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Belt Valley times. [volume] (Armington, Mont.) 1894-1977, March 04, 1926, Image 7

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025296/1926-03-04/ed-1/seq-7/

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*'
h Lt I
all your walls
For sleeping rooms—formal
parlpra and reception halls—
dining room and living
room
— for the library — and for
public buildings.
Properly applied it won't rub
off. Ask your dealer for Ala
bastine Colorchart, or write
Miss Ruby Brandon, Alabaa
tine Co., Grand Rapids, Mich.
/
Alaboatine —m powder in white and
tints. Packed in 5-pound packages,
ready for use by mixing with cold
or warm water. Full directions on
every package. Apply with an ordi
nary wall brush. Suitable for ell
interior surfacea —plaster, wall
board, brick, cement, or canvas.
|)i>
5)
!m
FORDS
run
moanas
■ With
^ IJUdi« tmuaj
«
«J If
»
C^uick
CORNS
In one minute yoor mltery from corn* to
ended. That's wbat Dr. Scholl's Zlno
psda do ufc/yby romovlng the eonas—
prmtlng or rubbing of shoos. Yon risk no
Infection from «moteur cutting.nodangor
from "drops" (acid,*. Zlno-pads ore thin,
medicated, antiseptic, protective, heal
ing. Get o box at yoor druggist's or shoo
dealer's today—35c.
Est FntSampU vm. Tbs Scholl Mf*. Cs., Chop«
DX Schott's
'Lino-pads
Put one on—die pain fi gone
'K
faite
a
FOR BURNS
AND SCALDS
Bunts and scalds are tnevi.
table in the kitchen. Keep
"Vs elloe" Jelly handy.
Soothe« and heals. Pure. Sam.
Famous for two gc
Cbeaebrougb Mfg. Company
State St. New York
Vaseline
■KB. U. ». PAT, OFF
Linste trips up Us own heels.
Fresb, sweet, white, dainty clothes
for baby, if yon use Red Cross Ball
Bine. Never streaks or injures them.
All good grocers sell It—Advertise
ment .
IVgjgfng away will win the day.
Sure Relief
Y
U
ft
'
6 Beldams
Hot water
Sure Refief
DELL-ANS
■g?» INDIGESTION
«nd 75« Rkjf&Soid Eweiywher®
—-
, NELLIE „
■KIVELL Onyx
1 ***+**********>*********>***++**+4
HEN I wrote this 1 could heat
the sound of a chisel and a
hammer and an air riveting macbli
wielded by the workmen construe«
an apartment building nearby.
■"Doesn't that noise nearly kill you?"
asked a visitor «s the sounds pierced
the air. t admitted It was not as sooth
ing as some things I could mention,
bot added that It did not Irritate me
nearly as much as the goise made by
the wrecking crew While tearing, down
the building that formerly occupied
the same site.
According to all traditions and leg
ends the noise should upset me. 1
presume It would If It were not for
the fact that I know they are build
ing, and that the hammer, which plays
a quick, light march, and the chisel,
which makes a little pizzicato, are
constructing, not destroying. Then I
recalled how thrilled I always had
been at the sight of a Labor day pa
rade, where every muscular son of
toll represented construction. Whether
be was a master workman or an en
tered apprentice, he was a builder of
homes, churches, schools, bridges or
something that would promote civi
lization.
In contrast I recalled another pa
rade which I had been Invited to wit
ness from a grandstand seat. There
came hack to me the cheers and ap
plause of the throng as the youngest
and strongest of our country swept
proudly down the gayly decorated
avenue. The finest specimens of man
hood In onr land, all physically per
fect. and every mother's son of them
trained to be a killer of his fellow
man. And somehow the noise of the
derricks which told me of rebuilding
W
ng
did not seem as nerve racking as the
crash of falling bricks and mortar
which bad come to me when the old
building was being torn down.
It Is the noise of destruction that
annoys me. . The noise of tumbling
bricks and mortar, of boards being
ripped from their moorings. While I
listened to the noises which accom
panied the polling down of the old
building I found myself thinking of
those soldiers ! had seen In that pa
rade; They were going forth to face
the noise of destruction, of guns and
howitzers, of exploding shrapnel shells
and bombs. All destructive.
Now since they have started re
building. the clear, ringing noise of
the hammer and saw seemed to soothe
rather than annoy me. A new build
ing was being constructed. The world
was moving ahead. The noise has a
sort pt harmony. There Is a musical
"clink, clink" of the trowels, shaping
bricks Into regular form. I am not
able to see the workmen, but the
qnlck, deft strokes of fine steel In
skillful hands seems to Inspire me.
They are building homes In which
families will live, home ties be footed,
children will be bom and love will
pWMto tB Perhaps its wall will
shelter the architect of a great cathe
dral or some other great man. But
anyhow they are building.
Aaid I tried to picture some of those
baft flu bid ttgtenfd to K»r of guns
and the bursting of shrapnel shells—
and had come back uninjured—work
ing on s that new building. I like to
think of them fts captains of indus
try—those boys who had been trained
to kill. I like to think that the band
which had been taught the use ol
destructive weapons had been relieved
of that responsibility and could now be
turned toward the constructive work
of wielding haibmers and saws.
The man who hullds Is the only man
who pays his fare In life's highway,
the man who can roll together two
little balls of dlft; making a stronger
one; the man who can lay one plank
npon another, so that It will hold
another's weight; th-> man who can
push a stone beneath the comer of
a bouse to hold the structure ; the
man who can put two words together
and send an idea winging on its way
is a builder. Everyone can be a
builder. Whether we build by a word,
spoken or written, or a deed,, we can
be builders.
Every man knowa whether he Is a
Every man
builder or a waster,
knows whether he Is an asset—oc^a
liability to humanity. I believe It was'
George Meredith who said, "Men who
think in terms of lifetimes are of no
ose to civilization. If a man's build
ing is measured by bis own span of
life he does not build well."
Jack or Tommy or whatever his
name is. as be carries his hod of nmr
tar up the ladder la a builder, and bis
work will stand long after his earthly
I tribulations end, and bis mundane
î sins are forgiven. The first grave
digger was a delightful buffoon, a
cheat and a charlatan, but he had
He boasted that be built
vlslon.
stronger than the meson, the ship
wright and the caroeoter, and he
argued his case with some plausibility.
The mason, the shipwright, the car
penter, the poet, the preacher, the
hod carrier, the writer We must Cgll
them great The world Is in good
bands.
somebody sent me an engagement
book. I wonder if they know any '
more Jokes like that. It remind* me
of the eld negro In lall calling down
te the street to another colored mao
to ask »what time It was
"What do yon care, yon ain't goln
nowhere*." woe the answer.
That's me, Fd rather have a apeüer'
or a book of synonym«
Ca*rr1s*< N the MeMsawht Oyadlssts. las)
^ CROS S'- WORD
t
7 \ ö 9 10
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30
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33
35
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37
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45
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15
50
48
51
me:
54
53
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58
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( Copyright. UM.)
Horizontal.
The pvrseas te wheat a thing Is
oolO (pi.)
Those who are
1—A New Yorker
IS—To ehoervo
IS—Neither
ipietely ogi ah
surksd
I.
•A aooaotcr
SS—More oeeare
IS—By
IS—Te drlodr
IS—KegarOlag (ahhr.)
•A naperlatlvc wer«
«1— Csntntaaded
<
SS—A perfume maOc from Sowers
50— Still
BS - — A miserai oprlag
SS—To parehaae hark
S7—A fairy spirit _
•S—To bara with hat water
40—Struck
«1— A small spot
4S—Te leag for
4ft—A eeaaty la North Corollas
4T— A misai le. aa a hall of Iroa
40 ■' -To go to court to gala legal re
Ores* for a wroig
51— First same of a geatlemaa asso
ciate« with "The Forty Thleveo"
SI— A prêt» Oigalfrlas "reveal"
IH—Street (ahhr.)
ST—Six (Roman numerals)
The aolBtloa will appear la aext Isaac.
SO—Oppose« to liability
IT—Illuminating mixture
1»— Ooe, ao matter what oao
II—A thick black llunld
IS—Aa kakllaal «raakar«
W— Braeatk
14—MaUee
IS—To procure
SS—Regular (ahhr.)
IS—Name of "Peer Gyat'a" motkof
!» —To kehel«
10— Aa aaelrat klag
«2 —To attempt
it—Declare«
4« —To managt
4K—WUIe
mi—S ecret movement
S3—A ceatlaeat (ahhr.)
Mt—Freak and laxarlant
DO—Nome gives to Yale
SS—Above
8
Solution of Last Weak*» Punit.
□nein noD nnaa
□ nmaDnEinnn □
nm smo nnn ara
nnra ononen qdq
nan □□□ san
BOBE3D 0 nnEDO
oa 00D ciram ran
□0000 n aranran
D0C1 00Q E30n
O00 □□000 0DH
□□ nmn non 00
O QQ00O0Ü00 a
□□00 000 E10O0
18—A Irm resolve
Vertical
1—A wteke« fellow
A aegstlveo
S—That thlag
%
4—To oarreoter
6— To eavrlop la a eyat
4— Kara of a Snk
7— One who bribes
5— A girl at a mixe« college (slaag)
Keg (ahhr.)
I*—To «0 wroag
II—Part of flshlag eoalpmeat <pl.)
IT—Aa epoch
IS—A large coatalacr for llaal«
! A'
HOW TO SOLVE A CROSS-WORD PUZZLE
Wkea the correct letters ore place« la the while spaces this pnssle will
opell wor«o both vertically aa« borlsoatally. The «rat letter la each war« la
ladleatc« by a aamber. which refera to the «eOaltlaa lists« below the psaole.
Thao No. 1 aider the Miami beaded "horlooatal" «elan a word which will Bil
the white spaces up to the «rot black «snare to the right, and a lamktr aadrr
"vertical" «eOaea a word which will «II the white «soore« ta the salt black ose
below. No letters go la the black spares. All worda a «cd are dletloasry wo»««,
eirept proper aamea. Abbreviation«, «lang, Initial«, technical terms as« obso
lete forms arc Indicated la tho deBaltlona.
RSERY RHYME
»
«
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N!
»
V
fksp
« *'
y
6
%
Hur
T
4 /.
~w
c*

s 0
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o
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a
s
s
tr
î
lavender blue,
OSEMARY green
Thyme and sweet marjoram, byssup
and rué;
m
Tulip and lilies, forget-me-nots too,
Grow in my garden and here s some for you
Paid three other gardener». Right side down, along flower basket
upper right comer down, on ribbon, upper side down, «long drees
=
f
COLOR IT NEW WITH
DIAMOND DYES"
U
Just Dip to Tint or Boil to
Dyo. .
Each 15-cent pack- ;
age contains dime- '
tlona so simple any
■woman can tint soft,
delicate shades Of ; AA
•dye rich, permanent Kjft'
colors In < lingerie, 511k,
Silk«, rlbboBs, skirts, BjW
waist a dresae« ( Ü,L
coats, «lockings. IIU*
'sweaters, draperies,'>.*#$
Silverings, hangings Ç
■.-*avery thlni î
. Buy Diamond Dyro^-no other kind
—and tell your tyqgglst whether, the
material you wish to color la woo) or
»Ilk, or whether it la linen, cotton or
mixed goods
''-'V
î*
DEMAND BAYER ASPIRIN
Probably Right
"In my opinion, the girl who thinks
she la too good for most men. Is right."
"Yes. and mostly left, too!"
Take Tablets Without F*ar If You
See the Safety "Bayer Cross.''
Warning! Unless you see the name
"Bayer" on package or on tablets you
are not getting the genuine B >yer
Aspirin proved safe by millions and
prescribed by physicians for 26 years.
Say "Bayer" when you buy Aspirin.
Imitations may prove dangerous—Adv.
While railway coaches In England
are not made wholly of steel, all lim
iter used in construction of the cars
1* fireproofed._
Children Cnjj 5 £
/S
m
*
I
1
I
Ns-V
MOTHER Fletcher'»
Castoria is a pleasant, harm
less Substitute for Castor Oil,
Paregoric, Teething Drops
and Soothing Syrups, espe
cially prepared for Infants in arms and Children all ages.
7
To avoid imitations, always look for the signature of
Proven direction« gjj each package. Physician« everywhere re co m m end it
Man 1» by nature a civic animal.
Freshen a Heavy Skin
With the «ntlbeptlc, fascinating Cutl
cura Talcum Powder, an exquisitely
scented, economical face, akin, baby
and dusting powder and perfume.
Renders other perfumes superfluous.
One of the Cutlcura Toilet Trio (Soap,
Ointment, Talcum).—Advertisement
If not clever, one can be clean.
"O Happy Day'' Bang the laundres#
aa she bung the snowy wash on the
line. It was a "happy day" because
she used Bed Cross Bali Blue.—Adver
tisement.
Benevolence wins affection.
D
I
\
î
A
f
A
It
BAYER
4
:'V'
E
$
Y
ï
>
t
R
BAYER ASPIRIN"- genuine
• 4
SAY
Unless you sec the "Bayer Cross" on tablets, you are not
getting the genuine Bayer Aspirin prescribed by physit • •
dans and proved safe by millions over 25 years for
Colds
Pain
«
1
Headache Neuritis Lumbago
Neuralgia Toothache Rheumatism
r
DOES NOT AFFECT THE HEART
Ifc.
Accept only "Bay er" package
which contains proven directions.
Handy "Bayer" boxes of It tablât*.
Also bottle« of 24 and tVsgglsM,
■M
t
GOOD HEALTH
NECESSARY
. , . sr T *' T. 'f' j 1 l" ' P ' M •
Maui Bm»jt W otnea Ow«
Their Ho&ltkto Lydia E.
I
fjsLi_
X' U- ' fin»
3
Fifty PM* *fb'
occupations for women. Some
t
Tssnss some did
housework »onr*
fobaWVoÆ éo Ö
n
F|l
-ham*, and *. f«W
m. took up nursing.
odUK, -there ate
tfew Occupations
open women,
ay they, work la
ogt
■f-J
? not
facto
d r ed s of other
women and girls.
There are also
women architects.
Sawyers, dentists, executives, and legis
lators. But all too often a woman
wins her economic independence at the
cost of her health.
Mrs. Elisabeth Chamberlain who
works In the Unlonsll factory making
overalls writes that she got "wonderful
results" from taking Lydia E Pink
ham's Vegetable Compound
Chamberlain Uvea at 500 Monmouth
St., Trenton, N, J. She recommends
the Vegetable Compound to her friends
In the factory and will gladly answer
any letters she gets from women asking
about it.
If Lydia B. Pinkham's Vegetable
Compound has helped other women,
why shouldn't It help you?
UB
M
Mrs.
W. N. Ü., BILLING«, NO. 10-192«.
By use of ultra-violet rays experts
In Paris have been able to read origi
nal texts In palimpsest do cu m e n ts.
BLACKHEADS
cannot be hidden. Get rid ol then
now by regular treatment* with
Resinol
I
*
PISO'S
coutihs
fut
jusjm—u,-nFuov
Wk Throstsad Chase ^
Persistent kindness conquers ,'thos*
whb arc evilly disponed.—Seneca.

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