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The Helena independent. [volume] (Helena, Mont.) 1875-1943, October 19, 1892, Morning, Image 1

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VOL. XXXIII.-NO. 250. HELENA, MONTANA, WEDNESDAY MORNING, OCTOBER 19. 1892. PRICE FIVE CENTS.
6ANS &
It LEI
o}
TO-DAY the American Street
Railway Association will hold a
National Convention in Cleve
land, Ohio.
The sessions will continue un
til the 21st instant, and all street
railway companies, horse, cable
and electric, will be represented.
The interests represented aggre
gate a vast amount, a sum in
fact larger than the combined
capital of the banks, and is said
o exceed $150,ooo,ooo.
Overcoats
and Ulsters
Are demanded by the
frigid weather we now
enjoy.
Our Fur Overcoats,
Our Fur Trimmed Ulsters,
Our Heavy Overcoats,
Our Heavy Ulsters,
Are now in Stock.
We are now prepared to
supply the demand for a
most
Comfortable Garnent
At a
Reasonable Price.
GANS &
KILEIN
INFINITE DEAL OF WORDS
Put on Paper by Whitelaw Reid,
"Rats," of the New York
Tribune.
dhe Arch-Enemy of Labor Form
~ Ily Bids for the Votes of
r . Workingmen.
Dreary ilatltudoe About the Tariff and
Other National Issune--Would Like to
Be Vice President.
New Yoax, Oct. 18.-The following is a
synopsis of the letter of acceptance of
Whitelaw Reid. republican candidate for
vies-president. The letter is addressed to
Hon. W. F. Durbin, Anderson, Ind., and
begins: When the nomination with which
the national convention honored me was
formally announced by your committee, I
accepted it at onee. In so doing I also ac
oepted the prinolples set forth in the reeo
lutienas adopted by the convention as the
basis of its appeal to popular suffrage.
There will be no misunderstanding as to
the purposes of the republican party in the
contest and no doubt as to the attitude of
its candidates. The party platforms are
more important this year than usual. The
declarationsof our opponents demand close
scrutiny, as their victory now would give
them the frst opportunity they have had
since 1859 to put in practice their policy.
It is obvious that in the common judgment
of the people the really vital issues this
year are those relating to tariff and cur
renoy. Fortunately both sides have stated
their positions on the subjects with direct
ness, simplicity and frankness.
The issues thus made between the rival
candidates are specially sharp and distinct.
We maintain that the tariff should cover
the difference in the cost of home and for
eign production, caused by difference in
home and foreign wages. Our opponents
distinctly repudiate the proposition that
American wages should be considered in
the matter, and have declared instead that
a tariff levied for anything but revenue
only is unconstitutional. As the London
Times naturally remarkea, this policy is
not to be distinguished from free trade.
Should the American people now choose
the republican candidates the present tariff
would stand, or when amended would only
be so ohanged as to insure closer conform
ity to the principles on which it was made.
If their opponents are chosen, then con
gress is pledged to repeal the present tariff
and to adopt one arranged for revenue
only, and their executive will be pledged to
the doctrine that a tariff having regard
also for American wages is unconetitu
tional.
We maintain that the present tariff has
worked well, developed American manufac
tures. steadied and increased American
wages, and promoted general prosperity.
Our opponents deny all this and denounce
the republican policy, which they say fos
ters no other industry so much as that of
the sheriff. We favor a system by which,
when we think the country is ready for a
reduction or abolition of duties, we insist
upon getting corresponding and reciprocal
advantages from foreign countries. Our
opponents denounce reciprocity as a sham,
and therefore inferentially pledge them
sevies to its repeal. 'lhe constitutionality
of a protective tariff was heretofore thought
to be established. A tariff bill was carried
through the first congress and signed by
Washington. A third of a century later,
Andrew Jackson maintained the constitu
tionality of the protective system, as have
Jefferson and Monroe, who each
repeatedly recommended the exercise of the
right under the constitution. To this tes
timony from men who made the constita
tion, and from the father of the modern
democratic party, may be added that of the
latest high autho ity of the democratic
party on constitutional law, Hoa. George
Ticknor Curtis, who recently said he could
not subscribe to the dootrine that a protect
ive tariff is unconstitutional.
The expediency of a protective tariff Is
vindicated by the experience of the last
thirty years, the most wonderful period of
fleanci,.l success over unheard of dillioul
ties in the record of modern civilization.
Under it and by its aid republican manage
ment of our finances has resulted in the
largest payment of national debt in the
shortest time known to history, and in the
simultaneous development of the industries
ox the country and p osperity of the people
on a scale without parallel.
Eight years ago, in a masterly public pa
per, James G. Blaine called attention to
the revelations of the United States census
ni to the net results to labor and savings
to the American people under the system
of protection. The true value of all prop
erty in the United States, excluding slaves,
was set downl ill the census of 1860 at $14,
000,000,000. That being wht there was to
show for $210 years of toil. With the suo
cess of the republican party that year the
republican protective policy, which has
since prevailed, was introduced. In the
census of 1880 the true value of prope ty in
the United States was set down at $44,000,
000,000. making an increase of over doublle
the entire growth of the previous 250
vears. It appears that the poperty of the
United States still further increased in the
last ten yea by $14,000,000.0C0, rmaking a
total increase in thirty yea a of republircan
rule and under a republican protective
tariff of $44,l000 l0,000, against $14,000.
(000,000 n.arud In the previous 250 years.
Our opponents deny tCat there has been
any increase of prosperity. declare tlt
wages have b.eu reduced and denonnce our
;olicy. It hbs been a for tunate cil cum
stance for the impartial public thr.rt in the
regular course of ofticill duty a nllUmbr of
democratio of.icers have since been requnired
to report statistics In several departrmentr
beasing upon the subject. All these reports
tend to show an lucrrroaos during the year
18t1 in wnigrs, in vstlrr orf products, ill
doeposite so savings banks or building and
loan associations, alnd in tile vtlue of real
and personals proprrty. l'hease clarial
democratic reofutatious of the dnemlonratic
denial that thie crountry is Irrosperours are
confirmred by the personal experiensc and
observation of tire people at IlaIrge.
At the close of the fiscal year, Juno last,
the reoiprocity policy had beent in opera
tion but a few monthis, and unuder all the
disadvantages attend lug the opening of now
lines of tradeo In foreign ciruntries, it sir
creased our t adie with foreign countries to
wbrhi it had been aspplied 23.78 tper cent.
lince then there has been still greater in
crease, amountling on Sept. I to .7.108 pr
cent. The not vale of "shlll" reciprooity,
therefore, to the lnitel Statre in a brief
period, a.d dui rig Ifancuoy, was ,22,CR)4.284.
'I'o abandon thlla sytraulll, which is Alino
lutely equitable on troth sides, which corts
uas nothing and bringcu auh results, wouli
be Imtadrect, while to denounce st is a shasu
is asn uut uth.
On the subshject of currency, the issue be
tween thie repnblican party and its opi on
nolitt is elmirt as sharply defined na on th.
tarift. We demand that every dollar, paroer.
silver, or gold, shall bIe made ansd kept as
golood as any other diollar. Our opponents,
while proterlnra the salne dtlesire, demand
that national bank cnr elieve hall be bIrorlen
down by the rIetlrt of the ten per Hsut. tax
on the sasues of the state bisunka. No human
bein ever lost a dollar by the note of nat
Ional baak, solvent or trtherwile. /uess
by stute books iare eounted by tena of
millions. It ' Is true that the
gradual payment of government bondas
may require some ehange in securitles de
meanded as gunarantee for national bank
notes. The party which devised the sytem
and made it a ragnifleent suaeoss may be
relied upon to meet this emergency when
it arises. There is good reason to hope
for some practical union of effort for the
common solution of the silver problem,
with the increased use of silver through the
international silver conference, but in any
event the country has learned to trust the
finanioal skill and integrity of the repub
Lican party and distrust its opponents.
It is sometimes said. "You predicted all
manner of disasters when Cleveland was
elected, but nothing happened." A good
many regreteble things did happen, though
the worst could not because the hands of
the party were tied in congress. But the
present political situation makes it plain
that democratic victory in the states which
they must now carry in order to elect a
president would also insure them enough
new senators to reverse the present slender
majority in the senate. If they elect the
president they will certainly have both
house and senate, and thus will be placed
in absolute control for the first time since
1858, with nothing to prevent the carrying
out of the threats they have made against
the present tariff and currency. It is idle,
I therelore, as it is elnnudrous, to say there
is no danger from the triumph of our op
ponents, since the candidates will not re
fuse to carry out their principles. He
could not with credit and he could not any
way, because power is not with him, but
with congress.
The attempt to change the issue 'from
tariff and currency and divert attention to
the alleged force bill scarcely calls for
notice. The very title of the bill proclaims
its object to be to prevent the use of a force
Sat elections. It failed, anyway, and the
southern whit men who were lately its
chief and most interested opponents now
begin to wish it revived to protect them
a from being theme. lves counted out of the
a elections they fairly won, as the other day
I in Alabama, by their own white, fellow
democruts.
It is well, however, to say that the enu
meration in the democratic platform of the
a prinoiple that the federal government may
supervise the election of federal oflioers is
grotesque. It now stands undisputed on
the statute books and was enforced at re
cent elections by Grover Cleveland, then
oweeident. But it is not to be disguised
I that recent clamor against the principle, if
it means anything, means a purpose to nul
lify the fourteenth and fifteenth articles of
the constitution.
The administration of President Harri
a son is generally recognized as honest, able
and safe. Considering the number of im
portant subjects, both foreign and domes
tio, it was compelled to deal with, and the
a satisfaction that attended the results, it
t may indeed be pronounced brilliantly sue
a cessful. I believe your declaration of
principles and your renomination of the
present spotless and successful president,
will command popular approval at the
polls and will, under God, insure the con
tinned benefit of our country.
POLYGS CANNOT VOTE.
Effect of a Decision by the Supreme Court
of Idaho.
BoisE, Idaho, Oct. 18.-The supreme
I court unanimously sustained the constito
tionality of the Idaho test oath law. The
decision in which the conolusion was
reached was handed down by Justice Hud.
son yesterday in the case of Joseph R.
Sheppard vs. Hyrum Grimmett, registrar of
P 'arrs precinct, Bear Lake county. The
Scase was argued a week ago in Lewiston by
SJudge C. W. Bennett, of Salt Lake, and
others for the plaintiff, a Mormon, who
I offered to register upon subsclibing to the
t oath embraced in the constitutional pro
1 vision, and ignoring the additional qualifi
r cation of the test oath law, enacted by the
first state legislature. This additional
qualification is that the elector shall not,
since January, 1888, have belonged to an
t organization that teaches or taught, en
I courages or encouraged polygamy. The
P constitutional provision is simply that he
shall not practice polygamy or belong to an
organization that teaches or encourages it.
Aplicatlon was made to the erpreme
court for a wit of mandamus to compel
a the registrar to register Sheppard. The
constitution provides that the legislature
-LaV provide additional qualifications for
I the exercise of the right of suffrage and
under this t-rovision the legislature adopted
the additional qualitication referred to.
'lIhe principal objection urged to this was
the allegation that it is retroactive, ex post
facto, and therefore void.
The court, however, finds that the pro
vision does not come under the character of
ex post facto laws relative to penal and
criminal proceeding, which impose punish.
ment or forfeitures, nor to civil proceedings
"which allect private rights retrospective,
and is not applicable to civil
lawI , bat to penal and arie
inal laws only. The right of
franchise is next considered and is
shown to be a privilege rather than a iight,
over which the law-making power, when
so authorized by the constitution, hbai en
tire authority to prescribe such qualifica
tions ai are deemed best. Numerous cases
It a cited and the history of the Mormon
legislature in Idaho briefly reviewed.
In refscirg to grant the mandamus and
holding the law to be entirely constitu
tional, the court states that if the condi
tions that have arisen since the law was
passed make it desirable that the law should
be changed, application should be made
direct to the legislature. This decision
will pIevent Mo mons from voting at the
election next month.
Nr, ,Jurldlietion In tile Case.
ST. I'AuL, Oct. 18.-In the district court
this morning Judge B]rill announced his
decision ill the mandamus proceedingse
brought by the dlemocratic state committlo
to compel Secreti try of bate trirwn to
groe, the fusion electors in a different way
from wha:t he had annoounced. 'ire irecision
was that tih cout bhad no jurisdiction sod
the case was dismissed. It is not known
want steps if any, will now be taken. It is
conceded that tile ballot as prepared by the
secretary of state under the law is confun.
ing on tie four fusionl electors, as thtry are
not groupoed together, ut scanttered among
other populist alctuora, thie live straithrt
democtatic elelctors being left by them
Sselves.
Calrfornirn Ftrtiers' Allrance.
tAm'nnlero, Oct. 18.-The third annual
sesionur of the California Farmers' Alliance
and IIdustreril urioin convened to-day.
IThirty-two coruntie out of thirty-six in
which the alliarrer existi were relr-seerted.
A lengthy address wans ldeliverel by I'reatl
dent Maliion (anllllon, who devited Imort of
hie atte.ltiron to natironal iasues. le closed
the rladdress with I tribute to the menmory if
P'resident Polk. deceannsed, of the National
r!hlanco. Tihe convention will bold asessiots
during the week.
-Attacked by Ti'otghsl.
Wr'N oirrir, Mich., Oct. 18.--For a long
time there has been sil feeling between thIre
tiugh element anut salvationists. It ccl
minated this ervoningt during thie arroy
pi:tralde, some oine felalrig Inlnut. Low to tlhe
grornd with a brick. A general free fiuht
ansued. Five personsu were se-iously i
j:nel.t], inle of thole fatally The victim be
iung Carrie Lowe, a eRlvaitionist. The liou
tenaut rind two other salvationists weare in
jured, andt two Irystanderu utruack with lying
ruiesloe. No ar. eats were madre.
UFor Matyor or Ntw Yore.
Naw Yonra, Oct. 18.-The followlin norm
inatlons were marle to-night foir mayor: IJty
the repubean coulnty convetiron, Edwin
lm:lirstoin; by the 'l ammny conunty conven
tierl, Throuas L,. (hilroy; by tln county deni
secruey couvontion, John QnLuUn.
Al THE 300UU-YAH ANGE
Some Fine Target Work by the
Marksmen of the National
Guard.
The Virginia City Company Led
in the Team Work
Yesterday.
Individual Records of the Men Who Made
Thirty-six or Better in the
Two Days Shooting.
The second day of the annual rifle contest
of the Montana National Guard was not
quiet so windy as the first, but the breeze
was suflltiently strong and the air chilly
enough to make perfect firing very difficult.
if not impossible. The range was800 yards,
no sighting shots, yeeterday. The team
work as well as the individual marksman
shin exceeded that of the first day. The
Virginia City company led in the day's
team work with a total of 95 out of a possi
ble 100. The Montana College cadet tearo
was second with 94, the Great Falls com
pany third with 92, and the Bozeman com
pany fourth with 90. Company G., of Butte,.
which led on the first day with 92, did not
do go well yesterday on aooount of an acci
dent to the sight of Corporal Baldwin's un.
The sight was loose,and at each shot dropped
a little without being noticed. This of
course Interfered with what would other
wise haveqbeen a good record. He was nearly
through firing before the trouble with the
sight was found out. His record was only
8, against 18 the day before, and it brought
the company total down to 87. Still G.
company leads on the two day's shooting
with a total of 179, against 177 for the V1r
ginia City team. Three individual scores
of 22, and three of 21 each, were made yes
terday. Company K., of Anaconda, arrived
during the day, and was allowed to shool
for its 200 yard score. Its work at that dis
tance was as follows:
Sergeant. Horn.................................11
l'rivate thea...................................
Private Mot'nary ................................1:
Private oLaean ................................. |
P'rivate liley....................................1
Total........................................61
The reeult of the 300 yard target shooting
yesterday was as follows:
A (',mnany, (treat Falls
Sergeant I oardman ............................it
Private Munroe ................................
Lieutenant trench..............................
kergeant -' oyes........................... .
Captain Witten ...........................21
Total ...... ........ ...... . .. ... ..9
C(: Company. Helena-
private teld. e ....i ................... ...........
('atiai leasr... ...... ....... . ........ .
Corporal Palmr ..................................
I'rivate iloaeiar .............................1
'rvate Iougerty..................................
Totla .... . ..... ....... ................. .
D (e arpimy, Virginia City
Cor;otal c. owman ...............................I!
Private Vickers .......... ...................
]'rivate tllingson ...............................li
l'rivato M eNuty . .................... .... 2
torporal on ...................................
'Total .............. ..... ...... .. .. ...
F Company. Ilillon-
SPrivate timmons.. ............................ I
Privato i mith .................... .
Private Clark .................. .. ...........1
ergeant lird...................................... 1
1- riates ulivan................................
Total ... .................................E:
F Company, tutto-
Lieutetnant oeodorf ................. ............ 8
teirieent Hausworth ...........................lit
Privato J. iaosworth ........................... 11
rivalt It. Ilausworth ............ ............. (
Sergeant ehiorman .......................... I
Total..................... ..................
(i Conmlpany. Bnute
Captain 'ook .............. . ... ..............2i
Lieutenanl rnaves .............................
Ctorporol aliw;n ...............................
I'rivate 'artLr .............................
t rivate Rleoffmn .... ...............
Total........... .......................T
H ('i mpany, Bozeman
('orporal Cain ...............................
Corporal \Vhitn y .. ........................li
Private Blartholmew .. ............. ........
iAeutenant Keown .........................It
tergeant henhan..................................1:
Total ........................................
K ('Colpany, Anaconda
ergeoant tHorn................................13
I'rivate thea ......... .......................... .I
p'rilate MclCnary................................
1 rivate McLean ................................. I
rivate iley.......... .........................
'etal ................................ . it.....
Troop '. Helena-
I rivate Ehlo..... ............................... 1
trio, to Portr ................ . ..... ...........
Privato Pricoe .............. ............... 1I
Pritato Lyons ............................. I
P'rivate Inelson ... ........ .............. 21
'iotalt .......... ............. ..........
Mlontano (Coliege ('adeta-
Sergeant teele .................................1i
I rirate Lodman ......... .... ..........1
er t i ker rk ................................ .. 21
Crltoral Blair .................... ........... 2
Private Adalm o...s..........................
Total ...... ........................... ........9
The individual work for the two days, for
men who have made thirty-six or better at
the two ranges is as follows:
ml at 0 Total
Contadin Colki. Co. 1)............... 2 2 " 12
n'rivate Nflsl, . troop A............20 21 I
~in ltlntlli v;t .lra .... (:0. . 17 22 t
T('rit inWitene, teo. ............ H 1 * .r
( oretlri'llll . tai ,10i.........11 ....1. L2 25
I'rivet. horter, 'Iromp, A............i t Itt
I'rleat. 'ilikires, t row D.............i tt . '
Srortdl l n 'luyty t o ........ t. itt I 1
Ia'r nte tai snn.r: to ............It 1t .i
1 rudel a iLaue, Cadets ......... .....1 , :1
I'rivane nciilty, Ct. I ............t1 2t1
Mlen who make forty out of a lossible 1(I
in the four dayns' shooting will be daoiu
riatod in olelasflcation as "irst class;" those
making fifty-sa as rileosen; those matiltu
snxty-eveon of nttrkemen; those makint
scventy-flve as eonerte; and those mlaklng
eighty sr shrrthhootsis.
'The ollleers in authorilty on the rantoare:
I iuut. Col. thoemeikor. ollirer in oimiattnd;
('lpt. WVilliam Zaetrow, renge olioer; Iiut.
Aihrt,r assistant ringe oftirer: hisust.
ItVylllles ]ilea. I(olf, siiwrin eolliore.
'i t'o- ave's shooting will bte at 0 yards,
I ughtltng shots allowedt.
I)wellllg ge ,l(i St.,'e5 I~itrleai.
(tIIuvoIt, Oct. 10.-FifteOn dwellings and
stores were burned ad two wouetn killed
in Eoiglewoad in the outlhern parte o tthe
city this nlorntioL. The financial loss was
$ett0I. Mrs. W. F. Butler, though not
reallg in danger, julnpeld front a Ithird stor
windotw, and streiking tn her heaol was irn
Msertily killed. John Itsward, ani emsploys
in the bl we bIe y w re stth nr rtd. was
lurnied to death. A woiu, or and hild tInr
one of the burned buildngs are not anc
ottinted for.
Twe Were Iteseued.
Nrw Othl*do sL, Ia. . Ict. .--hThe Nor
wargta steamer Alonen frot Itluefielde. re
i,ottS having rescued ihe first ollicer anut
one seaman of the llouluras steamer
itrangar, from Belire for l)luolleld. lho
capsized in a stiorrm otobsr 10, and of thlr.
teen n hboard, inoluding/ sevUe wonen antI
three children, all exoept the two resosed
are eatioesd to be loek
WANT TO SEE THE, PARADE.
It Mnl Yet Come i)own Through the
Heart of the Olty.
CICIAGO, Oct. 18.-The feature of the
day's meeting of the national commission
of the Columbian exposition was a fiery ad
dress by Ex-Gov. Waller. of Connectiout,
demanding that the military parade Friday
be held in the heart of the oily, where the
people generally could see it. A resolution
to that effect was presented but, receiving
opposition.'being an imputation upon Ge(l.
Miles, in charge of the parade, the matter
was laid On the table. Mr. Allen, of the
committee on ceremonies, said the desire of
the commission would be considered and
that a military parade through thie streets
would be prepared, if possible. 'The board
of lady managers also held a meeting tr,
lay. After some preliminaries Mrs. Potter
Palmer read her report, declaring that the
work of the loard is progressing satisfacto
rily. Mrs. Palmer said the board had en
countered great difliculty in enlisting the
co-operation of women of foreign countries,
especially in the far east, where the only
result of their efforts was an. intimation
that women would not be allowed to med
dle with stoh affairs, and even if allowed,
had not suflicient knowledge to undertake
the work with intelligence.
It was announced tnat the board invited
a proposition for the publication of a news
paper to be sold on the grounds, to be ed
ited and printed by women and devoted to
their interests. KResolutions of condolence
with President Ilarrisou were passed and
after hearing a number of interesting and
satisfactory reports the board adjourned.
Salute to ite Fired Oct. 2t.
WASlrrNOTON, Oct. 18.-Feo,etary of the
Navy Tracy has issued the following gen
eral order: 'On October 21, 1892, the 400th
anniversary of the discovery of America by
Christopher Columbus to whom Italy gave
birth, and Spain the opportunity of im
mortal achievement, all vessele of war of
the United States in commission in United
States waters will at noon tire a salute of
twenty-one gann with the Italian and Span
ish flags displayed side by side at the main
mast head. At all navy yards and stations
where there are no vessels, a salute of
twenty-one guns will be fired, the flags be
ing displayed in the same manner from the
principal flag staff of the yard."
A WITLESS JOKE.
Perpetrated by a Telegraph Operator
D)own in Kansas.
ToPrca, Kan., Oct. 18.-The operators on
the Santa Fe road except fifty on the At
lantio & Pacific division were all at work
this morning. The reason why the Atlantic
& Paciflo men refuse to return to work is
not known, but it is believed they are either
ashamed to confess that they have been
hoaxed or do not believe the order for them
to go back to work was genuine.
The Santa Fe strike came about this
way. Operator Baker, of Dodge City, after
reading the accounts of the strike on the
Gull, Colorado and Santa'Fe division of
the Santa Fe system, thought he would
play a joke upon the manager of his office
and wrote out the message ordering a strike
and signed Chief Ramsey's name thereto,
and laid it on the manager's desk.
Manager Sweet, after reading, imme
diately repeated the message to the next
station, and within fifteen minutes it was
received by every operator on the system,
and fifteen minutes later everyone struck.
Baker is doubhless the only man who got
i any fun out of the joke, for It is a most
serious buslness for the Santa Fe road. It
was not until seven o'clock in the evening
that Chief Ramsey was in possession of the
facts. and he immediately ordered the men
back to their work. I)uring the day the
entire system, from Chicago to the Pacific,
and from Kansas City to Galveston, wee
practically tied up. Baker was discharged,
The Tickers Will Tick.
ST. Lours, Oct. 18.-'rTe differences be
tween the telegraphers of the Missouri
Pacifia system and the management of the
road were amicably adjusted to-day by the
aid of mutual concessions.
SPORTING NEWS.
The Three-Year-Old Trotting Race Record
Lowered.
NARHVILLE, Oct. 18.-Another world's
record was broken at Cumberland park to
day. It wits the stake race for 3-year-olds,
Directum clipping two seconds off the
previous best time, making the distance in
2:11!,. Hal Pointer easily defeated Guy in
a mile dasheb, pacing in 2:1041, lowering hifs
own record. Many outside watches made
it faster.
2:15 trot-Belle Archer won, Fred S.
Wilkes second, Aline third. Hounua Wil
more fourth. Best time, 2:11!'.
2:15 trot--Directum took three st eight,
Kentucky Union second, Trevilian third,
Ambiosial fourth. Best time, 2:11l1..
Mile dash, yearlings-Mill LIadv won,
Winnie second, Brookside third. Firefly
Fourth. Beat time, 2:30).
2:35 trot-Eli won, Lalls Wilkes second,
Baron Posey third, Bowbells fourth. Best
time, 2:12'?! .
Mile dash-Hal Pointer won. (inu sec
ond. Quarters, :3:2, 1:02 !, 1,2=,. 2:01 1..
Two-vear-olds, stakes untinihed--Bon
nie Bull and Vidia each took a heb,t. Best
time, 2:1814.
BIt 1 Monley for itrlnthsers.
BosTON, Oct. I8.-Capt. Cook,,, of this
city, lihas received a telegram from a Lou-
don sportsman stating that the National
club, of London, offe. .l £4.t10 for a glove
contest bretwen (Ihampion James J. Cor
Iett and Peter Jackron. ind cuaraintoo
Jackson all the betting andl backing haut
(urbett reqlllrtrs, aid will COseItet to ally
lille for the lmeeting whLich tle oolupetitors
m auy decide on, altltough ip.efo ring the end
of alring o: late in Aril. Capit. Cooke
Swired the telegram to Corbutt.
Algeria atud NSale.
NeW Yoen, (rOt. 18.--A representative
Scrowd was on hand whei the i de of the
Algeria stud was resumed this afternoon at
Titterealls. Amour the sales were thie fol
lhwinill: Santa Lucia, to W. LakeLrland,
$7.411; Scottish laas, to W. lakeland,
Fi3,00t; Sauoy Lt's, to i,. S. (tardnrr, $l3 000;
Sunitside. to W. it. Norbce. $',3,110; Tur
eodt, to It. J. Engeini, $3;T,l5); Twilight, to
C. J. Em laght, $;L,2':a.
Ito,to, Toot k thie ltttlme.
'tLEVitANr, Oct. 18.-The eseoond chaIn
piionshipl game wits more of a sluggingu
Iatlch thaI yesterdaIy's gname, but the wokr
of the pltlriars wtas very evenly lInilancetd.
Cleevolrnd 3, hits to. errors 2, t'larkson and
Zimnier; Useton 4, hits 10, error 'e. Stairy
antil Kelly. Umptris, McQiuaild and Glaf
ney.
atltllon .,llower Tlthrestnl, Vellaurnee.
iTOPKA, Oct. 18.--GoV. linmphray hes
written a letter to (ueneral bMiles askiung
him that a companyn of IUnited States cav
alry be aeut to the southeru Kiansas border
to inottct tIo settlers frrom thie IDalton
eting. I Ie governorr's atioll is based on a
petition froe the council and citizen of
Cofleyrilio.
Ihdler Pleates (illty.
Tl'ottio, Oct. 18.-Alderman Frank Tan
ner, the sancond tof the boodlere was ar
raltuned for trial this afternoon and plead
guilty. This has thrown the remaining five
into conusternation. It is believed that all
cuetlt one, Manchester, will also plead
I M otIYylelt. '' l a h o n t e r m li g iv
MA. DALY AT MISSOULA
Secret Conference With Several Gen.
tlemen on the Subject of
the Capital.
They Will Probably Organize An
Anaconda- for- the-Oapital
Club.
BuItt Decildes to Stay In the Capital Rae
--No D)oes Doer Lodge-Other State
News.
MISROmYrA. Oct. 18.-[Hpoolal.]-Early in
Y the evening it was learned that several
I- gentlemen considerably interested in Ana
conda for the capital had held a meeting
in one of the rooms of the Missoula hotel.
d Among those present were T. C. Marshall,
F. i. Higgins, J. K. Woods, J. M. Evans,
I- C. M. Cratchlteld, Marcus Daly, W. P.
O'Brien and others. Exaetly what was
done at the meeting none of those present
d seemed inclined to communicate. It was
learned, however, that a capital club wonld
probably be formed in the interest of Ana
conda.
rDeer Lodge in the Race.
Di r.In LoDEO. Oct. 18. - [Special.] -A
tremendous mass meeting was held by the
ae otizens of Deer Lodge to-night to protest
against the report industrionsly circulated
If in some parts of the state that she had
d withdrawn from the contest for the capital.
She is still in the race, and will be there
until she wins or is defeated at the polls.
iButte Is for Butte.
BUTTE, Oct. 18.-[Special.]-A Butte for
e the capital mass meeting was held to-night
with an attendance of about 1,500. Many
enthusiastio speeches were made, among
the spbakers being men from Missoula and
r Madison counties. A capital club of about
1,000 was organized and Butte is evidently
n in the race to stay.
k MATTS AT ItOULDEI.
The Popular Orator Well Received -
iMakes a Rlousing Speech.
n BOULDE, Oct. 18.- [Special.]-Senator
n Matte, of Missoula county, spoke at this
place to-night upon the iasses of the day,
is and notwithstanding the inclemency of the
ir weather he had the largest audience since
the campaign has been opened. The gifted
.d speaker was introduced by the Hon. M. H.
o Parker, of this city, candidate for county
re attorney on the democratioticket, in a neat
2, little speech. All that seems necessary for
a speaker to find favor with a Boulder an
dience is to have Mr. Parker introduce
s him. Mr. Matte delivered a masterly ora
a, tion and brought forth an array of con.
n vincing rrguments in favor of tariff re
at form that ought to make all republicans
t as well as people's party men In Boulder
g vote the democratic national ticket next
ie month. The speaker was listened to
a throughout with deep attention and pro
found admiration.
e The court room was handsomely decor
1, ated and was filled to sunffocation with an
enthusiastic audience. Many people had
to stand in the corridors. At the conolus
,- ion of the speech, which lasted an hour
ri and a half, Mr. Matte was presented with
is a beautiful basket of flowers by the demo
re cratic ladies of Boulder. A rousing bon
fire and the sweet strains of the Boulder
silver cornet band helped ts enliven the
evening. It was a most successful meeting
and will hear good fruit on the 8th of next
November.
Banders and Callahan.
B'nrrcia, Oct. 18.-[Special.]-Cole. San
ders and Callahan addressed a large audi
ence at the court house here to-night. A
u very good display was made by the newly
is organized flambean club who were sup
*e plied with red hats and cares. The audi
dience contained about half democrats.
Sanders defended the force bill and made
the usual very tame arguments for protec
I, tion. lie characterized the populists as
I. the ghost dancers of politics and wound
ulp with a pyrotechnic appeal to stand by
the republicans. Callahan waived the
bloody shirt, twisted the lion's tall, and
, labored with the tariff issues.
t ' he republicans are much chagrined over
the result the registration, which show nn
doubted democratic gains.
It Polltioe anl Itegltratilon In Choteau.
Fonrr IeTN.TN, OCt. 18.--[HSpeOial.]-A
packed house greeted Heu. It. i. Smith
is and lion. E. ('. Day this evening at the
court house. The meeting was called to
i order by 1). 0. Browne, chairman of the
0 county committee, who prsenuted Col. J. J.
-)onnelly, the latter presiding. The
nspeakers devoted their reimarks to the
I tariff and were listened to with marked at
Y tention. They speak highly of the treat
Scnelnt accorlded tlhem.
At a nmooting ol the democratic county
committee the resignation of J. E. Wam
sley, candidate for representative, was ec
cepted and A. BI. Hamilton substituted.
S 'lhe registration in Choteau county will
0 be more than 1,800, an increase of 50 per
t cent aine two years ago.
Park Countty Ilatitute
.. tVNnwoHoN, Oct. 18.-[Special.]-'rhe
- teachers' institute for Park county col
0 vened in the high school building in this
clte at nine o'clock this molnring. 'lihe
morning's sesesion was taken up pirincipally
with routine work. 'Tlhis afternoon Mliss
nlallinger read a paper on primary work
Saind at the close of the reading therle was a
spirited discussion on this subject. J. I).
loes read an lunturestlng paper on eivil
y government. 'The attendanuce is very large,
nearly every teacher in the countc being
presunt. 'The session will continue three
days.
Ilelaver head l )emoeratl.
DI)il.oN, ()oct. 1S.--L[Special.!--The demo
crate were out In fore, here to night. A
tig mass muertini was addreessed y Hon.
a W. A. Clark. Hlonl. T. E. Collins and Miss
I Staver, candidate for county superintend
ent. l)elegations from outside uointe ar
rived during the day. Tlhe meeting was an
enthusiastic one.
,ult Against Elkles.
ii AIiriLnM( , I)ct. 13.-A sensational suit.
Sinstituted against recretaryof War ktephem
I . Elkinas and lEx-U'. M. Senator Davila by
Alexander thaw, a leading coal operatoer,

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