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The Butte inter mountain. [volume] (Butte, Mont.) 1901-1912, November 18, 1903, Image 1

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THE BUTTE INTER MOUNTAIN
VOL XXIII. No. 108. BUTTE, MONTANA, WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 1903. . PRICE FIVE CENTS
CANAL tREATY
PROSPECTUS
Varilla and Hay Have About
Come to Understand
ing Regarding It.
COLOMBIA BELLICOSE
Her Minister Will Soon Go
Home, Unless 'Trouble
Is Ameliorated.
BY ASSOC(ATED PRESS.
Washington. U. C., Nov. iS.-The main
features of the llay-Bunau-Varilla treaty,
providing for the construction of an
Isthmian canal by the Panama route, have
been agreed upon and a rough draft of the
convention is in preparation. No date for
the signing of the treaty has yet been
fixed. The Panama minister and Secre
tary Hay will have another conference to
day regarding the treaty.
It is thought that the members of the
Panama commission which arrived in New
York yesterday will remain there for the
present, as it is stated that their presence
is not needed here in connection with the
negotiations for treaty. It is stated when
the treaty is signed the commission may
receive instructions to ratify the treaty
and thus avoid the necessity of sending it
to Panama.
Unless Dr. lHerran, the Colombian
charge, receives word from his government
within a reasonable time, he will close the
Colombian legation here.
Boyd Talks on Uprising.
BY AS..OCIATED PRESS.
New York, Nov. a8.-Federico Boyd,
a member of the commission of the govern
ment of the republic of Panama, which has
just arrived from Colon, says that in a
few days a constitutional convention will
meet to formulate a system of government
which will follow closely the lines of the
constitution of the United States. In dis
cussing the revolution he was asked:
"What assurances, if any, did you have
from the United States in reference to the
attitude toward the uprising?"
"We knew, of course," he replied that
American men-of-war would be there to
see that traffic across the isthmus was not
interrupted by fighting and we knew for
that reason the landing of Colombian
troops would not be permitted. Outside of
that we had no assurances. What we did,
we did on our own responsibility and we
depended upon the justice of our cause for
recognition. The question of possible an
nexation to the United States had not yet
been talked about."
"The sentiment of the people of Pana
ma." Mr. Boyd added, "is to make the
isthmus what it seems destined to be from
its geographical position and to place it
where it can perform most efficiently its
mission in the interest of progress of
civilization, and become what it has been
intended to be-a link binding together the
two Americas and a gateway between two
worlds. The building of the canal now
lies with the United States."
Columbia Unfortunate.
Washington, Nov. 18.-It is learned here
that the Bogota situation has assumed a
critical phase as far as relations between
the United States and Colombia are con
cerned. Minister Beaupre on the 16th in
stant was pressed strongly by the Colom
bian government to know whether the
United States intended to recognize the re
public of Panama. It is understood that
the request was in such shape as to con
stitute a menace in the event that the
recognition had been extended.
Mr. Beaupre was instructed by this gov
ernment to again inform the Colombian
government that such recognition had been
extended to the republic of Panama by
the United States, but simply in the in
terest of humanity and civilization and in
expectation of solemn treaty obligations
binding upon the United States. He was
also instructed to tender to the Colombian
government the good offices of the United
States to effect a settlement of the differ
ences between Colombia and Panama. The
issue is awaited with some anxiety here.
JUDGMENT FOR C. C. M'HUGH
PVECIAI. TO T'IIe INTER MOUINTAIN.
Anaconda, Nov. z8.--By stipulation of
respective counsel, Judge Napton today
entered judgment in favor of the plaintiff
in the case of C. C. McHugh against R.
J. Hayes, the contest involving the office
of police magistrate. Judge Hayes having
resigned earlier in the day, as told else
where in this issue, there was nothing else
for his counsel to do but to agree to have
judgment taken against their client.
There was nothing done in the other
city contest case of Tobin against Harper
for the city treasurership, as Judge Nap
ton has desired that another judge he
called in and the intention of the defend
ant is to fight the contest on technical
grounds.
LIVINGSTON COUNCIL OBEYS
SPECIAL TO THI. INTER MOUNTAIN.
Livingston, Nov, 18.-The city council
met last night and allowed the bill of the
water company in accordance with the
mandate of Judge Henry. One alderman
moved that the bill, which with costs
amounts to $1,393,o1, be allowed, and an
other seconded it. The motion prevailed
unanimously and the incident closed.
Married in Livingston,
Livingston, Nov. z8.-W. F. Lee, a
prominent ranchman of the Shields river
country, and Mary E. Diller, also a resi
dent of the locality, were married at a
o'clock this afternoon by Rev. Mr. Smith
of the M. E. church. A number of friends
of the contracting parties were present,
Mrs, E. A. Turner Dead.
Bozeman, Nov. 18.-Mrs, E. A. Turner,
wife of a local drayman, died today of
pneumonia, Besides her husband she
Seaves several children, the oldest of whom
Is az years and the youngest six months.
INJUNCIION CASE
IN FEDERAL COURT
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF SIL
VER BOW ARE CALLED UP
TO SHOW CAUSE.
IN MAUD S. GULCH MATTER
Trouble Over Filling in asd Obstructing
Road Under Trestle-Railway
Seeks to Enjoin Board.
RPECIAL. tO TilE INTER MOtNTAIN.
Helena, Nov. :8.--The hearing upon the
order to show cause why the commission
era of Silver Bow county should not be
enjoined from interfering with the North
ern Pacific which is filling in the trestle
over Maud S. gulch, near Butte, came up
before Judge Knowles late this afternoon.
Asisistant County Attorney Dan Yancey
and Commissioner Haggerty are here to
resist the proceedings.
Messrs. Yancey for the county and \Vil
liam Wallace for the company are arguing
the proposition at 3 p. inm.
CHARGE IS MURDER
GEORGE POLLACK TO BE TRIED IN
DILLON FOR KILLING OF
DICK MARTIN.
SPECrAI. TO THE INTRR MOUNTAIN.
Dillon, Nov. 18.-Judge M. H. Parker
arrived from Boulder last night and this
morning began the November trial term
of court. There are a number of criminal
and civil cases on the docket.
The case of the state against George
Pollack, charged with murder in the first
degree in killing Dick Martin at Bannack
last March, was called. County Attorney
Robson is conducting the prosecution and
W. F. Farbour represents the accused. Up
to I o'clock this afternoon it jurors had
been selected and it is expected the
twelfth man will be secured this afternoon
and the introduction of evidence com
menced.
Pollack ran a saloon in the old mining
town and shot Martin after having son'e
trouble with him. Martin was a laborer.
The claim of the defense will be Pallack
shot in self-defense as Martin was about
to attack him with a cane having a leaden
knob on it.
CAN WONG AH FOO ABIDE
IN THE UNITED STATES?
Helena Court Is Trying to Determine
Whether He Must Be Deported.
SPECIAL TO THlE INTER MOUNTAIN.
Helena, Nov. I8.-The right of Wong
Ah Foo to remain in this country is in
volved in an appeal from the ruling of
Commissioner E. C. Russel of Helena,
which is being heard by Judge Knowles
today. The Chinaman is only 16 years
of age and claims to be the son of Wong
Tung Wah, who once ran a drug store in
Red Bluff, Cal., but is now living in
'Frisco. The claim is made the boy was
born in 'Frisco and therefore cannot be
deported.
He had been in Helena only a short time
visiting his uncle, \Vong Ton, when he
was picked up by the Chinese inspector
and, after a hearing before Commissioner
Russel, ordered deported. The local
Chinese became worked up over the case
and hired Col. W. F. Sanders to prosecute
the appeal. A number of local Chinese
have been examined and several deposi
tions from California offered.
PRESSING THE PORTE
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
Constantinople. Nov. 18.-It is under
stood here that unless Turkish reply to the
Russian-Austrian reform scheme is re
ceived by November ao, Baron Von Calice,
the Austrian-Hungarian ambassador and
M. Zinovieff, the Russian ambassador, will
demand an audience of the sultan, with
the view of insisting on its acceptance.
R. BOLLES IS BOUND OVER
Must Face Criminal Court of Denver on
Murder Charge.
BY ASSOCIATEID PRESS.
Denver, Nov. 18.-Russell Bolles was
bound over to the criminal division of the
district court today by Justice Byrne for
trial on the charge of having murdered
Harold Fridborn, a boy, who was killed
on New Year's eve, 9gou, when defending
his sister from a criminal assault. In giv
ing his decision the justice expressed his
own belief in the prisoner's innocence.
HE MUST BE SHOT
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
Salt Lake, Utah, Nov, i8,-James Lynch,
convicted of the murder of Col. Godfrey
Prowse, whose petition for a new trial was
recently denied by the supreme court, was
today resentenced to be shot January 18
next. The case against Robert L. King,
convicted of complicity of the same crime,
and who was granted a new trial was dis
missed, and King goes free.
IT IS VERY COLD IN BOZEMAN
Bozeman, Nov. 8.--The coldest No
vember weather on record was experienced
here last night and this morning. At mid
night it was 30 degrees below zero and at
6:30 a. in. today it was as below. It mod
erated as the day advanced and the
weather prophets say the worst has passed.
Furlong Acquitted,
St. Joseph, Mo., Nov, I8.--Joseph Fran
cis Furlong of St. Louis, the traveling
man, who shot to death Irving McDonald,
the young St. Joseph millionaire, Sunday
morning at the hotel Metropole, was ac
quitted yesterday by a coroner's jury sad
discharged from custody.
LOUISE BOSNAIR ON
STAND TO TELL
HER STORY
Wronged Girl Clings to
Her Version of Villainy
of A. O. Jones.
FPE.CIAL. TO TIll' INT IEtt TAIN.
Bozeman, Nov. 18.-l.ouise Bosnar took
the stand in the district court today and
testified against A. 0. Jones, who is on
trial on the charge of wronging her. The
girl told practically the same story as T.
M.lenard gave to the jury yesterday, going
into somle of the disgusting details. She
bore up remarkably well under the ordeal
and withstood the severe cross-examina
tion of the defense when an effort was
made to break down her testimony.
She told the jury that it was Sunday,
November a, 9o02, that the accused
wronged her at the Monforten home in
this city. . She had remained at home to
care for the children when Jones called.
She kept her shame from her relatives as
long as she could and then she told of it.
She detailed how she was sent to Hel
ena and later how Jones and Menard sent
her to St. Paul, giving her a ticket, a
lunch and $j in money. She staid there
with a AMrs. Mess until Chief of l'olice
Robinson of Itozetman came after her and
brought her back.
The girl told practically the same story
as she did at the preliminary hearing. Her
cross-examination had not been con
cluded at a p. m.
FIVE BADLY BOILED
Iv A$SOCIATFI, PuRgis.
New York, Nov. g8.-Five workmen
have been injured by the collapse of a
huge lard rendering vat in a West Fortieth
street establishlment. Three of thenm will
probably die.
The men were at work in the basement
when the bottom of a tank containing
many gallons of scaldling grease suddenly
gave way and the men were literrally
boiled. Instantly the grease became ignited
and soon the basement was in flames.
The cries of the men could be heard
by pedestrians in the street, and aid was
quickly rendered by the police and fore
men, but three of the men had almost
been boiled alive before they could be
rescued. The others were seriously hurt,
but will probably recover.
MOORE HELD UNDER BOND
a5l':ClAI. TO TI1n INTIIa MONTAIN.
Virginia City, Nov. 18.--Fred Moore,
who had a hearing yesterday afternoon on
the charge of making threats against P. V.
Jackson and \V. M. Jackson, has beeen
held in honds of $moo to keep the peace.
ANARCHISTS FOILED
Y ASSOCIATE.D PREIRS.
Rome. Nov. H.-.The Messagero today
announced that three anarchists had been
arrested at Milan in connection with a plot
against the life of the president of Switzer
land, 'M. Deucher.
His Courage Failed.
Paris, Nov, 18.-A dispatch to the Pa
tric from Lugano, Switzerland, announced
that an anarchist has surrendered to the
police and has confessed that he had been
selected to kill the president of Switzer
land, but that his courage failed him.
After King of Italy.
Nice, France, Nov. 18.-The police here
have arrested four anarchists who are sus
pected of the intention of waylaying the
king of Italy on his return from England.
IN CONGRESS TODAY
B%' ASSO'IA'TE.D 'RESS.
Washington, Nov. IR.-Today's session
of the senate began with the presentation
of a petition from the "Dames of 1846",
for an increase to $30 per month of all
pensions granted on account of the Mexi
can war.
Mr. Gallinger said the pension com
mittee would give due consideration to
the petition, but called attention to the
fact that all survivors of the Mexican war
now receive pensions of $1a.
On motion of Mr. Spooner the senate
ordered printed additional copies of the
treaty between the United States and New
Granada which was made in 1846 and pro
claimed in 1848. Adjourned.
House on Cuban Bill.
IlY ASSOCIATED PRESS.
Washington, Nov. 18.-The house today
resumed consideration of the Cuban bill.
Mr. Grosvenor of Ohio, who opened the
debate, prefaced his remarks by saying
that while the debate had taken a wide
range, he regretted that there had been
no discussion on the other side of the
house on the Panama canal question. In
this connection he said the position of the
administration was unassailable and would
redound to the glory of the American
people.
CONFLAGRATION IN BILLINGS
SPECIAL TO TItIH INTER MOUNTAIN.
Billings, Nov. 18.-'The bursting of a
water heating plant in the residence of
Mrs. Clifton on First avenue and Twenty.
ninth street caused a fire in the house
about g a. m., which called the assistance
of the department to extinguish. The loss
was small.
To Let in American Meat.
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS,
Paris, Nov. 18.-A petition signed by,.a
number of deputies was distributed today
in the chamber of dcputies, proposing to
allow salt meats from the United States
and Canada to benefit by the minimum
tariff.
BACKBONE OF WINDY
CITY .STRIKE IS
BADLY BENT
More Cars Are Run-Cold
Weather Drives the
Lawless Indoors.
IIV AM.lI'IAlI D tI'I .'4 .
Chlicago. II.. Nov. tI. While nlleotia
lions for lIpence be tween thlie cit rtallIway
and its lstrikinllg e plllllloy.es are penl ding ill
the city hall, through ihe o\1verturles to
Mayor llarrison and the Alhergu.alic Arbi
tratlioll co intlitee, a third line of the cowl
p;ayl)'~s strike breakin cars was p1tI in
operation todaly tinder police protection.
Five cars on th1e Indiant avculle electlic
linelt were started utnder gulard of latlrol
men drawn from the \cWe1ntworth anld c'ol
tage Grove avenue lilles, where trlllelr
had binit apparenttly subsidcd almost to
the point of disappeltcarancle.
Mayor Harrison and his mediation coot
mittee held allotther conl'ferenc with itpre
elitatives of tihe cotllpalty andlll o the
strikers today.
Except for a few slitlne" throw1n there
was no atttempllt to delay thte Inldiia ave
Ilne cars on the rollte to til' itusilless cnll
ter. Neither strikers. nor their sympullthii
ters were present in any grealt Illollllers.
(In theII returll, however, corlnsiderable dtIelay
wasl catused by the "short circliitiig" of the
line. A rope had ibeen tt' Ilhrtwn r the
trolley wire anlld a heavy copplllr Iwire
drawn up until the two met anlld diverted
the curirent. 'rile obstiilit was shn1 I're
moved. ''he We\ntworlth atnl ('clllage
(Grove tavenue carn met with oInIty trillng
interference and carriced a lirgely in
'reised tnumber of passengei'rs. I he vitlh
weather had ntuch to do with cle.,ing tII
streets of loite.crs.
MILLER-JOHNS CASE
READY FOR THE JURY
nv AxFOI'A II.. ilt si.
Cintcinnatti, Nov. is. ThI v'litI'IrnmnoIt
today closed its evilemnre in the ltial of
Miller tand lhits, hiigel with 'iiiC
spiracy to extorlt bllrihe. from ii John J.
Ryan. It is expei'l'cld tliIhe ':,se wIill go i,
the jury tomlllorrow.
FEAR HORN'S CLIOUE
MILITIA PARADES STREET OF CHEY
ENNE, WHERE A RESCUE IS
WHISPERED AT.
BY AeSO.IATrD 1alF.R.
Cheyenne, Wyo., Nov. ix,- Two cont
pulies of militia have been patrolling the
streets under arms, occupying the buiild
ings In the vicinity of the jail in alticliil
tion of an attempt to liberate 'fTom iorn.
The sheriff yetterday received informa
tion that an attemlpt would he iImade Ila,,
tight to storm tlhe jail. Hie at olnce clim
Inonicated with (overnor (Chatterloii, willh
is in I)enver, and the latter ordered the
lucal miilitary compllalnies to protect the jail
at all hazards. Up to nmildnlligt tlhitlg
had been seen of the sotoiling pail rty.
REV. LEWIS BECOMES BISHOP
iY ASiOl' IA E II lF) 1 S,
Newark, N. J., Nov. isH. Rev I, Iward
s. Lines, former pastor of St. I',ll's
Episcopal church, New lH;veltn, was tod;ay
consecrated histhop of the Episco,,pal di,,
r:e of Newark in succession to the' Iat'
Bishop Starkey.
MISS M'HENRY HURT
iV ASSOCIAT'iD PRI. Sq.
Omaha, Neb., Nov. H. -- Nlli Mr
Henry, staring in "M'l.iss" now playing
here, was seriously burned about the lower
limbs during the performance last night.
In the rescue of the school Illister from
the burning house, 'the actress' skirts
caught fire as she dropped through the
roof. She was carried to the wings and
the flames extinguished.
TURKS MEET DEFEAT
SY ASS.O'IA'IEDI PRVRR.
Constantinople, Nov. 18.-- --T he revolt in
the vilayet of Yemeni, Arabia, is extending
southwest. The Ottoman troops advanciing
on IIodaida were determinedly opposed by
the revolted tribes and were forced to re
treat. Another attempt to advance from
Mohka failed, the Turkish troops being de:
feated.
TURKS STILL AMUCK
IY ASSOC'IA'IED IPRISS.
Constantinople, Nov. I8.---The Mussel
mans in the district of Kirk Kileseh have
burned five Bulgarian villages in revenge
for an attack made by the Bulgarians on
the Mussulman village of Zarasa.
SNOWSHOE STRIKE SETTLED
BY ASSOCIA'TED PE .SS.
Wilkesbarre, Pa., Nov. i8t.-The strike
at Snowshoe, in the soft coal district, has
been settled at a conference here. The
company agree to give the men 66c a ton
for low coal and 6oc for high coal until
April, and then 66c.
WILL CUT THEIR SALARIES
BY ASSOCIA'TD PRElss.
Halifax, N. S., Nov. 18.--The Dominion
Iron and Steel company of Sydney has
given notice of a general reduction of
from to to 33 1-3 per cent in the wages
and salaries of all its employes, effective
December t next.
NORTHIERN SECTION
WRINGS ITS HANDOS
IT IS 26 RELOW TODAY IN HAVRE
AND GrLAT TALLS IS ALSO
HUGGING THE FIRE.
COAL FAMINE IS UNL j.LY
Plenty of Fuel for Butte, WI, 'ew of
the C(ties of the State At ,', r to
Be in imm-diatc N :
.i t ill1 rliI 1111ii 1iii I i 1i %I N,
l I tch.a, \..'i i\ , I. I lil llt i 111 the O liti'.i
Ie t cl l41 'h l 11.I s h lit n I'.l c hlidl, ;accod·t
iIlK hI . ';(',1li n ) Il)1 1. l II..t s. 11 1 1111"m l h X
p1t14 t,4lio1 is . that . he t .',c 1 w. 15.5 h.i1 1h1il1
litl tg ,t'.' III litt, shteth. l,,i it lillyht ,t'.
t:hll I"lll.l(l4llly ti lI i, l tr. tiltrr. . i'.. 1 t1l1 h.1%
,1;44t 1 .ilhtiti ' 1, 1 44.11 . ',1 4"4- %% , Ii I l1.1
tlh ( lh 4 * hion direc.t 11o .1 ..o . it Ii 11 ,.
h.114 cohllert a r,111 o ,14 tlll'd I h h1e ,r.
t flit d y 4 l4 l .IIIirl ,. 1 ( .1 tht lI''.it ,11i' th ,.h ',
lit, h ll 1'<lr., l .l.w 11r451111, pas'di l it l1. 1ilt
Warn ier 1 1tw I 1 11ntIh 1tihe re. At 1ii 4. III
the i41b'erver at I I.i l re 5 11h 11 ,. h . lIIih lh'
that the gove44lltolit Ith man11 r tl ete 1 showed
('1144 regist'red lit4 hehw. It h1.01 not mod
Sher t i s lroi.uJh,' inll ,14' itl tilh ilh '. ilic
clit I liand fillh '. i ii \lilliontn., aIs thiI
'w.ea'tllhe' IIIII ( ,l1 lhi' I IIIss'.I i' i* dhecr'. :l.ea
'I'g o n t heIII '.' i' o t'i, i i h t i nl , a ,I , l , t,
that tlv will iiike \'t'111 . \" .1( 11 f 1 11.1n , notab1ly
l.ihbey ;and lalispil .
The . l 'tI it'y 4- i P'us , 11'4l11t.thii rt
pli ,rlt, ii. , d by> the wh ,tathl lii bU ,i.'ilt 1 .11
Warnier Weather Ped'ctcld.
" I1'14 1 .5454- o h14 ll 14'4',."Illl. 1 1;" h 1111.4I 141
t ilit 11 1 1 4ill.t I'l , ,hl; ti Ir in1til l . liv.'
rtllyl). flti : i titr , it.1111 i11, t11 , Il i h1t,
Slatekil" 44 ,t1 allttitly d hIv' tlh ' ihtl wa.t5
t iedille ll ti. \\,I titit. ; i, r ':,11% 'la tll ulilII,
"18l oll op l oII ng 4-r tier' 4b111 instant t,
l( 1r ll lIs IlIpi llt ll iit l il l 'l lt .m .lt 1''
"IoIns: ! h1 h,1 I t'o . al , 1. lII I, 1i,,m n
i4ll : t ilet , i Ii. I '1Ili ii4 I1. , II I m . itl h1,f
,ii M ihl. I tii , i n fii t' . . Ili il ii f I
It,i ii l'itl fi 'illIt, Illillit'. .'5, i; l:ti e,
11a1111, .*I.
i "lliry t isu Itl i'l, h ,I lit i ll t .h itt11 , 41
lday'' - ihrl. IIi tyh1f I);tli t1,1 . ,4111l t\ ly'4
lil g1 the i ilillitlfrl il l lii . 1 144", iiiill /t yl4
ti tlilUhtly beloiw.
w '"eha hel n hI r ll ne al. It l IMnhtl' hII
"ii'l, ht'4i , hi'll rlll :41 h 1 ,4 i s l, )o l"i HIIlhl hl
h;l o ilt f " t Ia t1 l ' i'3. Ill i \14,l 1ill l Oll.t1ii0
hlank of 1 i Iiir 14 l1ll"411%11 Ivalw' Wh i aidll
wally and iti this.l i ttl Il lli h ll, ti1111 f ii
moderate t ught 14 1 and 'I h ·tilda).
"Oni the I'airic coast ii til pressi rel ill
il reasig ll rlll :ii tm m i ~il approacllillll hingll
tfhe 1l14r-1h 'ialiflornila coastl ; 1h11i di 11turb
alice will bei felt ill 1'4-iestr' it lf iii4a
Il'huerlidtly, giving li.ii ow in the northlv.,I
porlti.n, In hlires i andl Ihr lgr:illr pall
i1t 1 tiht I lOlla hw t llr l o lillllll Il'I f l'iti hl lt
will bie 4--illlwha4 litill i ihing, b till . tlliw
i-, 'xpevitd."
Af'ter fhle' "xp#''e mir of Ttl u lid'ty flhl
weather in illll. hItday illy abe il( il ibtlt sry
as "baimly" if oui r hlu, s l, ' ih1ll.i Li hat hIi
'says. The is f wel l tiii l peiit rliti rii' recordedi
tt the g iiverlotlaint w5 fti' es1 r bl t i(it d lihg
last night was five 4lll-4w lrll1, which was
one delllgree higher 1h141 the previol'; , 4ll ightl1'h
reconrd. Exposed Iherlwn lr l, Imil it
,omlew llat hllverl, as, Il( y il ay, idoll , xii1
they lpro bably io e al i lr hit h I l llit alilst
what til te 1h 4lin 4licnlli, hall knlll ind ntl| 1i4r
44,li,.11' 4111, c kept Ithl ou lt,,hh l 1iii, hIave
til down town llth marrerry had nbad over
exposed Iher nlllol' tl rs mostly ii.( nll, I ill
they felt warm ,r, 4v51i if they didin't.
Speaking relatively, thle da:y oplneild with
every pr.plrct olit hing a mihl ou1.
From \Washingthn the ;ilvi'es to Ihl
local wlaiher 1114r'(4i11 arc: "fair tilighl,
followed by ,now 'llitri'.day ill -he north
45,t , s iu llon; risihl h uliplrat ure',"
No Coal Famine.
Scarcity of car,, lack of produh time anl
heavy d.ellla for ev'al fr(11 (Colorald o has
i'allsed it temporary ,hortlnl; in Ih,- 10l444
Market, but there is no in) hn liat. dan;gii r
of a coal famine.
Most of ihlt. coal iwlld in 111# cily comllll:
from W'ymling, and bito e. t hi.a b ,comlle
.hipl. d . r,.. hl. te . . . . Vy-min. c, ,;,
Inen daily,
Great Falls Well Fixed.
SI',;CIAf, TO Till: IN'TI:i MOUNTAIN.
Great Falls, Nov. i8.-Great Falls fuel
is plentiful and as many of the Montana
coal fields are in this city, there is no im
mediate prospect of a coal famine,
Fear Famine in Billings.
RI'ECIAI. 'TO T'Tille INTER MOUINT'AIN.
Billings, Nov, 18.-A coal famine is
staring this city inl the face unless the
situation is speedily relieved, It is said
(Continuetc sa Is 'i<ithrees.
MARINES LAND
IN HASTE
:irst Attack of Rebels on
San I)omingo Repulsed
With Great Loss.
SITUATIONISSERIOUS
Powll Cables That Floreign
Intcrcsts Are Now
in Jecopardy.
C .111 nItJ l ig n1 t . IIlteic -i%. \eIsI, t. SCe.
\(·I" hIghtilng holok pl.. lilaI nlight arl'l o n)dll
Ithie c' ev. 'he i s le l i . 'e pit rl llte
1 n111a ( t1 r'11 Ih * c Pttll ttl.t i't. I .i . j ld f teIl
s c tel t i - til ii cc t tit- it ui
llh I'- i itit Stah "-. i 'lcrieI, r tlt h I llI -nI rt
lanit I I.1i it'n.t ,it p it ,ti- A itit;l | ilntter
r' ., am I tltr t tlit p rl .,eI ,ttheih 1 ric,
h'l' ,l~llly ,lh ,IP, tl. lll ,1~ 11.. 11111tl Iha' I'h 01
lic(.lllth i ,ltll. i t . il t iti' m.i h eI.I Ithei tll -
It·'nli ii te s git l' lld l( lther
w tcttuh it iii ha u tie td t tg M~ti~i
1 11, III t e gi 1ltlllel-ll lli( t , h it I I tl.' l -.
l tIrk i, ll' .l hlu 1 lit ii..y li nl e. - il
!r;illm o theit, l.lc h Irnl e . nhn
1 .11· ( uttue'icut Xci. i. i it\''( tut di-·)))1 -(11
Ih' IIhll Ib .h t' rld y th¢' I'111|€'111(· I S si
rlli llnlc-i ;tI rsII, l 'titl it hI.ct hit. tu oarnl i
elilt, r h .'l ll I n oll ;l ll.n w h '( e sh, 11 , N rialll I;lly
.I ii ii - venn.m it ice lime of th
i n t. --t--s n t lsa io h s . I a
,lI tiii llllt'l l I tI' ll i it (t h r inoo l li A it .
tltnd Ih etti i 1t i1 tiy I i t hi' Ietc
PRO)ItNFENT NEW YORK
PUBLISHERS ARRESTED
Clrles Ridefl, of hl Abb, hy Pr. i .to hr
ChaPrged With Grand Larceny.
N ew Viii i', .elin.g itt--Ain f tihtl I tllrtl
Sant~l(lionis 1 Dealporate.
\I, 1t iL higiti l.o iti , ieut.i hl ;llri i lll l Aiit -
tel tt;tItI tttt JI.'IY liii U lire actll H II, itt1' lily
i i tel I c.* etu t t ill li t c tt rl i t euhb
"l,I' .·l(.lII.llt.l 1II. (.l Illy l;It i'll| Ih;lllil l}/=l
r,l'. Ill., I w iiIrllqi 81 1 1( )11 1llh'l Id ll~lll' hr
. l i. - hunhll Sldt k tIh ci ttlr11 ttc itrli.it li ti-r
iat ic ighit l it telirt-nei tieletMdi Itutin trutleh
II"li ii li ot~ igi Ih" l'li il r iell lll I ll.l c l
r I1 i ir ' uctic l i t Ni . l wt" hi i 1 o-ii ,
Mif i- , w eliptrili $ *ii g i tltle' lehitt,
tt l htjtlt aret tiiu livjt inty l ity- Aiti n lug1
-ulciitiiu i - otrh t tmily wex e ittie-ti.ti
PROMINENT NEW YORK
PUBLISHERS ARRESTED
Charles Rideal, of the Abbey Press,, le
Charged With Grand Larceny.
Ne'(w Vmlk, No'lv. INl.-An ,a resu11| ofl lith
hl''i |,ve t igaio ofl the affir;lP' li the' Ahlbey
'lt" , pp c- k i'Lr r , whiwh aey.r severl
$ mt tttiutl iti tI iin h u hl i- tir e h lirt i-l h ii ry
;lnd at tf ilur latIihr, As is.Mlllt Iti,'lsetl At
twlelllly ( ,l'i llla has. e';ll~sl'l Ih=' ;lrnt o~f
| hurirh. Rhica~l, Iormerlly Iire,,ide.nt of th|.
emicl(enrt, ()il ;1 wHarrit t harlgill himl w.ith
Wl~list breen'y.,. !Aliesther allanl, whol hIrts h1a
atl h'lea, adhrital cooet'll'rionl with thl' ;affins
,d" tI1e t'm sllpatly, \.ill I.' ;rlreica:l if I1, i'ulll
I1e r,.at'hed. J hi. ¢lo llpittlitl, Il;init by it
inlatlniser iol the' fil'llI of M. L.{Wetaktriin
80i1, alllegld Ihat HIdeh.l unt1 ..';,0001 }':|ls
of ='loth wolrlds $!,90~ froml thatl |irml,
whi('h ahn alil~idvit hy the Ahbb.y Pre'hs
',hiplpin <lel{hrk .;|id was inllnwdiat,.ly
',h ilpped aiway.
M r. (;;trv;Il .ay.. Ihat fr'lll varioul. ti|'l.
$|7,1.0. wa,'l h ofl cloth was. 1,rde.red ;od
Ilhat il wa€1' soldI he're. andl inl Jlillliilr: ;It
at sactrific(..
W. C. T. U. HEARS GLAD
TIDINGS OF SUCCESS
IIY AS :,'0 IAl il 1I .H.
Cin t ili li, Nov. IN,-- Today at the ,n
tional convention of the W. C. T. U.
Mi rs. I'.. Mlulahu t of Kadnass spoke on
"White Sl;ives-."
A ihihtath, real a letter from a miiehmber
of tongres,, sayinlg that there wasi but
littlIe priospect of he li passage of any bill
repiJ ;lllnlg the S t ll canteen law.
Tli. repor't of Mirs. l ". N. N. ( lraha , gel
oral :,tpe oiltluueent of tihe departiine t of
,or tl< a.; llgll ilway piilioyes, Showed
bstantia l olld e'l'colr;agittg restults. Over
',ooo0 railroad emiployes are lIow wear
iIIg fLl railro l t lemperate:: button.
CHAMBERLAIN IS CONFIDENT
IYV ASeio I iAIAI ) tI H lSS,
lhndon, Nov. IH.--+Joseph (Chamlbmerlain,
thie forimer colonial seeretary, held a re
c,:ptionl at the colonial olfice today to hid
farewell to the agents-geteirail of the
colonies. Lord Stratlcitna, high cotnutis
sioner of Camllada, was spokesulllt of tihe
latter.
rlteplying to the address of Lord Strath
coon. Mr. ( haltberlain said he had now
alsI lthe assured convictionl that hlie had
ben abile to convince his fellow country
men that it was to their advalttage to
adopt his fiscal poilicy.
JOHN OTTO IS A LUNATIC
Man Who Tried to Harm Colorado's
Governor Has Been in Asylum.
ItY AS.TO IA''TED PuI 'S,
IDenver, Nov. 18.--John utto, who was
arrested last Saturday on the charge of
attemlpting to do harmn to the governor,
acknowledges that he had served three
months in the insane asylum i California
for his persistency in trying to present
his views on the labor question and so
cialism to Governor Pardee of that state.
This explains the letter found on his per
son at' the time of his arrest, which was
written by the governor of California.
To Relieve the Poor.
SPECIAL TO TIHE INTER MOUNTAIN.
Anaconda, Nov. t8.-A number of the
charitably disposed women of Anaconda
met in the assembly room of the Montana
hotel this afternoon and discussed the
best plan of dealing with local cases of
distress during the winter. Considerable
interest was shown and it is expected that
an organization will be formed that will
accomphlibsh much good in a charitable way.

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