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The Helena independent. (Helena, Mont.) 1875-1943, February 13, 1892, Morning, Image 2

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M THE DEMOCRACY IN 1892
Gov. Boles' Eloquent Address at the
Banquet of the Greystone
Club,. Denver.
His Candor. Honesty, Olearness
and Ability Won the Highest
.-e' Compliments.
The Tariff Ably Discussed by One Who
Knows Its Effect on the Farmers
mad Laborers.
Daxvan, Feb. 12.-The guest of the even
ing and the most conspicuous flsure at the
successful banquet of the Greystone club,
Tuesday night, was Goy. Heraes E. Boies,
of Iowa. The most exhiliaratlng scene of
the evening occurred when the toastmaster
in words full of complimentary eloquence
introduced that distinguished gentleman
and announced that he would respond to
the sentiment "The Democracy in 1892."
As the governor arose and faced the audi
ence applause broke forth in cheers and
shouts that shook the foundation of the
theater. Many in the audience rose, waved
their handkerchiefs, and continued to cheer
for several minutes. Meantime Gov. Boies
smiled and bowed his acknowledgment for
the cordial reception, and when quiet was
generally restored proceeded to deliver his
address. Although he confined his re
narks entirely to the tariff question, he
secured the interest of the audience from
the start and held it to the finish. The
candor and honesty with which he die
cussed the question, as well as the clearness
and ability with which he made hisapoint,a.
won the admiration of his hearers. He was
frequently interrupted with manifestations
of approval, and as he concluded was loudly
cheered againm. His remarks were as fol
lows:
Mr. President. tUentleaoi or tee isrey
atone Clnb, and Fellow-Citizens: The atlas pe
from which in my school days I learned the 1
geography of my country located the place the
where we meet to-night within the bound- th
aries of what was then termed "The Great eet
American Desert." At that timein all that ms
vast expanse of imaginary sand and barren on
hills beyond, out of which we have since in
carved states sufficient for a kingdom by toi
itself, and in which great cities have in
sprung into existence in a single decade, thi
few signs that foretold the westward march oe
of empire had yet been aeen, few sounds na
that betokened the coming of civilization th
had then been heard, and here, and around oo
us, hushed in the deepest silence of it all,
lay the limitless plains, the gently rolling
hills, and lofty mountain peakethat stretch tt
away from the feet of your .own imperial th
city of the central west. th
In coming to Denver I had a twofold ob- on
jeot. I wanted to meet a people that had in
manifested a desire to become acquainted ee
with me and I wanted to look into the wi
heart of that wilderness whose circumfer- fo
ence I was taught in my childhood to be- qr
lieve fixed an impassable limit over which pe
no tide of emigration would ever flow. I th
have seen all for which I came (except the in
desert), and I have seen that which pleases th
me infinitely more than any area of sands m
or barren hills could do, for I have found a ta
busy, bustling, hurrying multitude of men, is
gathered, I suspect, from the crean of the hr
older states and transplanted to this land T
of silver and gold to spend their energies p,
in the development of the most exciting if m
not the greatest of all our industries. di
I have seen plains, too, that look as hi
though they were hbounded by the borders ai
of the sky alone, not barren, as in my st
sohooldays I was taught to believe them, at
but dotted over with the homes of content- hi
ed men, and I have seen hills following gi
hills until they lead away into the twilight be
of that which to me at least is still the on- ci
known, and mountains that cleave the ec
clouds and drink the sunlight from zegions
above the storms. Pc
I have seen more than this, for I have a]
stood in the capital of a state containing w
500,000 people that has doubled its popula- f
tion in a single decade and more than tI
quadrupled it in two. I have traversed the p
streets of a city that in ten short years has b
increased its inhabitants from 35,000 to p
100,000 souls, and I have stood at the foot w
of mountains from whose rocky aides both tI
gold and silver streams flow out into the h
world's great channels of trade, adding t
thereto in a single year more than $27,000,
000 in value of precious metals alone. n
I shall go back to my prairie home. to a
state rich beyond comparison in the pro- a
dootions of its soil, to a reople intelligent, t
industrious, and contented with that which a
nature has done for them, but I shall bear p
with me a broader conceution than I had t
before of the limitless resources of that t
magnificent country the foundations of n
whose political institutions our fathers I
laid, but whose superstructure our own d
hands are necessarily aiding to shape. But v
the occasion that calls us together, the v
sentiment assigned me as the subject of i
my remarks, the audience that it is my
privilege to address, all remind me that I t
am expected to speak of political questions I
in the brief time allotted me this evening.
"The Democracy of 1892." What will the t
people expect of it? On what lines must
its battle be fought? For what principles i
must it stand to be worthy of success? i
These and kindred questions crowd the
mind as we look forward to the political
struggle in which we are so soon to engage.
In a broad sense the democratic party must
continue to stand as the champion of the
personal rights of the individual. It must
at times recognize the fact that tmen inherit
from their Maker certain natural rights
that neither kings, potentates nor majori
ties can rightfully despoil. That chief
among these in a government of the people
is the right of each inmividual to be as
fairly and justly treated by the laws thereof
as is every other member of the same.
That extending the scale from the indi
vidual to the smallest unit of organized
eocioty, and thence upward until each in
the order of ita lmlportance inl our form of
government is included, every one of these
ao lour as they art within constitutional
limits in matters that pertain to their own
welfare and affect their own interests
must be permitted to be sole judges of
their own affairs, from whose de
cisions there can te no appeal. Sepa
rating those who compose the factors of
our government into groups and consider
ing tllte as distinct parts of the grand az
gegaate of which the nation is composed,
democ-acy must stand for the inflexible
rule that betweni classes, as between in
dtividuals there shall be no distinction of
right, no favor to one at the expense of an
other. Applying these principles to prac
tical questions with which the American
people must deal, and remembering the
position to which the republican party t:;
committed, it is easy to foresee tmhe sunorerno
issue on which parties will divide in the
contest of '92.
No doctrine was ever more thoroughly
imbedded in the creed of a political organ
ization than that asserted by modern re
l:ublicanism that the powers of this gov
ernment may be used to promote the
pecuniary interests of distinct classes of
citizens, and no result was over made moro
ceutain than that which follows, if this can
be done, that the same powers may be used
to retard like interests of other classes.
S'l'ee years ago a democratic presidont
aroused the country by his declaration that
"unnecessary taxation is unjust taxation"
and by that dcclaration incorporated into
the political creed of his followers, ras one
of, its cardinal principles, to remain, I hope,
forever, the doctrine that the rightful
power of this government to levy assess
ments, direct or indirect, is limriter' to its
necessities for revenue alone. This rias no
declaration of hostility to the nianufactur
ion industries of this country. It was the
asqrtion of a principle that put into prac
tice would give them free raw material
that weald stimulate the commerce of the
nation ane open to the products of their
mills the markets of the world--that weld
send the Amerlean flag at the msuathe.d of
ur own o rchn m srcai inemiato port.' from.
which It h*s been boied a, *a z!
Nor does afariff for revenue only imppl:
that Amerioca manufactluring industriels
are to be deprived of all benefit therefrou lr
Theorit ase *e ..tlny it would be imLpose -
ble to so levy it on articles of any kind
manufactured ans onmumed by our people. i ,
It dost, howeverf, t'mnly that the purpose of
the levy must be reuii~e, not protection, -
and it follows that it',thould be so laid, bt l
to place the burdn t' othe tax it imposeS le
dn the shoulders of they e best able to bear do
it. Carried to its loglct result thes doe- yh
trine would place upon t'e free list all ar
ioles of prime noeessit.i It would lift B,
the burden of taxation fr mto the shoulders
ef the toillnut millions of tie nation, and
place it whe: a it belongs, on the shoulders N
of those who possess its wearlth.
Just and beneficent as would be the rae
suit n this resneot it is not from this
sourco that the chie advantotR e to the It
Sasses of our people would ct.'me. The s
United States to-day is in its agrio Itutn l ad- o
antages the Egyt of the whole.world. It e
is from her granaries the food should come
to eupsly a constantly increasing deficit in at
the markets of the most populous coon
tries of the eastern hem.sphere.
Nearly as many of our people are e:ogaged
in this one industry as in all others' coon
bined. It is from the products of their
labor that three-fourths of that vast vol- -
Lem of our folreign expetls have come ,that
has developed our trade with the countries w
sf the world and enriched us as a nation -
nore rapidly than any other that ever e- S
isted. n
To them, if they are not to be enslaved of
by laws that foster other industries at the
expense of their own, open markets in the
treat centers of civilization are a necessity
-not those of the undevbloped countries of
the southern half of this hemisphere, and
islands of the sea that produce more agri
cultural products than they consume, can
furnish vastly better markets for the pro
duets of our mills than our farms, but those qe
ef the most populous countries of the old
world whose hungry millions are ready to
akte all our surplus food productions at o
fair prices in exchange for those staple
necessities of life that they produce and we
must use. It is no stinted concession of ii
right in the lesser markets of the world
such as so- called reciprocity affords that w,
ought to satisfy these people. They have 14
made the bulk of the wealth of this nation, -
but its laws have turned the golden stream
from theirs to other hands. It is no unfair
advantage of others that they ask or de- -
serve. -
Circumstances have ordained that the -
pric!e of the products of their labor shall be
oIad by markets open to the competition of
the world. No statute of ours can change .
this condition. Simple justice demands
that Ao far as the necessaries of life are con
ernr.a they should be permitted to buy in
marks ts where prices ard fixed by the same
competition. Nor are the farmers of this -
nation the only class intensely interested
in thia great problem. To all who live by
toil of any kind it is the crowning question e
in the whole list of economic problems
that we must soon settle one way or the
other ar. the future policy of this govern
ment. Thirty years ago the wealth of this
nation viae much more fairly distributed T
than it in to-day, Then one could almost
count upon his finger ends those who could QI
rightfully be termed millionaires. Now
they are numbered by thousands.
If conditions remain unchanged through (i
the life of another generation who can fix
the multiple that will foretell their numbers o
then? Can a few men absorb the wealth of ,
this nation and leave the masses independ
et? Do not let us be deceived. For every
immensely rich man there must from ne
oesesity alone be many wretchedly poor. All y
wealth is the product of labor. Great
fortunes simly represent the earnings of
great numbers. No one man can
perform the labor requisite to produce I
them. They can only be acquired by an
individual through the aid of some process -
that enables him to appropriate that which
many produce. What is it that has changed
the curxrent of the nation's wealth and that
is directing it away from the many into the
hands of the few? Let us stop and thinyk.
Thirty years ago a great necessity com
pelled the levy among others of an enor
mous tariff tax. This alone of all the bur
dens the war imposed proved a financial
blessing to a single class. Everywhere be
aide, among all our people, that great I
struggle -was a gigantic, insatiable de- r
stroyer of the wealth of n ben. But in the
height of the storm, when the nation strug
gled under the load it was compelled to
hear, that class grow rich. When peace
came it was securely intrenched in the
councils of the roeublic.
One by one most of the war taxes disap- p
peared. This remained, or, if changed at
all, was changed in the interest of- those
whohe business profits it increated. At
first these men could not bring to their aid
the united strength of either of the great a
political champions of the country. In
both were willing champions of the peo
pie's rights. and in both, I regret to say,
were those who, yielding to the influence
that wealth is always able to exert, joined
hands to perpetuate in times of peace laws
that were born of war's necessities alone. 1
The scene has changed. Upon one sideis
now arrayed the beneficiaries of these laws,
and by allies more powerful than them
selves in the shape of trusts and combines
that these laws have made possible, and so I
strengthened they are in charge of the re
publican party. They dictate its policy-
they control its action. If they maintain
their position it does not follow thai this
nation as a whole will cease to grow rich.
We shall go on producin l wealth as we have
done before, but a few will control it; many
will be poor. Can we change the laws? (ian
we divide the many correntsthat are empty
ing the wealth of this nation into the hands
of a few men and scatter their golden con
tents among those who produce it? This is
the question of the hour.
In the present status of political parties
there is no power on earth that can acom
plish this save and except "the democracy
in '9." Ve must not falter. This is the
issue and this alone will lead us to victory.
'Til11' MAKiLKE TS.
ihr* oe .. F tb . 12.--far slaver. .9 c.
Copper--Firm: lake, $10.7010.75.
Lead -Weak: domestic. $4.0u.
The Caaulaination of the deal in coalors was
followed to-day by large realizationa and there
b oar saources, eaveral rlmtre he aci mhed in
cfrcvlatiua, amoeng tIea tItr legal praoeoding.
eri, Iu, sb. tke: . l tar o . xresnoammativol of
tIod--l. 'lho rrlnoras. however. halano atrcial
1 o:lo.t dPc'lin f. ito II., stlck ,f tho sr, raids being
lvua to realizeation by s;et:ullst-iv,' bOytaW. Late
I ill tihe day n. hwv1r. lle1disg took a droo and
Seveylthangtorv 1folhwt. 'Ilh arkl eloee. wIek.
' eto iriknipal l 1os . . lse art l s tadin 4.., New
Lanoland 2%. I)telavara & lluadein 2, ordagee 175.
S(ovternaroents Sltady.
P l'etroleun -('loved ,11%.
f CheinZ c:losing
U. . ar ig....... ! 2 Orexo a....... a . 8
-U. S. 4v cuvyon....ll! 2, Facilic Mail.. .,6
MU. . c r a....... I(I Pullno a I'alY c. ..a t pe
Pacitict e .. ... ...1:1 le i . . 5.,!tr n
Atrhuona........ : tl.. Hock /blannd .'ii. evv".;
t ans'ab Pan..... :'s r't. l aulb.... 77%
Canada soull: ... 2~-y ti. Paul . Oahlia 4e'/i
I' entral Pafitc Ill', 'leta- l'ar:ific...... l.,
- uorlington ... i.. 10 Union l'acfi, r..... 4
If .aEl. Western....ltl U. i. lxpr,css .. 47
iKri ..........e... i. g!; tosrgo F.XIreos itt....1
tis ana, 'l'Izaso... 1.7 .\e-ltern Union.... i
Lake e-horei - .. 1t Antori. t:aottonOil. :15
!'it!2 t N ..' ... . 7 6 "'ermi. l . ..... n'
SMihtigt:tau Coentral 115 oad [`ru~ t ....... 2ldtt:d
L:hi s.onar lnacific.. ll 'lr4u'n ttrg hort Line. 75i.
to rOulhw5t.te ..... it4 I. t. . W otern 1.... 17
La Nr-lhpwv::tora,trrefl -,1% It. Ii. W~pre ...... r - 1
New York¢.enltradl.17IHi ]P.G.. Is. ta. 77(0
reoon Iyo s... .... r s27
1toney on call eary; rnrio offIAred at 2 per
cent- primes siorcantiit paper. ,7.€¼,,/z; sterhlng
exa hang steady; tO-dre bills, Y4.b52; demand.
is 'OI!It:AGO CtA'BT lR
(f CaTCAsoo. I-atb. 12.-Cattlo--lbaeslotn, .000;
re manrk.t; elew: lower; natives. $t.0OA.4.; etock
u ers. $ 1t.2:7 :12: . cows. tl.illOt'2r .0.
tlode---icr,.hite :15.15:1: nolww lIwer: rough sail
4.72; prime hIeavya nd butchlers' wrights, 54.82%.
; Peepi -Itoeei:rts .,..0,: ;steady to wi's:; ewes.
t" .;;.2e;,: i. i; ut o iil. .Sl.bll(u,5,O: weltho'r s snai
mb litrling., $..7.l'£6.0 westerns, 5.10's 2.522;
; ttOWANTED ..
19-/ l',. "I T ealieac ClTIES'
J el DI, TRICTS, WATER
_ | COMPANIES. ST. R.R.COMPANIESe.OL
- 10".1Ie Dearborn Street, CHICAoO.
hoa Is Wall Street, NEW YORK.
sir 70 State St.. BOSTON.
'll mW I . . ra W ·· ) a4 e
rJ a~rs u Iwat a good lwiln to .Worlc tor
j1TUATION W ANTED--IAY A WO LAbljT
inwor dicok th issca y or aur. t
ITTUATION \WANTED--BY YOUNG LtODY
hotsew aIn fmin y or wags n dr nalee ,t'hro a
atrt e t.
LITUATIONS r VANT -L bf.ri4
Advertilswntae under thil head the tie o
- pr.e.toaul al around machinist, 0? wil go toha
wro ,y Ibesay. Address al . M. thtote
i TUATION W ANTED- TO DO WORK .O
n. t .'resid in close to cty by a marriHod
nto lan ad ohard work. Atloreis Doug
las LE lbi e oieAitB. O
AN'IE---A FRST-CLAS COOK. APPLY
F loaT .Do- FOiE GENER&L HOUSE- F
dwory nsit have goork referensa. n- t
enoue Ai Sixtftavenue.
HEALPO WA NTI D-VALY . LA i
hoe and collector, onw e whao hbe obad eienet e e
in fireter a d. :lifeuer a do referreu. if appl
nt eisie atle persont antd.a st eniraphr andb e
Fo"TUATION WANTED-Y BA WOMAN TOet
ll pay Still per month. Apipy to -C,' box a
148D lilOe City.u
, rman fe acity trade: norne hbut h perien~ed
FO- RENT-iSCE.LANEON
aet une tieuh todre, tirm
10l RENT-AN-STORE ON MAIN STRE ET,
wt largte and esirables cheap reCt. W. i. Cox.
IUR IENT--ATORE OR OFDOlCE WOOIN FI
ltopera house Steele & Clements.
OR RENT--IXNE LARGE BASEMENT ON F
lUpper vain street Steelle & Cleevts.
F. OORE-N--GIL UFU GEDRAL HOUMS
'ANlt - RENT-FUPTNIST -D B OOR.- I pio
in firoemars life i wule preferrned if appli- o
OR RENT-BLARGE WEH r FURNISHED F
Sfront room to one or two gentlemen. En
uire No. 9ui North Ewing. a in
ronoams at rea onti atestHarvey to bo
4rand street. hNext door Hotel Helen_ _
res wth ihoaor. No. ti Nurte Renton
-r
"OR RENT--NICELY FURNISHED ROO
VOR RENT-- PLEASAONMT FURNISIED F
la rooge arn with firt-clas retable eard, aet l
untion avenue. _ _ _oomrnhed on
F'OR RENT--ROOMS AOFD OARDOOM. E
SWarrn street, corner S Meth avte. e
14'OR RENT-LROOME LIA B-IVATE FAMILY -
Swith or without board aStl Ewing street.
FOlIl ENT--DN PELLOSG. V E
FOR I ENT-FURNIS SHECLED OOMS
at 2 South Rodney street.
OR RENT--AERY DESIRABLE R DSI
feonce rSi toleme on Rodney mtreet e1r
Sixth avenue. Steele & Ciments.
1OR RENT-I-fXlROOE A FAE OUSIEN D ON
Slevenths avenue, a l per Hnrom b. terele & 1
Ga strlements. and oor Hotel Helenas
F'OR RENT-SEVEN IRIOOM IN I IOUSE
171 Breekonridge street. 3 rooms now cccoo
piled by rfoumre and will remain if desired. F
acvnuae. ufi. steele &Clemouts
------- -- the
BOA RED A FIND ROO OFFEREN. maT
LFOR RENT--RICK HOUSE, E[GIT OMN- l
and wash rooms, hot and cold water n three r
la roes urnace prsonaile rates. uire at lowe.
C(eenStore.
TOR HRENT-FIVE-IOO NIHOUSE FUR
Fnishedu suitable r housekeeping. 2 er
month. Inhuire at Icl State streboa
tOR RENT--FOUR-ROOM CY TTAGE ON
' niouth l{odney, i8; 1 -root dwelling and r
large bar, cityre water, 06 Peosta avene lneo 7
roomi house pruce street a modern, $at 7-room
Ninth avenue. .0; rooms frnished on e
Savenue e ar Edwards street, 5. ilatheson
FOR BENT-I-IY IIEOF 7 IIOOMSV NEWI
Sathe en & Cou. Denver block. F
lORt RENT-- ('ONO VENRENT H ROM e
I dwellingo with large std ae No l streta
avenuet rlr. Matheson & Co.. Denver block.
1OR RENT--NO 18 PEOSTA AVEINUE,i
1' 2Brckdwellinge rosms, bath reos, etc.;
20. stheson & Cii.. Densser block.l
-O0 AL;NT--UNIt NISl lOOMl 1t U ANI)
pied artmerts of all kinds and if desirable
- . ---.---- S i
bOild AENT-BREA HE, EIA T E I- tli
lOIl tAIE--It AcANT ILlSItOEN'i (IN O
wI test side at oa Itargie; fu roots, furnace
bath reoom nd all iolern fitti r s sohl Ira
sad iesnu tilinge. $o.ientuoa. ot w es
1o . H.ALI--i'LW Ilt-ltOtsi Il-tt l, ON E
w' west lckie: easy teriss; ussr n-w school
'ildhnig founitry and -.lecti lhueine. $ t2 n ef
month, Igt.
FURt RIENT-FOURR IOMEET ON IITALIENA
South odner foot 5ofoy whree-fourtha
Io Main h sue. r ue ostr1 fiset, t rons ,, n thre I
si rese will bi sold aten grbat sa-rii-e. ,Ii-lie &
NnthOioiaent av2;iii5o; hros furnihd iiii li rven
tnent u -nsi i EdI wa gi l c ditreiet d85. Mery l 1w
antl ternie to siit; a onit;il. sV, F. lX, bold
Sbolo k. lok c
OIl ENT--OUSE WILl tYO A POMN I'E, OF
lenrd iotIuiiiiong i stri-et ain ut sore
awu ten niiuthe walka southof h.rodwalwy front
ago 410 feet: wautouuuvenir eo t,; a gutoo hliiation
fur omsoe one whio wants i roomy lrcotti s fror
keeping tenis ir iowa: easy terois. hiitheson
S& Co.. iisver I~loik.
2fe. Vteso. Cuto, Dnragt. bl
-- -f-- -A---- -
~tjl'(" OAIt-- 8i- I IsMtOUc YtA N I"NTI'T
g r s-ise s vishiniu is, bloc-k f roivi a' ni tvotsor -
selt inrctha ,or, lihiihvii ,% lo.. l-iiiisur Illouk.
' jOlt SAL-:--MOiI)-:l:N OWI-;l,lhNOs ON -
saettir, 1 risie , bob s. an i si dv c old I
talance to alut lit chs ,ir: ,inio , l-'s. t rim °mo
tor lin . Mlatihesii An lI(o.. ensvir-i iock.
l4Otlc HAIE--Low- A ('TIIOISIti BI, NIbliN
1- I,- t l ait, fciuse iisi droa tw ter luli, grounds.
rrioitsildn ion. mnly , lblock frotIc
I( slectriis: iiitor; email teovtreot ii w, bla sco
slustuolhisents. ,tloel.,& . {'Icr,.s. .
fron Mains ,-mr, --in ot; fruuutsiii t co sirsts; v iry
f iv iubllists triii frl iuto u i at u iu at c re lo tar.ain.
=Ot SAlir. -l sti . Ici.,lhtr r e-tclD tOi t l
sigh street ; $5,5i0i. l0ic i fet -re'o,,, Cra..
hues0 e, onms t HSer builevard; $.1,501., 5t'IelI ft'
fi-risom frame h, -use sa IroadwayE. ti. B rrenol
Fox AA45IIf**t5I4& asl9'1ATwo.
OB 8ALt4L-lLO1t0ANT RESIDENCE O IN
Jt Mtadi Ua nou, wost aide, east rnt,, lot.
8O a.0 fee E on sere a great bar,
iOR IA --LEU- TAL POPERIZ TY IN OOIII
O s' nl townaelt will Pel ont ets terma, 1t -
street ani 0L l'l e atro0a 0 d F .em ei d
So ltong time b o a new tree0.voomn lCote
Dlot 5Orx12. APS oX 117 .oty.
FLOR StALE-t.tl0 E REl0 I)EN JE LOTO IN
1'llauae*rddltitnat very low pricea, Wm.
MIUth, gt.
FOR SALE--1400 FOR AN EXCLLENT in
building lot on Hiollbn avenue, on line of on
weotrl0 motor: $50 down. $20 per month1 or
purehaor making limprovmentts on the lt to
the value of $500 mayt hae t yeare' time for poy
men:. of etire proe of lot, Nlnathteoo tt Cu.,l
louenver block, at
OR 1 A114-LOCTS AND) ACRUIAGE, AT IAIl.
I' ttill, the new railroad town in the Flat- t
head valley. \m, Moth, agt. id
MOl SALE--$1.800., 5xll2 FEETt 4-fROOMl
Sframe house, liroadwatee motor line $4,500,
O0xlO0 feet, B-room frame house, 50 feet double
frontage on IBenton and Park avenue, bniness di
property; $,000, .4IO110 feet, 8-room frame hosee
on Lawrence etreet 000, 100x140 feet, 0-room
brick house on Eleventh avenue. E. S. French &
Coa TI
TOR SALE--$3.00 FOR AN ELEGANT NEW ti
Shouse in Lenox addition: eight rooms be
side bath-room, front ani back stair, reception o'
hail, oak finish, plumbed for hot air and gas, C
ample grounds, north front; $1,000 dowe d a de
aided bargain. latheson & Co. Do, nvor Block.
LCRtSALE-$5l,t00. 4o0t10 FELT, 0-ROOM
brick, bath, cellar, etc.. gas fixtures, double a
frontage on two streets. E. S. French & Co. F_
FOR SALE-E-0LLISTON LOTS IN DEPOT
additon from $40 to $100. Matheson & Co., .
Denver Block. ea
FOR CALE-L5,00 A0x140 FEET, l-RBOOM ai
Sframe house, a corner on Warren street;s a
$6,500 75x150 fet 8-room stone hou on Madi- d
son avenue; $3,500 40x118 fooeet, 6-room frame
house, corner, on C ohu her street; $3,500, 40x11e o
feet. 8-room frame house on Chaucer street. Y.
i. French & Co. t
LOH SALE-Fl0x40 FO T ON LYNDALE th
Savenue at a bargain, terms to suit. Steele & o
Clrments. ti
F" OR SALE--O0NE OF TIlE FINEST h
Sranchs in'rMontana, 2,080 acres, every acre
can be irrigated and have abundance of water, he
ine range on every side, good market for every- I
thing produced, good improvements; will be sold
at agreat bargain. W. . Cox, Gold block th
F OISA1LE-$S,30. .ElN:T, 4-iiOO I 'RAAMEI m
o h Dakota avenue; ,00, 50x81, -room l
frame hase, Blake street; $4,000, 42x88 feetL ,
i-room brick on Sixth avenue, Beattie; $3,500.
SSx88 feet, i-room brick onBeattie street. E.. 8. at
French & C.. as
.jojRSA .LE--IVARELIOUSI LOTd N EL- hi
liston, on N. P. right of way. 100. EMath.
ont & Co. ar
Ot SANLE-2,800 L 50x14 FEiET, 5-10011
Sframe house on i cth avenue; $,500, 50xt140
feet, I-room brick house on Eighth avenue;
1,4000, 2x10 feet, 5-room frame houes on Broad
way; t4l200, 45x1000 feet, 5-room brick house.
corner, Broadway. 1: B, French & Co. at
TORSALE-COIINEtt LO'I 1LOx150, on best L
residence street in the city; full view of
the east side and valley Address box 17. city
poatoflie. t
'OR SALE-AT A BARGAIN--50 FEET ON
X Broadway near Hoback; easy terms. Ad- t
dress postoffle box 26, Helensa. 6
T OR SALiE-$2,500 7-BOOM DWELLING ON it
P osta a venue, corner lot; $200 down, $25 01
per month. Mathesou & Co., Denver block. L
FOR SALE--$5,C A VERY FINE RANACH d
F in Deer Lodge county of 800 acres, ample s'
water and timber, good buildingse commands r t
fine range. Price, which is very much less than '
the value of the bare land. includes team mares,
mowing machine and other fam. implements, a'
saw and hingle mill, a considerable quantity of
lumber and loge; J2,500 down. balance easy8
terms. sMatheson & Co., Denver block.
1 t SALE-IFOR $00 GHOOD BUILDING t
Sloet 50x150 on South end of Rodney street; a
address box 777, city postofoice,
IOR SALE-- lSO.0, NEAT 4-ROOM DWELL
ing on Eighth avenue, near turn of motor n
line. with good lot; $220 down, $25 per month. 0
Matheson & Co., tDenver block. i
FOR SALE--3,500, ELEGANT DWELLING IN
Easterly addition, within 10 or 12 minutes
walk from court house; contains reception hal,
eight rooms, also bathroom fully equipped. '
pantry, five closets, plate glass windows, fire
place, hotand cold water, large cellar; plumbing
for furnace and gas, finished in sak, fronts c
north: $1.000 down, balance on any reasonable
time desired. Matheson & Co.. Denver block.
FOR SALE-LOTS 1 AND 2, IN BLOCK 10,
Scorner South Rodney and Southern streets. r
Level ground; inest view i the city. Apply to
J. N. Craig, 12 S. Rodney street. ti
BTISCELLANEOUAC.
II OR TRADE-UNIMPROVED PROPERTY
Sto trade for eqluity in improved. Steele &t
Clemente. t
FOR TRAI)E--IMPROVED PROPEsTY TO
S trade for unimproved. Steel & Clements. 1
WANTED--A 1.400 OR 1,00 FOUND SAFE f
cheap. Address E. M. N., Independent of
ice. I
`ANTED--GOOD FiAMILY HOUSE, SOUND
and thoroughly broke, to weigh 1,000 to
1,150 pounas. V. Haigst, M. 1).
1ANTED-TtE OWNER OF A LARGE
body of low grade, free milling gold ore
wants a capitalist who mwill build a mill on thec
property tor a halt interest. Apply to W im.
Moth, agt. 3
,ANTE.--SAW MIiLl AND LOCATION BDY
mill mran where there is good market, or
aceossable O tody of timber. (live full particu
lars. BM. Biriggs, Salt Lake City, Utah. I
"OIl REN'T--IAIIIICST AND) BIEST Ilt)Tl'EL
.1 insBu City (witni one exception). Fortyy
rooms, besides kitchen, dining room. store room,
office and bar; steam heat, electric lights and OaN
nunciators; fronting two streets; electric cars
palos tl, door every eight uminutes; close to all
railroad stations. Ltuccently sold to close an
estatle and now for lease on liberal ters'teo riglht
party. Call on or address lSiemoens & Gamer, t
east Broadway, Blutte t'ity, Msontana.
PEALED IDI)S FOi SINKIN(i A SHAFT
5- 3Ox7 feet clear, in ore, will be acrcepted. For
particulars eddreces hex 0i.7.
,ANTED-'Tt) UY I C1 ECOND-HIAND 2 TO
horse-pa ,wer Losler in exChangce and pay differ
ence. Address A. T.. tlil office.
loan. Fror partire call or :sdreos Mclssnald,
Anning & tcLeod, Si and 11 Atlas block, Dlulena,
I ANTEOD--A MAN WVtO WILL tiIVE$1,'09
for a half interest in a large sluartzlead, the
mosney to be oxponded its developing the prop.
erty anitl to he paid in as work progressOes lMath
seon ' Co., ly.sver lock.
WANA''lEtD-- : CUtITOsIMEIt lOll ONE OF
the fittest residence oites on west side; price
low fora,'sh. Win.S.suth.
AN'TI1;1)--A IIUYI-( t 1011 A I'sECE OF
inside proparty: just the thits Tor a row of
Sfar; eloco to Slain stroot. Win. Butll.
aNAID--To TO 'TIAhJ)I 0) AChES NEAIR
G tireat Falls for telena property. Steele &
Clement.
" VAN''E -A IUYIYII Fol- A I'LAT'EOD
the beelt residence property on
west side; price way.down:; hall cash, aulanee in
Sons year. inI. lsiti agnt .
n UJANTil)-TO IUILI) A SIX-IOOM 1iOU1 E
'' with furnsce and bath room complete for
$.1000. Call and sae plies; we know they will
suit. Waslla,'e s'ihornburah, l)et:vor iuildsnq.
on east sid. hlardwood floor elld liaish,.
bath, fursnace, ail snedorll convoniroclos, for un
imwpoFdroeoroperty. or will sell equity for $5,000.
SMONEiY TO LOAN-It. U. L'ALMEII. NEE
at rO h(tAN--IN SUMS TO SUIT. LOW lA'/iad
oofIuteresr, Steels &Cle slonte
1 oONEY TO LOAN--STEELI & CIsESIE CNTS.
In sums to etltl low rate of Interest, no
t contmmisson. no interesst in avanoce, no ,iulay.
LO.ST.
]OBT--G;OIID NI'CICACE, INI'l'ltLs.. ii. iL
'W engraved on gold coilss. tbstllrrn to IDr.
to Wirth snd recrlis rHeward, si North Mains etreet.,
ry OUNt)--A CIIE(',K 1(O1 A tSMALL
amount Owner' car havare me by callissn
at W. F. liodgisns, corner First sawd DIaws streets,
I ]4OUNI)--VALUAiLF 1i)(1i; OWNIi:st CAN
r have same I5 lrllviag Draperlt arid piaying
fortlrtlsad. Address lP. Carry, Isanted hock,
cia 'I'ltstsol.
, FOUND1)--A LADY'S MUFF. CALIt AT
sI- Jackson's Musle Slour.
1'OUNi)-tiO I-D-PsATEn ItAItI'lN. OWN
[ or c:an have same try calllug at this office,
paying charges and prorving properly.
FOR 8ALU--Mt.LTEANZOU3
, t 0.',• . th l ,ppAo
*t ornetr xth venue . .
gOrssllt- 111ir.4 "plyu 1 0W @ lney, c mr
am, po tly genmtl, Inquire to., s
Se'. r wnoh lthree miles from elelta.
101% .8eL-lOl D, BUIGY ANj HAL1
oets price $75t Apply at Ma 11otiy Jst
stret. ornep Sixth avenu, ;
rlto 48: (wrr eotav teNK ,. 'On . , atN
'enemas 1, tartoexec tor of t lalt will anti
dmont f h Din deeaed, Froder-
J, Bradless E izaber b de atherade for. t
esie. d Minne ,ol t:d . th,
SItnmberI FF' SALE -Tinb TlUOInAS Ulmhi
Savings lla 'k, a rol'porat on duty incorpor- Jo
atd under and oby virtue of rof thle l te andr- p
ritory (tow starel of aMl stana plaintiff. t e t
ithomar iI. ('artr, eozocutor of the last will a.tl ,a
-testameut of Martha Dent , deacaaed, redar- of
kick . Mfalonea Nellie J... ,lackey, il onter y Not- ts
lie J, Braille., Elizabeth McNeal. (atherts U. fir.
L ons and ain aes tcle, defendants. t.D
Uner and by.evirtoe of an orderof sate and
idecreeoffored uotro anid sale i lascd out f the
district coart of the Firsnt judieial district of the
aetat of Miontan, oin and for the county of Lewis
and Clerke. un thel2th day of February, A. D. do
18114. In the abore entitled action, wherein 'tihe tat
Thomas Cireso iavings .auk, i corporation duty tri
incorvorated under and by irte of thre laws of of
the territory (Aow state) of Montant the ab.0vo
named plaintiff, obtaine a judgment end de
reeos of foreclostre and sale against t homes H. i
tcarter, eeeuto r of the lst will and teotamenth
Malone, qellie 1. Mekey., fotrmerly Ieie Ji J.
tlradl.ey. TlNaboth Maeytl, Catherine 1i. Lyon CO
and Minune Cela, defendants, on the 1cth day of '
February, A. D. lel2, for thie sum of $1,n 20. fir
besides interest, costs ani attorney fec, which a
said decree was on the 12th day of February. A. A.t
D1. aiB, recorded in judgment book No. "dc" of
sald court at page -, 1 am commanded to sellG t
all those certain lots, pieces or parcels of land, an
situate, lying and being in the county of Lewis Is
and Clarke, state of Montana, and bohnded and
described as follows, to-wit:
Lot number ive (2) in block number thirty- e
one (31), and lot number eight (8) in block num
ber eighty-two (82), and lots number one (1) and d
two (2) in block number forty-five (ib), alt in
the Northern Pacific addition to the oily of llel- tr
ans, county and state aforeisid, according to ast
the official plat of said addition, as the same ap- sr
ears on file in tie office of the county clerk
nd recorder of said county of, Lewis and
Clarke.
Together with all and singular the tenements,
hereditaments anti appurtenances thereunto be
longing or in any wise aoppertaining
Public notice is hereby given that on Saturday,
the 5th day of mtarch, A. D. 189., at 12l o'clock M
m. of that day, at the front door of the 'court C
house, Helena, Lewis and Clarke county, Mon
tana, I will, iii obedience to said order of sale
and decree of foreclosure and sale, sell the
above described property, or so much thereof d
as may he necessary to satisfy said judgment,
with intrest and costs, to the highest and best
bidde, for cash in hand,
Giwvn under my hand this 12th dayof Fehru- bi
ary, A. D. 180)4. ti
CHAS. MU. JEI.FERIS. Sheriff.
By IRALPH G. JOHNSON. Deputy Sheriff. a
ALIAS SUMMONS--IN THE DIBTRICT di
court of the First Judicial district of theh
state of Montana, in and for the county of
Lewis and Clarke. in
Abner B. Clement, plaiinmiff, v.Andrew M. Pa w
ton and The Northwestern Land and Investtent hi
Company, a corporation, and G. W. E. Griffith,
trustes. defendant.
The state of Montana sends greeting to the
above named defendants. d
You are hereby rebquire to appearlin an action
yrought against you by the above named plaintiff
in the district court of the hirst judicial district
of the state of Montana, in and for the conty of
Lewis and Clarke, and to answer the complaint t*
iled therein, within ten days (exclusive of the i'
day of ervie) after the service on you of this e
summons, if served within this county; or. if
served out of this county, but in this district. w
within twenty days; otherwise within forty days,
or judgment by default will be taken againstryon
according to the prayer of said complaint.
The said action is drought to foreclose a moat- a
gage executed by defendant Andrew N. Pat- le
ton to James i. tilmour on the 6th day of c
June, 1890, on the fellowing described real es-a
tate situate in the county of Lewis and Clarke
and stelate of Montana, to wit.: The northeast e
quarter ef northeast quarter, the north half of 51
southeast quarter of northeast quarter the west et
half of northeast quarter and south half of $
northwest quarter of aertion 8. and north half n
of northwest quarter and northwest quarter of L
northeast quarter of section 9, all in township 10 d
north range 3 wet, except 9 acres taken off the d
west end of north half of southeast quarter of
northeast quarter of said section 8, and for the
recovery of a judgment "f 2,500 as an attorney's a
fee for foreclosure proceedings and for costs. ri
The complaint alleges among ether things that ti
on the 6th dclay of June, 1890, said Patton axe- t
cited to said Gilmour three promissory notes,
ons for the sum of $9,110, due and payable one
year after date and bearing interest at the rate of
eight per centam per annum, one for the sum of
$10,000, due and payab.e two years after date, t
with interest at the rate of eight per centum per *i
annum, and a third flr $10,00o, due and tay.lo
three years after date and bearing interest at the y
rate of eight per centum per annum, and that to a
secure the payment of said notes said mortgage
was executed. And that sauch and every of said
notes was an ins aliment of the principal sum
of $29,110 owing by said l'atton to said.iGilmour.
That said mortgage was recorded in ts ofice ef -
the recorder of Lewis and Clarke county on the
30th day of July, 1890, in book 8 of mortgages
on page 21. That on the 14th day of January.
1896, said Gilmour aigstned said notes and mort
gage to this plaitiff for value. Tiat said first note c
I for the sum of $9,100 and interest is due andI
Sunpaid, except the following sums, f625 paid
Aug. 24, 1811. $625 paid Sept. 9, 1891. $125 oaid
-Sept. 24. 1891, $648.61 paid Oct. 9, 1891, $358.61I
paid Oct 15. 1891, and $70 paid Nov. 1, 1891.
'lhat on 6th day of June, b90, James H. Gil
moor and wife executed a deed conveying to4
said defendant Patton theabovedescribed prem- t
ises for the consideration of $51.500. that at that
time there existed two mortgage liens thereon,
one for the sum of $,.000 executed by said Gil
Smour and wifs to David H. Gilmour,'datedl Nov.
i80,. 188th and due and payable five years after
date, and bearing interest at the rate
fof six per centum per annum pay- ]
able annually, and one executed by
said Gilmour and wife to 'the Jarvis-Conklin
Mortgage 'Trns. company for the sum of $5.1100,
- dated Feb. 1, L89J, and due and payable five
years after date, with interest at the rate of sig
y per centum per annum payable semi-annually.
, which two said mortgages said Fatton agreed
to assume and pay. as part of said enm of $51,
a 500, the purchase price of raid premises. That
li said P'atton has failed and refused to pay the
n interest. due and in arrear on raid two mortgages
t amounting to $240 on the first mentionedl andt
8 317i on the second. and that the holders of said
mortgages are about to for.elose the sams.
That said property cannot be sold in portions
T without injury to the parties. That the defend
r c.ut Northwestern Land and lnvestment rcen
tiany and ci. W. 1 Griffith. trustee, have or claim
to htavs some interest in the premises scetruing
since oaui mortgase, aod tljat the sum of $'2,500
is a rsasonablc attorney's fee for the foreclosure i
croececling.. 'l'ihe plsintiff denands judgmnnt
fsi foirerlosnre. That the mortrgaed tiremises
be said and tihe troce.ln a tpliel to the paye.eot
of tiet costs and expeneso ot this artieo, iclulid.
iug $2,501) for attorney's fee, and tita'amutnt
owing on tIhe three notes and mortggag, with in
t'rest an said notes up to thl time of payment.
and that the defendant Ptatton may be adjudged I
to tPa any d.eitonry.
Aud you are tireby notified that If you fall to
Ii appear and answer the said comnplaint, s above
required, the said plaintiff will aiiply to thei
court. for tie roeiof in coid complaint demanded.
0 Given under my hind and tue seal of the dIs
trictcourt of the F"irct judicial district of the
slate of Montana in and for the county of Lewis
and I larko, this 2"1st day of Jansary, in the
0year of our Lord, one thousand eight hundred
and ninaty-two,
- Ifeall JOHN BEAN. Clark.
S y li. It. T'onitrPon, Deputy Clork.
if CUnvTeHEn GAi.L'ND.
Attorneys for Plaintiff.
% OTICE OF APPLICATION TO CUT TIll.
tar. in accordan0. with the provi3iois of
I section 8, rules ,ritd r.'nlstions prsocribtld by tite
h tso:sorah u iooereorl o tue interior. Ilry 51, 1211,
0 the sntocireigno4l irrby gises notice tint at thl
ixpiratlio of Itwenty-ore anys troci thoeir.t pub.
licltioo ,fI tliv. nutic.. it will aOlply to t .e hon
ormablescaretary itf the interior, by its written
.s apLdicati,o, fur authority to cut and remove lbs
iI merchuntab!o saw loeg, consisting of pine and
fir timbe:. on the following described public
lands, to wit:
Berginining t thel forks of Cottonwool creek,
It. which itas tributary of the south fork of the
nu I osseelbhli rivcr', thenrc running up theleft oc
west, and midd:e ftork of said Cottonwood
creek, and embrcug thie hatuifil Water stehd of
both.
Said land embraces what would he lp. I n, r. Ii
a, if surveyed. All of said land is rough, rooky,
nismonulainoll anti innsurvayet, aeli is south of,
and adjaceilt to ty. 7 ii., r. 10 o. (sorvecedi. and
ad is on the north etitie of tIe Crazy Mountains, in
Meagher county, stats of Montana, and contains
about tilres million (l,td0,s0)fseet of merohnt
able pine and fir tiuboer.
noSl' II IhtUS. SHIEEP CO..
ty T John M. Smith, president,
SMITIIa fiouM,
Atlornvyo f,r Applitrcnt,
. hirte Sulphur Siprings Mont.
uII HOVEY & BICKEI
I~ CIVIL AND MINING
t, ENGINEERS,
tk, ROOMS 24, 20,
- Mershnnts Natlonal
Tnauk Building.
N
cc, iclolna, - Montana.
gak IBTIIIt tee
nt , ara' o the ounty o or
toar .,C Nl nsto hmidt, plaat iff v, ~ An
drewy , intto n,NrthrwUts Jer n m atjt~ d Inv cst
m ntt company and o, I n, Uritlit trustees,
,thei auth na stois greeties to then
S irret eb te tphaat iA ea tIo
of erve) a t he dlr eu on o n l t fo thie suret
mtots, if oree within tiotes courntyt or if sLrved
out of this le truty, but in thi. isistric wlttin
twenty dse, th w.oth . dwotts at, uorty 0a 0, o
judgment bOdefalt wil b Le ýa nt you
acgrdinic to te prayer. of a coimplaint .
't'hel i sa l ailtion broila t to onbtain a eres o
this court for t.he forelosors of. a eraln mort.
t ag., deseribad in th1e rump slot, and executed
y the eain Andrciw N. Alton ao the 2 td day of
June,1t90, tin anccU ore the pay nt of two certain
promissory notes made by btsm to tise Ipltontl
oh the same stay, which nalt notes ware for t he
sum of six thousand dollars eau, lawfoul menrey
of thes United Ilatles, descrihe. the complaint
dorein, and which, by the non-payment of the
ireot of said romissory not.ose, when deue ans
th e intereat of th second of said prnomesory
notes. hos becoite due, sa d alleging that there In
due npon are oreomissory notes the sam of
eleven t ousand nine thundred and seiventy-flre
and 73.100 (4lt,0l75.79) dollars, and wlshc sum oS
due, and the sum of $:156.1o for taxes, with in
terest at the rate of ten pet' cent per annum from
the 1ths day of January, T1o5. Also for the sum
of b b0, cLe s and f rels to be l ed lod allowed
the court ad for costs of sanit ohere exptendot;
that the pri mit^s onoveyes by said mortraloe
may be sold and the proceeds thereof applied os
the payment of einid sotes, moseys expended by
plaint as aforesaid, counsel fees and copts of
suit. For further particulars roforenoe to the
complaint r n file is hereby matde and in case
such proceeds are net esluaient to pay thie same,
then to obtain an ekplaitton againlt te said An
drew N. Patton for the balance remaining due
an also that the above named dofendante, anti
all persons claimissg by, through, or under them
may be barred and forever foreclosed of a.1
right, title, claim, lion, equity of redemption.
ises, and further and other relief.
SAnd you are hereby notifled that if you fail to
apear ad a nswer said complaint, as above
required. the said plaintiff will take defefilt
...inst you and apply to the court for the relief
demanded istse said conp'aint.
Given under my hand and the seal of the die-.
rint court of the First judieial district of the
state of Montana. in and for the county of Lewis
and Clarke, this 10th day of lanuar y, A. 1). 1.9.
[BEALI JOHN liiAN, Clerk.
AsHUitl K. BARSnUR,
iPlaintiff 's Attorney.
SUMMONS.--IN THE DISTRICT COURT O0
the First judioial district of the state of
Montana, in and for the county of Lewis and
Clarke.
tecondl National Bank of Helena, Montana.
plaintiff, vs. James W. Conley Catherine Con
ley, George F. Weoleton and Mary I. Wooleton,
defendants.
The state of Mentana sends greeting to the
above named defendants:
You are hereby required to appear inan action
brought against you by the above named plain
tiff in thedistrico court of the First judicial dis
triot of the state of Montana, in and for the
county of Lewis and Clarke, and to answer the
amended complaint tiled therein, within ten
days (exclusive of the day of service) after the
service on you of this esummone, if served within
this count); or, if served out of this county, buhot
in this district, within twenty days: otherwise
within forty days, or judgment by default will
be taken pgaienst you, according to the prdier of
said complaint.
The said action is brought to recover a judg
ment in'favor of the plaintiff and against the
defendant. James W. tonloy, for the sum of
$233 14, witlh interest thereon at the rate of 10
per cent per annum from the 24th day of April,
188l, upon two certain promissory notesa which
were made, excouted and doelivered by the de
fendant, James W. Conley, to one than. Gab
itch for the sum of $11.67. each dated at Hel
ena. Montana, April 24, 1888, and bearing inter
est at the rate of 10 yer cent per annum; one of
which said notes is payable eighteen months
from the date thereof, nd the other twelve
months from the date thereof, which said notes
were sub.equently assigned, transferred over,
and delivered to this plaintiff who is now the
legal owner and holder of the same; also to re.
cover a judgment in favor of the plaintiff and
against the defendants .for.closing a certain
mortgange dated the 24th day of ApriU€I88, made.
executed and delivered by James W. Conley
and Catherine Conley to (has. Gahisch, to se
cure the payment of the said two notes of
$t1.87 each, whichoaid mortgage wa recorded
in the on as of the county clerk and recorder of
Lewis and Clgrke county, Montana, April 28,
1888, in book 3 of mortgages, page 157. For the
description of property in mortgage reference is
made to the complaint in said action.
And you ate hereby notified that if you fail to
appear and an-wsr the said complaint, as above
required, the said plaintiff will enter your default.
take judgment against James WV. Conley for the
sum of $233.84. with interest at 10 per cent per
annum, from April 24, 1888. and for costs of
suit. And will apply to the court for the relief
demanded in the complaint.
Given under my hand and the seal of the dis
trict court of the bciret judicial district of the
state of Montana, in and for theconnty of Lewis
and Clarke, this Slet day of December, in the
year of our Lord one thousand eight hutdred
and ninety-on.a
[SgAL.] JOHN BEAN, Clerk.
By H. B. TaouPsoN, Deputy Clerk.
MuOCONNLIn. & CLAYIERU,
Plaintiff's Attorneys.
G ARDIAN'S NOTICE OF SALE OF REALi
estate.-,Notice is hereby given that in pur
suance of an order of the district court of the
county of Lewis and Clarke, state of Montana,
made on the 23d day of January, 1892, in the
matter of the estate and guardianship of Henry
J. Cruttnden. Lawriston J. Cruttenden, Saras
L. Cruttonden and IMuth Cruttenden, minor
children of Jarious H. Cruttendon, deceased,
the undersigned. the guardian of said minor chil
dren will sell at private sale for the sum of thir
teen hundred and thirty-four dollars cr's and
subject to-confirmation by Sidt district court on
or after the 15th day of February, A. D. 1892, all
the rigst, title, interest and estate of the said
minor children in and to all tIlose certain lots.
pieces or parcels of land situate, lying and being
in the said connty of Lewis and Clarke. state of
Montaua, and bounded and described as follows,
to-wit:
'I he northeast quarter (ne 1) of the southwest
quart.or (swa) and the soutlhwest quarter (ow
1) of the northwest quarter (nn 1?) and lots
thres (3) and four (4) in secation ten (10) in town
ship ten (10) north of ranee one west of the
principal merirlian of Montana.
Otiers or bids for the interest and estate of
said minor children in said described real prop
erty will be received at the office of the clerk eof
said court, at the court houne in the city of Hol
ons, county of Lewis and Clarke, state of MHn
tn VIOLOA L. CRIIUTTENDEN. Gnardian.
Dated Jan. 29. 182.
siALtE OF REAL ESTATE--BY VIBTUE OF
adecree male in the district court of the
First judicia district of the state of Montana.
in and for the county of Lewis and Clarke. on
the dat day of October. A. ). 1411. in the suit of
William is,. lIrctor, plaintiff. against Samuel
Alexandor, defendant, the stndersigned, as a
master of eani court, oppoitited for that pur
pose, will sell to the highiet bidder, for cash. on
Wednesday. the 24th day of February, A, D. 192,
i at the hour of 12 o'clock noon of said day, at
the front door of the court house in the city of
hlelena, all the right. title and interest of the
satit William F. Rector in and to the following
described real estate, situate in the city of Ilel
ena, county of Lewis and Clarke and state ot"
Montana:
l.ot 19 in block 0I, lots 2 nnd 4 in block 18, lot
2-1 in block lit. lot 5 in block 15, lot 12 in block
22. lot 12 irs block 24, lots arid 8 in block 24,
I lot 14 in block Il. lot 18 in block 25, lot 12 in
block 14. lots I and 2 in block 15, and lot 12 in
block H. all of said lots and hlocks being in the
Flower Garden addition to said city of Helena
JOliN t. IlAilOWhi.
Helena. Hont.. Feb. 2, A. D3. 1812.
'A TOTICE TO CREDITORS--IN THR MAT
f ter of the estate b-f rederick ti. Fish, de.
I Notice is hlereby eilun, by thi. Ondersigned, R(i
iniultratur of the estate ioi Frederick . Flisi..
Scceaecd, to the creditors f,i. and all porsons
r, havlrig rlaiisia againsti thO 11:id docoasod, that
-n liey are required to entiibit said claitos with the
is becoas-ry v,,rsche-s, to ti(o caid administrator at
d Itt:tuniutrs+ut, in the City of leisna, easto of
contar, the sarr.e bLsirrg tihe reosieusco of eat
hilminiitr.tor. within four monttis after thes first
r, hsblication of this notice.
so V-. S. SPAULI)IN(+,
cc &dminritrator of the estate of Fredesrick S. Fish. -
I Dated llsleiShMO.at., I1)5. 2. 1891.
TO CIIEDITORS.--ESTATE OF
Notice horohy given bh the undorsiene, ad
1 deceased, to she creditors of, and airpersons
having claima against the said deceased, to ex
hibit them with thie iecessary voulhers, within
fosr montls after the first publication of this
smotio. t sths said adminlstrairix at room 2t,
l'ittbbrgh block, 14elena, Montana. the same
being t1 placs for thre transaction of the hbsi
ntess of said estate. situate In the county of
ELIZABETH II. HOEN, -
Arlminietratrlx ot the estate of Henry Hoes.
Dated Jan. 18.1892.
BTUDY LAW
AT HOME.
TarnE A Couvne IN Toul
Sprague Correspoodonce
5eohoni of law.
t(Inorptorated.)
bend this cents lotamp,)
for iartiulare to
s. Ootner, Jr,, Bec'y.
I'o. U$8 Wblteer Pluoe, Detreit, Mite

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