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The Butte inter mountain. (Butte, Mont.) 1901-1912, December 14, 1903, Image 9

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STATE TREASURER
AND THE OFFICE
INTERROGATIONS REGARDING THE
BANKING OF PUBLIC FUNDS
IN STATE BANKS.
MR. BARRET'S EXPLANATIONS
He Says He Uses His Own Judgment
Says He Has Furnished Bonds
Heavier Than Law Requires.
SPECIAL TO THE INTER HOt'NTAt,M
Helena, Dec. 14.-At the next meeting of
the state board of examiners, there will be
laid before the board for consideration, in fact,
for its guidance, a bit of instructions from
the senate committee on finance, relative to
the management of the office of state treas.
urer. The report of the committee consists
of 28 interrogatories submitted to State Treas.
urer Iarret and his replies thereto.
The questions deal with the calling of war
rants, the amount of money on deposit in
various banks and other matters pertaining
to the offce. All of the questions and replies.
as well as the committee's recommendations
to the board of examiners, were ordered filet
with the secretary of state, who is secretary of
the board of examiners.
Uses His Own Judgment.
Among the questions asked the state treas
urer was why he did not make more frequent
warrant calls whenever the cash amounted to
as much as $ioo.o0o.
To thllis the treasurer replied that he called
warrants whenever in his judgment the cl
dition of the funds warranted it. The treas
urer denied that, as reported, he had ma.le
calls without furnishing the public with the
amount of the call.
Asked why so muclh time elapsed between
the date of the warrant call and t..e time when
interest ceased, the treasurer repllied thatit 1the
paymllent of warrlants was adjusted to suit the
demands of the office. lie admitted he had
been requestcd by the state board of examl
iners to reduce deposits in certain Ibanks.
Asked if he thought it safe to deposit as
much as one-half or more of the state funds
In one ballk he replied this had never bee'n
done.
Air. Ilarret admitted he was a director of
the State Savings bank in- I-utte, in which lie
keeps a large amount of state money. 1ie
says that the q(uestion of designating the
banks in which the ftund shall be deposited
rests solely with the treasurer, who is liable
on his oflicial bond.
Asked if he hall not unduly favored the
State Savings bank in the matter of deposit-.
IMr. BIarret replied in the negative, claiming
on the contrary lie often had more in the
American National hank of Ilek-na thlaln the
bIutte banlk.
The treasurer denied that last spring wh-n
there were rumors of trouble with the Ilut:e
bank he drew money from other banks anai
placed it in the bank in which he is a director.
lie .aid he was well aware the lButte bank did
not need assistance.
His Bond.
In regard to his bond hie says the law only
requires a bond for $1,o,ooo, while ihe has fur
inished a bond for $375,003. The treasurer
furnishes the committee with a list of bank
deposits. Tails shows that since Aulgust 3t
the deposits in the American National lankik
of Helena have increased from $1o6,730 to
$,85-52: and the deposits in i.e State Savings,
batik have decreared from $2a4,652 to $97.30o3.
'The amounts in other banks range from $io,ooo
to $S5,0ao.
The senate committee adopted the following
resohitions for the guidance of the state board
of examiners:
"Whereas, It had come to our notice that
tihe funds of this state, in the hands of the
state treasurer, are being deposited in banki
in amounts of more than the capital stock of
certain banks where it is deposited; and
"Whercas, The indeCmtily bonids given by
banks for state dep.osits consist principally
from uflicers and stockholders of said banks;
"\Whereas, The system of making calls for
outstanding general fund warrants is not what
would be considered good business principles
by anty business man, batik or other corpora'
tion; therefore, be it
"Resolved, That this committee deem that
tinder sections 443. 445 and 450 of the political
code, it is your duty to exercise the greatest
care in guarding the public funds of this state,
and that you immediately take steps to see
that all balances of state monies in banks be
reduced not to exceed one-half of the capi
tal stock of said banks.
"Resolved, That you are also requested to
examine all indemnity bonds given for the care
of state funds, and where it is found that any
bond or bonds conltain the name of any surety,
that is either an officer or stockholder of such
bank or banks, such bank or banks be imme
diately required to give other sureties in lieu
of such other officer or stockholder.
"Resolved, That it is the opinion of this com
mtittee the state board of examiners should, at
least once in each month, make personal ex.
amination of the conduct of the office of state
treasurer, and that such report be published
as required by law, giving the amoutnt of bal
anees in funds, balances in banks and the
amount of cash on ihand.
"Resolved, That a copy of the above, to
Igetlcr with the questionls submitted to the
state treasurer by this conllmmittee andil his an
swers thereto, be handed to the secretary of
the state board of examiners for their guidance
and consideration."
CELEBRATE FEAST OF LIGHT
At Knights of Pythias hall, on South
ltain street, yesterday, mcmbers of I'Nai
Israel congregation and the council of Jew.
slh women celebrated the Feast of Light.
It commemorates the victory of the Mac
cabees over the Syrian king, Antiochus.
An excellent program of music and reci
tations was given, largely by the children,
under the direction of Rabbi Weiss.
CHRISTMAS
MAGAZINES
The sale of those already in
has been so great that we have
had to reorder. If you want
those yet due you had better
place your order with us now.
EVANS'.
BOOK
114 Nort STORE
SBudweiser's
Greatest Triumph
Declared superior to the best Bohemian beers by the Imperial
Experimental Station for the Brewing Industry at Prague, as
announced by the following Associated Press cablegram:
American Brewer Makes Best
Beer in the World.
[8pecukt to the Amuocwkted Prces.)
Prague, Bohemia, Dec. 1. - Tho
Imperial Scientific Commission in
vestigating the different kinds of beer
of the world has awarded the highest
honor for superiority to an American
product.
A correct translation of the results of their examinations is given below, with
the Imperial and Royal Notarial and United States Consular verificatiotis.
Upon subjecting a sample of BUDWEISER Beer, brewed by the
Anheuser-Busch Brewing Ass'n, St. Louis, U. 8. A. to a thorough
examination, we declare it to be a fully matured lager beer. Its whole
nature bears witness to the fact that only the very best materials were
used, and that the greatest cleanliness prevailed in its manufacture.
The product is not only similar to the highest grade of Bohemian Pale
b Beers in all its properties, but surpasses our best beers in keeping
-. . * qualities, which is of the utmost importance.
.L Experimental Station for the Industry of Brewing, Prague, Bohemia.
JAROSLAV SULA, Supt. and Manager.
T hereby certify that Mr. Jaro.lnv Rut I. personally known to tme na the ) f1l iit ('Chemist
of the IExperlmental Station for the itrewing aIndutry n Bohemia, unit hat lihi, Iy 1 .1 lettt
r land.gnod the above doucumn nt in my pretenet. Praeue,. Nol r tin t tr hir, h thnit i on Niit. 11 n1 l three.
J. U. tr. JOIIANN SLAMI NIK, Imperial ald Roy Ii al Nti-tan, I'ragul.1.
I certify that the foregoing authentication is under the official seal of J. U. Dr. Johann Slamenik,
Imperial and Royal Notary, and is entitled to full faith and credit. In testimony whereof 1, Arnold
Welssberger, Vice and Deputy Consul of the United States of America, have hereunto subscribed
my name and caused the seal of this consulate to be affixed. Done in this city of Prague this
third day of November, 1903. ARNOLD WEISSBEROER, U. 8. V. & D. Ctonul.
,i Budweiser
Is bottled only at its home, the
Anheuser-Busch Brewery
St. Louis, U. S. A.
COLONEL BEESKOYE
INDITES A LETTER
WRITES TO CLERK PRINGLE OF THE
MISSOULA COUNTY COMMIS
SIONERS ON "PEC."
IS WILLING TO KEEP "PEC."
But He Wants His Neighbors to Pay Him
for Alleged Cutting of Timber
and to Close His Gate.
aPI'C:IAL T1 TTIF. INTEtR MlOt.NTA1N.
Missoula, Dec. 14.-A week ago Col. K.
F. \. Ileeskove was arrested and examined
in Cleric Kemp's onice of the district court
here on an insanity charge preferred by
Charles iulftman, a neighboring ranchmlan
of "Coyote Bill," as Colonel Beeskove is
better known, living near his place, which
he calls Hunter's Home, about 1a miles up
Rattlesnake creek from Missoula. lie was
adjudged sane and returned to his ranch.
Several days later the board of county
commissioners served notice on him that
in future he must preserve the peace and
not threaten any of his neighbors with a
loaded rifle, which performance about to
days ago led to the recent arrest. Clerk
Pringle of the board is now in receipt of
the following unique note from "Coyote
Bill," who is determined to "keep the
peace :"
Pea Up the Rattlesnake,
"if Huffman Tod & Frankling wil kep
tip thear fense & close my gats and pay Me
$25o,oo, too hundred & Fifty Dolers, for
timber cut on My land by H. T. & F. for
250 feet of Bridges hetwen the Hunters
house and Frankings Place; and $5.oo for
etch Bridge built by Me acros the Rattle
snak crick, and abov all Mind thear own
busnis and Not Molest MY Location. No
tice all will be well. Totel in all $260.00.
"K. F. W. BEESKOVE,
" "Hunters Home (Missoula Co.) Mont."
ASKS FOR RETURN OF
THE $1.50 HE LOANED
For Answer, Unknown Man Is Beaten
Up by a Missoulian.
Missoula, Dec. 14.-At 3 o'clock yesterday
afternoon an unknown man loaned one M.
Murray, an ex.Chicago policeman and at pres.
ent a lumberjack, $.5so, and three hours later
asked for its return. For answer Murray
knocked him down and then ran about a block
in an effort to escape Chief of Polece Hollings.
worth, who saw the whole affair.
As Hlollingsworth overtook Murray, the last
ter turned and knocked the officer's cap olf.
HIollingsworth then used his club freely and
finally got the man subdued and under arrest.
Meanwhile friends of the unknown victim
of Murray's flat had quietly taken him away
in an unconscious condition to the Regina
hotel, where h.passed the night Incognito and
left for par unknown early this morning
without.yrv g his identity.
'l'urray ell1" e tried In police court, with
the chieflo ol4j as ohief witness.
IRRIGATION WILL
HELP CATTLE MEN
C. H. FITCH SAYS PROJECTS IN
MONTANA AND SOUTH DAKOTA
MEAN MUCH.
BETTER FEED IS PROVIDED
Fitch Takes Low Price of Beef in Sea
son Just Past as an Example of
What Dry Ranges Do.
SI:1 IAL. 10 TtO T NTEtR MOI'tiTAIN.
Washingtilon, I). (., )Dec. 14.- In an inter.
view with C. II. Fitch. 'egineer of the United
States reclamation service, he said to that
Inter ,'lMountaintt curreslpondent:
"During the cattle-khipping season just closed
in the Northwest, the advantages of irrigation
were miost apparent. 'This year the price of
beef was exceedingly low, and to mlliake mat.
tera worse, mtuclh of the beef sthipped was not
even in a fair condition, owing to the dry
spring and slow growthl of grass; consequently
the steers from the range were low in weight
as well as price.
"On the other hand, the farmer whose stock
was grazed during most of thle year, but was
fed alfalfa fromt irrigated lands duritg the
winter, did not fall off in weight, but were in
prime shlipping condition, and weighing heav.
ily brought a better price per pound anld made
more potmdts. Taking for instance the govern.
ment reclamation projects on the belle 'ourcie
river in South Dakota and the lower Yellow.
stone river in North Dakota and Montana, thet
amount of land reclaimed, while 'probably
reaching into the thousands of acres, will be
but narrow strips in the vast area of grazing
lands surrounding them; but the open grazing
land will be muttch more valuable thant now,
because of the contiguity of farms and the op.
portunity afforded for providing winter feed,
which simllply means anl insurance against lois,
"A large percentage of loss which must oal
cur int exceptionally severe winters will he
thus provided against. On the Yellowstane the
lands which may be reclaimed are close to the
state line, some of it in North Dakota and
some of it in Montana, but a large section of
grazing land itt both states will be mnuch bcne.
fited thereby."
TO GIVE POLITICAL RALLY
SP'ECIAT. TO TIfE INTER MOIlNT'AIN.
Missoula, Dec. 14.-it was announced last
week that tile students of the G;arden City
Commercial college would give a grand po.
litical rally on Saturday evening at the corner
of Iliggins avenue and Front street, but on
account of the weather it has been decidctd
to hold the rally in the opera house tomorrow
evening.
The public will be trea:ed to the uniquttl
spectacle of the two opposing parties-liberal.
ists and conservatives-holding a political rally
in common on the same night, to music, vocal
and orchestra, and to selections by the best
elocutionists in the city. A band will be on
hand to dispense popular airs.
Some of the leading lawyers of the city will
speak on the political issues of the day. The
candidates of the political parties will make
short addresses, .a.ere will be a display of
fireworks. Higgins avenue will be illumi.
nated from the depot to the bridge.
BRYANS PASS CALL
UPON HIS HOLINESS
EXPRESSES HIMSELF AS BEING
PLEASED WITH THE BEARING
OF THE GREAT PONTIFF.
THEN HE SEES THE FORUM
American Cicero Gazes Long and Fixed
ly on Spot Where Roman Orator
Excoriated Cataline,
aY AH4So'IATI:n Prtu i.
Rolmle, Dec. l.t.-\Villiamn J. Isryan, a'com.
pl:lnlld by his son. was received in private
.ulldielnce by tle plope yesterday.
Mr. JIryanl was preseted by Mon,ignor
Klt.inediy, rector of the Amer.ica college, who
acted as interpreter. lie Ih liness ,.pke witl
great interest of thie Catholics in A.n rica.
At the cJnchltci~n of the audience, Mr. Ilrysn
isl.i ed lhimself as highly pleasied with
the p)ie's learilng, Iefolre ,lhng to the vllti
-an, Mr. Itryan visited sever;c 1 of the inter
uInag sights of I(omr, including the (Co'uliseun
il Hloluian Furtum.
IIh took great interest in the stpot from
thiere C'iceru thutndcerd hi, invectives agaUilt
c( t;lilne. Later Mlr. li),an Itutchcd with Ait.
Ia ad.or Meyer.
14 KILLED, 42 HURT
TRAIN DERAILED AT CORDOVA BY
THE COLLAPSE OF AN
EMBANKMENT.
IIY ASSOC'IAI'ITD tI'IttESS,
Maidrid, IDc. iy. 'lhe collapse of an em.t
Itnkiten.t at C(',rdova yesterday derailed a
. rmI. Iort.ent pst.ons were killed and 4J
HENRY MILLER DIES
IN THE POOR HOUSE
,tE('CIAtL TO Ttrt; INTRttt MOUNTAIN.
Missoula, Dec. 14.--HIenry Miller, a
paralytic, who was taken from the Bruits
wick hotel to the county poor farm last
Tuesday, died at that place, aged 6a
years. lie came to this city four years
atgo from Butte, and has acted in tile
prpacity of cook at the leading hotels of
├Żlissnula during his residence here.
So far as is known the deceased was
unmarried, though he 'has a number of
relatives in Rochester, N. Y., who have
been notified. He was a member of the
F:orester~ lodge in Butte
Trial Venireman Excused.
SP'tIAI. TO 'tlEl. INTER MOUNTAIN,
Missoula, Dec. 14.-Axce Schulstad, a
member of the trial venire of the district
court, has been finally excused.
MONTANA R. R. COMPANY
Time Card Effective November 23, 1903
Mixed Passenger Passenger Mixed
1 .n. y. " , ' "' y, S taotion s M ..days, Iui .days,
Wcdllncduaya, nlllsllday, Wednesdays, hursdayy,
I, llayi. S;iulldiys, Fridlay%. Saturd;ays.
I.ve. H8:a, a II.ve. 9:51 a I ............ LOM ARD ...... .... Arr. 345. p l Arr. 4:00 p nm
Arr, i4:u0 p l n Arr "- p "u' l ......... DORSEY.............. I.ve., : p nt I.ve. t:oo ln i
I.ve. i::55Si ip I.ve. i.::l4, pi I ............. DORSEY .... ......... Arr, IS: 5 ii Arr. t2I:3p in
:op p5 1 I:. M p nI ......... FiEEM ANS........... t1:20 Ip to 1:so a mi
:15 p In s 1i 5 ........ MARTINSDALE ....... 1.15 a l 11:00 I In
3:45 i )n a ) I Ill ....... .... TW ODOT . ......... is:1 a II Io:Us a 111
4:5'p . 2:55 1 "l ........ HARLOWTON ......... :5,0 m 9:45 a In
5:3' P m1 3:45 p 1 ............. U ET................ 1:55 am 8:J5 a m
6 pII 4:31 II i .............. M OOR ............... 9:i a tI 7:45 am
Arr. H:, I,pm Arr. 5:jom pni .......... LEWISTOWN .......... v. :Jo an1 l.ve. 6:45am
ROBERT RANTOUL, General Manager, Helena, Montana.
ONE IS DEAD AND
ONE IS TO GIVE UP
HIGHWAYMEN AGAIN GET IN THEIR
WORK WHILE HOLDING UP A
CHICAGO SALOON.
SPRINGS FOR THE ROBBERS
Latter Open Fire and Then Seeing Their
Victims Weltering in Blood, Flee
Without a Bit of Booty.
nY ASSOIcA'I.I I'I1:SSR.
Chicago, Dec. 14. -Antuoe Niessler was
shot and instantly killel aaid John Te'mnple
was severely wounded in the latter's sa
louor at 22.11 l'rincetost avenue by one of
two highwaymen who uttemptel to hold
the place up. Niessler, who had stepped
into the saloon a moment before the rob
hers, was shot while going to the assist
ance of Temple, who had been ordered
to hand over the money in the cash drawer.
As Niessler fell to the floor, shot
through the heart, Temple sprang for the
robbers, but he, too, was shot and it is
thought will die.
The robbers becoming frightened fled,
without taking any of the money and are
still at large.
ENGLISH POTATO CROP
IS A TOTAL FAILURE.
London, Dec. 14.-Disaster has befallen
the potato growers of the United Kingdom.
In November, 'oor, the imports were
about aoo,ooo hundredweight, valued at
about $t65,ooo. The same month last
year, after a small amount of potato dis
ease, the importation doubled. In Novem
ber last the imports rose to a,ooo,ooo
hundredweight, valued at $1,oo,ooo.
FEWER BABIES GO
BEFORE THE ALTAR
EPISCOPAL BISHOP GAYS AMERICA
18 THREATENED WITH DE
POPULATION NOW.
ANNUAL FIGURES OF CHURCH
Is Not That Fewer Children Are Bap
tized, but That Fewer, Actually,
Are Being Born Today.
IlY A5SOCIAJ'I'D PRIt.SS4.
Tnlianapllis, )ec. .1..---hlpiscopal Bishop
Francis of the diocese of Indiana declares
that the shortage of babies in the church
is alarming and that the homes of the
wealthier members of the church have an
average of about one child to the family.
"Women in the finer home do not want
babics," declared Bishop Francis. "We
have a constantly increasing number of
adult baptisms, but the number of infant
baptisms is decreasing. This is not be
cause they do not have their babies bap
tized, but because there are fewer babies.
The .Living Church annual, the Episcopal
manual for the year, just published, shows
how alarming is this shortage of babies in
the church. The numnbcr of baptisms of in
fants has decreased 50o per cent in 14 years.;
This in the face of an increase of com-+
umunicants.
"Not only is there a shortage of babies
in our church, but all over the land in the:
wealthiest homes. It appears like a repe
tition of the career of Frane."
Mrs. W. A. Cook III.
PE.CIAr, TO rTHE INTERt MOUNTAIN,
Bonita, Dec. z4.--Mrs. W. A. Cook, a
prominent woman of this place, is ser
ously ill and mayr- not recover.t

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