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Rocky Mountain husbandman. (Diamond City, Mont.) 1875-1943, October 19, 1876, Image 8

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025309/1876-10-19/ed-1/seq-8/

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MINES AND MINING.
QUICKSILVER-HOW IT IS MADE.
Few of our readers probably have any
idea where quicksilver came from or liow
-t is made, but the following very excellent
letter from a correspondent of the American
Groccr throws much light upon the subject:
California, in addition to bcling the largest
producer of silver and gold in the world, al
has the richest quicksilver mines, and the
name "New Ahnaden " has become synon
ymous with quicksilver all over the world.
Having the good fortune to meet Mr. J. B.
Itandall, the Superintendent of the compa
ny, we were favored with an invitation to
visit "New Almaden " and see how this vol
atile and interesting metal is produced ; and
taking the cars one afternoon, a ride of fifty
miles, by the Southern Pacific Railroad,
brought us to San: Jose, which is the nearest
point on the railroad to the mines. San
Jose itself is a thriving little city of ten to
twelve thousand inhabitants, situated in the
charming Santa Clara valley, which is the
garden of the State. Possessed of a delight
ful climate and a most fertile soil, in which
can be raised nearly everything that is pro
duced either in the temperate or torrid
zones, and so near to San Francisco that it
has a good market foi* its productions at all
times, it is a veritable farmers' paradise; and
it is no wonder that its fertile bottom lands
command' high prices. Passing the night
at San Jose, we' took a team early next
morning and drove out to " New Almaden,"
which is about fifteen miles from the city.
The mine is situated nearly at the summit
of one of the foot-hills of the "Coast Range"
of mountains, and was originally discovered
by4he Indians. resorting to this place to
procure the red paint with,which they
smeared their laces. and which was here
found cropping out of the ground. It was
di-eovpred that this material was a rich vein
of-cinnabar or crude quicksilver. In course
of time a company was formed to work it,
and, for many years, it has been one of the
,Srincipal producing quicksilver mines of the
world. Being furnished with a guide, we
stepped into the bucket of cage, and in a
moment were lowered 1,440 feet down into
thebowels of the earth. Here we got out
sthd' Were conducted through 'a long and tor
tuous tunnel to the point where the miners
were wosking the vein. We found a set of
swarthy fellows drilling and blasting, and
Ulling the small cars which are run over the
tramway leading out to the shaft. After
witnessing their operations for a short time,
and securing Some' rich spircimens of ore, we
, traiced our steps to the shaft, and were
hi0sted to what is known as the "1,200 foot
level," and here got into a somewhat larger
c r than those used on the lower level, and,
iidp'eIe1d by a mule, were soon again out in
heo dayligh.
S'khe redicing works or-tfrnaces' are situ
atedldown it ,the bottorn of the hill, and,
proceeding there, we were shown the mout
iDteresting part of the process. Thile ore is
put into vast-ftii'naees or retorts, and roast
ed at a white tleat for :three to f4ur days.
The fumes from the furnaces are conducted
throughta number of little rooms known as
"C ind Iisesr , . In which they condense into
tdiIclksilver, aqd run down through cha.n
uels.provided-for the purpose, into iron ket
te or receptacles below. It is very inter
-:_ing to stand by the side of one of these
.ttles, and put one's hands. down into
hatseems more like molten silver than
'iything else. It has all the weight and
t~nilng solidity of the heaviest metal. In
teed, so heavy is it, that if you tlhrow a
,piece of iron upon it, the iron floats like a
alip of wood upon w.ter; but you endeav
or to grasp it in your hand, and it slips
away from you as if it were a phantom, and.
gtem' sever'l attempts, we gave it up in des
Dair, c.nvinccd that this was the most in
takrgiblb of all the heavy substances that we
had ever seen. From these kettles it ib
-rawn offinto iron kegs or " flasks," as they
are called. These are about twelve inches
high, and fonom four to five inches in dnine
ter, yet they containu about seventy-live
Pounds of quicksilver, from which an idea
ama$ e formed of its great den.sity. and
t.h of the quleksllve'l r produced here is
us4 amualgamatiug with, and thus col
lectl-g, the gold and silver produced in the
rmanes of the Pacific Slope; Lut large quanm
titles are silpped to all parts of the world
for use in the mechanic arts. China takes con
silderable quantities, most of which is man
ufietiured into vermilion ; for it is an inter
esting fitct lhat the red color which shows
in the ore but, disappears in the relined pro
duct, can again be made to appear by pur
sut in, a certain chemical formula. The Chi
nese arc very expert at this, amnl Chinese
vermilion has been celebrated for years. f01
late, however, the universal Yanece nation
have begun to mnlufactLure vermilion ; and
it is now said of this, as of many other arti
cles, that our manufacturers can " beat the
world" in producing it. Of course every
body is familiar with the use of quicksilver
(or mercury as it often called) in therinome
ters ; but its sensitiveness to heat has lately
been utilized for a new purpose-that of g'iv
ing tire alarms. In the Palace hotel, San
Francisco, every room has a glass bulb filled
with mercury, let into the ceiling, and, in
the event of a tir.e originating here, as soon
as the heat reaches 110 degrees, the mercu
ry rises, connects two electric cttrrents, and
the news is instantly telegraphed to the of
fice that there is a fire in To.
It is said that a practical joker once tied a
match to the end of his cane, lit it and held
it up to the bulb ; in a moment the fire bri
gade of the hotel were thunl:dering at his
door ;;opening it with the blandest possible
smile, he informed them that it was all right,
they might go back again now, as there
wasn't any fire, but he was satisfied tlie
thing would work if there was one. The
number of uses for which quicksilver is em
ployed is constantly increasing; but tle pro
duction has also largely increased, and, iii
consequence, the price fallen largely. Two
years ago it was worth $1.50 per pound; to
day, sales were made at forty cents, froml
which it will be seen that it has more than
kept pace with the decline in other articles.
At present prices, however, it is said that it
does not pay to mine it; and, doubtless, pro
duction will soon be largely curtailed unless
the price advanced.
fH Y 'MARKET AND FEED STABLE.
JOSEPH IObRSIKY, Proprietor.
LOWER MAIN STREET, HELENA.
Accommodations for
ALL KINDS AND ANY NUMBER OF STOCK.
Is prepared to
COMPETE 'WITH ANY STABLE IN TIIE CITY.
]-HAS FAIRBANKS' iAY SCAL'ES.
I have 620 acres of the best hay land in Prickly
Pear Valley, six miles from town, from which I get
all my hay.
Highest Market Price Paid for Grain.
June 29, 1876-32-tt'.
GR Y Is now restored to its hatural con
Sdition by the use of
DRY, WOOD'S IMPROYED
HAIB BESTORATIVe.
F A DED E The IMPROVED ARTICLE is
now taking the lead over all oth
AND ers, leaving the hair clean, soft
and glossy. C. A. COO.K &
Falitg CO., Chtieago, III., Sole Agents
for the United States and Canada.
Sold by all Druggists everywhere.
I:X A. I 1 Trade supplied by all Wholesale
Druggists. 47-6m-eow
APPLICATION FOR PATENT.
No. 460.,
U. S. LandOtflice, Helena, M. T.
August 8, 1876.
Notice is hereby published, that John Frith and
Elisha Poad, whose post otice address is Canyon
Ferry, Meagier county, Montana Territory, have
this tay tiled application for patent, under the nain
ing laws of Congress, for a Iphaer mining claim
situated in Avalanmch gulch mining district, Mcagherc
county. Montana Territory, designated as lot No.
37, in T' 10 N R 1 E, Prmincipal Meridian, Montana
Territory, which claim is not of record, and de
sriihed in the otlicial plnt and field notes on tile in
this oice as folllows: Beginning at the southwest
corner of lot No. 38 t lII r 1 e, from which the
northwest corner oft 10 n r 1 e bears w 449.50 chains
distant, an'l running thence s 23 deg w 7.8;0 chauins:
thence s 36 dleg w') chains thence s 55 deg 1.t mili
w 9) chains; thence s 46 (deg W 20 chains; thence s
59 dee w 0 chains; thence a 27 deg 15 min w 10
chains; thence s 516 deg 30 min w 9 chains; thence
s 10 deg 15 min w 5 chains; thence s11 dog e 10.40
chains; thence e 1.30 chains; thence n 6 deg 45 min
w 11 chains; thence n 27 deg 15 min e 3.50 chains;
thelrcnce n (6) deg 45 min e-5.24 chains; thence n '28 deg
45 rmiun c 1;. chains; thence n 54 deg 45 rain e 35.70
chains; thence n ~3 deo e 26.60 chains; thence n 2
dee e 6.50 chains; thence w 2.50 chains to the place
of beginning, embracing 31.26 acres, upon whlich a
notice of said apldication, together with a plat of
tle premises claimed was posted on the 26th day of
June, 1876.
The adjoining claimants to these premises are the
claimuadts to lot No. 38on the North, placer claim.
No others known.
Any and all persons eloiming adversely any por
tion of the above described plaemr ecdim are hereby
notified thlt, unless their adverse claims are duly
iled, according to law, within the sixty days period
of publication hereof, they will be barred by virtue
of the provisions of the statute.
J. H. MOE, Register.
B. F. MARsi, U . . Deputy Mineral Surveyor.
aul7-n3e 9w
ROCK Y MOUNTAIN IIUSBANDMAN,
A first cleass Weekly Journal. devoted to
AG RICULTURIE,
HOTTICULTLUr.E,
STOCK RAISING,
TWOOL GROWING,
AND THE
Industrial and Educational Interests of
the Great North-west.
WITII A HOME' DEPARTMENT,
Filled with choice selections and contributions from
•.oo(i Anthors, and a general review of p)asing
e'enuts, Mineral and Scientiic Newiv comprising
in all to make it
THE BEST FAMILY NEWSPAPER
Published in Montana. Persons desirous of send
ing a paper to their friends in the States will lind it
to be just what they want, as it will contain, from
time to time, a full and complete account of the
manner, cost and result of
FARMING, GARDENING AND FRUIT
CULTUIRE IN EVERY SECTION
OF OUR TERRITORYt
Together with the best information concerning our
great Pastoral advantages and Water Privileges.
Also. statements of experiments in
WOOL AND STOCK GROWING,
Showing the profit to be realized. Everything
given from a nRELIABLE soURE. As an
ADVERTISLNG UMEDIUM,
It will have no equal in the Territory, since it is the
only papier that will be read by all industrial classes,
and unluersally by latrmers and stock men. We
will endeavor to
Protect Our Patroins
Against articles of doubtful utility and irresponsible
firms. Our friends in the Enat nmay rely upon the
intformation given by the ROCKY M10UNTAIN .i's
B,4NDMAN, reapecting the
Superior Advantages Montana Offers
To those seeking homes. Having traveled through
all the principal valleys in the Territory, and being
intimately acquainted with. and having friends in
every neighborhood, is prepared to
FURNISH. CORRECT LNFORMATION
Relative to agricultural land, pasturage, water
rights, mill sites, lodes anti placer mines. In fact,
EVERY BRANOCH OF IhDUSTRY
or business, together with snow fall, severity of the
weathelr, wrird, frosts, etc.
The Patrons of Husbandry will bear in mind that
Jle IiuSANDMAN was, by a unanimous vote of the
First Aninumal Session of the
TERRITORIAL GRANGE
adopted as the medium, for communicating with the
members of Snbordinate Granges, and that the
imembners of that body were earnestly requested to
labor and sustain it.
FREE FROM ALL SECTION~L BIAS,
Or personal controversies, it will lend its aid to
the cause of justice and truth. It will be found a
COUNSELOR AND COMPANION
for every western firesSe.
TERMS :-$4 00 ;per annum.
With Clubs of 20, one extra copy.
Single CoicJ, Ten Cents.
~ls. encens the frst-class Agri
cultural,' Iortjeultural, Stock and Grange Journals
We will furni;sh the Husbandman and American
Stock Journal fbr $4.5O.
Htmsbandma and National Granger 4. 75.
H. t. SUTtlERLIN,
Editor and Proprietor.
REWER.'S
WHIITE SULPHUR SPRINGaf.
ESMITI RIVERi VALLEY,
MIEACEIIER COUNTY, MONTANA.
Thce.3e S rings are situated on the Helena and r-,e
roll road, 40 imiles (ast of 1)i:lniond. Thebeauti;ru
loca1tion :11iid wondlcrfiul curative qualities of tlh
Springa hat\ aI)lrc:uld) ii.lduced hundreds of invalide
a..d ll casure -cel:ker to vi. It them.
Vi. itrs will lind good, colnfortably futrnishe.
rocun.-, airtde he t;ble 1upplied with the best the cuSL6
try alli ds.
S-TERIS REASONABILE.-.
II. B BRAINARID.
June 29, 7876-32-Gm.
-ELENA AND DIAMOND CITY,
STAGE I LINE.
UNITED STATES MAIL.
. B. CLARK, - - Proprietor.
Conches leave helona Monday, Wedr.esday, tod
Friday, at 7 o'clock a. inm.
Leave D)iamond City Tuesday, Thursday, and
Saturday, at 7 o'clock, a. in.
IHELENA AND .BOZEMIAN.
Coaches leave Ilelena every morning, (Sundays
excepted,) at 4 o'clock, a. nl.
Leave Bozcni:n e\ cry morning, (Sundays except
ed,) at 4 o'clock, a. im.
I'assengcrs and freight carried at moderate rates.
OFF'ICES :
IIEL7,EA-Davis & tWallace's, Main Street.
Boz MAN--Willson & «tich's, cor. Main and Boo=
man Streets.
BOZEMAN AND VIRGINIA.
Loaves Virginia City every Monday, Wednesds
and Fridlay, at 4 o'clock, ,. inm.
Leaves uozeimian Tuesday, Thlrstday and Satur
day, at 4 o'clock, a. ni.
O'iii ci--ln Virginin, at Rlaymond Bros.
VM. M. . PI. I1CE & CO.
Comnnissioni 31Ierch ants
-A-ND
MISSOUlR1I STATE GRANGE AGENCY,
NO. 14 SOUITII COMI'L ST., ST. LOUIS, MO.
Special attention given to the esale of
GRAIN, TOBACCO, WOOL, IIIDES, &e.
And to the purchase of
FARM, FAMILY AND PLANTATION SUPPLIZ8.
TO TIlE WORKING CLASS.
We can furnish you employment at which you cam
make very large pay, in your own localiiics, with
out bieig away from hlome over night. Agents
wanted in every town and county to take subscrip
tions for the Centennial Record, the largest publica
tion in the United States--16 pages, 64 columns; el
egantly illustrated; terms only $I per year. lThe
R-ecord is devoted to whatever is of' tnterest connedt
ed with the Centennial year. . The great Exhitbition
at Philadelphia is fl3ly illustrated in detail. Ev
erybody wants It. The whole people feel great in
teorest in their country's Centennial Birthdlay, and
want to know all about it. An elegant patr;otis
crayon drawing premium picture is presented free
to each subscribed. It is entitled '' In remembrana
of the One Hundredth Anniversary of the lndo
pendenee of the United States. '" Size, 23x:;0 inchee
Any one can becomie a successful agent, for but shoW.
the paper and picture and hunnrc'ds of s ubscriber
are easily obtained everywhere. There is no busi
ness that will pay like this at pretent. We hars
many agents who are making as high as $20 perday
and upwards. Nowv4 the time; don't delay. EO
member it costs nothing to give the business a trial.
Send for our circulars, terms, ul.d sample copy of
paper, which are sent free to all who apply; iq ft
to-day. Complete outfit free to those who decideto
engage. Farmers and mechanics, and the"ir Msi
and daughters make the very best of agents. A4
dress, The Centennf al Reeord,
July 20-35-3m. l'ortland, Maine.
BRED J. KIESEL & CO.
Forwarders for
MIONITANA AND IDATE
CBRuINNE, - - - UTA
Mark goods
CARE F. J. K & CO., CORI.NE, VTAM
May 4, 1876-24-6m.
PROPOSALS FOR CARE
And Maintenance of Heagher C00r1F
Poor for the Ensuing Yeac.
COUNTY C('Lx:I'S OsTe.eI
Moagher County, M. T., Seplt. 7, 8i76.
Notice is hereby given that scaled p)roeposflS wtl
be received at the County Oleik's 0111ce, i Diioult
City, for the sll)Iotl't anid nltiteinance C t the cottlo
sick, poor and int.h, per capita by the wOek, iu
one year, commenemng iDec. 1st 14 b, to inchul
feed, clothing, nursing and burial exsp'n"e. 1 _"_f
pro'osals "iii be receivel at the 'mk' oieoers
serve the right to reject any urd aili - bis,
Cl'k B'd Couity CQo's•

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