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The Butte inter mountain. (Butte, Mont.) 1901-1912, November 11, 1903, Image 7

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GENERAL NEWS OF SPORT WORLD
HE IS PBCG f RI.
RIMiS RECEEi
SGRAIOIRON
BY ASSOCcIID mPats,
New Yesk, Novw, r. -- ltmo d.
MlcVeigh, :1 years of age, a member of
the Cadillse football team, lies at the
point of death at his home in Brooklyn
from injuries received in a game No
vember 3. When he returned from Long.
Branch, N. J., where the game took place,
there was a bruise over his right eye, but
he did not complain.
Several days later he was found. un
conscious on the floor of his 4bedroom
and grew rapidly worse. The doctors say
his brain was Ihjured and lie will prob
ably die.
DAN PATCH: HAS AGAIN
LOWERED THE REDORD
SY ASSOCITUED PRESS.
Birmingham, Ala., Nov. t I.-Daar Patch
paced a mile on a haltfmile track here in
9 :o3a , lowering the only w.ke's record
for pacers outstanding against mim. Tht
previous record to this was s:o3., held
by Prince Alert.
Cobweb, the runner that paced Dan
Patch, faltered on the turn, just before
entering, the stretch, and but for this Dan
Patch would probably have made the mile
in less than :o3.
The time by quarters was: 3o0, I :os,
z:3214 and a:o3/.
With the exception of a slight breeze
blowing down the stretoh the weather
was ideal. The track was hard and fast.
CRESCEUS FAILS IN 1I1
ATTEMPT TO LOWER IT
aW AsmucIArm PRIaI.
Kansas City, Mo., Nov. r z.-Cresceus
yesterday afternoon failed in his attempt
to break the world's trotting record of
a :o8 for a mile on a half-mile track,
malking no better than 2:za/4. CondiL
tions were unfavorable. Besides the fact
that the wind was blowing hard and track
not perfect, the stallion was slightly lame.
TWO BOUTS IN MILWAUKEE
BY AISSOCrArBM PRESS.
iMilwaukee, Wig., Nov. Ir. - Buddy
Ryan of Chicago got the decision over
Gus Gardner of Springfield, Mass., at the
end of a six-round bout before the Badger
tAthletic club last night. Battling Nelson
won from George Memsix in four rounds.
JOE WALCOTT LOSES OUT
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
Boston, Nov. s.- Sandy Ferguson got
the decision over Joe Walcott last night
after IS rounds of fast and clean fighting
before the Criterion club. Ferguson
showed superior form and the decision
met with general approval.
Jones' Dairy Farm Sausage, at P. J.
Brophy's.
Blood Diseases
Bad Blood Blood Poison
There is no human disease, hereditary or contracted, that requires
prompter or more heroic treatment than specifio or contagious poison in the
blood.
Hot spring baths, specific remedies, potash, mercury and other min
eral mixtures and poisons may either boil out or drive in the external symp
toms for a. time, but they can no more eradicate the merciless, killing, all
consuming taint- than the fabled fountain of Ponce de Leon produced per
petual youth.
There is no better evidence of a bad condition of the blood and un
healthy state of the system than a' sore that won't heal, or a festering, dis
charging ulcer or abscess. There are many ways by which the blood may
become contaminated and poisoned. The excessive use of mercury in cer
tain diseases, inactive kidneys and. torpid Ilver, exposure, and lack of nour
ishing food, weaken the constitution and causee the system to become
congested with impurities which are talen up by the blood, and wherever
the flesh Is bruised or scratched a festering sore or discharging ulcer be
gins. A boil or blister, pimple or burn often develops into a frightful
looking. sore because of the unhealthy condition of the blood, and the place
will continue to grow and spread; finally reaching: the bones and causing
them to decay unless the blood! is purged. and purified and the system thor
oughly cleansed' of all morbid and unhealthy accumulations. This cannot
be done with washes, sal.es and soaps, which only afford temporary relief.
The only way to get rid of these disgusting evidences of impure blood is
to remove, the. oaues
Nothing does this so surely and effeotively as my Germicide Tonic
Treatment.
Nervousness, Exhausted or Debilitated
Nerve Force Froma Any Sause
RESTORED TO O TItIR NORMAL CONDITION BY
STATIC ELECTRICITY
And My Speclat Tonic Treatment
There is a popular impression that specialists' fees are exorbitant. If
such be.true, I wish to state that it is not applicable to me. On the con
trary, my very large practice and unusual facilities for treating men enable
me to offer the very best treatment 'inexpensively.
If YOU ARE SUFFERING
Consult the doctor who has made a special study of chronico diseases.
Cosaltation and Examination Free
DR. NORCROSS
Corner Rooms peio-si, Owsley Block, Butte.
SIDE LIGHTS ON THE
DAY'S SPORT NEWS
"Sporting Editor Liter Naimtain:
Please inform me about the fght between
Jack Itunroe andt Peter Maher. I have
abet on the fight and ap anxious to know,
"SUBSCRIBER."
Jack hMunroe fought- Peter Mwber in
Philadelphia Iast Saturday night. Mun
roe landed a knock-out hin the fourth
round of what was schedt.It to be a
six-round bout.
There has been much discussion relative
to the most dangerous blow in boxing.
There is no most dangerous blow.
Each fighter is a method unto himself
in that.
Bob Fitzsimmons uses a "hook," which
has killed a man-Con Riordan.
It is delivered with a crooked and
stiffened arm accompanied by a swing
of the shoulder. The blow lands full on
the point of the jaw and carries its im
petus with it after the moment of. ia
pact.
This jolts the jaw-bone up against those
of the skull, and was the same as that
which put Jim Hall "out" for half an
hour at New Orleans.
"Kid" Lavigne hastened the death of
Andy Bowen with a straight uppercut utn
der" the chin, which threw back the head
with a jolt sufficient to jar the nerve ex
tending from the base of the brain to the
spinal column.
Kilrain was near to death undler the
force of that severe body blow which
John L. Sullivan found so effective.
Guydo, the French boxer who net
Jeffries in Paris, is said to have spit blood
after a blow in the stomach, from the ':f.
feets of which, with other complicatio'ls
due to the injury, he died.
Those who witnessed the agonizing ex
pression on the face of Jim Corbett at
Carson when struck on the solar plexus
by Fitzsimmons appreciated how near a
strong and perfectly trained athlete may
be to death as the result of a well de.
livered and. powerful blow near the heart.
Jack Johnson is now clearly the chamn
pion of the colored heavyweights. Ilis
defeat of Sam McVey in a so-round cotn.
test leaves him almost without a disputant
in his particular class. Although he
failed to put McVey out, he had the better
of the fight after McVey had made a good
early showing.
Johnson has a good string of victories
to his credit. He has scored over George
Gardner, and has demonstrated his abil
ity to beat the colored men in his class.
He is still suggested as the strongest op
ponent for Jeffries now on the boards.
There is not a chance for the colored
heavyweight, however. JeffTries will not
fight him, and if Johnson gathers any
more glory it will have to be over men
other than the champion.
He is a crude fighter with a great amount
of strength. George Gardner explained
his failure to beat Johnson by saying that
the colored man had too much weight for
him. Johnson, according to Gardner, de
pends upon his size and strength to rush
In and land a blow by main force and then
clinch. He repeats these tactics time
after time, not giving an. pponent a
chance to do anything.
The big fellow is very anxious to get
a try at Jeffries. And there is no good
reason why the champion ought not to ac
commodate Him.
Can it be possible that at last Bob Fitz
simmons finds the weight problem a prob
lem for him?
It has always been his boast that he
neither took on nor off weight, and to
those who knew him the boast made no
hole in the facts.
He was the only man who held two
championships, the middle and heavy, and
could make the lesser weight and be plenty
heavy enough for the greater.
But now there is a sad note from the
coast that the old man is going the way
of all healthy flesh and has become fat..
Joe Gans is hammering away at his
proposition to box "Young Corbett."
Gans' last appearance against a feather
weight champion was when he fougltt
Terry McGovern at Tattersall's,,. Chicago.
Although that fight was a fake, Gatls
still claims that it was on the squaretaiIf
(;ans could not whip McGovern, how does
he expect to stop Corbett?
A match between Gans and Walcott
looks like a good proposition. Both men
have bad records, but both are acknowl
edged" to be great fighters. Both are
agreeable to the battle, and it may lie
fought in December at Boston. The weight
proposed by Gans is 3sa pounds at rin:g
side, which ought to suit Walcott. consid
ering what he has done in the past.
Walcott, in his fighting career, has met
"Kid" La.igne and "Mysterious" Billy
Smith, and has gone down to a lower
weight than Gans asks, it is true also
that Walcott has found the lightweights
too much for him, perhaps because he
weakened himself to make the weight.
In iRt8 Walcott fought l.avigne at 133
pounds at Maspeth anld lost in i5 rounds.
He met l.avigne later at San Francisco
and lost in 17 roumuis.
The high salaries that have prevailed
among ballplayers will soon he a thing
of the past. W\ith the expiring of the
present contracts there will be a cutti:ng
down all along the line. Once more has
the grasping player killed tile goose that
laid the golden eggs. l.ittle or no mercy
was shown tile club owners hy the stars
while the two major leagues were at war,
but now it is different. Tile hoot is on
the other foot, and before long it will be
gin to pinch.
It is the same old story of O8o all over
again. Then it was the players them
selves, and they got all that was in sight,
and in some cases more, for it had to w.e
produced to satisfy their greed. Capital
got tired, and withdrew its support, and
the National L.eague again took hold.
Down camne the salaries with a thud. It
will ble the same way again,t ahd the play
era have no one to blame hut themnselves.
To pay their prices and other expenses
makes it impossible to run a team exceut
at a loss.
AFTER THE RECORD
DUFFY IS GOING TO TRY TO DO
FIFTY YARDS IN A VERI
TABLE FLASH.
Arthur F. Duffy, the fastest sprinter the'
world has ever seen, will make an attempt
to reduce the world's record for So yards
at the big indoor meet of the Missouri
Athletic club in St. Louis, Mo., Decent
her to.
Ever since the palny days of I.ou
Meyers, when he astonished the world by
traveling the So yards in o:o5s , athletes
have every year attempted to reduce the
record, but have always failed. The near
est approach. to Meyer's record has been
o:o5 3-5, but many hate been unofficially
timed in from 5 seconds flat to 6 seconds
and over.
In 19go Duffy ran the distance in a So
yard invitation race, at the Georgetown
University meet, in o:o05 flat. James E.
Sullivan'of New York, who was referee of
the meeting, would not allow the record,
as he claimed Dutfy beat the gun. The
Georgetown sprinter did leave the mark
In very fast manner that night, and after
ward acknowledged that he was a trifle
faster than the pistol.
Although the "champ," as he is known
to his friends, has been compelling ath
letes to lose championships year after
year, he seems to hold his speed in a re
markable manner, and only last summer
broke the English, Scotch, Welsh and
Irish record for the hundred-yard dash.
Not only that, but Duffy ran a hundred ,n
a grass track in o:o9 4-5 three times, a
most remarkable feat, and had he not
been taken ill the day before the Birming
ham sports, he would probably have
equaled his record of o:o9 3-5 for the hun
dred.
The outcome of the St. Louis race will
be watched for all over tile country. Duaffy
will compete in a' So-yard invitation and
will sneet Frank Scheuber of Harvard,
who beat the Georgetown wonder at the
Boston Athletie club meet at Boston in a
4o-yard dast in rooa. At the time Dufty
was a trifle fat, though the Harvard man
won the event in a world's record time.
HANDLER QUIT IN THE THIRD
DY ASSOCIATED PREISS,
New Orleans, Nov. Ix.-Jimmy Handler
of Newark and Cyclone Kelly of San
Francisco met last night at: the Southern
Athletic club. Handler quit in the third.
Up to that time his opponent had much
the better of the bout.
A DELIGHTFUL SUMMER TRIP,.
If you are going fst this summer why net
se ealt LlarCitsmnd Denver sad the elesgan
seenum through Coleade along the line of
the. Ro Grande spysmt You can't beat it toe
aexellent service and good scomumodations,
Oaly cue, change. of ears betwe Butte sad
Chicago and St. Louis. Write for rates and a
sopy of "With Nature na Colorado." 4, W.
itsgerald, general agent, Butte, Montana.
JUST "TO MENTION IN PASlINtW
Cram's Atlas of the World, pSo3 edition, with
handsome up.to.date, map of Montana, is given
free to Inter Mountaln subscribers who pay
$7lo for one year in advence. The spedal eoo
ote coupon is also lncluded.
WILL CORSEHT T ?
IMPRESSION IS THAT HE 18 TRYING
TO DODGE HI18 BOUT WITH
EDDIE HANLON.
San Francisco, Nov, rt.-Is Eddie I[an*
lol to be deprived a return match with
Young Corbett, who enjoys the proud dis
tinction of holding the championship? The
indications point this way, which will be
som.ewhat of a surprise to the local sports
who supposed the match was clinched
copper rivets. H'anlon was the good In
dian, and agreed to all of Corhett's terms
in order to meet the champion wlhont he
ferls he can master the next tinme they
hook up.
I tdlie did not care so much abo :ut the
terrtll as he did for an opportunity to fight,
Tih, weight, which is itsually the hardest
thiing in a match to agree upon, Hanlon
eonceded everything. Corbett said, "1'11
fight you at tag ponttds at 6 o'clock."
Hanon replied: "All right, conme on."
Han;llonl can fight at a lighter notch, but
he %n;, afraid Corbett would balk if ltie
propon;.id anything lower. Rather than
have hin slip away he allowed Corhett
his own weight. In the matter of purse
HIIIloi, said: "You call split the money
to suit yourself. You canl have it winner
take all, or divide tile money equally.
I dlIn ' care."
W\hile these negtintions were going on
Hanlon was not aware of the fact that
Coritett, whose eye for husinless is as
sharp ast his eye to land a knockotut punch
ill tiii ring, was iickering with the Ilayes
V;llely club, under whose auspices tile
fight was to he held. What Corbett was
alter was a bIonns. lie received a hontlts
whil II le fought Hanlon before, artnd Morris
Levy was ready to give himn a second dose
of the suatte amount, but C'orbett said this
was not large enough. lie insistedi on
.cevy ilcreasing the Ionus, which the club
main:iager has refused to do. lHence there
is grave danger of the match goinlg by
th, boards and t'oriett not returning to
Catlitornia next month. Corbett is a hard
chilp to do business wilth right now for
th,' reason he is nlakinlg money as if by
m.t4ic anld making it easier thau he would
by lighting Hantlon again.
"It looks to tme as if ('rbelt wanted to
cr:iwl out of the fight," said Ih iitnhm yes.
ter.lay. , who returned froml the country
this week. "Hlere gave inl to hinl otn
everything, atd then hie won't tcote
arounl. I don't object to thie club giving
him a ibolus. 4but he shoullI itbt wanlt
everythingt. IHe outght to hI reasonabltlle.
I don'llt ktnow hiow Ii a htiltltts lie got the
fi'r.st time, but it was pretty fat. I wantt
to light Corbett for tIw reasuins. Int the
,fir.t place, I am after the chanlpintthiip,
ani ill the second place lhe w.llul draw
mtttre mtotuny thantt any othier lighter. If
I don't get hint I don't know whto I
will fight next."
JIMMY BRITT WINS
LIT'LE TROUBLE IN SECURING DE
CISION FROM CHARLES SEIGER
IN TWENTY ROUNDS.
San Iranei-co, Nov,. it. -ijimmy Ithitt.
the ( slif',rnia light weight. easily ti.
cur' I the dlecision last nighl over ('harley
Sci a,,r. ofi New 'ork. T'Ilhre was uo snuge
of the conte:,t int which the issue was
in d o'tu t.
out generated Sciger at every stage of the
ga:me. Iritrt creat'ed h:avc with Seiiptr-'
,stlomth with left hooks, which hlie lanlded
tiel a. l agatdini.
Ile varied this during the latter stages
of the coItest by working his left to
fate atnd soon had Sciger bleedig copi
ou-l,y fromt the no:le lad mouth. lritt
tim,',I his bltows and seldom failed to
rc:Ih sme portiont of Sciger's lanatomy,
" lhe 141h rtound was the only one in
which Seiger had a chance. 'Toward the
clai-, of this round he succeelded in land
ing two wild swings on the ('alifornian's
ja'". lone partially flooring him, and the
second sending him to his knees. The
bell ring at this stage, but ltritt went to
his cornlir without showing signs of dis
tret ., l1e camte up fresh in the 15tlh
IFound and once mortie began l is plan of
out'pointing the easterner.
J-rom this on lritt seetned to grow
fresher, and as the fight advanced, there
Wi, a toticthale increase in the power
behizndi his blows. Britt employed his
left ahnost continuously througllout the
fight, but when the oplening presented, hle
used his right to great advantage. Seiger
put up a game fight and his ability to
take punishment was marvelous. Time
and again he seemed on the verge of go
ing out for good, but always came back
and forced tihe fighting. lBritt left the
ring withotut a mark, while Seiger pre
sented a pitiable appearance. Ilis mouth,
nose and eyes were badly cut and his
body plainly showed the effects of Britt's
left hooks.
MARY COLLINS DISCHARGED
Lowenthal Fails to Prove That She
Took His Money.
Mary Collins, charged with grand lar
ceny, was discharged yesterday inl Justice
Colligan's court. It was charged against
't4he *oman that she, while employed at the
iYork block, had relieved J. Lowenthal, a
lodger, of the sum of $6o.
Lowenthal alleged that he dropped the
pioney In the bath room and that the Col
lins woman got it. There was not sufli
cdent evidence produced yesterday and the
defendant was discharged.
SWEETEST THINGS
What are the sweetest things on earth?
Lips that can praise a rival's worth;
A fragrant rose that hides no thorn I
Riches of gold untouched by scorn;
A happy little child asleep;,
Eyes that can smile though they fay
weep;
A lrother's cheer; a father's praisel
The minstrelsy of summer days;
A heart where anger never burns;
A gift that looks for no returns;
Wrong's overthrow; pain'squick release;
Dark footsteps guided Into peace;
The light of love In lover's eyes;
Age that is young as well as wise[
A mother's kiss; a baby's mirth-
These are the sweetest things on earth.
-New York News,
Ifennessy's, Agents
Is Batte Mwr the aleb1ated
earhartt Brand
Men's Working Clothes
THE
PRICE
"THIS 18 THE. TICKET."
The Carhartt brands of
Union Made
Overalls, Pants and Shirts
are manufactured under the best conditions, from
the best materials, by the best paid labor.
earhartt elothing
Is known and worn by union working men from
one end of the country to the other. Full lines
of all brands always ready. For further particulars
call or address
Hennessy's, Butte, Montana
A eOMPLETE
STOCK
Guns, Rifles
and Ammunition
Your Patronage Sollcited.
Hardware Anaconda eopper
Department Mining Co.
Butte, Montana
MURDER MATTERS
IN DISTRICT COURT
TRIALS OF SALVATORE FRANCESCHI
AND ALBERT BECKMAN ARE
SET FOR NOVEMBER 24.
ASSISTANT COUNSEL NAMED
Attorney Cavanaugh Will Help Attorney
Grice in Franceschi Case
Beckman's Spirits.
The cases of Salvature Francesclii and
Albhert Heckman, both charged with mur
der, were set for trial on November 24 by
Judge McClernan today. Attorney John,
(;rice, who will adfetnd Franceschi, re
quested the court to appoint assistant
counsel to help him with the case as the
work was too heavy for one attorney. The
court appointed Attorney Cavanaugh.
Mr. Denny, who will defend leekman,
annlouced that Attorney Bialdwin had
withdrawn from the case as associate
counsel and requested the court to ap
point some one to assist himt. The court
announced that he would wait until Mr.
Baldwin appeared and announced his re
tirement from the case before anyone
would he appointed in his place.
Judge McClernan stated that lie was
tired of having attorneys wait until the last
moment and then withdraw from a case
and that they would have to come to the
court in person and make their request.
Beckman has grown thin and pale,
though his spirits seem to have revived to
a certain extent.
LITTLE TIM HARRINGTON IS
TO FACE DISTRICT JUDGE
Tim IHarrington has escaped from the
industrial school three times. It is a
rule of the school that three escapes places
the child in line for the reform school.
He will be tried in Judge McClernan's
court possibly tomorrow.
Bill of Interrogatories
Judge McClernan settled the bill of in
terrogatories of five witnesses from the
state of Oregon this . morning., These
interrogatories were the result of deposi
tions taken in the case of Stephano Far
rarar. Attorney Newton is looking after
Ferrarar's interests, while Mr. Lynch
represents the state.
The Northern Pacifie raitway now offers a
reward of two thousand five hundred dollars
(Isaoo.oo) I place of one thousand dollars
(s,ooo.oo) for information leading up to the
arrest and conviction of parties implicate4 in
the work of dynamiting bridge at Livingston.
L, G. PIER.UN, A. G. L.
BUTTE SNHOEING
FORGE
17 South Montana Street.
EXeLUSIVE
HORSE SHOEING
SHOP
W. McEachran, Prop.
JUSTICE APPEALS
TRIED BY A JURY
JUDGE HARNEY IS ENGAGED IN THI
HEARING OF CASES UP FROM
THE LOWER COURTS.
SUIT AGAINST SHORT LINE
Cow Belonging to E. B. Sabin Is Killer
and He Wants Damages-Other
-Matters Before His Honor.
Judge Harney continued trying justice
court appeal cases in his court today, with,
the aid of a jury.
The case of E. B. Sabin against the
Oregon Short Line Railroad company went
to trial. Sabin sued the railroad company
for $815 becausee a cow belonging to him
was killed on the road. He got judgment
in the justice court, and the railroad ap
pealed to the district court.
A. good part of this forenoon was de
voted by the court to listening to the law
yers argue law points in the action, the,
jury being excused in the meantime.
Before opening this trial the court dis
missed a number of other justice court ap
peals.'
The case of Tim Shea and Carl Kerr
against the Frank Commercial company was
dismissed because of the default of the
plaintiffs this morning, neither of the.
appearing in court.
The suit of Fred Arbour against the
Colorado Smelting & Milling company was
settled,
The court dismissed the suit of William
Richards against Samuel A. Hall, doing
business s iall Bros., because of the deg
fault of the plaintiff who did not appear
for the trial,
Judge Harney Is rapidly disposing of
his justice court appeals.
T. A. Morrin, attorney at law, room 5,
Silver Bow block. 'Phone pz8-.0

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