OCR Interpretation


Belt Valley times. [volume] (Armington, Mont.) 1894-1977, December 11, 1924, Image 6

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025296/1924-12-11/ed-1/seq-6/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for Page Six

SS
OUR COMIC SECTION!

'
£
Our Pet Peeve
i|
fi
j*
..
C
1
1
1
;■
3
1 \
/
•''i/p'
.*
•%r
-
Æ
- •
'M
c-Vi
'■A
V
• -
v
Uj
In a Hurry Too
■BBIK557
mm , wc NM» a nt*
Th« Y '17« HAVING BOME
WONDERFUL. «At«* AT BOM« OF
tUt MMN ClACS FUOMITUOB /
^ HOU diS - TH» PßlCt* ARC /
V 1 VtffT LOW
ALL OUSMT — LWT 4
TAklC 9BT, CANNY
Y 6 * # Tm»* ONE
<4 .# 395 -
T
L«T(J
GO /
J
r
V/
k
»
W/a
o
\\
Ü
vC
A
0HT*Ju«r Tmi bei? That'S *395 - Bio,
WTOt BOA «PRiNÖ fr MATTßMg it* $4(0*
-and the whole <?rr _ _ /
IB ♦ * Ô5»
YEB —
GOlHG OUT •
60«Nff DOWN.
4tR P
i
I*
is
i
k
i
i
f
n.
m
i
•Jo
(
n
j
?
o
Ä
T3U
VAH&I
US*


r Accidentally" Sounds Correct
/® 8 EW JUNttUG A
VhJDCMB\ WO
\oP9BT TUB 1V4K*1
ß
f^tuNT'wOMe or)
\ NOOft HIOW.*/
S 1 R.\
<
1
o'
1 »
V
r,
■;i
*
■ '
U».
K7
\
\ 0 * 4 ,*
.
*
HAW!
"I
A
iSi
'r.
* 4
I
ssa
j )*, x
A
«k 1
t.
e/
l: 9:
gSSm*
I
*/
tPC* <
mm***
■ H ill««»— M ill III I I IIII
AQuisteasGreeftif
♦« MMWH t MMMtMIMl
1
W
;
la The f w w
A
HEBST! not a memory of homo, or
T
friend.
Be they so far remote, however
lowly:
do place whore new affections richly
blend
That doe# not grow more beautiful,
more holy.
A! Christman.
V- 1 -
There le no laughter of a little child.
No fiery paaalon of Toutb'a rosy
morning.
No treasure-house of Age, benign and
r mild.
That ie not sweeter for the Christ's
adorning
At Christmas.
There la no depth of love, no pang of
sorrow.
No mighty moving in the human
heart.
No comfort for today, hope for to
morrow.
In which the Christ has not a larger
part
At Christmas.
go, as we send onr greeting of affection.
We share the memory ef Him who
came;
(n fellowship, in happy recollection.
Each fervent wish Is hallowed In Hla
name
At ChriAtisaa.
For
■I
Mother's
Christmas
By ETHEL COOK ELIOT ^
(®. 1*1«, Western Newspaper D'n Ion.)
O I N O home for
Christmas 7"
"Yet. AU of ns
always go. Great
fan seeing each
other again and
exchanging news
We go back to the
farm."
"Yours must be quite a family now,
with all the children. Bqt I suppose
your mother gets in extra help, and
you all help, too."
It was not impertinent, because it
was my best friend speaking. She is
just frank and sincere. She had
dropped Into my office after hours, not
le buy insurance from me (yea, I am
8 female Insurance agent and not a
failure at it either I) but to say "good
by" before herself leaving the city for
the holidays.
"No, there's no extra help to be
gotten these days In the country any
more than here. Not any that's worth
while. So mother does It all herself.
But she likes It. Christmas only
comes once a year."
We said no more about that, but
after my friend bad gone I remem
bered her clear, frank eyes and the
way they had received my reply. They
had been slightly skeptical. I couldn't
j gat that skepticism out of my mind.
The result was that, after much
thought, I suddenly closed office a
whole week before Christmas, prac
tically kidnaped my youngest sister
away from her home in a nearby
city—that comfortable home with Its
full nursery, cook and nurse girl—and
whisked her away to the country to
give mother a little surprise.
At first I thought the surprise was
to turn out an unpleasant one. We
arrived in the early afternoon with
out warning. There was mother in a
huge apron, her hair tied up In a
towel, the front hall full of brooms
and mops, honsecleanlng. Ehe could
not conceal her chagrin from us, we
It certain
ly was different from onr customary
homecoming. Thai, she met ns at the
ST
EBHHBfip
Wtthart Warning.
Croat door, her am linked In father's.
dressed in her beat silk, her white
house shining to
Am
then tt# pantry fined with plea, cakes.
erto wonderfol Jelly tarts! Sett m
to Vitim, komelika, hoapltabi« hoeae!
mdk a «»erhUngly dean pantry fog
R***
Mow ■
■'Î
we were axpeetott Fatter had ban
isJMd htmoalf to the hero, and we
found Vm dtocoowdately amoktag kp
jiao'« stall the hoeee
to be up and
fmimm» mu tt s**m MetMw mm
I«MtH 8
*T I
*Qàk ûmrf «ha «reefed «n
mm«*' » 0tsfamm Wmi
J HotMoTi n4tl m J<ut tUa turn
Started to fix for you."
We pat down oar suitcases is
dement at this unheard-of welcome
from mother, our mother 1
"That's just tt, mother, dear, 1 *
said. "We didn't want 70 a to do all
this 'fixing' alone. We're come to
fix for ourselves, and the horde that
follows on Christmas Eve." -
Well, at first mother simply wouldn't
bear of It We were to be company
and just wait till she got the rooms
we were to occupy aired and made up.
Since we were all there, well we must
stay. But we shouldn't drudge. She
guessed we worked hard enough, each
at our own particular kind of work,
all the year, not to have to work when
we came home.
. We wouldn't listen. We bad come
for one thing. We laughingly over
bore her In all her objections.
More than that, we called father
In from the bam and got him to
bundle mother up and take her off
for a sleigh ride. "A sleigh ride!
Who ever beard of a sleigh ride and all
the parlor furniture In the hall wait
ing for the parlor to be cleaned!"
Well, mother heard of a sleigh ride,
and under just these conditions now.
She heard of it from her two strong
minded daughters, her youngest and
her oldest. Father caught our spirit
at once and bustled her%way. How
merrily the bells jingled as they
whirled away through the snow!
Now for it! Marge ant} I tucked
up our skirts, draped ourselves In big
aprons and wound towels abont our
beads, and fell to. It was hard work,
but what a lark we made of It And
we bad a good supper waiting for
mother and father when they got back.
And every day that week we did
he same Father whisked mother off
In the sleigh to visit old friends In
neart> y towns, or just for the ride,
And while they were gone we—
hn * tle ^; , i „
By Christmas Eve the house was as
shining and tidy as It would have been
had mother been left to herself with It
And Marge had proved herself a mar
velous cook, too. There were plea and |
cakes, and even tarts, and the ham
with cloves. The turkey was dressed,
too, and the staffing made.
mother had not so much as put he.
nose Into the pantry door.
Then the family arrived. Thro«
daughters, with their three husbands
and several children apiece, and two
brothers with their wives and off
spring. AUd mother and father met
them at the door, mother's arm
And
Fath er Wh i sk ed Mother Off In the
(Wolqh to Visit Friands.
tucked In father's, her hair freshly
curled, her black «Uk rustling.
"My," cried Brother-in-law Jim,
Nell's husband, "but you've lost tea
years, mother I Euch bright eyes and
pink cheeks I've never seen."
Marge and I, in the dark«- back
ground, nudged each other and giggled.
All the others cried the same thing.
It was true enough, too. This was a
different mother from the rather
weary old woman we were accustomed
to meeting at holidays here In tha
open door. - £.
Father spoke up : "You're dead
right, children." he said. "Your mother
looks tike this all the year except at
holiday time. Then she just slave»
getting ready for you and sort of gets
worn out. This year was different.
This year she went honeymooning
with me Instead."
Marge and I came forth from bid
ing. "Yes, and hereafter la always to
be different," we promised.
And how It paid ! We'd gotten Into
the way of thinking mother was an
old woman. Now we saw her as her
neighbors and father saw her—hearty
bright-eyed, carefree
"My, tt seams good to be eating
otter's cooking," escaped bar that
night, over Marge's apple tarts. "But
yon are naughty children jest the
sause. Marge end you shouldn't boot
me so ! Right la say own bouse, too !"
The reproach ln her «yea, though mOd
indeed, was for an Instant reel. Merge
caught it. aad quicker than I. got up
and ran around to mother at her
and gnve her one of her old impulsive.
ttBdfah
"Tea, another dew. It's
■tetter. So twss fair!"
And everybody agrwd that Marge
had justified ear
to be
to
Walt, another Christmas far here, and
apraan The etter girts have offered
to tthe ttefcr taraa. of coaran. bat I
ts let them. Î loek for
ward to tt* «arato cto».ai»* «pm
m jolly Utile stotar. Marge.
Is « Jatofaeattm. And tt* best part
«t ö »1 is tte
ummm oat ef tt* yard
Ball's Catarrh
Medicine
a •
Avenue,
Vanity Coet Life
Thè AMyrIaM were a luxurloU8 and
beauty-loving people, and both men and
women were addicted to an elaborate
aae 0 f cosmetics. According to history,
the last monarch, by name Sardana
pains, "dressed and painted like fils
women." and It la due to this vanity
that he met his death. On® of bis gen
erals visiting him found him penciling
h la eyebrows and stabbed him.
__ _
fid In tha . .
fatty P»» Sold by aO __
V. JL CHENET A OCX, Toledo, Ohio
Baby Tortared Day
and Night by Edema
Healed flick SUa
Brookiyu, N. Y., May 10:—"I
thought it might Interest
know how much Resinol has dona
for my baby. Her faca was covered
with scabs and
you to
itching a
so severe 1 had
keep stocking
her hands to
her from scratch- f^j
ing. I had to be
up at night as it
bothered her so \
■hecoold not sleep.
Two doctors, one
of them a skin
to
on
specialist, told me
she had eczema.
I tried several remedies, but noth
ing helped, so when I read in the
paper about Resinol, I thought I
would give it a trial. I can't praise
It enough, for it has done wonders
for the baby's skin and she sleeps
all through the night now. I would
advise anyone with a similar case to
try Resinol Ointment." (Signed)
Mrs. Rose Goeradorf, 27 Fur man
Ointment.
j throat and long Inflammation,
constant Irritation of a cough keeps
the delicate mucus membrane of tbs
throat and lungs In a congested con
Litton, which BOSCHEETS SYRUP
F ent *- V and quickly heals. For this
f reaBon 11 bag been a favorite house
| hold remedy for colds, coughs, bron
' chltis and especially for lung troubles
in millions of homes all over the
world for the last fifty-eight years,
enabling the patient to obtain a good
night's rest, free from coughing with
easy expectoration in the morning.
Ton can buy BUSCHKE'S SYRUP
wherever medicines are sold.—Adv.
Botchee* Syrup
Allays irritation, soothes and heals
The
Harriot'* Mascot Hungry
The governor of French Indo-Chlna
has given Premier Herrlot of France
a costly pet. It is an elephant eleven
years old and weighing 2.644 pounds.
On the trip from Indo-Chlna to France
It ate 400 bunches of bananas for
which the premier had to pay.
desperation be has sent it to the
Lyons zoo.
In
Turn flattery upside down and yon
have slander.
Prrmarunt road*
art a good
investment
The
—not on expense
High Cost of
Postponing
Permanent
Highway
Building
Poor motor roads sdfie
j
j
j
ioduatry and agriculture;
sums snnu
aDy in high mahUMwaci
costa, and greatly increase
tire and repair
gaealme,
Lll*.
There fa not a state, not
a county, not a commu
nity, that isn't paying a
heavy price lor having
too few pnwwmsiii roads.
Them me edl tmatf
et the wastry—evea whab
tmo# » opwns?»
nr tr«Ac
Thhls uwfag oili wM dsh
Ikse »
CCMtÉMr nriRwii
J ' 1 j. v}
ai
.16,000,900!
Jfmm 4m Adesriew At PW
tnMtwMNdi
Year
» Be «4
niniwnwi
fri-nhfi-rf?
dptyagg,
PomtMJNp a smart
jmooumom
»
4
mm *-wmOMbn
--

xml | txt