OCR Interpretation


Belt Valley times. [volume] (Armington, Mont.) 1894-1977, November 12, 1925, Image 6

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025296/1925-11-12/ed-1/seq-6/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for Page Six

PO
m


FATTENED POULTRY
v BEST FOR MARKET
It Is well known that during the fall
months there is relatively little fresh
killed young poultry on the maiket,
because the season for broilers has
passed and the great I
era bas not yet reac
Therefore, prices ,|of welhlattened
young stock ire excellent.
Farmers and commercial pool try
men should never think of disposing
of their market poultry io an on fat
tened condition, aaya ,the Department
of Agriculture. "This la time whether
the birds are sold live or dressed, and
Is apparent since muçh bettoy prices
are paid for well fattened stock than
where the stock Is taken directly off
the range. Farmers throughout the
country lose many thousands of dollars
through not properly fattening their
stock. The birds to be fattened should
either be placed In boxes, stalls, open
pens or In fattening crates where they
are kept for a period of two or three
weeks The size of the birds is an Im
portant factor, because a bird that
weighs from three to ftour pounds usu
ally fattens more readily than the
smaller bird. The larger the bird when
the fattening period starts, the short
er the time required for fattening. A
three-pound bird can be fattened quite
well In three weeks, whereas a bird
weighing four pounds when put In the
fattening crate, could probably be fat
tened in about two weeks.
Birds are best fattened on mois
tened ground grains. Several good fat
tening rations have been used, one of
which la as follows; Equal parts, by
weight, of çommeal, ground buck
wheat and nliddUngs. Another good
Ik qf the roast
the market.
fattening ration la composed of two
parts cornmeal, one part crushed oats
and one part middlings A variety of
grains Is a good thing, although corn
meal la particularly valuable Tor fat
tening purposes Whatever fattening
mixture Is used. It certainly should be
moistened with sour skim milk, usjng
enough milk to make the mash Into a
thin batter dr'hlch will run out of the
pall when the birds are being fed. Milk
not only Improves the palatablllty of
the mash, which Induces greater con
sumption, but it also Improves the
quality of the flesh. It should be used
whenever possible, for it not only has
good fattening properties but also
tends to keep the birds In good health.
When the birds are properly fattened
they should each gain about one pound
in weight ; therefore, there Is not only
a larger bird for market but the price
per pound will be considerably higher
thon where the birds are not fattened.
There is no excuse, therefore, for not
fattening cockerels and culled pullets,
and this year it should be done early
because of the Increase In grain prices.
Soy Bean Oilmeal Is an
Excellent Poultry Feed
Testa at the Indiana experiment
station covering four years and In
volving 980 single-comb White Leg
horns and Barred Rocks proved soy
bean oil meal equal to tankage or
meat scraps for laying hens. Mineral
matter must be added to the soy-bean
oil meat, however, to make up that de
ficiency.
The Purdue standard basal ration
was used to the teats. It consists of
grain, 100 pounds of corn, 100 pounds
of wheat, 60 pounds of oats and mash.
60 pounds of bran and 60 pounds of
middlings. To this was added 80
pounds of tankage or 85 pounds of
meat scraps or 46 pounds of soy-bean
oil meal pins 10 per cent of minerals
or 47.6 pounds of whole soy beans
plus 10 per cent of minerals.
The mineral mixture consisted of 22
pounds of steamed bonemesl. 24
__ pounds of finely ground limestone and
16 pounds of salt The addition of
— mineral matter la necessary to pre
vent a great growth of fat
The United States Department of
Agriculture considers soy-bean oil
meal an excellent feed for growth and
egg production.
Crowding During Winter
Is Harmful to Poultry
Quito a number of farm poultry
raisers make the error of housing too
many bens and pallets together dur
ing cold weather. Hens will lay as
well If yarded and well cared for as If
on free range. But they dare not be
crowded when they are confined.
If the bens are being fed and forced
for egg yield atone, we most get them
into winter quarters to their pens
early to the fall and keep them there
without changing them about Intro
ducing new hens Into the flock of lay
ing birds always causes mors or leas
confusion, and this helps to decreas
ing the number of eggs laid.
Best Turkey Fattener
Old corn fed pkrirty whole and part
ly cooked, with boiled potatoes, and
thickened into a mach with meal, la
ooe of the beat fattener* for turkeys
Give the mash to the morning and the
whole corn at night Do not confine
them.
If new cor® 1» given, the
tendency Is to have bowel trouble. For
this give boiled milk. They must be
free from lice to tottra. Turkey. wtH
be m high this year that each care««
be made to »ear as much flesh

Dainty Gifts You
Can Buy or Make
Hbt«I Powder Puffs
Gay little beauty doctors ars these
up-to-date powder puffs, and Ideal
Christmas gifts. By means of water
color paints, narrow ribbons, laces
and tiny flowers, ordinary powder
puffs are transformed into these
whimsical affairs that portray saucy
flappers or demure maids One side
of the puff is decorated while the
other makes itself useful.
Pretty Ribbon Fancies
y
!
■■
KH
»,<
V
B
y
f
-
It never occurs to Santa Clans to
leave pretty ribbon fancies out of his
head at Christmas time—he merely
varies them a little each year. Hen
are gBrtera made of rltbon shirred
over flat elastic, and trimmed with
lace ruffles set with ribbon flowers. A
corsage flower of folded ribbon, set
In millinery foliage and a small lin
gerie blossom are also pictured.
For the Christina« Tree
All the little people for whom the
tree blooms and bears will be delight
ed with toys and ornaments made
from crepe paper printed with figures
of children. Ornaments, Ilka thorn
pictured, are made by pasting the pa
per to cardboard and cutting the fig
ures out. A bonbon wrapped to paper
la tied to each one of them with baby
rltbon, which also serves to hang
them on the tree.
Gifte for Girls
Pretty hair ornaments are always
Included In the list of gift« that girls
will tike. The most fashionable ones
this year are bands and coronets made
of silver ribbon, and flower wreaths
made of colored tinsel ribbena.
■■g# ■
lmo " owe . r for "* ""*** *
wound wire. A coronet and flow«
wyeath «re shown here.
Slants on Life
By J. A. WALDRON
W
_ Contrasting Contacts
r pRADITION advise« that a aearcftj
A 0 f awn may always be expected at
rammer hotels. And feminine experi
ence must verify tradition, for who
does not know that women at I atom
find flirtation a vocation T
But wherever men are lacking aa<i
jeomen are Idle and most fall back
upon their sex, they are Impulsed to
form friendships with one another, or
at least to get together In association
that passes for friendship. And sonn»
times friendships formed by women Id
strange places survive social and other
differences that would be fatal at
home.
At the Hotel Delmar the breakfast
hour on a certain sultry morning dis
closed some twoscore women with but
three or four men. Some of the wom
en were dressed for tennis, others for
golf, several for other outdoor exer
cise, and but few had that purposeless
aspect that sheer laziness gives. '
One very pretty young woman, upon
whom the eyes of others In bet vi
cinity turned with admiration or envy,
according to the ages of the gazers,
for her sartorial style supplemented
nature's endowment, was oblivious to
all about her. As she daintily nego
tiated her breakfast she apparently
found Joy in a letter which she read
and read again. And as she rose from
the table she held the letter open as
though It had not exhausted her In
terest, strolled out upon a piazza and
settled comfortably In a chair.
Another woman, older but still at
tractive and elegant In dress, had re
garded the young woman with a pe
culiar Interest, and, following her,
took a chair near enough to Indulge
her Impulse to become acquainted.
They fell Into conversation without
knowing anything whatever of each
other. But In such circumstances
names mean nothing, and formality Is
ignored.
"I suppose you are alone, as I am,"
said the elder woman with a smile.
"For the moment, yes. I expect
some one this afternoon."
"1 had hoped," said the elder with
a sigh, "that we might get acquainted.
* &
«
*1 Suppose You Ars Alena, as I amT*'
ind perhaps be companionable. I
know no one here, and one so seldom
finds congeniality I"
"We can be friends Just the same,"
said the younger. "The one 1 expect
Is to remain but a day or so. Be will
return later. I am to be married
soon," she added, blushing.
"Ah! It Is strange I am so Im
pressed by youl And as you have
confided a secret—I suppose It Is a
leeret —I ahall tell you something of
myself," They drew their chairs
closer. "I am here to forget—or try
to forget—an unhappy episode to my
life."
"I suppose wa must all have unhap
piness some time. Fortunately I have
escaped it. and aball not anticipate It."
"There may be persona who never
It by."
"You are Mill young, and I think
you are of a buoyant aplrlt," said the
woman wltb an approving
"What episode to life cao
younger
glance,
prevail over the will to seek happi
ness?"
"True as to some things. But with
the affections and a Ilf* that has
teemed settled yet la broken it la dif
ferent"
*too have been disappointed In
lovel" The tone was one of pity.
"Tea. Or to marriage. Sometimes
It meant the same thing. Sometimes
love and marriage have no Intimais
That
You feel for me.
relation,
proves you are to love."
"Ah 1" The younger woman's ex
pression was an eloquent affirmative
"Then listen. When yon are mar
ried, cherish the love of the mao who
loves you.
Some womra do not realise upon their
opportunities. I may have been care
less. I may have thought that what
seemed settled would never be dis
turbed.
Never be careless of It
My husband drifted away
I may bave assumed too
from me.
much. But I could not stand rivalry.
I divorced hlm, sud be never mov^
to defend himself. Surely that was
a confession I"
The younger woman wa« disturbed,
but her will to friendship was not af
ghe took the other's hand.
y
fected.
"No woman who loves a man can ex
cuse rivalry," «be said,
gave a little cry. and roae.
oo an earlier train, as ! felt
fie would!" And with a happy
Then she
"He has
flutter she started to meet a well
groomed man of about forty who with
quick, nervous steps entered the plasza
with a searching glance.
The smile aa he approached left him
srhen he recognized the elder woman,
who crumpled to her choir to a faint
OUR COMIC SECTION
Let's Begin at Home
*
WELL, PI U-,'THERE S
A MOST CONVINCING
ARGUMENT (N FWOß.
OF PtSARMAMENF
(5tE IF I CAM ^
\Rim6U W pAILj
ft
m.
ft! *30
MI5S nr
WATctrys
HIT
two air* *
vou miss rrj
1
j ■
■Fr
N
i' 1
ßL
■0]
I
V
%
;'.Vj
■V.
I
:fii
'00M
-V.
æsüü
rt
'■
il
.
*.*:
- . , "...
:
£52
$0m
warn.
;;
W?:
•Jri
y '- v MW
m
vVXvJ
mm
:
l
«WttSa«
Y'ÿ&ïM.
£


ti
THE FEATHERHEADS
Punishment Enough
T
mmimm
BUT NOTH INS/ TDu'RE A BAD \
BOY, FREDDIE FEATHERHEAD,
60 RIGHT UP TO YOUR ROOM J
AMD STAY, --- x
t THERE /
fj
But,
R }P..
§
> >
>
X
*
.vl 1 .
< <
<
«
t
M
i?
POP, I JUST CAM'r
STAY UP IM MY ROOM
ANY LONGER — - .
•PUNK" CRIPPENS r
OUT VMLKlH '
WITH MY ClRL J
\ >
».
m
< *
>
dt
>>
1
Si
J
1
U
A:
c WwUra N«w»p»p*r Unloa
A Difference
ABCKIE, THE PRINTER'S DEVIL
'TOT
AM* VfiWCÖF "P4® UM
(TOO MA**f „
I MAST HOW»«»
too MAMIMQUfrL t
OB*at O0UU> «AM» «Y
VPt 4AOMX BfirrtU tt OM J
t» MAUY fihgfVW»S»t
Op
E3
03
twAl I
BSD
l
, f
.i
OP wrr mam }
V
YOOOE RM JAAMY
Stow ones
J.
■ ; fa
,
A
jfe. • i

xml | txt