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Belt Valley times. [volume] (Armington, Mont.) 1894-1977, April 10, 1924, Image 4

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BELT VALLEY TIMES
S. A. Rsmiofton, Editor
PUBLISHED EACH THURSDAY AT BELT, MONT,, BY S. A. REMINGTON
;
$2 • VMr la Advance
American PrcM A,«'«.. Pareil»
Advcrtiaiaf KcprcacaUlive
B—and tm dm Pa w cUaa M Bek,
Mm*., m laaaad Ciem Mad
List of Baseball Supporters
This week we are publishing the
roll of the citizens of Belt, Armington
and surrounding country who have
signed up to help support the local
ball club during the season of 1924.
We are not stating the amounts
subscribed by each because- there are
several matters that enter into the
The finan
ability and duty to pay.
etal means of the individual, the re
taras to be expected as well as the
willingness to contribute.
Some people have conscientious
scruples against Sunday baseball and
others may think it inadvisable under,
local conditions. We must respect
their right to determine these matters
f#r themselves.
The list is in the hands of T. W.
Noble, secretory-treasurer of the as- !
sociation, and the Times will be glad
to publish from time to time thel
names of additional subscribers. 1
G. W. Merkle Coal Company
Bert Funk
First National Bank
W. C. Blomquist
A. V. Bakko
Black Diamond Cafe
New Drug Company ,
Pythian Billiard Parlor
Charles' CifTifôn
E. H. Bemis
Hamment Brothers
McConkey Merc. Company
Caah Meat Market
T. W. Noble
- Dr. J. S. Stewart
B. H. Sundermeier
S. A. Remington
N. H. Nelson
Chas H. Dahl
Nelhart Lumber Company
N. H. Browning
. A. Velebir
John Jaap
O. M. Olson
Prank Frye
. Roy Servoss
A. H. McDonald
W. P. Pi I ge ram
T. W. Epperson
R. McShane
B. H. Gillette
N. H. Gillette
CL W. May
Ben Kennedy
W. P. Sheldon
A. L. Winston
Cal Sharrard
Thos. Wright
Mike Horano
D. Spogen
John Jeffries
Leo C. Graybil!
Gua Probst '
Joe Mor ris_
Wm. Marsh
Gas Manchester
J. W. Graybeal
J. 6 . English
Cb»s.. White
B. F. Bales
Andy Boboth
Wm. Vendsel
John Boboth
F. T. Florek
s.
R. E. Dunn
H. C. Gob sack
Nellie Klimas
John Pattsner
Basie Velebir
J. W. Mearns
Edith Kerneghan
C. Riley
D. R. Gray
Louis Mitchell
Andrew Patrick
Pauline Polutnik
J. S. Pearson
E. J. Marquardt
Henry Morrow
R. E. Mahood
Alf Johnson
Lee Johnson
J. W. Leland
Joe Segla
A. F. A A. M. No. 137
O. Sampson
A. M. Robertson
A- P. Brutofaki
Edith Johnson ~
Genevieve Schroeder
Otto Polutnik
Harry Browning
Boy Johnson
L O. O. F. No. 64
Leon Co rette
John Dolin, Jr.
Baptist Pizzini
John Cinker
Angelo Pizzini
Jacob Werti
E. Bennett
Harris Beynon
Francis Bjorn i
Mat Richardson
Ray Wilson
A. J Wants
John Oudan
Hike Dolin
William'Hill
Dove Bakko
è
John Berner
Etanfc.v Kliman
Geo. Brutofski
George E. Dolin
Alex McGraw
Lester Brodie
Joe Midura
Arthur Samuelson
Walter Midyett
Fre< ^ Lord
C. G. Johnson
Matt Lesell
** eter Kupi
Charles Berg
Everett Auren
, „
atiff - The natural 8ha P« is by far the
be «t, aniyou can't improve on nature,
Youn » trees P lanted two or three
V e nr * a *° can stand a ,ltt,e trimming
TIME NOW TO PRUNE TREES
(Continued from Page One)
ming a tree in a globe or pyramidical
shape as it looks artificial and too
to jjive them a uniform shape and
j is also well to help the growth of the
i trunk. For instance: If the season's
■ growth was from three to five feet,
[cut off about one-third, but by all
j means don't cut back into the hard
! wood. Eliminate all the lower
branches on the trunk to the height of
i six feet from the ground so that a per
son can -Winr under it Paint all fresh
made cuts with white lead to keep the
! moi s tur e out, ——
Pruning, if it is needed, should be
gin now, when it is perfectly safe. In
case you have to cut targe branches,
be sure and cover the wounds with
white lead or bees wax.
"To inspect the trunk is most im
portant is it is the breeding place for
insects. Cut out ail the decayed bark,
in fact, give it a good scrubbing with
[a atiff brush clear to the branches.
'Mix one-half pound of soap, one gal
••
I ion hot water and two gallons of kero
sene and apply this emulsion with a
brush. This will kill all the pests and
will not injure the tree.
"Formula for emulsion for spraying
the foliage later in the season is as
follows: Mix 10 ounces of B lack Leaf
No. 40 to 60 gallons of water, qdd two
pounds of fish oil soap to this mixture.
"Now, what is the cause of the
trees splitting the bark and getting
those sickly blotches on the trunk?
I have taken this matter up with the
horticultural station in Washington, D.
C., but so far have received no remedy
for its prevention. It seems they are
at a loss on this question, but claim
it is caused by the abnormal change in
temperature in the spring months
when the sap commences to go up.
For instance: We have a temperature
of 38 to 40. Suddenly it
10 below freezing—and we have ex
perienced this often,
quence is the circulation of the sap
stops. When warmer weather sets in
regain the sap will travel again but it
will leave some fluid behind where it
was held. Opening the blotches up
you will find a watery matter in them;
by all means cut this all out clean. If
don't it and will
The conse
in time kill your trees.
' Spraying of trees is essential. We
must take precaution to prevent in
sects that destroy our trees. Even
the tree looks healthy «nd clean
ought to have a spraying and I recom
mend this being done about the month
of June."
CHRISTIAN CHURCH
Sunday school 10:80 to 11:30. Junior
Endeavor at 3:30 p. m. Christian En
deavor 6:30 to 7:30. Communion and
church services 7:46 to 9 p. m.
t—
Dr. J. W. Graybeal
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON
First Class X-Ray
Equipment
Hours: 10 to 12, 2 to 4
7 to 8
-
belt, Montana

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•Bat at the—
Club Cafeteria
Get what you want—
Pay for what you get
Splendid Cooks
Everything spotlessly clean ♦
4
•>•«• •;• + + 4 * *•;• + + + +
an
THE HOMELESS CHILD.
What will we do with him?
This is a question of grave import
ance. The proper handling of the
homeless means much to the future
welfare of not only the child but of
the coming generation. The time was
when the homeless child was much
neglected and was left to shift for
himself in the best way he could and :
that wag not very good. Then the j
Christian era began to take an inter
est in him. It was not till the last of
the seventeenth century that he began I
to be cared for in orphanages except!
a few feeble attempts which were
made in the first and second centuries. |
The plan of adopting the homeless
child out into good homes is of very 1
recent origin. During the last half
century this plan has been adopted as
the best method of handling the de
pendant where he it free to be placed.
The society which has been doing this
work in our state the past 26 years is
the Montana Children's Home society.
To date about 2,600 dependent chil
dren have been placed in good homes j
by this organization at an average 1
cost of 1136, and 98 per cent of them
have made good. Besides making
many children happy we have made
as many homes cheerful by the bring
ing in of a child. No dollar spent for
charity could possibly tell for more
good accomplished. It
so
a
and a joy to be engaged in such a hu
manitarian work.
The district superintendent has
cently been here soliciting for the
support of the society and friends
have generously contributed but there
are many whom he was unable to see
personally and if they wish to help
with a contribution, • «hock sont, to
the^ society will be greatly
The past year a campaign has been
put on to raise money for our new
building of which there is an urgent
need. In 1923 we were compelled to
turn away over 300 aid cases because
we had no room for them. Enough
•■»* » 1 « •, f
money will be on hand this spring, we
hope, to begin on the building but it
will need considerable more to com-;
plete it." Can you not send in some
thing for this worthy cause? Is it
right that we should that we should!
be forced to refuse a worthy case for j
want of room? Many worthy par
ents do not wish to give up their chil
dren and are willing to send in money
for their support if we can keep them
for a short time.
We have two~4HtIe brothers which
re
we wish to keep together by placing
them in the same home. They are
four and five years of age and are
fine boys. We also have a brother
und sister we would like to place to
gether, The boy is fogr year* old
and the girl 18 months. Is there not
someone who can take them and love
them as their own ?
Yours in the interest of the home
less children of Montana.
F. R. BROWN,
District Superintendent,
1111 2nd AW. N., Gt. Palls.
Coach Lowrey tells this this one;
When the teams came trotting out on
the field and the substitute players
ran to the bench, a young woman who
knew more about motoring than about
football remarked ;
"My, haven't they a lot of spares ?"
statement of the Ownership, Man
agement, Circulation, etc.. Required
by the Act of Congress of August
24> 19 i 2 . of the Belt Valley Times,
published weekly at Belt, Montana
for April j 1924 . state of Mon .
-1 tana> County of Cascade, ss. Before
j me a Notary Public in and for the
State and county aforesaid, personal
ly appeared S.A. Remington, who hav
ing been sworn according to law, de
poses and says that he is the pub
lisher of the Belt Valley Times,
and that the following is, to the best
of his knowledge and belief, a true
statement of the ownership, manage
ment (and if a daily paper, the cir
culation), etc., of the aforesaid publi
cation for the date shown in the
above caption, required by the Act
of August 24, 1912, embod
section 443, Postal Laws and regu
lations, printed on the reverse of
this form, to wit: 1. That the
names and addresses of the publish
er, editor, managing editor, and
business managers are: Publisher.
S. A. Remington, Belt, Montana, ed
itor, S. A. Remington, Belt, Montana;
Managing Editor, S. A. Remington,
Belt
ied in
Montana; Business Manager,
S. A. Remington, Belt, Mon
tana. 2 . That the
owners are:
(Give names and addresses of in
dividual owners, or, if a corporation,
give its name and the names and ad
dresses of stockholders owning or
holding 1 per cent or more of the
total amount of stock.) S. A Reming
ton. Belt, Mont 8 . That the known
bondholders, mortgagees, and other
security holders owning or hold
Ing 1 per cent or more of total
amount of bonds, mortgages.- or
other securities are: John Hane. S. A
Remington, publisher.
Sworn to and subscribed before „„
this 9th day of April, 1924. Lee
C- Graybill. Notary Public for tha
State of Montana, residing at Belt,
Montana. My commission expires
May 11 , 1924.
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The First National Bank of Belt
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Condensed Financial Statement March 31, 1924.
RESOURCES
LIABILITIES
Loans A Investments
$53,354.88
Real Estate A Fixtures ...... 5,919.40
Other Assets ...
.$30,000.00
. 3,000.00
. 8,693.20
Capital .
Surplus -
Rediscounts
2,826.66
CASH & EXCHAH6E - 26,425.50
DEPOSITS - - • ■ 46,933.24
Total
Total
.$88,626.44
CASH RESERVE 56 PER CENT
$88.526.44
Reserve required by law 10 per cent. Our cash reserve is more
than five times the percentage determined by law to be sufficient
for protection of deposits.
THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK OF BELT
WE SOLICIT YOUR ACCOUNT
REPORT OP THE CONDITION OP
Farmers & Miners State Bank
at Belt, in the State of Montana,
at the close of business Mar. 31, 1924.
i ,. ,
*PPT*^tnd
warrants
Stock in Fed eral Reserve
ß an k
Banking h 0U8e "S
niture ânu xix*
^ re
n .. 8 j
r
j
Resources
Loans and discounts $218,936.68
Overdrafts, secured
177.26
2,003.60
$221,116.64
1,900.00
$ 20,000.00
estate
8,659.90
owned
$ 28,669.90
Cash Reserve
Gold coin .
Silver coin ..
Currency s .
Due from approved
reserve agents ..
$ 130.00
1,933.43
7,200.^0
30,330.09
$ 39,693.62
U. 8 . Liberty Bonds .. 22,690.00
Checks and exchanges for
clearing house
Other cash items
.$ 96.95
1,331.37
$316.297.28
Total ~.
Liabilities
Capital stock paid in. $60,000.00
Surplus fund .
Undivided profits less
expenses and taxes
paid
12,600.00
3,116.99
»
$ 65,615.99
Individual Deposits
subject to check....$107,411.22
Time certificates of
deposit due within
30 days
Cashier's checks
9,768.00
1,067.07
T
$118,226.29
Time certificates of
due
on
after 30 days.
Savings deposits
subject to 30 days
notice...
$38,231.96
39,667.99
$ 77,899.94
Certificates of deposit Is
sued for borrowed
money ..
Notes and bills rediscount
~ed ..7.7777.77. ........7
$ 10,000.00
43,655.06
$316,297.28
Total
State of Montana, County of Cas
cade, ss.
the above named bank, do solemnly '
swear that the above statement is true !
to the best of my knowledge and be
lief»
I, C. H. Provin, cashier of,
C. H. PROVIN, Cashier.
Subscribed and sworn to before me
this 8 th day of April, 1924. H. C.
Gossack, notary public in and^for the
State of Montana, residing at Belt,
Montana. My commission expires
Apr» 2. 1927.
Correct Attest:
CHARLES CARLSON,
PHILIP LEVEILLE,
Dtraetora.
BELT MEAT MARKET J
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Belt
••"r
"
Business Readers
-♦
Advertisements under this heading
Ten Cents per line for each insertion
FOR SALE—1919 Model Ford tour
ing car $160 Stone Paulson Belt t f
FOR SALE—Gehu Seed Corn $2.00
per bushel. Also limited amount of
Rainbow Flint at same price. Mat
Richardson, Armington.
37tf
FOR SALE—Five or six fresh cows.
87tf
Inquire at this office.
FOUND—Two ladies' hats on the Gt.
Falls road. Inquire at this office.
FOR TRADE—Good team of mules
for horses. Beaudry Bros., Belt. 43p
FOR RENT—320 Acres of Pasture.
See Harvey Lewis.
39tf
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FOR SALE—Registered five-year-old
Hereford Herd Bull. Frank Shirley,
Route 2, Belt.
40tf
FOR SALE—Laying Strain S. C. !
Rhode Island Red eggs $1.25 for 16.
$3.76 for 60. Purebred. Frank
Horan, Belt, Montana.
41tf '
FOR SALE—Hot Point Vacuum clean
er in first-class condition. Mrs. O.
H. Johnson, Black Diamond Cafe. 43
FOR SALE OR TRADE—Two work!
horses and two sets of harness. See j
E. C. Hinkle, Armington, Mont. 43 j
LOST—PURE WHITE COLLIE with
brown ears and black tuft of hair j
beneath each ear. Answers name of
Duke. $6.00 reward for informa- ;
tion that will lead to his recovery. ■
Notify Albright Ranch Co., Rice- j
villi :, Mont.
48
FOR ylENT—Partly furnished house j
on Upper Row. See John Kleffner.
ANOTHER SKILLED MECHANIC
has been added to the force at THE PIONEER GARAGE
Hereafter we will have two first-class auto mechanics
JOHN MARQUARDT
and
BOB MAHOOD
capable and ready to put your car into first-class repair for
the 1924 season. If you live in town give us authority and
we will get your car, repair it and return it.
<
J
PIONEER GARAGE, Henry Morrow, Prop .
Give \ our Sole A Genuine Treat
You have thrown many a pair of good shoes away just
because the soles were worn through. Perhaps the count
ers were out of shape, and the welts may have been 'shot.'
Don't do it again. No matter what the condition of the
shoe, if the upper is good, we can rebuild it and make it
almost like new. Perhaps there is a pair of shoes in your
closet right this minute that need attention. Bring them
to os and permit us to advise you. They may be saved,
and many more weeks of wear put into them at very
small expense. "Be Thrifty—Have 'em Repaired."
THE BELT SHOE SHOP
LOUIS MITCHELL, Proprietor.
NOW LOCATED IN CIGAR FACTORY BUILDING
/
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FOR TRADE—One registered Here
j ford Bull four years old. Harry
Penn, Route 2, Belt, Mont.
42tf
j FOR SALE—Two Barred Rock cock
| erels, one fresh milk cow and a
quantity of farm implements. In
quire R. S. Blain, Armington. 44p
The Brady
house on the Upper Row. See Leo
C. Graybill.
FOB SALE OH RENT
42
I
W. H. GEORGE
FUNERAL CHAPEL
> ,
Extra Service Without
A d d i t i o n al Charge
AMBULANCE SERVICE
Day and Night
PHONE 4236
GREAT FALLS, MONTANA
V
Business readers bring results.
?

Busy Bee Lunch Room
Lee Johnson, Prop.
Short Orders
Lunches
Open Till 12 P. M.—
Chinese Noodles A Specialty
4
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BELT ELECTRIC
SERVICE STATION
John Poland, Prop.
Auto Battery, Generator
and Starter
Repairing
I

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