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Belt Valley times. [volume] (Armington, Mont.) 1894-1977, May 06, 1926, Image 7

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025296/1926-05-06/ed-1/seq-7/

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NO WOMAN CAN
BOUSE EFFICIENTLY
m
Without Good Health
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BBS
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Four Wall« Can Make a
House, but it takes a Wom
an to Make a Home
To be a successful homemaker, a
woman must guard bertealth. When
mother is not well, the home Is up
set Women everywhere are learn
ing through their own personal ex
periences, as these women did, the
merit of Lydia IB. Plnkham's Vege
table Compound,
Lancaster, Ohio.—"For ten years
After my marriage, I had poor health.
Early Ute of Coal
In Scotland coal was used as early
as the Twelfth century.
Sure Relief
Bm-kHS
INI
6 Bell- ans
Hot water
Sure Relief
V
DELLA NS
FOR INDIGESTION
2S<t and 75$ PMs.Sold Everywhere
Your shoos feel easy H you use
ALLEN'S FOOT-EASE
Stops the pain ot Corns
and Bunions and yon can
walk all day In ease and
comfort. Nothing gives
I such relief to hot, tired,
aching, Inflamed or swol
len feet, blisters or cal
luses. A little ALLOTS
FOOT-lAS* sprinkled In
each shoe In the morning
will makeyou forget abou t
tight aboea. It takes the
friction from the shoe. Al
i use It for Dancing
W
ew Shoes. For free
»»n,pls sad s Foot-Ess* Walking Doll, addreu
ALLOTS FOOT-EASE, U Wor. N. Y.
RLACKHEADS
■w cannot be hidden. Get rid of them
now by regular treatments with
Resinol
STOP THAT COUGH
with Boschee's Syrup—the old reliable
family remedy that has been In use
for 60 years. Loosens and brings up
the phlegm And eases the dryness and
Irritation. At all druggists. 30c and
00c. If you cannot get It, write to ~
O. O. GREEN, INC., Woodbury, N. J.
W. N. U., BILLINGS, NO. 19-1926.
Matter of Opinion
"Is that your dog, Willie?"
"Well, the man next door thinks be
owns him."
Shave With Cutlcura Soap
And double your razor efficiency as
well as promote skin purity, skin com
fort and skin health.
•limy soap, no germs, no waste, no irri
tation even when shaved twice dally.
One soap for ail uses—shaving, bath
ing and shampooing.—Advertisement.
No mug, no
A two-faced person has, at least,
one pleasant face.
Children Cruist
/S
I
I
l
i
A
•- Fletcher's
a
less Substitute for Outer Oil*
Paregoric, Teething Drop*
and Soothing Syrups, espe
cially prepared for Infanta in arms and Children all ages.
o
of
/
.ytbywfcöHdftJ € VfBTJ «»!»«* €
Pr&m» dirt&km* go mds
*
1 was on a visit to my sister la
üöcs, Michigan, sad she had taken
Lydia £. Plnkham*s Vegetable Com
pound. Her hoe band got me a bot
tle aid I took it and felt so much
better that I got a second one. Nov.
whenever I teal run-down I take the
Vegetable Compound and aoen feel
air right a g a in . I have had three
little girts in the last six years and
do all my housework, sewing, wash
ing, and Ironing. My time is pretty
weil taken up, but I will answer any
letters I receive."—Mae. Foakk Din
Pis tvs
con, 823
Avenu«, Lancaster,
Ohio.
Sturgis, Michigan.—"I am very
thankful for what your medicine
has done for me and have recom
mended It to others. I took It to
give me strength before my baby
was bora. I would have to stop work
and tie down sometimes all the after
noon. I felt as if I did not cars
whether anything was done or not I
got tired out so easily. One day I
found a little book on my porch and
that night I showed it to my hus
band and he went down town and
got me n bottle of Lydia E. Pink
ham's V
medicine
that I was soon able to do my work,
and when my baby was born, my
nurse. Mrs. Forbes, said it was the
easiest birth she had ever attended.
I will be more than pleased if I am
helping someone else by giving my
testimonial."—Mas. Bdwabd Pxn
si no, 208 Surprise Av«~ Sturgis,
Michigan.
egetable Compound. Tbs
has helped me so much
More important we think we are
the more we value time. - '
CORNS
Lift Off-No Pain!
u r
f
preezqh U q
rn— rvr vy
Doesn't hurt one bit 1 Drop a little
"Freezone" on an aching com, instant
ly that porn stops hurting, then short
ly you lift it right off with fingers. #
Your druggist sells a tiny bottle of
"Freezone" for a few cents, sufficient to
remove every hard corn, soft corn, or
com the toes,
calluses, without soreness or irritation
Sophistication takes the flavor out
of a lot of things. - ,
"DIAMOND DYES**
Just Dip to Tint or Boil to Dye
BEAUTIFY IT WITH
Each 15-cent pack
age contains direc
tions so simple any
woman can tint soft,
delicate shades or
dye rich, permanent
colors tn lingerie,
silks, ribbons, skirts,
waists, dresses, coats,
stockings, sweaters,
draperies, coverings,
langlngs — pvery
A
thing I
Buy Diamond Dyes—no other kind—
and tell your druggist whether the ma
terial you wish to color U wool or silk,
or whether it is linen, cotton or mixed
goods.
People stand for whatever they fall
for.
Red Cross Ball Blue should be used
in%very home. It makes clothes white
as fxnr and never injures tbe fabric.
All goOd grocers.—Advertisement
Nature's first great title—Mind.
jm
ULltU
DIFFERENT CAUSES
FOR POOR HATCHES
Many small factors In the manage
ment of the Hock can often affect the
results which are attained In hatching
eggs. With the present development
of the incubators the expert operator
is usually able to secure good results
If the original hatching quality of the
eggs Is satisfactory. In the large
hatcheries It Is often observed that
different trays of eggs run side by side
will show a marked difference In the
number of chicks hatched. The rea
son for this difference lies In the ortg
Inal eggs.
Some of the factors that help to
secure satisfactory eggs for hatching
are as follows;
Mature breeding stock. The usual
age agreed upon la nine months. Many
prefer females in their second year.
Plenty of male birds. Many sup
ply one cockerel to ten hens, but the
majority agree that one cockerel to
fifteen hens is sufficient with the light
breeds.
Remove diseased birds from the
flock.
Birds which are otherwise confined
should be given an outside runway
when it Is possible to do so without
endangering the health of the birda
Direct sunlight should strike the
birds.,
Birds should be comfortably housed.
Floors should be covered with a lit
ter of straw and changed whenever it
shows any indication of dampness,
mustiness or filth.
Artificial light should not be used
to stimulate laying for 00 days pre
vious to date of saving 'first eggs for
batching.
A balanced ration of approximately
equal portions of scratch feed and
mash should be furnished.
The hens should be supplied with
some type of green feed such as man
gels or sprouted oats as well as hop
pers filled with oyster shell and grit.
Regularity and good care for a
month or Sis weeks prior to saving
of eggs as well as during the period
oi saving of eggs for hatching, com
bined wltji the above essentials,
should produce eggs which will hatch
a high per cent of live chicks.
Turkeys With Diarrhea
Diarrhea is one of the prominent
symptoms of blackhead in turkeys,
though It may also occur from other
causes. It Is a pretty safe guess that
blackhead is present when diarrhea
appears and the turkeys begin to drop
dead, one by one. as the disease pro
gresses. No remedy of any consider
able value has yet been found for this
trouble. Each turkey may be given
a one to two
spoonfuls, when any looseness of the
bow e l s a p pesr. Thls will clear out any
irritating matter.
Improvement of Flock
One of the most economical methods
I of Improvement of the poultry flock is
j by the purchase of a few settings of
hatching eggs. From these may be
raised a few females and enough
breeding males to head the flock dur
ing the succeeding year. Care should
be taken to make sure that the stock
from which one Is purchasing eggs is
superior to hie own.
Nests Easily Cleaned
Nests for laying bens can be easily
cleaned If they are bnlit in sections, or
tiers, of three or more nests, without
bottoms, and set on shelves. When
the nests are pulled from the shelf all
the straw and dirt will fall to the
floor.
Poultry Notes
Teach birds to roost early—prevents
crowding.
Put young chicks in clean bouse on
fresh ground.
Rest chicks In boxes for a few hours
before putting Into brooder.
• * «
Have brooder bouse ready before
the chicks arrive.
Segregate cockerels from pullets as
soon as possible. Keep forcing pul
lets along with mash, even when on
range
• • •
Look out for overheated brooders
and brooder house fires. Make an In
spection of all apparatus regularly
and take no chances.
Do yon know why big dressed chick
ens will not sell readilyT The city
man is a frugal buyer—he has to be—
and chicken soon runs up tbe price
-when heavy.
I# disease Is In your flock, there Is
a cause. Hunt for it; and barn or
bury all dead chicks without s sec
fad's' daisy -—-—
• • •
If you have "a good old mqtber hen
for chickens" don't kill or seB her
Even If she only lays five eggs • year,
■be earns her feed in brooding.
• • •
To throw sway the addled eggs at
nesting or hatching time Is tc teach
some animal bad habita, or pollute th#
air. Bury them deep or bum then
SThe
COWS ON PASTURE
NEED SOME GRAIN
Farmers feeding dairy cows during
the spring and summer should be sure
to use plenty of property mixed grain
feeds with the legumes or grasaqs^to
get best and cheapest milk returns,
according' to the national dairy coun
cil. Leading college dairymen have
made a study of this important prob
lem, and agree that dairy'cows cannot
possibly consume enough grass to
maintain milk flow and their body
requirements, too.
"Cows can't make milk on air and
water," writes Prof. A. R. Merrill,
dairy specialist of the Connecticut ex
periment station. "They need some
feed. Pasture grass is one of the best
forms of succulent green feed that we
hare, but as a rule there Is not
enough of it. Cows that are depend
ent on pasture alone cannot get the
amount of feed they need. When we
stop to consider that the average cow
needs 100 to 150 pounds of pasture
grass per day for maintenance and
production, we can easily see why It
la necessary to furnish some additional
feed."
"The feeding of grain on pasture is
so Important," states Prof. E. L. Sav
age of Cornell university In Dairy
men's League News, "That I am going
to take the time and space to empha
size it again. A mixed grain feed
containing 17.5 per cent to 20 per cent
proteiq should be fed on pasture."
For farmers who do not raise suffi:
dent grains, there are many balanced
ration feeds on the market, use of
which will bring profit In Increased
milk flow. Moat of them contain
corn, oat and wheat products and oth
er grain raised cheaply in the corn
belt states. These eventually flud
their way into the enorffious milk sup
ply of cities such as New York, Phil
adelphia or Boston, gccordlng to the
Notional Dairy council. Dairymen In
New York use large amounts of feed
produced In the West, and have
learned that they cannot produce
milk profitably and maintain their
herds without adding a grain ration
to spring and summer pastures.
Big Value of Soy Beans
for Production of Milk
In some of the recent experiments
reported from the South Dakota ex
periment station, ground soy beans
were found to be similar in effect
In the ration to linseed men), and of
somewhat greater value for milk
production. Soy-bean hay was found
to be more valuable for milk pro
duction than alfalfa hay. The ground
Soy beans do not appear tu have any
effect on the quality of butter when
quantities,
though wit h some cows they tended to
increase the percentage of butter fat
Since the development of oil fac
tories in Illinois, the feeding of soy
bean cake from which the oil has been
extracted Is likely to be considered
more practicable than the feeding of
the whole ground soy bean.
Dairy Houses Separate
From Other Structures
Every farm should have a suitable
place in which to handle and card for
milk. Milk ordinances and sanitary
regulations of boards of health in
many communities require that milk
houses or spring bouses be part of
the regular dairy equipment Milk
or dairy houses separate from other
buildings give the best satisfaction.
Extension Circular 107, which »tells
how to build them, will be mailed
free by the Pennsylvania State college,
if you send your request to the agri
cultural publications office of that in
stitution at State College, Pa.
Grain for Cows on Grass
Many feeders fall to observe that
cattle are Dot receiving an adequate
ration when rinntng on pasture. Even
those who do comprehend that the pas
ture is too short, often fall to supply
extra feed because it Is not prepared
and the pressure of tbe season's work
causes them to neglect their cows. It
would seem that when the pastures
an dry, the weather hot, and files pes
tering the cows, silage supplemented
with some good legume hay is quite as
fsermlnl os It is in the dead of winter.
Substitutes for Calves
While milk is tbe natural and the
best food for calves, good ones can
be raised on milk substitutes, espe
cially If whole milk is fed for a few
days and the calves are then gradual
ly shifted over to the substitute dur
ing several weeks—that is given a
little 1
when plenty of skim milk is fed, these
commercial meals are very good as the
grain ration that a skim milk calf
should always have
milk each day with it. Even
Feed for the Heifer
From weaning time until freshen
ing time, dairy heifers require little
grain if they have available plenty
of alfalfa or other legume hay and
good sUag«- To assist in tbe develop
ment of the foetus and to get them
In good condition for calving, heifers
should be given some grain for three
or four month* before freshening and
rather s générons grain ration the
last six or eight week* Of course, the
grain cation should be reduced the
test tan days tt the gestation period

A car
for every purse
and purpose
v n ;
^ - a *
JL distinct price claffc« have developed,
v ■ Gonerfd Motor« is represented in each. :
The General Motors line or passen' 1
get cars comprises 52 different models.
They include every open and closed
body type and range in price-at-the*
factory as follows:
; CHEVROLET -
6 Models—$510 to $765
PONTIAC
2 Models—$825
OLDSMOBILE
9 Models—$875 to $1115
OAKLAND ~
6 Models—$975 to $1295
BUICK
16 Model*—$1125 to $1995 -
CADILLAC
13 Models —$2995 to $4485
. - -- j *
Quality is the first laW of General ' "
Motors; and sweeping economies* pos
sible to an institution with the re*
sources of General Motors; are reflected
in the prices of General Motors cars.
Select the car that suits you from
. the General Motors line. You may
buy it out of income on General
Motors* time payment plan (QMAC),
which assures fair terms and low rates.
. «1
wry* *nr
ink
ifmr
• .4#.'
- TJ -
if~-1 ■
■i !<
H
m
k * -
rV
GENERAL
MOTORS
CHEVROLET - PONTIAC » BUICK
OLDSMOBILE » OAKLAND
CADILLAC ' CMC TRUCKS
"A car for every purse and purpose"
Jutt the Rett of It
Phyllis—Jean's young man Is s
handsome devli, isn't be!
Doris—You're partly right. He Isn't
handsome, though.
For your daughter's sake, use Red
Cross Ball Blue la the laundry. Site
will then have that dainty, well-groomed
appearance that girls admira«— Ad
vertisement
Proof of It
"Happiness is only a matter of
imagination.''
"Yes. People imagine that we are
happy.'
r ■■
L
B
Jost mfac AUbstths with
water cold or hot and
apply to any Interior sur
face. The gore result fa
beautifully tinted waQs in
exactly ths color yon wish.
* grnwét » I
Crwm mm
Ala b astine co m e s la all
**«n«l*^ c o lors ew d threw
I-- to form count*
has* others so that your
>

instead of KaUomine orV&taliapar
—. ■ -.--.-.
-_ju and as onn
owl r h oto* 1 a*»vtcf*. P vajm *o
If, A
fill— Tour Brui«ht troubla g«ts wore*
without attention. Oar lyi iMtsi tree with
full Instructions, (Und to Northwaslarn Opti
cal Co., U11-14II B. Prospsot, Ssattls. Wash.
FARM OWNERS
HERB 18 YOUR CHANCE to get casll
for your farm; farms wanted every
where. Write for free particulars, jam
will be under no obligation to me, to
write me today. J. Wsln, 9-P Paulding,
Schenectady, W, Y. .
Are Ton • SmI Bbtat* Owner *nywb*re ta
tb* Unit«) But** and you with to ret) f«v
euh T Writ* Alb«rt R. Scbn*id*r, Ora,
FtdaHty Mortd*** BIS*., CkwUnd. Oh I*.

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