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Rocky Mountain husbandman. [volume] (Diamond City, Mont.) 1875-1943, August 28, 1879, Image 4

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LIVE STOCK.
A GOOD remedy for diseases of horses or
other stock is always acceptable to the gen
eral reader, and we take pleasure in giving
them to the public in these columns. A
remedy that has been applied and- proven
by a thorough test, is worth more to many
persons than many times the price of a
newspaper. Our friend J. B. Smith, of
Boulder valley, who has had some experi
ence as a veterinarian, has been kind enough
to furnish us witti the following prescrip
tion and rules of application for the treat
ment and cure of "sweaney" on horses:
One pint coal oil, one pint turpentine, one
pint alcohol ; mix well with one ounce of
chloride sublimate;* the same to be well
pulverized. Apply by pouring on once a
day for three days in succession. After
three days from last application again apply
it three days in succession.. Then, after
three days, apply three more days in suc
cession. Then miss nine days and apply it
three days, and after nine days again repeat
application three times, and so on; aftet
nine more days again apply three times.
Care must be taken not to rub with the
hand, as it will be severe. Apply simply
by pouring over the sweanied parts on the
horse. The horse must be so tied as to
prevent him from touching the part cover
ed with the medicine, with his nose, Fol
low these directions and the cure will be
certain and permanent.
WESTERN LIVE STOCK TRADE.
There are many who argued last winter (
and spring that the low prices realized for 1
live stock last year, and the restrictions
placed upon our foreign live stock trade,
would give a check to cattle raising in the
west. Perhaps such would have been the
case were there any crops the western farm
ers could raise that would pay them better.
Live stock, even at the low prices, pay bet- f
ter than anything else. Hence, farmers
have been forced to keep in the stock busi
ness. Nor is this all. If we may judge
from2 the receipts at the prinoipal western
markets the past six months, stock-raisers
have been in no wise discouraged. The S
W~etern States are peculiarly adapted to (
grain and stock-raising. To quit stock and
grainwralsing in this country means to quit
Bfting; and none realize this more ford
bly tban land owners. In the west, wher
ever you And cultivated land, there you will
intd grain: and live stock. Thousands of
new.thjilies have located in the Western 1
States the pust year, occupying, cultivating
andastocking new lands. The productive
territory In the west is so large, and the
flow of iunmigration so constant, that we do
40t filly appreciate the rapid changes that
are constantly going on.. Notwithstanding 4
the many drawbacks in the live stock bus!.
sets the past few years, stockdaising is on
the increase, and must continue to grow as
1 e west is settled up and developed. The
aotsipta of cattle at Chicago, St. Louis and
Kansas City for the six months ending July
14cthow an increase of 31,510, of hogs 597,
9I8, and ofiskeep 26,858. Of the three cities
Chicago is the only one that exhibits an in
crease in its cattle receipts. At Kansas
City the receipts have been about the same
as last year. The increase in cattle, there
Ibre, has come from the northwest, along
the Union, and perhaps, Northern Pacific
railroads. The flow of immigration to the
southwest, and extending as far north as
Nebraska, had a tendency to force many
Texas cattle owners tarther west with their
herds. The opening up of the Black Hills
and Yellowstone country, a territory noted
for its fine grasses, has also lured to that
section many large cattle owners the past
tWo years. The Dodge City Times, of last
week, announced that Col. J. S. Driskill
had just left that neighborhood with several
thousand cattle for the Yellowstone coun
try. As the southwest is settled up and le
gitimate farming apd stock-raising advance,
the trade in through Texas or semi-wild
cattle must be driven to the frontier. While
the southwest is losing this trade, it is get
ting in lieu thereof permanent settlers, and
increasing its number of improved stock an
nually.. The per cent. of good cattle on our
market the past six months has been 100
per cent. greater than ever before known in
the history of the trade. Not only is the
larger per cent. of the Texas cattle drive
now going to the Platte river, western Mis
souri river and Yellowstone river countries,
but Wyoming, Montana, Utah, Oregon and
Dakota are annually increasing their quota
of cattle. These are all pastoral countries
and offer unsurpassed ranges for large herds
of cattle. While the Texas cattle trade is
drifting westward, hog-raising in Kansas
in fact throughout the new west-has re
ceived increased attention. And we doubt
not that before many years tha country
west of the Missouri river will have doubled
its annual crop of hogs. At Kansas CityT
alone, for the past six months, the increase
in the receipts of hogs has been over 81,000;
at St. Louis 132,000. and nearly 400,000 at
Chicago. There has also been a healthy in
crease in the receipts of steep. And there
is every evidence that the live stock interest
west of the Missouri river is in a healthy
and growing condition. Receipts of live
stock at Kansas City, St. Louis and Chicago
from January 1st, to July 1st, 1879, and
comparisons for the same time in 1878:
CATTLE. ,
1879. 1878. 1879
Chicago......554,024 512.332 Inc. 41,694
St. Louis.....186,286 195.744 Dec. 9,452
Kansas City 55,538 56,262 " 728
Total.......795,848 764,338 Inc. 31.510
HOGS.
1879 1878. 1879
Chicago... 3,543,129 3,159,244 Inc. 383,885
St. Louis.. 808.725 676,691 " 132,034
Kan's City 313,331 231,337 " 81,994
Total..... 4,665,185 4,067,272 597,913
SHEEP.
1879. 1878. 1879
Chicago..... 182,990 157,720 Inc. 25.270
St. Louis... 78,623 72.838 " 5,785
Kansas City 17,817 22,019 Dec. 4,202
Total......279,430 252,577 Inc. 36,852
-Kansas City Price Current.
THE CATTLE DRIVE.
"The cattle drive of the present season
from Texas and the southwestern ranges is
placed at 250,000 head. From Montana and
Oregon our estimate places the drive of
1879 at 100,000.head. The drive of Texas
and Indian Territory cattle and ponies
reaches Ogallala in June, towards the latter
part of the month, and continues to arrive
during July. Kansas wss formerly the
northern limit of the drive, and this gave
Kansas City a considerable advantage as a
market, but the proportion of the stock re
maining in Kansas is yearly decreasing
while that of Nebraska and Wyoming is an
nually Increasing. At Ogallala, on the
Union Pacific, is now found the great cattle
rendezvous which formerly ended at Abi
lene on the Kansas Pacific. Our advices
from Ogallala are not up to date, but a
week since the arrivals had reached 75,000
head, and it is fair to estimate them at 100,
000 head at this point alone. Besides the
Texas drive, the mountain drive of 100,000
head will reach the Union Pacific, and this
route will soon become the greatest stock
thoroughfare in the world. The demand
for feeders In Nebraska and Iowa is already
very great, and the Omaha live stock mar
ket is soon to become an important object
of Interest between the rival Chicago and
St. Louis lines when the new Wabash and
St. Louis lines reach Omaha."-Journal of
Commerce.
FAcTs seem to prove conclusively that
the high production of wool in one quarter
of the world is usually attended by diminish
ed produ'ction in another. Our readers can
call to mind numerous instances within
their own knowledge of lands in many of
the older states that were first improved by
I sheep, and now such lands have beeome too
valuable for growing wool and are devoted
to other forms of husbandry. During re
cent years, while Australia has been in
I creasing the jiumbers of her sheep at so
I rapid a rate, the wool production of both
Germany and France has fallen off In a pro
- portionate ratio; and with all the supposed
rapidity with which the production of wool
I has been increased throughout the world
a during late years, the actual consumption
of raw wool throughout North America,
I England and the entire continent of En
- rope, has correspondingly increased.
r
IT Is said that over five hundred bead of
,I cattle are already promised for the. next St.
e Louis fair.
BIG HEAD.
The .lisease in horses, known by this
name, is a constitutional affliction, supposed
to arise from a scrofulous tendency. It be
ing essentially due to malnutrition, such an
imals should be kept on liberal and nutri
tious food. Nothing is better than liberty
on a rich pasture. The application of a
blister is sometimes resorted to, but local
applications often prove a disappointment,
because, as stated, the disease is of a consti
tutional nature. Food that is hard to mas
ticate should not be given. Tronic remedies
may be employed with benefit, such 7s the
following dose, morning and evening, for
some time : Halt a drachm each of phosphate
of iron and nux vomica, and a half ounce
each of powdered gentian and ginger. A
small handful of ground willow bark may
be mixed among bruised oats and corn ev
ery evening.-National Live Stock Journal.
CINCINNATI, as the chief city of a great
wool producing state, and from its proximi
ty to the great sheep growing regions of
Kentucky and Tennessee, leads any other
city in the Union in the number of sheep re
ceived and shipped yearly. In July the to
tal number received was 105,8d9 head.
BREEDERS' DIRECTORY.
JAMES MAULDIN,
BREEDER OF
PERCHERON-NORMAN HORSES.
Stallions and Mares forsale.
f Correspondence solicited. Address, Watson
s Beaverhead County, Montana. fl-4m.
BENNETT `& GOODALE,
Importers and breeders of Thoroughbred
COTS WOLD
AND
Spanish Merino Sheep.
Are now prepared to supply the wool-growers of
the Territory with pure-bloods of either sex.
Inspection invited. P. O. address: Camp Baker,
Montana. sep-43-3m
& H. EDWARDS,
Importers and Breeders of
IMPROVED AMERICAN MERINOS.
A FEW CHOICE RAMS FOR SALE.
Elk Grove Ranch, 7 miles west of Bezeman.
P. O. Address, Bozeman,. M T. 34-Gm
S EDMAN & McGREGORY,
IBREEDERS O0
GRADE AND
THOROUGHBRED SHORT-HORN CATTLE.
Range---Upper Ruby
valley, Madison county,
anti the Sweet Grass and
Yellowstone, Gallatin
county.
P. O.---Adobetown,
M. T.
JAMES J MAINE.
Range Missouri val
ley, vicinityof Canyon
Ferry; also, on Smith
river valley.
P. O.-Canyon przy
Also 200 branded - on the right side and nn
der the Mtr.
BROOK & MOWER!.
Range- Beaverhead
rvalley, betw~een ub
river and McKisser
creek.
P. O,-SaliaburY Mop
tan&.
J. G. SARTER.
Range-Smith river
valley, from White
Tail to Newlan creek.
P. O. Address-Camp
Baker.
S. MARKS & BRO.
Range-Smith River '.
valley, from Camp
Baker to Rim Rock.
Address, Diamond
City, Montana.
P. J. MOORE & BRO.
Range--Smith river
and 1uscleshell Val
leys.
Post Office-Martins
dale, M. T.
MARK.-HIalf crop in lest ear, and wattle on
Cacti jaw.
THOMAS COONEY.
Range---M issouri
Valley, from Confed
erate to Cave gulch.
Post Office--Canyon
Ferry, M. T.
JOHN T. MOORE.
Range-Smith river
Valley, from Camp
Baker to the canyon.
Post Office---Camp
Baker, M. T.
MARK.-Swallowfork in left ear, and wattle on
right jaw
J. V. STAFFORD.
Range--Missouri val
ley, from Canyon Fer
ry to Duck creek.
Post oflice---Canyon
Ferry. - -
r erry. _--___m_
JOHN LINK.
Range--On Missonri
valley, from Duck
creek to Cave gulch.
Post office--Diamond
City.
JONAS H IGGINS.
S' Itang e-- Muscleseli
Valley.
Address--F. Gangler,
Martinsdale, M. T.
KROFT & FLEMING.
Range-Smith river
valley, from Camp Ba
ker to Rim Rock moau
tains.
P. O.-Diamond City.
NELSON BUMP.
* Range-On Missouri
valley, from mouth of
White's gulch to Duck
creek.
Post Office-Diamond.
0, Horse Brand: the same on the left shoulder.
GADDIS & BRYAN.
Range-South Fork
of Smith River.
P. O.-Camp Baber,
M. T.
m GILBERT ECKER.
Range---Smith river
Valley.
Post Offlce-Diamond
City, M. T.
JAMES E. CALLAWAY,
BREEDER OF
GRADE AND
THOROUGHBRED DURHAM CATTLE.
Breeding to milk strains a specialty. Young
stock for sale.
Range---Upper Ruby
valley, from Puller's
Springs to Home Park
racMadison county.
P. .--Virginia City,
Montana.
i- Mark--Over-bit in each
ear, and peudant me
th talie tag in right ear.
Brand-Triangel C on left shoulder (changed
from left aide). Vent as appears in above cut.
a
S. L. LEWIS.
I. B.Aap-e---Smith river
valley. from Camp Baker
to the canyon.
Post noffle--Came Rn
liqe'.:, Mlorit~ a.
V Mark---Dulap. Crap off of right ear and a hole
in left.

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