburb of Great Falls, with 400
names, and fromnt the farmers of the Belt
mountains, xa5 names.
Up to this afternoon no delegations had
called upon the governor, although Secre
tary J. T. O'Brien of the Butte Business
4Men's association and Charles Schatzlein
of Butte are here with a petition signed
by a large majority of the business men
of Butte, urging the governor to call a
special session.
The petition may be presented to the
governor before he leaves the executive
office for the day.
Result of Shutdown.
SPECIAL TO TILE INTER MIOUNTAIN.
Philipsburg, Nov. 6.--There is a general
regret here over the decision of the North
ern Pacific management to discontinue the
daily train to Drummond after November
8 and substitute a tri-weekly service. The
shutdown at Butte and the recent troubles
at the Granite-Bilnetallic mine, which re
sulted in a receivership, probably brought
about the suspension of the daily service.
Return From Helena.
The committee of business men who
went over to Helena to call on Governor
Toole returned to the city this morning.
When seen by a representative of the Inter
IMountain each member of the commiftee
declined to say anything for publication.
But all expressed themselves as pleased
with the reception accorded the commit
tee,
Petition From Missoula.
Missoula, Nov. 6.-A committe of busi
ness men left this morning for Helena to
present to the governor the desire and
wishes of this community that he call a
special session of the legislature to re
lieve the present industrial crisis.
Ladies IHave Bowling Match.
Missoula, Nov. 6.-The ladies' bowling
club hired the Edison theater last night
and, excluditg the male sex, allowed only
women to enjoy the performance. After
the theater they were entertained by Mrs.
H. O. Collins. It was a departure and
proved to be a very enjoyable under
taking.
UNITED STATES HAS
RECOGNIZED THE
REPUBLIC
PROBABLE THAT ENGLAND WILL
ALSO SEND REPRESENTATIVE TO
THE NEW GOVERNMENT.
HEAVY FORCE OF SAIL
ORS GUARD PROPERTY
Outbreaks on the Isthmus Can Now Bo
Handled by Marines From Amerioan
Warships and Worst of Trouble
Is Probably Through With.
Washington, Nov. 6.-The United States
government has recognized the defacto
government of Panama. It was announced
at the state department after the return
of Secretary Hay from the cabinet that
instructions have been sent to United
States Minister Beaupre at Bogota (as
suming that he has not left the capital
yet). and to Mr. Ehrman, the United
States vice consul at Panama and now
acting consul there, to inform the govern
ments of Colombia and Panama respect
fully that the defacto government is recog
nized.
CONSUL INSTRUCTED TO
RECOGNIZE REPUBLIC
SY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
Washington, Nov. 6.-The following
telegram was sent by the state department
today to Mr. Ehrman, acting consul gen
eral of the United States at Panama.
"The people of Panama have by an ap
parently unanimous movement dissolved
their political relations with the republic
of Colombia and assumed their independ
ence. When you are satisfied that a de
factor government, republican in form and
without substantial opposition front its
own people, has been established in the
state of Panama, you will enter into rela
tion with it as the responsible government
of the territory and look to it for all due
action to protect the persons and property
(Continued on Page Eight.)
MURDER CASES TO
BE UP VERY EARLY
JUDGE McCLERNAN WILL TAKE UP
A NUMBER OF CASES OF DE
STRUCTION OF HUMANS.
COUNTY ATTORNEY DELAYED
lillness of Mr. Breen's Sister Has Pre
aentcd Official From Pushing the
Murder Cases on Hand.
There was no session of Department III of
the district court today and will not be until
Monday next, when the work of impaneling a
jury will be begun.
The work of preparing the docket for T'ues
day is now under way and next week prom.
ises to be a busy one for the county attorney's
office.
The work of trying the capital offenses will
he in the hands of County Attorney Peter
Breen. Owing to illness in Mr. Breen's family
he has been tunable to attend to business and
the bulk of the labors have fallen upon the
shoulders of Assistant County Attorney Lynch.
There are five murder cases to be tried and
one manslaughter case, but it is not likely the
latter will be tried in this district owing to the
fact that the ease, that of .lewellyn Felker,
has gained such widespread notoriety that it
will be hard to get a jury.
Albert Beckman, the slayer of Ilelen Kelly,
will be tried, as will also Salvatore Franchesci,
charged with killing Deputy Sheriff Lazarre;
Dominick Rolando, for killing Dennis hlol.
land; Walter H. Brooks, who killed Chevrier,
and Thomas Pooley, who killed his son-in.law,
Thomas Littlejohn, and daughter, Lydia Little.
john.
J,. CRANSTON KILLED
LOAD OF POLES ROLLS ON THE
WOODHAULER-FORMERLY AT
GREAT FALLS WORKS.
SPECIAL TO THlE INTER MOUNTAIN.
Great Falls, Nov. 6.-Jerry Cranston
lost his life while hauling poles from the
mountains to his ranch on Hound creek,
about 5o miles from town, yesterday after
noon. The news of the fatality did not
reach here until today. lie was hauling
poles down the mountain when the load
broke lose and the poles rolled upon him,
hurling him to the ground. His neck was
broken. lie was alone and it was several
hours before his dead body was found.
lie lived around Great Falls for a num
ber of years, having worked at the smelter
and for the street railway company. He
was about 38 and unmarried. He leaves
some brothers and sisters here.
The funeral will be held here Sunday
with interment in the Highland cemetery.
GREAT EXHIBITION ASSURED
DY ASSOCIATED PRES,.
Portland, Ore,, Nov. 6.-The finance
committee of the Lewis and Clarke expo
sition reports that the funds made avail
able for the exposition up to November
exceed $r,ooo,ooo. An effort will be made
to secure from the next national congress
an appropriation of $2,5oo,ooo.
Of the state appropriations, that of Min
nesota is the largest, being $70,ooo. Eight
other states have contributed various sums
from $So,ooo up and many more states
have promised to make appropriations,
some of those already contributing agree
ing to double their appropriations.
Several foreign countries and many of
the states of the union 'have agreed to ex
hibit all or a large portion of their Louisi
ana Purchase exhibits at the Lewis and
Clarke exposition In agog.
COLOMBIAN CHARGE
TO LEAVE COUNTRY
PROBABLE THAT ISTHMIAN NATION
WILL SEVER RELATIONS WITH
THE UNITED STATES.
MOVE CAUSES NO SURPRISE
Colombia is Angered at the Attitude of
America in Recognizing the Inde
pendence of the Panamans,
BY ASSOCIATlI) P.Trsa,
Washington, Nov. 6. -The Associated
Press learns that Dr. Thomas Ilerran,
'the Colombian charge, is prepared to
leave \Vashington on short notice with
his family for Colombia. It may be
stated that instructions to withdraw will
cause no surprise at the Colomhlan lega
tion, where it is believed the state de
partment recognition of the independence
of Panama will cause intense feeling In
Colombia. So far Dr. lierran baa had no
advices front his govcrnment.
MAY SETTLE THE
STRIKE OF MINERS
BUT THERE IS NO HOPE OF FIXING
IT BEFORE MONDAY, WHEN
MEN WILL GO OUT.
COLORADO IS BATTLEGROUND
But Wyoming, Utah and New Mexico
Will Also Be Hit Hard When the
Coal Miners Finally Go Out.
DY ASSOc'IATII'I) '15F5.
Denver, Nov. 6."--A conference is in
progress in this city looking to a settle
ment of the trouble with the coal nminers
in the Northern Colorado tiehld and with
a prospect of successful terminaition. The
situation in the southern fielis is grow
ing more tense, however, and there is now
apparently nothing that will prevent the
driners from going out on, strike lMnday
at the call of Presi;lcnt .Mithelll of the
United Mine Workers.
All Hope Abandoned.
District President William. lowelts of
the United Mine Workers of Anmerica said
today:
"\e have abandoned all hope of 4
conference with the Colorado h uel & IroN
company and the Victor lieel compnay;
and the battle will be waged-to a finish.
Colorado will be the battleground, but the
interests of the miners in SomÂșthern Wyo.
ming, Utah and New Mexico will be
looked after.
"National President John Mitchell will
be on the grounl. Cononissaries are to he
established in nearly every miinug town..
and Pueblo will be the commissary point.
If any miners are ejected front the coin
pany houses they will be looked after by
the national organization, which has an
ample re:erve fund t, carry on the strike
to a successful end.
Non-Union Miners.
"In reference to the non-union miners'
I will say that if they refuse to obey the
strike order and do not conie out at prear
eat, weight will lbe brought to bear upon
them to quit work."
AMERICAN WARSHIP
IS TO HURRY TO
SAN DOMINGO
Insurgents Are Marching
on City and Minister
Sends for Help.
Washington, Nov. 6.--A cablegram has
just been received at the state department
from United States Minister Powell, dated
at San Domingo City, today, stating that
the insurgents arc marching on that city
and asking that a warship he sent at once.
The cruiser Baltimore, which sailed from
Hampton Roads several days ago, is now
due at San Domingo, and the state depart
ment believes that her presence there will
be sufficient.
HISS THE U.S. FLAG
CANADIANS JEER AT AMERICAN EM
BLEM DISPLAYED ON STAGE
AT VANCOUVER.
Vancouver, B. C., Nov. 6,-Public senti
ment here on the Alaskan boundary mat
ter is not quiet alayed and each possible
occasion finds expression among the gen
eral public of this province.
During the performance of a minstrel
troupe last evening the music of the
American anthem had no sooner been
recognized than the gallery broke into.
omonous hisses antd when the flag formed
itself in the .t ,c lights the expressions
of dissent bec:..1e so loud that the curtain
was hastily rung down.
HERE TO TAKE MEN BACK
Sheriff Hill of Virginia City, Madison
county, was in Butte today for the purpose
of taking two men named James Houldo.
and John Killon, charged with horse.,
stealing, back to Virginia City for trihl.
The men had been in the county jail here
for several days, having been arrested by
Stock Inspector Collins. Sheriff Hill was
a guest of Sheriff Quinn while In Butte.
M. O, P, COMPANY
TO APPEAR TODAY
JUDGE McHATTON WILL COME INTO
JUDGE KNOWLES' COURT IN
SHOW CAUSE ACTION.
DATE IS NOT SATISFACTORY
Attorney for Heinze Petitions for More
Time and When It Is Refused,
Chooses to Talk Today.
If the I. () 1. . opanly lthoulght dte
stroying the enllt itanc'ca to the Haraitu I tict
front the loutta;itn View ,woull effectuatl;lly
prevellt nt the Iltte & Iatonl companlLy front
discoveriing the fortmer'i thievery of ore
fronm the Michael LDevitt claint, it is mis
taken, for yeslrteray iftf rntoo the IlButte
& I)ston)l ctompiany applied to Judge
Kniowlest for t: tordter citing the Mt. I'.
company to show canue whlly cer.ain dle
v.elnpmnc t wolk shouild not he perforttcl
in order to ncerlilln io what' extent tlihe
HI illni e cottpaylll y I.I l blee comllt itllill delh
retdtions n. IIl viohtlin: the ll coturot's tnders.
The order was granted on ihe' allijidavit
of II. V. \Vinchell, geologist in the employ
of tile li11tte & lIostion.
The .M|onItaattan I re I'trltrasitg coiitipany
was cited to ailtl'Lr into ciurt at ,o o'ctlck
thin mtorniing. and in lthi re.spect it obeyed,
bulllt Ias usuaIl wlas tepared ll itio resort to il
strtlctive milethods itn iordelr to delay jit
lice anm defeat the ;rims of th court in,
attemtptiogl to i tscerlia il tl there wasn to
be any respect sthown to the tl'nitl .$titts
court.
Has Not Had Time.
Mr. ,'vrhirc started to, rnead lh allil.,vil
of Mr. Winthellc, iasking pernissint to
pet form ithe dhevelottetcll worki, whken
til(ge M l illtiton intrp s id as t l. . e tclt
for dlay lthat he haid it haidl time to look
up the maiter. Ile Iasked thiat thi couri
ex'tenl lt' lilme of hea ring the older. anill
watied steveral days in whiclh to thik the
m;atte Lr over.
JTudge Knowis stalred that t he ;I I14
hear the hatter in liclienu o Tuesday,
hit for sums' reasol l this did ll01 suit
.I fllatilo , rinIl afit i parler yigt fr a whihle
h," ct..se ted I to .tet the I f t ii' t .t ,t tlick
l lib t afterlfno .
In speat:king in Jidlge .tellIatioit outi
e.entding the. tiite tJudge Know.les re
inmarked that if there wasi to ie aiy dle
fe.ine otlrcr as'i to why tlhe order shouldu
net Ihe gralnted, allowing the work, he
wished to hear it right iaway. tudl tlhat for
tIist reason: he wantcd llte paLrties to ex
p1lite motlfers.
Court's Attitude.
It is evidetnt from the courtr's attitlude
tIhat hle intetnds to i ee tle I' matter
through at.i'it asertaii whethler or not his
-orders of ijunlctioia old sultrvey hIave hien
i violated.
'The lilibuilering fta:t' s of the Mon
itnaL (re Pturchasing eotmpanty aire having
their effe'ct tupon the court Lntl it is iitife
evtilett that Jludge Knowles is growitng
tired of sutch tmethods..
Term Nears End.
The present ltert of the I fitiil States
chort will iend im iorrow, attl n ilJug
. . .. . .. . . .. . . .. . P a..... . h. ) . . .
OLD BOILER BURSTS
STUDENTS OF OHIO STATE UNIVER
SITY HURT WHILE EXPERI
MENTING IN FIELD.
SIY ARSfOiIA'lrIE PilRHS.
('olumbus. .. Nov. 6.-- \Vhil students
of the uigrictilt eral college at the o(hio
Stat' unliversity were witne.ssiilg the liar
vesting of a field of corn for ensilage
pvrpoacs, by a machine operated by an
oldhi traction elgine today, the boiler ex
ploded, killing Engineer Charles' I'eppuer
and injuring seven persons, one---A s,it
ant IEngincer John De)lgarn---fatally.
The injured include President Vernon
II. Davis, who had his hand mangled, and
several students. ' lie force of the ex
plosion was terrific. Pieces of flyiig iron
were hurled tlirough the air, and blew a
girl over in a barn over a hundred yards
away.
WILL CLOSE GAMES IN
DILLON FROM THIS ON
3'3P."3IAL TO TItE INiTER A I' N'lAIN.
D)illon, Nov. 6.---(u;almbling imust cease
forthwith illn illon, as the city last night
passed an lordinance aga inst gartmbling,
nmaking the ptnishment a fine of from $5o
to $.oo. This has had the effect of closilng
the saloon games. The council also de
cided to order the colored inmates of
houses of ill-fame out of town.
A lproposition from T. II. (Gibbons, A. J.
Cusick and W. F. Scott to build a city
reservoir for $15,ooo was rejected.
NO MORE GAMBLING IN
GALLATIN METROPOLIS
SP:'i-AIA 'o TO 'HE INTI'Ri MO NSTAIN
Bozeman, Nov. 6.--The city council last
night decided to enforce the anti-gaumbling
ordinance, and the knights of the green
cloth are preparing to leave today.
Charges were preferred against Driver
Maddox of the fire dlepartnlent for diso
hedience of orders and these will be heard
at a special meeting of the council on Sat
urday.
MAY BE ESCAPED PRISONER
Washington Authorities Think They
Have a Folsom Man.
BY ASSOCIATED PRaESs,
North Yakima, Wash., Nov. 6.--.A man
giving the name of Fred Slocum was ar
rested here last night as one of the
escaped prisoners front the Folsom, Cal.,
penitentiary. He is believed to be Joseph
Theron and Answers the descripton of
Theron exactly.
WEATHIER-Washington, Nov. 6.
The weather indications for Montana to
morrow are: Probable showers and
considerably oooler.
REMAINS OF BISHOP
RESTING Br ATH
FLAGST IES
ARCHBISHOP CHI " E PRESIDES
AT SERVICE It rE CATHE
DRAL AT T APITAL.
PROCESSION FiuM THE
RESIDENCE TO CHURCH
Pallbearers Include Many Prominent
Catholics and Ceremony in the Great
Fane Is in Keeping With the
Deceased's High Rank.
SIli IAl. in 10 r e INThli Al ' N . AIN,
Ielel., Nov. y . The 1n1stil ret .linsi of
the 1;lac Ilishop .hhn Bi. liroinl of %1-0n
ltanl were laid to rest today with .ltlllUlst
and imtprltsa e CeL.remtIonHy belittintg his high
tatIr oll in the (catllholic church.ll
I'Ptifticn: ruuietm high marns wia teh.
hlratd by .Archbishoip Ahlexither (h'iisti,
of I'ortland, atsisilted byv sev'er;al clergymen.
The fulll c;lathedlrzal ch.ir Ilrinishllr the
mlnuic, which was of a high order.
Itislhopi (l'i)lay of Seittle' dlelivered a
powei fuil srrimiin upon the siuliject of
"I lrath," d4iiilng whl iih heIll lillted out e
signifiannt traits in the Ile of Ih de
easei. aiill pai iilihnte to his lu g l d
einUltlii wolrk i ll Ih; ofIt , il h li c Ihurch.
' I he iathedral jis.~i croweldsl during the
srvi.'s, the aihlr ;Iand vc.lihule Ireing
packed with peopIlle. it only trm I'elhna
hIi 'tl l all pi ar'r1 fi t sit .; . i lel re
of Ilatholi(c sucit'ie, alnd Ith actuail :umI
honoraery pillhetuell n gil l I t I hol tIlse
hishop's r drr d nce" :it l, r , fu.r ,ig inl plol
rt .Sinn, narched to fhil cathedral, a short
di".,iita e cast, Ihle" clergy ca;lyilng the
ein1 llllrl a in, othith r i lnicae tl"l IoIInitly i
the i o'ietis ll llal tl lit t llluarris.. Asl st ii
ias they had lu r.i s uted Arhtlishop 'hris.
le legiti atll i ll li r. i le to l B lls I leirtm
thle lchurch wiilh the exce:tinon of the clergy
and pl.dhbarers, after which the honly was
buried Uundernealh the cathedral. -long
bhried therr a number it yelrs ago.
T'hI. follnwing were the pIllbearers :
lRv. Father 'rimrn,. S. I., president of
(onlzaga college, Spok:ane, Wash. ; Rev.
Fthrer Victor Day, Irelcna ; Rev. ;Father
('tuntinuedl ni Plsge Eleven.)
WILD BODWLMWARS
MASSACHE A
rARRISON
Capture German Fort in
Demaraland, Africa-
English Prisioners.
ItV A R.i IAl|Vl i 'l t|IS'4.o
J.nllondo , Nov. 6. Accot ling to heatil l cr
Town coIrresonrI.enl t of the Daily Mail,
the IHodehl.wla tribemrn .i, who are eni
s ,091'd in a; native reblellion in I)enmara
1 eruall fort. 'I hy bnrnell d the fort and
the village. nlatsiared all the etrmlalllt's
and took the English families prisoners.
A relieving foice fromll the north en
iagled a llrge hodly t of natives ald fighting
r ensued, Itie re-ll of which is not known.
The T orr.lei.deIlt adds that the fighting
i ilI pposed to ht diue to the executiont of
a tiulel zv.ar chief by IGermanl officers.
Murdering Traders.
('aJutown, Nov. 6.-(ltticial advices re
ceived here fully confirm the massacre at
Warmbad, I)ainaraland, Germanll Southwest
Africa, by thle JondIlzwar trilbemen. 'he
Geria:ls gIallantly fought to the end, but
inoe of thilem escapUed. nWarbad was
Minterd.
I.i"Irts of isolated murders of German
tradersI are also co(ingi in. The rebellion(
in l)arnara, ad is officially attributed to
distress caused by the drouth.
JACOBS SUCCUMBS
FATAL INJURIES SAID TO HAVE
BEEN RECEIVED IN A FIGHT
WITH HIS BROTHER.
sP('cIAl. TO T'ii INTER AmOI:NTAINL
Billings, Nov. 6.--A young man by the
name of Jacobs, living near Forsyth, who
was brought here to the hospital for treat
mwent for injuries received in a fight with
his brother, died today. lie talked very
little about the affair, and it appears to
ble shrouded in mystery. The two brotheri
had a fight at the ranch of one of them
near Forsyth. The dead man is said to
have sonie plroperty..
LITTLE MONEY IN THE
CATTLE TRADE THIS YEAR
SPECIAL, TO THE IN'lk MOUNTAIN,
Missoula, Nov. 6-The large cattle cattle out
fits of Northern and Eastern Montana did
not lay up much money this year, accord
ing to Thomas Burke of this city, who has
recently made a trip through those sec
tions and looked over conditions, and as
a result they are planning to quit the
business and engage in the sheep busi- c
ness.
Prices this year were poor. The arbi
trary action of the Chicago packers In
fixing prices is given credit for the depres.
sion, combined with poor feed and the
fact that many more cattle than usial
have been thrown upon the market,
SUFFOCATE TO
DEATH IN
MINE
Seven Men Lose Lives in
Fire in the Kearsarge
Plant at Summit.
R. B. TURNER IN LIST
Famous Mining Expert
Gives Life in Heroic
Effort to Save Men.
MINERS FROM BUTTE
Nearly All of Those Lost
Had Gone to Madison
Town From Here.
THE DEAD
R. B. TURNER.
WILLIAM FLEMMING.
JAMES POWERS.
JOHN TOBIN.
ED LAHERTY.
GEORGE ALLEN.
ROBERT DONNELLY.
y 1'l1 IAIL. i '11 IlE INIT.l MOI'NIAIN.
a iginia t'il)', Nov. 6.-- The Kearisarg
I Illin at Stuninti, eight miles south of Vir
e ginil ( ify, Wllas thile heelle today oif ol11 l1t
the w"lst mlining fatalities that ever oc.
'turred ini NMlntana. R. II. l'rutrnr, the
If %,lpriillt lnileI of thnemaille and six imen,
1. nerly all of them t nlitrs fromn nutte, lust
r tllheir lives from bIeing sutffcated by smoke
fremti a lire that destroyed the boiler house
and Ilacksnith shlolps at the entrance to
the main turlel to the mine.
Up to i o'clock only one body, that of
John Tobin, Ihd been recovered. The
minle was so full of smoke that it was not
deemed safe to seud in aldltional search.
ing parties sinc' tihe superintendent and
two miners Ilst their lives while engaged
in the heroic work of trying to rescue
mi1ners from tihe mine.
CONFLAGRATION STARTS
IN BLACKSMITH SHOP
The boiler hunse and ilackasnith shops,
located ait the Ilotiith of the tnnnel, a'ught
fire ietween 4:"o and 5 o'clock this morn
ing, the fire starting in the ilacksmith
shopI. It was tlhout the tie the men wt're
lhainging shift alld all but four of the i8
Illiners emnployerd in the Imine got out.
Siuleriiiltendnt Robert It. Turner was
early onl the scenet and ldecided to go Into
the mine after tillh. iller who tad failed
to comlle ouit. As suoin is the fire had sub
sided solmewhat lie entered, accompallnlied
by two others.
Not far from the entrance to the shaft
they rniliie acrofa ilhe body of John 'l'obin,
a who had evideilly succupmed while try
ing to get out. 'I hey carried him to the
I lloutll of the tunneltI ansl then returned for
the others. lTh'l peopl waiting oil the
oulside biecalmle imore anxiolts as time
passed and the rescuing party did not rc
turn.
HEROIC TURNER WENT
BOLDLY INTO SMOKE
The indicalion are at i o'clock that Mr.
Turnecr and the men named have lost their
lives, as they would certaitnly have rc
turniied before this. There is an upraise
in the tunnel not far from the shaft and
the supposition is that Mr. Turner and the
other rescuers, while searching for the
missing mliners, were suffocated by the
smoke which fairly poured into the tun
nel fromt the hburning buildings.
The tunnel connects with a shaft which
mlade it a veritable chimney. Mr. Turner
never knew such a thing as fear and hero.
ically led the rescue party when his friends
tri.ed to dissuade Clim as he was ill only a
few days ago of asthma.
SoIme of tile dlead miners formerly lived
in Iutlte. ('oroner Johnson has gone to
the scene. 'lhecre is considerable excite.
m,I\nt and the details are hard to obtain.
lThere are about 150 nmen working for tile
Alder company, which is operating the
Kearsarge millne, putting up a 6 stamp mill
and mining.
TURNER STOOD AT THE
HEAD OF HIS PROFESSION
Robert B. Turner, the general superin
tendelut of the Kearsarge mine in Madison
cotunlty, who so gallantly gave his life this
morning in a vain effort to save the lives
of his men, stood at the head of his pro
fession in Montana. lie was regarded as
the leading authority on cyaniding work
in the country, although only 35 years old,
and was one of the best practical and
theoretical mining men who ever came
to the West.
The news of his tragic death, which
was bulletined by the llnter Mountain
at 10:3o o'clock this morning, spread
rapidly over the city, for "Hob" Turner
formerly lived here and has a host of
friends in the community. The first news
of his death was given to his partner, F. S.
-Mitchell, of this city, by the Inter Moun
tain.
Although Mr. Mitchell had heard of the
disaster at the mine lie could hardly bi
lieve that his friend and business asso
ciate was dead.
GOES TO THE SCENE TO
COMFORT THE WIDOW
"I can't understand how a miner of his
experience could be caught in a mine like
(Continued on Page Eight,)

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