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The Helena independent. [volume] (Helena, Mont.) 1875-1943, February 10, 1891, Morning, Image 1

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025308/1891-02-10/ed-1/seq-1/

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HE E A O T N .T E D * d N N ,AR 0 8 1 RC I e G N Y ..
-OF
Our ia Ce ll Uoa
OF OIAUh L E CRINA1
SOME : PRICES:
A& bepfutl vSala d Set, 13 pieces,
zr plates and bowl, the finest
Sclass of goods.
Regulhr price, $5o, now $36
A niagnificent Chocolate Set,
same.class as above, one pot
and half dozen each, cups and
saucers.
Regular, $50; now, $35
A very beautiful Game Set, co
balt border and every decora
tion different, wild duck on
platter.
Regular, $65; now, $45
Four other Game Sets, $48, $40,
$30 and $25; now, $27, $25,
$2o and $i8, respectively.
.Several handsome Fish Sets, $75,
$58, $5o, $40 and $35; now
$55, $35, $32, $27 and $25,
respectively.
Several complete Dinner and
Tea Sets.
Numoer.i. Ice ream Sets, Fan.
: P-l`e la dozens "and hal(
dozens.
DON'T
Miss this Opprtulity!
You may never again have the
chance to buy these beautiful
gqods for so litte money.
We are Going Out
--OF THE
China Business.
In the future we are going to de
vote our attention exclusively
to
CLOCKS,
WATCHES,
DIAMONDS,
SOLID SILVER,
RICH JEWELRY,
PLATED SILVERWARE,
CUT CRYSTAL GLASSW'E
FINE CUTLERY,
PIANO LAMPS,
UMBRELLAS,
BRONZES,
BISQUES.
Do Not Miss this Sale.,
-THE
J. Steinmet Jewelry
-CO.
LEADING JEWELERS,
Helena, Mont.
N. B.-Finest Watch repair
ing in the northwest. Jewelry
made to order and repaired.
Diamond setting and engravibg,
original and artistic. A mail
order department. Write for a
ring gauge to order just the fit
atd She Was Dislpsed to Veto Her
, aughter's Proposed
Marrsiage.
ThI Would-Be Groom Held Mater
iast While Filla Made
the Cab.
e
e Thea Ontran. thq 014 Lady, Jolned file
Isemerata sad They soon e
"Were Wed.
10l~rs -g R e y.-Soolet nt Pittiburg's
mcst abiltng libuab. Sewlehley,41e aI
tated to the est6i of'delight tvor an elope
aeat within its borders, Mr. Waer Eaton.
ad, goods man of, New York, and Miss
idXdll.ataly4t Yonkers, are the lead
aboitom'n tsn, somedy. hr. Eaton wasee
gulsal boldtFgd dadindR as young Lohb
-lovr of old, nd the lady i quite as sweet
an daiantyts any of the maidens who have
used thetope-ladder route to happiness.
8oml time ago the young people met and
loved. The young woman's mother had
advir her sanction, but withdrew it later
ir/favor of an older and wealthier suitor.
The daughter objected to the ohange of
suitors. The mother, without telling her
daau'tsr where they were going, brought
her, to Sewlekle.. for a visit ten days
ago. They were stoppine with a
friend, Mrs. MeMillan, of Edgeworth. Mr.
E.ton, afteh a few days, obtained a hint as
to the whereabouts of Miss Llllenthal and
came to PlCtterg, uinally tracing mother
and daur tl to Sewiokley. 'He has been
in Sewiekley for the past week, endeavor
ing t.communfcate with his sweetheart,
but not until Monday was be successful. A
note was dually delivered to the young
woman, and an appointment was made for
that afternoon.
The .trysting place was in the meadow
that slopes gently away feom Quaker ave
nue, jst below "~and Hill." A moment
after the young lady reached the spot the
watchful mother arrived.
The group then consisted of a handsome
middle-aged womah in deep mourning. a
tall, stylish. girl, draped in a suit-of tan
colored cloth, draped over a cardinal petti
coat, with a large ha; covered with
feathers; a nice-looking, but not particu
larly striking young man. A carriage stood
on the roadside.
,The mother etpostulated, begged, and
pleaded., The youang people were implaca
ble. Suddenly the girl ran to the carriage,
and the yoqnM inan throw his arms about
the mother and held- her. His sweetheart
Agpasfely inside toe carriage, he released
with Xha 1stt' tud agility of ybltbh.
raced toward the vehicle with his soon-to.
be mother-in-law and beat her. The
driver whipped up his horses and away
bhey went at breakneck speed up the road.
[n a moment carriage and lovers were lost
o view. In less than an hour they were
mt of Allegheny county, and in Beaver
county, where they were married by a
triendly minister. They then returned to
ewickley, passeing the night at
he residence of Mr. Charles Cooper, who
iad assisted them materially in carrying
,at the elopement, and who had asked that
he honeymoon be spent at his house.
Yesterday morning they called at Mrs. I
LIcMillan's for the bride's trunk, and the
oenal tears, reconciliation and forgiveness
ook place. The bride is well known in
'ittsburg, having often visited at the reei
lnce of Judge and Mrs. Magee. She be.
ame very popular among their large circle
f friends.
MILLIONS OF FEET.
Depredations by Timber Thieves Amount
to Very Large Figures.
ST. PAUL, Minn., Feb. 9.-The speoial
agents of the general land office, appointed
in June last by Secretary Noble to investi
gate alleged large timber depredations in
the Rainy lake and Rainy river country, in
Northern Minnesota, by both Canadian and
American parties, state in their report that
such definite information of large depreda
tions has been obtained as will enable the
government to sustain actions of law
against the trespassers. The yearly average
of logs passing through the Rainy river is
,paid to be between 45,000,000 and 50,000,000
feet. 'Of this amount about fonr-fifthseame
from the United States and the remainder
from Canada. Two-thirds of this timber is
unlawfully out from government land, and
besides several instanoes where lands have
been improperly certified to the state of
Minnesota as swamp lands, have been dis
covered. The sensation will come when
the interior department brings suit against
two or three big luniber firms. one of which
has its headquarters at Duluth. The
govesnment cannot at present get at the
stealings of the Canadians.
Battle With Horse Thieves.
AanDuoa, Feb. 9.-Four United States
deputy marshals, Captains George Stewart,
John Swain, Sam Turner and Joe Phillips,
assisted by seventeen citizens, had a reun
lar pitched battle with a gang of horse
thieves and outlaws yesterday morning at
the Howeth ranch. about twelve miles
northeast of Berwyn. All of the band but
one wer eaptred. Though more than 200
shota were firea on either side, no one was
hurt but Bill Hudgins, alias Billy Forehand,
the leader of the gang. He was shot while
trying to escape in the oompany of the un
known man who got away. Hudgina'
wound is not serious. The names of the
captured ones are Bill Hudgins. Walter
Howeth, Henry Howeth, Albert Wolf,
"Gum" Cash, Joe Montgomery, Oscar
Smith and Basumpee.
Horror Follows Tragedy.
CLnrroBsvL.~e. Wis., Feb. 9.-Charlees
Knock, a resident of Leopolis, shot and
killed his wife and himself one day last
week. The bodies were not found until
Saturday evening. The face of Mrs. Knock
had been partly eaten off by a cat.
Jamaleo's Exhibition.
Naw Yoga, Feb. 7.-A newspaper received
to-day from Jamaica gives the flrst aoount
received of the opening of. the
exposition, the cable having been
broken. The fair was opened by Prince
George, of Wales, The paper contains ex
tended deescriptions of some of the more
Interesting exhibit.. Nearly all European,
as well as moat American governments,
have exhibits. but of American exhibits
that of the United States is the smallest.
This is explained as d to the factthat
sample notice of the propoed exhibition
was set Athis government and no invita
ties to participate.
The lorth jakets Leglstatre rggf
with Il--ill Probably Carry.
B!s.ra.rx, Feb. 9.-[Speela]--The'L
A'eht pver the reeubmission of probteli
eame up in the house to-day and Mat :i*
night is still on, The temperanm es ommil
tee is composed of nans members, eight of
whom are outspoken prohibitioniast [email protected]
three o'clock they reported house bill Ne;i.
182, providing a constltptionai amendment
for resubmlsion, and favored an inderbIte
postponement. After a hard figbt this re.
port was ad6pted. Then it wls moved to
reconsider, and also to lay that motion on
the table. This was too much. It was
ound tbat Williams, of Grind Forks, we
absent without ve,., aMa a Noll of ie"
house was ordeted. 'the serab -at-ri
secired the highways sad byways looking
for Williams, who, when last seen, was
teaking 'tsrak aerces the hills i-
to the country. All eforts to And
him were of no avail 'And thq
committee so reported, Then the sergeant
was given two depnu.es to assist n the sereh
and started out again. In the meantime
repeated motlionsto dispense with busines
under the eell were made, 'put aqd defeated,
twenty-six voting aye, thirty-two being re
quired. At midnight the call had not been
broken and the resubmlsesonists seem de
termined to hold the fort until help should
come on the 9:20 train in the morning,
when, it is believed, by the arrival of half
a dozen tardy members resubmision will
carry in the house by two or three major.
ity. In the senate there is a strong senti
agent against prohibition and resubmiselon
il have a safe majority.
.A RUBRL I ZD.
Speaker r lder, of Kneas. Antoeatle and
Also Profane..
Toran, Feb. 9.-Speaker Elder is virtu
ally the house. He is a very clear-headed
man and his experience has made him in
valuable to his party. He is not a Chester
feldand frequently violates the proprieties,
On such oocasions he IS alwayse dled with
remorse. The other day Representative
Heber requested that the telegram which
he tried Inefeteually to have read the day
before be attached to the petition to which
it related. The telegram antnouned that
sixteen or seventeen old soldiers had not
been able to sign a petition for Mr. Ingalls'
re-election, and they desired that it be
anmended so as to include their names. Mr.
Heber besought the speaker to have the
telegram incorporated in the petition.
"The clerk's desk is full of petitions," re
plied the speaker, "and it will take too long
to hunt for this one'."
"Here is the telegram," said the ineau
tious clerk, who hsa not yet learned the
acbpe of his daties.
'Pat the - - thing down," exclaimed
Mr. Speaker, loud enough to be heard by a
great many people the vicinity of his
desk, "Put it down."
The telegram disappeared, and the clerk
was unable to find either it or the petition.
As the apakes;lanced aroutd at the In
a h jrrgittle'foar sefzedbem7tdt
Heaven forbidt Jtf by good fortine they
had not, they should not learn of his shame
from the newspapers. H-e seized a pencil
and wrote hurriedly. A page brought a
crumpled slip of paper to the representative
of the Times. It read:
"Reporters are requested not to report
profane words slipped from lips of speaker."
Idaho Wants a Fourth Senator.
BoEsy CITY, Idaho. Feb. 9.-In the house
to-day a resolution to ballot for United
States senator to succeed McConnell came
up and after a lively parliamentary squab
ble was passed by a vote of nineteen to
seventeen. Under the provisions of the
resolution which passed the senate a ballot
will be taken in each house to-morrow, and
on Thursday there will be a joint session.
Claggett has twenty-eight votes, including
the democrats, which is a bare majority of
the legislature.
Wanted to le seen.
RLu~xon, N. C., Feb. ,9.-In the house to
day, when the bill to repeal the charter of
the P3tersburg & Weldonrailroad was under
consideration, a sensation was caused by
the reading of a letter to the president of
the road from D. H. Rittenhouse, formerly
secretary to President Polk, of the Farmers'
alliance, dated Washington, Dec. 31, in
which he raised objection to the repeal and
invited an interview.
No Election Probable.
PrIxax, 8. D., Feb. 9.-In the ballot for
United States senator to-day, twenty-five
different persons were voted for. There
were a areat many absentees, but all are
ex.peted here to-morrow. Many leading
politicians express doubt as to there being
any election by the legislature.
The Paternal Idea.
SAcaEmNTo, Feb. 9.-A joint resolution,
which passed the California senate, asking
congress to enact a law providing for the
government loaning money on farming
lando, passed the house to-day.
FULL OF WRATH.
Owenby Will Tell the Whole Truth to the
People.
Cmcaoo, Feb. 9.-J. A. Owenby, the sil
ver pool witness, returned front Washing
ton to-day. He threatens to bring suit
against the sergeant-at-arms of the house
and others, whom he holds responsible for
his arrest while here. In an interview he
said he had a great quantity of evidence
which he was not permitted to give, which
would have shown that he and Donald, the
New York bank cashier, had an explicit
understanding. Owenby declares that a
member of congress from Nebraska, whose
name he gave, offered hint $2,100 not to
testify as to the facts known to him in re
gard to the silver pool.
Owenby charges that several of the con
greseional committee made every effort to
render his testimony "as farcical as their in
restigation." He exhibited a number of
telegramso and letters signed "Donald,"
which he said were from the cashier of the
Hanover National bank. They were worded
in a very guarded manner, and their mean
in is not apparent. Owenby said he had
cipher for use in communicating with
Donald. He asays that In due time he
would clve the ngames of the congressmen,
esMdes Senator Cameron and Represents
lve Ketchum, who, he says, were implicat
ed in the pool.
Marvelous Eseape of All.
Miaow Orrv, Iowa, Feb. 9.-The north
mond passenger train on the Burlington,
e.dar Rapie &A Northern was derailed
ear Randalla this afternoon. Three cars
rent down an embankment. The train
was heated by steam, exeept the mail oar,
and the stove there turned over, setting fire
a the oar, whioh was entirely destroyed.
ere were twenty-ive pmsengers on the
rain and all were badly shaken up. 8om.,
tierbd fraetunred limbs, but none are
bouglht to he fatally hurt. The wreck
was a very bad one andit is marvelous that
to fatalities resulted.
JOHN.T5 I HE PEOPL.
~e Canadian Premier Issues a.
E'Ieretioneerihg Address to the
Dominion Voters.
He Decries Full Reolproolty as a
Stepping Stone to Annex
atlon
lesd Protesttions oft Loyalty sad Mace
S suntlng of rte Glories of the
Union Jak,.
1'Toswro, Ont,,Feb. .,--Sir John MaoDon.
hid has published a address to the elect.
o.4fr s Canida ifn" whi hes says: "As it
. and nagate in 1897, soan 1891 do quea
. relating to thi trade and commerce of
bth.p o.ty ocupy the foremost place it
the bpunbi it and, (Our polley in respes
here to-s what it has been for the
pest thirteen year, and is directed by a
traeletermination to foster and develop
the ipedroes of the dominion by ever.
cas in our power consistent with Can.
.ea's position a an integral portion of the
Eritish empire. To that end we have
labottil .p the past, and we propose to con.
tin. in the work to which we have applied
o14 ei, of building up on this continent,
the flag of England, a great and
ul nation."
DlIng with the policy of the opposition,
l that unrestrieted reciprocity would,
Us opinion, inevitably result in the an
of the dominion to the United
although its advocates in Canada
lnliedh to be the ease. Sir John con
: "To the descendants of the plo
Who settled this country, the multi.
lie Englishmen, Irishmen and SBooth
- Wso emigrated to Canada to
up new homes without ceasing to be
3t t4bubjects, I appeal and ask you what
>Iou to gain by surrendering that
atle~our fathers held most dear? Under
he ipad folds of the Union Jack we en
osesstt ample liberty to govern ourselves
u w please, and at the same time we par
lolpate in the advantages which
Ild ftom - association with the might
is- e.pire the world has ever seen.
Lhe great question which you will shortly
dealled upon to determine resolves itself
nto this: 'Shall we endanger our posses
Ion of the great heritage bequeathed to us
y our forefathers, and submit ourselves to
lireet taxation for the privilege of having
or tariff fixed at Washington, with the
oesptet of ultimately becoming a portion
f the American Union?' I commend these
saues to your determination and to the
adkment of the whole people of C.mada
rit.t.iunlouded. qonfidence that you will',
.veJ4not u rtri$ of- thb procd dls
inction you enjoy of being numbered
maong the most dutiful and loyal subjects
1 our beloved queen."
THE ENGLIaH NAVY.
Admiral .lr Thnnae s Syuiondls Polnts Out
Its Astonlishing sVeakness.
LONDON, Feb. 9.-The truly perilous con
dition of England during a war, owing to
the exceedingly weak state of the navy, as
compared with that from 1793 to 1815, is the
subject of a very remarkable letter just
written by Admiral Sir Thomaq Symonds,
of the. royal navy, to the Marquis of Salis
bury. Standinz in the light of recognized
authority, Sir Thomas is listened to by the
British military service with miigled won
der and apprehension. The servic papers
print the letter in fall with copious edito
rials.
Misi Thomas states that Great Britain has
so few cruisers that even in 1895 it would be
impossible to supply the coaling stations
during a war with Irancs alone. The fight
ing and mercantile navies would be para
lyzed and a punctual supply of food would
be impossible. "In 1814," he continued.
"we had l0t8i vessels, and in 180, 54)1. In
the personnel of our numbers are about
20,00. partly trained men. The French
have 104,000 insorits and 26,000 marine ar
tillery men and light infantry, a total of
130,000 well trained men. We should have
at least marine artillery men enough beyond
what we have to garrison our dockyard
towns, which should be, like the Fiench,
under control of the admirals.
"As to vessels, we have none. We need
twenty battle ships and fifty cruisers of all
classes, ready for sea, as a reserve-excetit
being manned-to relieve accidents, and
even for coaling, passing the crews of those
vessels returning to port to those ready for
sea."
In conclasion, Admiral Symonds saysthat
he deems it his imperative duty to make
manifest how recklessly his country is pur
suing the road to ruin in the event of war.
for he is certain that seventy-six armor
clads and eighty-eight cruisers, some of
which are of a questionable character, can
not possibly fulfill the duties expected of
her majesty's navy.
PUBLIC ECONOMIES.
Leading Feature of the Plrogramme of the
New Italian Ministry.
lBout, Feb. 9.-King Humbert has ap
proved the following cabinet: Di Rudini,
premier, minister of foreign affairs and ad
interim minister of marine; Colombo,
finance; Nicolera, interior; Luzzatti. treas
ury; Polloux.,war; Branca, public works
and ad interim of posts and telegraphs;
Ferrais, justice; Chilmini, agriculture; Vil
laril, instruction. It is stated that a saving of
12,000,000 lire is possible in naval estimates.
An examination shows the finances of the
marine department in great disorder. For
instance, while only 12,108 men are afloat.
estimates are made for provisions for 17,
610 men. The Riforma, Crisoi's organ, de
clares the new ministers all at variance
wi*# one another and thatit is doubtful if
1'xhoe will support the posed comumer
cial arrangements with . King Ham
bert has ofered Signor C a title of no
bility. Signor Brana er of public
works, to-day said the .w ministerial pro
gra:mme would deal chiefly with economies
in the public service.
New HIsua etter Thing.
Lo'snoi, Feb. 9.-John C. New. United
States consul here, was asked by an Asso
inated press representative if there was any
truth in the statement that President Har
rison had cabled New to return immediate
ly to the United States with a view to con
Ferring the treasury portfolio upon him.
"1 have not receisved any message from I
Ilarrisen and I know nothing about any
proposition to offer me the treasury port
[olio." In a further interview to-day in
regard o a vacancy in the cabinet, Consul.
-enerdl New Nsaid: "I do not expect and I
do not desire the treasury portfolio."
MePrshiaded the Archbishop.
HALIrAX. N. ., ahb. 9.-Thirteen well I
nown Uatholies have writtea to Arebtbish. i
op O'Brien protesting against his taking
sides with the conservatives against rep
Iproelty with the United State. They de.
elare that no ecolselatle, not even the
poe, has a right to give commands in msuch
.mattr, qe rsaebbishop in .rply scores
.pith hm t or their prsanmptioi and in
btp alnatlo language reasearts his right to
male Lnmown hs views,
Prospeofs Less Premising.
Lownow, Feb. 9.-In a letter to the chair
man of the Irish leadership committee of
Dublin, Parnell says: "I regret to inform
you that the prospects of settlement are
less uromising than last week. I shall
continue, however, to do everything in my
power to reunite Ireland, while safeguard
ing national interests,
Rad a Contrary Efnect,
Loxnow, Feb. 9.-The citizens' memorial
sent to the czar Jan. 24, regarding thi
tratment of Jews in Russia, has been re
turned to Lord Salisbury, through the
Russian ambassador, without comment.
SThe lSt. Petersburg eorrespondent of the
Telegraph declares that the only result of
the memorial is the redoubled persecution
of theewsw.
Patti Very Mad.
PAwms, Feb. 9.-Patti is intensely indig
nant over her troubles in Berlin with Zette,
who made a contract with her for a St.
Petersburg concert. She says he did not
All his part of the contract and she will
now sue him for illegal distraint.
SET FOR MARCH 16.
The Davis Case and All Other Silver
Bow Business Put Off,
Burrs, Feb. 9.-LpseoisL]-The Davis
nase weat ontinued this afternoon until
March 16. The writ of mandamus and pro
hibition, requiring Judge MoHatton con
tinue the Davis case until he had appointed
a Jury commission and had drawn a jury
according to law, were served at two this
afternoon. Before the arrival the judge
had disoharged both the grant and trial
jurors and had announced that no more
business would be done until thFe(der had
been complied with. The grand jury had
but commenced the consideration of a num
ber of cases, one of them being for murder,
and were ueat of in the midst of their use
faulness. After aceopting service upon the
supreme court papers Judge MoHatton is
sued a formal order owntinuing the Davis
case with other businiss until March 16.
The foreign witnesses in this case have re
turned home and the lawyers and experts
are following by every train. A final con
sultation was held to-day and it is thought
the last of them will be gone to-morrow.
Murder Was Attempted.
BUTIS, Feb. 9.-[Special.]-George Bure
ley, the man so badly burned yesterday
morning, is still alive but hisphyaleians re
gard it rather as an instance of unusual vi
tality than an indication of recovery. He
is still delirious and growing ausktr, his
(aaoth'betqg loored foral say° thpe- ;
tihatieosi tday an Isud'to -stre4ietbhl e the
story that his injuries were the result of a
deliberate attempt at murder, and the of
ficers are now working on that line. No
clue has been found yet that offers hope of i
securing the offenders.
Local Creditors Still in Possession.
BUTTE, Feb. 9.-[Special.]-Another at-!
tempt was made this afternoon by the
eastern creditors of J. R. Boyce & Co. to
secure possession of the stock. Attorney
Parker, representing J. V. Farwell & Co..
served a garnishee from the federal court
npon Sheriff Lloyd to get a portion of the
stock set forth by an invoice from the com
pany. The service was again refused by the
sheriff and the creditors were obliged to
look up some other method to secure them
selves.
IMORRIS VS. WIBAUX.
The Chicago Packer and the Montana
Dealer at Outs.
Cuarcao, Feb. 9.-LSpecial.J-Nelson Mor
ris, the big packer, in a circuit court bill,
asks an accounting from Pierre Wibaux,
the Montana cattle king. I. Meyer. acting
as agent for Morris, made a contract with
Wibaux, on June 21, 1890, for 3,800 steers at
$45 per head, and 8,000 cows at $20 per
herad. They were to be good, merchantable
cattle. Up to Sept. 10 Wibaux had deliv
ered 2,%37 steers,. for which he was to re
ceive $106,515, and 3,610 cows, amounting
to $72,200. Morris had paid him $138,280.
Wibaux claims there is due him $45,438.
while Morris declares that the cattle dealer
owes him at least $120,000 as the
steers and cows fell far short in quality of
what the contract required. Wibaux
claims to have more stock which he has
tendered to Morris, but which the latter
has declined to accept. A few weeks ago
the cattle dealer began suits amounting to
nearly $200,000 against Morris for alleged
breach of contract. Now the packer seeks
to have his claim established and insists on
an accounting. In a few days attorneys
representing Mr. Morris will ask for an in
junction to restrain the prosecution of the
lawsuits brought by Wibanx.
TOeTEST A GUN.
If Suecessful Coast erfense Warfare will
be RevolutionisedL
CnrcAoo, Feb. 9.-The United States gov- j
Prnment has authorized a test, at Fort Sher
idan, of a new gnn, nine and one-half feet
long. said to be capable of throwing dyna
nite or other higa explosive shells a die
aince of ive miles 1,000 times in succession
without even bexoming heated. The inven
or is li mis (athmanu, of Chicago. The
chief novel feature is the use of liquified
arbonic gas. delivered automatically along:
he entire length of the bore at the instant
of discharge, npt only as an absorbent of
he heat gnuetated, but as a cooler after the
ibarle has left the gnu. By unotner device
mnrumatic pressure is produced with pow
[er. Shojll the inveotion trove a success
;athmann expects tLat tee existangssteams
f coast defense would be revolutionized.
Trusts Multiply.
Franor,. 0.. Feb. 9.-A Aine table glase
rare hbuse in Pittsburg. one in Wheeling,
ne in Fostoria and one in Findlay to-day
lined in an application for a new truat
omblnation, which is to be known as th e
Inited States Glass company, with a capi
t of $1,000,000. This is sid to be the be
Inning of a combination whlch will soon
antrol all table glassware faetories in the
ountry.
Ntreak by a Tornado. -
iamtsonusa, Ala., Feb. 9.-A tornado
truck Helena this afternoon nroosag and t
adly damaging several bullldngs. Two or 1
Iree people wer painfully injured. The
orm went on in a southesty diretl. d
ad it is reported thae It strame Taladepg.
PENSION [HE HEADSMAL
Clarkson to Be Foisted Upon the
People in Some Expensive
Capasoty.
His Chief Reoommendation B
That He OCan Give Omoe
to Republican.
rarther Conferenee with the laXdia
Chiefs-Esrnlags of ubeididse "
Railway Compalies.
, WAsanrox, Feb. 9.-There ii a 00aS
deal of prte.zre here among leadiang rs
lican spoilamen to get Clarke~n ..Lb.a
inet. He was sa saoetefal in roottlgg'c,
I nearly all the democratic pomstmssl$E a
it is known that, should he get a mabijt
place, he would make room for a thosesad
or more republicans in the next year. The
thing may be fixed for Clarkson, for ti is
said to meet with favor at tie Whits house,
In support of this, the Indianapolls Jeoteda
of yesterday, the home organ of the Dpres
dent. ons of the editors being an oecupant
of the White house, printed the following
editorial parsgraph: "A reoonstruetion of
the cabinet that would bring Mr. Clarksonm
of Iowa, into it, could not fail to be gratify
ing to republicans eve ywhere. Mr.'Clark*
son is a republican of the best type, and as
able man wherever be is placed."
Of course, the cabinet would have to be
reconstructed to give Clarkson a plaee; for
he is in no respect an able man, and thawr is
no cabinet position that he could All with
the exception of signing his autograph 4le.
missing democrats. As far as maling him
secretary of the treasury, that would be
such an absurdity that the whole ecusaty
would laugh. Now how could the eabihtet
be reconstruceted to give Clarkson ands
number of republicans a place, and at lba
same time help along the Harrison boops
for 1W92. Why the postoffmo departmst ,
for it requires less head than any other
cabinet place, and it is a good place for a
political spoileman or a good politiciat.
Clarkson is both. A man does not have to
be overloaded with brains to be either,
Wanamaker might be given the treasury,.
or Mr. Noble might take it, and Mr. Waae
maker the interior. Neither Waussamar
nor Noble is fitted for the treasury, but as
an emergency exiet to give Ularkeen L
cabinet position for political purposes, t
experiment might be tried. Anyt
Rive Clarkson and the republican b a
chance.
CIVILIAN AO5MT7. .bIn
Preferyed by the hidaS3 5. Uitia e a,
with the Indians was resumed to-day. 'Cm
missioner Morgan said he had heard enough
of the past, and wanted to hear of plans
for the future. He was prepared to isueg
$103,000 worth of beef to Indians entibled
to it, whicth had been out of in the past.
Senator Dawes said if the Indians did their
part and were industrious the government
would do its part and help them become
self-supporting. White Ghost spoke of the
encroachments of whites upon Indian lands.
RIations of coffee, he said, amounted to
about 100 grains per week to each person.
He also complained of the smallness
of bacon rations. He said the delegation
had reached a unanimous decision that they
did not want military agents. Big Mane,
of the Lower Brule agency, said that whites
prevented Indians from getting fuel e.m
bay. He wanted the agency moved nearer.
They needed better school facilities. ie
complained of the small size of beet cattle
given them. Little-No-Heart spoke in the
same vein.
Commissioner Morgan asked such of the
red skins as preferred civil agents to stand
or. All did so except Major Swords, chief
of the Indian police at Vine RBlge who
preferred military agents. Mad Bear, from
Standing Hook, said his people insisted on
more reservation schools. If schools were
located on the reservation their inflaence
would be felt not only by the pupils but by
the parents as well.
P1RPI··ouenaswomn
The Union and Central Pacific Compealte
Must Pay More Money.
WAsrmOTOn, Feb. 9.-It has been learned
from a letter recently sent by Taylor, com
missioner of railroads, to the secretary of
the interior, that action is about to be
taken under the recent decision of the su
preme court of the United States in the
case of the United States, appellant, vs. the
Central Pacific Railroad company. The
decision reverses the decision of the court
of claims in which it was held that in the
process of ascertaining the net earnings of
the Union and Central Pacific Railroad
companies upon which the 25 per cent. is
required to be paid to the government, un
der the Thurman nat, it was proper
to deduct from the gross earn
ings not only the actual oper
ating expenses, necessary repairs and
interest on first mortgage bonds, but also
that there should be deducted all sums paid
for improvements, betterments and new
equipments. The supreme court reverses
this decision and holds that under the
Thurman act the net earnings must be
ascertained by deduct nig trom the gross
earnings only the actual operating expenses,
necessary repairs made within the year and
interest on first mortgage bonds. Uinder
this method of calculation the net earnings
of the Central Pacific company will be in
creased $2,0X00,U00 and the net earnings of
the Uni m. Pacific company nearly $7,000.
000 since the passage of the Thurman act,
25 per cent. of which sums will now be re
covered by the Lovernmelnt.
A letter received by the secretary from
Commissioner Taylor calls attention to the
decision of the court and suggests that it
will benecessary to make a retatement of
accounts with theso roads and asks the sec
retary for instructionsin the mattes. Com
missioner Taylor, under orders from Seo
retary Noble. has had a conference with the
aoting secretary of the treasury with the
view of getting a full report of all bills for
services of the Union and Central Pacific
companies on file in the tresaury dopert
ment and not acted uron. It is iotended IM
ascertain accurately the state of aeooansa
between the government and these roads
and then insist upon prompt payatt of
the amounts found to be due.
To Peretall a Sllver Rielr.
W asem ros, Feb. 9.-Dlngley a4 4 ,
for reference in the house, a reslelutia 0i
an amendment to Towaseud's resld
designed to bring the saiver bi.t belkon .
house. Dinuye's ameamet ashAet i
ordstr btoer sen a mmdn emt .e .
pompriatlin bill the suhnes of a
that has pased the house slid be ss
thl senate for air muosib othls
the obvios purpose i tits
to emar s sliwrrs - by
s aulhw

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