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Judith Gap journal. [volume] (Judith Gap, Mont.) 1908-19??, December 20, 1912, Image 1

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JUDITH GAP IS LOCATED IN THE CENT ER OF T H E LARGEST AND MOST PROLIF IC WINTER WHEAT REGION IN TH E WORLD
Judith Gap Journal
VOL. 5. NO 6.
JUDITH GAP. MONTANA. FRIDAY. DECEMBER 20. 1912.
PRICE, FIVE CENTS
THE FARMER IS
THE KEYSTONE
From the Twin Bridges Monitor.
This paper cannot withhold its gen
crons appreciation of J. J. Ilill. For
mauy years it has frequently taken
occasion to speak of him in a way
which would induce him to become a
subscriber. But unfortunately he
has never had any of these articles
brought to his attention, and there is
a horrible suspicion at times in our
mind that mayhap he has never even
seen the Monitor.
But that as it may be, Mr. Hill
has recently reiterated the statsineut,
which has long been a slogan of his,
to the effect that "We must recognize
the 1'arm as the corner stone of na
tional prosperity." A trite and true
saying. Especially true right at this
time, when a new natioual adminis
tration is about to come into power; a
foreign war is in progress and Wall
street is upset by a high rate for
money which has caused many a cap
italist to put up his socks to tide him
over. And yet the country goes
nloug as if nothing had happened.
The wheels of industry are grinding
unceasingly, the commerce of the
country is at a high tide; there' is
work for all, and not nearly enough
empty ears. Why? Because the farm
is the corner stona of our prosperity.
Because we have had a large harvest.
As long as the farmer has the soil
and the ability to till it, this couutry
will be all right, for he is not only
the corner stone but the keystone as
well.
PARK COUNTY
WINS BIG PRIZE
Minneapolis. Dec. 15.—Joseph P.
Mash and Charles Bridgeman, part
ners, ranchers and now bonanza
wheat farmers in the Shields river
valley of Montana, 70 miles north of
Yellowstone National park, have
won the prize of $5.000 for the best
five bushels of wheat grown in the
American northwest during 19t2 and
exhibited at the Minneapolis land
show.
It was "Turkey Bed" and weighed
the full flo pounds and a few ypunces
more. The commercial score card
Î ave it 02 1*2 points. It milled 104.7.
ifty nine and one-third bushels per
acre was the average on 52 acres.
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RESOLVED
THAT .WE SHOULD QUIT THE
Silly pact ice cfgmnq uokmlzx
PRESENTS AND GIVE OUR FRIENDS
Something they can use.
So many nice usetulthings
like GLOWES, HANDKERCHIEFS
NECK WEAR ANDTHE LIKE- WE
HAVE ALL THE THINGS YOU
WBMU!:■<; BUSTER BR
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•oeywcHT >1... BYnu. nim inwo e«. rMir-.—.
"QUALITY STORE"
A
Merry
Christmas
To All
BEERS AND HAYNES
"THE PIONEERS OF JUDITH GAP'
GOOD ROADS
AGITATION
TheLewistown Argus is carrying
on an energetic campaign for state
legislation this winter iu.the iuterest
of good road making in Montana.
Here is the scheme:
"The county plau is simply to ask
authority from the legislature for
the counties to spgnd exactly the
the same money they are now spend
ing for road work, but to spend it
scientifically in a bond issue which
will allow the same results in two or
three years as there would be under
the present system in tweuty-iive
or more years. As an illustration,
' Fergus county is now spending ap
proximately $50,000 a year on its
roads. Used as a basis for a bond
issue, this $50,000 would be capital
ized into $500,(too of bonds. It would
not add one cent to the yearly cost of
building and repairing roads, but it
! would build all the roads in two or
three years which otherwise would
I be built in twenty-live years. The
! chances also are all in favor of the
i same amount of money building a
I much greater mileage of roads in the
shorter time, as the legislature can
safeguard its expenditure and the
work can be contracted for iri the
townships or road difttricts as parts
of a completed whole instead of the
present patch-work method.
The proposed plan will not propose
that counties can bond themselves
indiscriminately for road purposes.
It will not propose that they can
spend any more money through a
bond issue than each is now spending
for road purposes. It will in no
way interfere with any of the
existing roads nor any plan for state
wide or interstate roads. It will
coniine itself solely to the proposi
tion of using the money now raised
toward the one end of giving pre
sent and prospective settlers the best
roads to their nearest markets."
The Argus has seut out a letter to
all the members of the legislature
asking for sn opinion as to the feasi
bility of the plan Among the an
swers is one from A. C. Grande, the
newly elected senator from Meagher
county, as follows:
Lennep, Mont. Dec. 10.
Fergus County Argus, Lewistown.
Gentlemen: I have perused your
ANNOUNCEMENT.
The Journal has arranged for the distribution from this office
of about 20 packages of the Chrisfmas cards oflered as a pre=
mium. Those who have not received the package from Chicago
by mail can call at this office anytime before Christmas and se
cure one. Those who have no t taken advantage of this big pre
mium offer, can do so up to next Tuesday and secure the Xmas
package at this office.
There are no dates on the cards and they will be serviceable
for any Christmas.
You have a f:w more days in which to take advantage of this
great premium offer. Don't neglect it. You will always regret
it if you do.
article on good roads and it seems to
me your plan is a good one and al
though, if it is not accepted in its en
tirety, it will have the effect of de
vising even a better one; and if so
your work will not have been in vain.
I am heartily in favor of good roads
and I am in l'avor of legislation that,
will make it possible to construct
highways for all time to come that
will be a credit to the people now
living. These roads that we build
will be used, no doubt, as long as the
human race inhabits this portion of
the earth and, therefore, when we
build a road we ought to build it
right to start in with.
It will be impossible to give every
farmer a good road to bis nearest
market at the same time, and there
fore to begin with we must all work
for the good of the greatest number,
regardless of our own individual in
terests if we ultimately want to make
the greatest success.
1 believe to begin with, maiu roade
should be built, through the section
of country where they would benefit
the largest number of farmers and
then extend brandi roads as last as
the money wilt permit.
No doubt the government will soon
ttiru its attention more towards
building highways and instead of
squandering millions in ways that
benetit no one, use some of this
money in upbuilding our country in
the line of good public highways; but
in the meantime we must not be idle.
Under the plan proposed by yon,
I believe the money should be dis
tributed by districts in proportion to
the amount of taxes paid, and that
the districts should be laid out with
a view to equalizing the work, tak
iug the topography of the country
into consideration.
The supervising authority should
be left to some competent man to be
appointed by the board of county
commissioners.
I also believe iu the use of convict
labor for building roads. Not long
ago 1 saw a gang of convicts at work
on a road being built upSlieilds river,
and it impressed me as being a hu
manitarian project, not alone from
the standpoint of the convict, but
also from the standpoint of the far
mers. 1 believe the farmers needed
this road just a little more than
the convicts needed the fresh air and
exercise. 1 am not positive but that
the convicts should be paid a small
or suitable wage, this wage to be kept
in trust by the state until the prison
er is released, or, if a life termer, he
should be allowed to use this money
for some humanitarian or philan
thropic purpose. 1 believe this would
make them take more interest in the
work and at the same time have a
tendency of uplifting them and to
make them feel they are not living
entirely iu vain as far as their own
interests are concerned.
Sincerely yours,
A. C. GKANDK.
Senator from Meagher County.
TO
CHANGE
LOCAL TRAIN
Commencing either Wednesday or
Thursday a supplementary time table
will go into effect on the Great
Northern on what is known ns the
fifth and sixtii districts on the Bil
lings line between Great Falls and
Billings.
The Great Northern division offi
cials are now workiug upon u pro
posed change iu the running time of
the Billings local passenger trains
Nos. 241 and 242 which schedule will
be announced in a few days.
Up to a week ago these two trains
ran clear through from Great Falls
to Billings but with the extending of
the ruu of the Butte local trains
through to Lewistawn last Suiulu.x
the Billings local passenger trains
were cut off the Great Falls district
and were run between Billings and
Judith Gap only. This made it
IKfcessary for the local tratiic be
twten Judith Gap and Moccasin to
be handled by the through Burling
.ton passenger trains Nos. 4:1 and 44.
A week's trial of this service prov
ed it to be unsatisfactory and it bus
been decided to extend tin* run of the
Billings local to Moccasin thereby
covering the whole line with a local
{fusseliger service. The new schedule
for these trains is now being worked
out but it is intended that the west
bound train 241 will leave Billings
early in the morning and will be run
to Moccasin wliere it will connect
with the westbound train No. 287 out
of Lewistown to this city and Butte,
Which train leaves Moccasin at 9:80
a. m.
The local will remain at Moccasin
until the arrival at that place of the
emstbound train No. 288 from Butte
to Moccasin at 5:55 p. m. After
making connections with that train
the local will run to Billings as train
No. 242 arriving there late in the
evening.—Sunday 's Great Falls Tri
bune.
The local will leave Billings ar
noon, arriving in Moccasin at 5:45.
Another local will leave Moccasin at
9:80 a. in., stopping at Judith Gap
for dinner, and arrive in Billings at
about 8:45 p. m.
RAINBOW CURRENT
INTO LEWISTOWN
Mauager Simonson of the Lewis
town Electric A Power Co. expects
that current from the new high-ten
sion line that lias just been completed
into Lewistown from Hainbow Falls,
will be turned in, for use in this city,
by next Sunday or Monday. This
will give the company a chance to
furnish this city with ail the power
and current needed.
A large amount of work on rebuild
ing the local distributation system
has been carried on the past summer
and fall, and about hail of this work
is now completed. The other half of
the big jolt will be taken up again
early in the spring and rushed to
completion. Simonson informed the
News that efforts would be made to
get Stanford connected up as soon as
possilbe, and that current would be
supplied to Moccasin, Hobson and
other towns in that locality by early
spring, at least. The weather and
the opportunity to obtain men to
carry on the work will be the chief
determining factor s. -Lewistown
Daily News.
WOULD REPEAL
PUBLICITY LAW
Washington—Alleging that the
newspaper publicity law is unjust to
newspapers of the country, Senator
McCumber has introduced a bill to
repeal the law, which is embraced in
the postoffice application act of the
last session. In a statement, Mr.
McCumber says:
"The law, it is asserted, works in
justice to newspapers and the ques
tion of its constitutionality is now
before the supreme court in an action
brought by New York publishers.
The law is especially obnoxious to
small country papers, which lind it
impossible to comply witii its provis
ions, anda repeal of the law would be
greatly appreciated by such pub
lications."
Why is it that when a husband and
wife can't agree on a little thing like
the pronunciation of a word or the
color of the parlor curtains, they al
ways think it necessary to remind
each other of all their physical and
mental deficiencies?
The boss says there are two kinds
; of men who believe that tiie linn
; fiin't get along without them—the
! ■■ne who works hard because of that
.ilea and the one who soldiers be
cause he believes it.
S id
THE GAP'S CHANCES !
GETTING BETTER !
II. C. Finch was in Harlowton
Wednesday aud in conversation with
some of the prominent citizens there
learned that the county commission
ers in considering the petition to
form Wheatland county had elimina
ted six townships in Sweetgrass
county on a protest from property
owners there. There were two other
protests, one consisting of a strip of
territory along the west end of the
proposed new county one mile wide
and twelve miles long which protest
was allowed. The other one, signed
bv Mr. Smart and others, the loca
tion of which territory Mr. Finch
could not discover, was not allowed.
This élimina ion takes off about
$S50,0»H> valuation but still leaves
enough to cover the $4,ooo,non in tax
abb* property according to law.
But the best part of this elimina
tion is the fact that Harlowton will
be thus deprived of about fifty votes
for county seat which would reason
ably go to lier.
This makes a much closer light for
county seat honors tlinn Harlowton
likes, and gives Judith Gap as near a
sincli on the county as anything in
this world is certain.
If every friend of the Gap gets
busy t lie county seat can be landed
for this town.
FERGUS WHEAT
6,000,000 BUSHELS
David Ililger, president of the
First National bank of Lewistown,
and one of the best informed man in
the Icoimtry on such matters, has
given his estimât« of the grain pro
duction of Fergus county for this
year. It is based upon personal ob
servation iu every part of the Judith
basin and upon actual crop returns
from individuals and the elevators.
According to Mr. Ililger's ligures
the wheat crop amounted to d.ouo.oou
bushels; flak 600,000 bushels, oats 1-,
500, («Ht bushels, with a large produc
tion of barley and other grains. A
report circulated early in the year to
the effect that the Judith basin would
■bow a marked falling off in wheat
this year was based entirely upon the
fact that last fall there was a con
siderable shortage in the acreage
sown to winter wheat. This was be
cause the continuous storms prevent
ed harvesting iu time to plow the
ground in many cases. It was much
more than offset, however, by the
acreuge sowed to spring grains.
Spring wheat did splendidly in tiie
Judith basin this year.
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Grill
ap
Open Day and Night
BEST FOODS
BEST SERVICE
H. M. HANSON, PROPRIETOR
—n
m
if-S
-A
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,-riu
»1
You will find in our
Hardware
Department
many articles suitable for Xmas
gifts—a gift that will be
highly appreciated.
Wishing one and all a
Merry Christmas
C.R.STONE
! SEND PRODUCE BY
! PARCELS POST
i Washington, Dec. 18.—According
{ to regulations governing the parcel«
■ post system, promulgated by Post
I Master General Hitchcock, perish
j able articles may be sent through the
mails only under specific, restriction
as to their containers and the dis
tance they are to be sent.
Butter, lard, tisli, fresh meats,
j dressed fowls, vegetables, fruits,
j berries and similar articles likely
j quickly to decay, may be sent for
j short distances when securely pack«
! ed: Kggs will he accepted for local
: delivery when packed properly in a
j container and for any distance when
! each egg is separately packed in a
j perfectly secure manne,
j No restrictions, is placed on the
I mailing of salted, dried, smoked or
! cured meats, lint fresh meat will be
! transported only within the first zone,
i Fraglie articles; including milli
nery. toys, musical instruments and
articles of glass in whole ro in part,
must be securely packed and marked
I "fragile."
! Articles that may not be sent '»7
i parcels post include intoxicating
j liquors of any kinds; poisons, poison
j oils animals, insects or reptiles, ex
I plosives of every kind; inflammable
articles, including matches; infernal
machines; pistols or revolvers; dis
ease genus; auv obscene, defamatory
or scurrilous matter now prohibited
by law; live or dead animals, or
birds or live poultry; raw hides or
pelts, or anything having a bad odor.
Books and printed matter may not
be forwarded at parcels post rates;
hut only at the pound rates, or third
class matter.
A commission of railroad officials
headed by President llalpli Peters, of
the Long Island railroad petitioned
the house postollice committee for a
re-arrangement of weighing aud pay
lor transporting mails.
The railroad men set out that they
did not contemplate carrying the
parcels post when their present con
tracts' were made and declared as a
matter of fact tliev were not obliged
to accept packages weighing more
than 4 pounds.
The average woman is permitted to
believe that it is her business to look
alter the higher life, leaving man to
look after the lower life.
Haven't you said a thousand times
von wouldn't stand certain tilings
and then stood them?
One of the world's largest electric
plants is plunued to develop power
for nearly all the mines around Johan
nesburg, South Africa.

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