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The Daily Missoulian. (Missoula, Mont.) 1904-1961, June 08, 1909, Morning, Image 1

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TomorroL i -INF 1[ h N PICE FIVE
VOL. XXXVI. NO. 34. MISSOULA, MONTANA, TU7ESI)AY MlOIRNNU, ~J "NI S, 1909. PRICE FIV ET
LIVELY DEBATE
ON TARIFF
BILL
SENATORS ALDRICH AND BEV
ERIDGE ENGAGE IN SPIRIT
ED CONTEST.
AMENDMENTYOTID DOWN
Dolliver's Amendment to Strike Out
Committee Report, Placing a Duty
of One Cent per Square Yard for the
Process of Mercerization Is Lost by
an Unusually Close Vote.
Washington, June 7.-The senate
chamber was again today the scen,
of a lively contest. Senator Aldrich,
leading the conservatives, and Senator
Beveridge, heading the progressives,
did most of the talking. 1 Both son
ators were frequently on their feet
and there were many sharp conflicts
between them. Beginning the session
with a vote on the recommendations
of his committee for a duty of 3 cents
a square yard and 20 per cent ad
valorem on the fabric known as win
dow hollands, Senator Aldrich was
apparently somewhat encouraged over
the prospect of making decided head
way 19ith the cotton schedule. His
hopes, however, were doomed to dis
appointment, for only a few moments
afterward Mr. Beveridge took the
floor and before he concluded he had
opened such a gap that the Rhode
Island senator himself could not re
sist the opportunity to walk in. Mr.
Beveridge, having said he had been
inclined to support the recommenda
tions of the finance committee, the
admission led the chairman of the
committee. to say the Indiana senator
had not shown such inclination by
his vote.
Joint Debate.
From that time forward the two
senators were engaged in joint de
bate much of the time during the day.
In the course of his remarks, Mr.
Aldrich, while contending that many
prohibitive tariffs were justified, said
be never had favored a prohibitive
policy. He predicted that in time the
south would become the greatest
manufacturer of the finer grades of
cotton goods. Replying, Senator Bacon
declared that if even such should
prove to be true, he would not favor
any increase of the customs duties.
About the middle of the afternoon
thd senate reached its second vote,
which was on an amendment by Sen
ator Dolliver, to strike out of the
committee report a provision fixing a
duty of 1 cent a square yard for the
process of mercerization. The amend
ment was lost by the unusually close
vote of 32 to 38. The narrowing of
the margin was, however, due to the
absence of senators rather than to
the conversion of the progressives e,
the Aldrich standard.
It was after this vote that Senator
Aldrich found occasion again to chal
lenge the attitude of some of the re
publican senators who were contend
ing for lower duties. He charged
them with playing the part of brig
adier for the democrats, and speaking
of Senator Beveridge, declared he had
associated with the democrats for so
long that he was adopting their ideas.
He characterized Mr. Beveridge as the
leader of the opposition.
Make Replies.
Both Senators Beveridge and Cum
mins replied, the former asserting
that he was standing on the repub
lican platform, while the latter stated
he had so often been charged with be
ing a democrat that the charge did
not worry him.
During the day Senator Smith
(Mich.) found occasion to attack the
position of Secretary MacVeagh as
the mouthpiece of the administration
on the tariff situation. He intimated
that he did not consider the second
member of the president's cabinet a
reliable leader on this subject, be
cause of his former democratic proc
livities. The progressive republicans
gained a concession from the finance
committee in the removal of rubber
goods from the cotton schedule, thus
preventing the imposition of a duty
on such goods because of the cotton
in them.
WORK BEING RUSHED0
ON THE BATILESHIPS
Philadelphia, June 7.-,Work is be
ing rushed on the battleships Kansas,
Georgia and Idaho, which are under
orders to leave the League Island navy
yard on June 15, to join the reor
ganized Atlantic fleet at Norfolk for
the summer cruise. The three battle
ships have been undergoing extensive
alterations. The greatest part of the
upper works have been removed and
the new regulation lead-colored paint
has been applied and the most strik
ing of all, time replacing of the familiar
type of military masts with the new
fire control masts, constructed from
many small iron pipes, interwoven
like basket work., A
FEUD CAUSES
ATTEMPTED
FORMER TENNESSEE SHERIFF
IS SHOT AND MORTALLY
WOUNDED FROM AMBUSH.
THE ASSAILANT ESCAPES
Former Official, Who Is Famous for
the Part He Has Played in the
Numerous Feuds of Breathitt County
for Years, Is Shot as He Sweeps
Refuse From Porch of His Store.
Jackson, Ky., June 7.-Ex-Sheriff Ed
ward Callahan, famous throughout this
section of the state for the part he
played in the numerous feuds that
disrupted Breathitt county for years,
was shot from ambush early today,
and it is believed, fatally wounded,
at his home in Crockettsville, 16 miles
from Jackson.
Callahan had swept out his store
preparatory to opening for the (lay
and was brushing the refuse from the
front door when the shot was fired.
The ball took effect in the left side
of his abdomen. Two doctors left
early for Crockettsville. Bloodhounds
have been put on the trail of the
assassin, who, it is undestood, hid be
hind a pile of coal to fire the shot.
Excitement in this region is intense
over the shooting.
Callahan was in Jackson Saturday
in attendance upon court, a warrant
having been served upon him for ma
licious shooting in a family affair some
time ago. His case was continued
and hl at once left Jackson, telling
one or two friends that lately he
was fearful of his life.
Trouble Over Church.
Lexington, Ky., June 7.-It is re
ported here that the immediate
cause of the shooting of ex-Sheriff
Edward Callahan was a dispute over
the management'of a church he built,
of which he is a deacon at Crockette
ville. Captain W. G. Mulliken left
here with his hounds to trace the as
sassin,.
Callahan was the chief lieutenant of
Judge James Ifargis, who was shot
and killed by his son, Beech Hargis,
the latter having received a life sen
tence.
Judge Hargis, several years ago, ap
pointed Callahan sheriff of Broathitt
county and the enemies of the Har
gis clan claimed that they were being
persecuted. Six yeas ago Attorney
James OR. Marcum was shot in Jack
son and Callahan and Hargis were
arrested. Many of the members of
the Hargis clan had removed from
Breathitt county and it was said the
fued had ended.
MANY ARE INJURED
IN All EXPLOSION
London, June 7.-A dispatch re
ceived here from Cracow, in Austrian
Poland, says that 500 persons were in.
jured by the explosion of an army
powder magazine there Saturday
night. Three soldiers were killed, 40
houses wrecked and hundreds of other
houses damaged.
The magazine, which was situated
near the railroad station, was struck
by lightning. The bolt exploded se%
oral thousand pounds of powder and
1,500 of the projectiles were scattered
among a big crowd of people who had
assembled at the station awaiting a
train.
DEFICIT DISCOYE RED
IN SOCIETY'S FUNDS
St. Petersburg, Juno 7.-The Port
Arthur Benevolent society heht a
meeting here today, and as a result of
an investigation found a deficit of
$7,500 in the accounts of the society
under the presidency of Madame
Stoessel. It was decided to lay the
matter before the crown prosecutor.
Mme Stoessel is the wife of Gerleral
Stoessel, who was in command of the
Russian forces at Port Arthur at the
time of the capitulation to the
Japanese. It was during this period
that the deficit occurred.
ROSE CARNIVAL OPENS.
Portland, Ore., June 7.-Promptly
at noon today Portland's third annual
rose carnival was inaugurated by
President Taft, who was sitting in
his office at the White House at
Washington. He pressed the tele
graph key, which set in motion the
week of festivity which has been ar
ranged by the rose festival com
mittee.
A "WALL FLOWER"
d AMo Jranr Tins
/( t. V / N~ -N,Rt
4,1 / f\
4r - 9 `
I ain't studded with swell nuggets, So just press mue once for good luck, 13111,
I ain't fourteen carat bright, (live me one good, solid smash;
But I'm weary, oh, s,) weary, Sot me spinnin' like I used to
Of this pesky tariff fight. 'Fore the late fina ncial crash.
PETITION 1iS DENIED
BY SUPREME
COUVT
EFFORTS OF MRS. PEYTON TO
FORCE PAYMENT OF HER
SALARY PROVE FUTILE.
Helena, June 7.-For the reason that
the legislature failed to provide for
the employment of Mrs. C. 1. Peyton
as a deputy fish and game warden
in the method prescribed by the con
stitution for the enactment of laws,
the supreme court today denied her
application for a writ of mandamus to
compel H. It. Cunningham, state
auditor, to draw a warrant for her
salary at the rate of $150 a month, as
provided by a, resolution adopted by
the recent legislature. Mrs.Peyton is
the wife of a deputy fish and game
warden who was killed recently in
Flathead county while in the ferform
ance of his duty and with the view
of providing a pension for herself and
orphan children the legislature passed
and Governor Norris approved a res
solution directing her employment as
a deputy.
Acting under an opinion by the at
torney general, W, whom the matter
had been refered as to its legality,
the auditor refused to draw a war
rant. Hence the application for a
writ of mandamus, with, the result
stated.
In another opinion the court grant
ed a writ of mandamus directed to
A. N. Yoder, secretary of state, re
quiring him to file an amended cer
tificate of the Cascade bank of Great
Falls, showing an increase of captial
stock and extending the term of its
corporate existence. It is held that
the institution has complied with the
statutes in force. The bank, of course,
must pay the necessary filing fees.
PAPERS ARE iLI.
BY THE R AIk AlAD
Anaconda, June 7.-Articles of in
corporation were filed this afternoon
by the directors of the Montana,
Idaho & Pacific railroad. They are
J. H. Richards and C. E. Christman of
Boise, Idaho, and James G. Wilson of
Portland. The capitalization is for
$16,000,000 and the proposed line is to
run from Lapwai Junction up the
middle fork of the Clearwater river,
through the Lolo pass to Missoula,
thence through Missoula, Powell,
Granite and Deer Lodge counties to
Butte. It is generally surmised that
this is a move on the part of the Har
riman lines for an outlet to the Pa
cific, competing with the northerrn
lines of the other three transconti
nental railroads.
YATEMAN IS RETIRED.
Washington, June 7.-Brigadier Gen
eral Richard T. Yateman, recently
promoted from colonel of the Eleventh
United States infantry, has been placed
on the retired list, owing to disability
incurred in the line of duty.
INSURANCE MAN DIES.
Boston, June 7.-Charles W. Jugg,
eastern manager of the Firemen's
Fund Insurance company of San Fran
cisco, is dead in Brookline. He was 711
years old.
SECURES NEW PLAY.
Paris, June 7.-Charles Frahman an
nounces that he has secured Rosa
linde "Chanticleer" for Amarica.
DAM IS THREATENED
BY THE FLOOD
WATERS
Cheyenne, Wyo., June 7.-More
than $50,000 worth of property has
been damaged and the bhl Path
finder darn, a government project,
is threatened with destruction as
the result of floods and waters pouts
in Wyoming today. The plant of
the Carbon Timber company at
Douglass is under water and the
sawmills and covered tracks have
been washed out. A landslide at
E0dson cut-off delayed traffic.
At Uva a waterspout warhe2 out
a bridge on the Chlorado & South
ern railway and several plues of
track. The LaPerle dam has been
damaged to the extent of $20,000.
PIONEEfR OF MONTANA
IS DEAD
BROTHER OF DISCOVERERS OF
GOLD IN STATE DIES AT
HOME IN BUTTE.
Special to The Daily Missoulian.
Butte, June 7.-Samuel D. Stuart, a
pioneer of Montana and a brother of
Granville and James Stuart, who
discovered gold in Montana, died at
his home in Butte this morning. Mr.
Stuart had been ill about two weeks,
but his condition did not become seri
ous until a few days ago, when bron
chial pneumonia developed. His wife
and two of his children were with him.
Stuart was one of the well-known
pioneers of the state, although he did
not come to the northwest until many
years after his brothers. He was born
in Bureau county, IlII., August 10, 1836.
On the breaking out of the civil war
he responded to the call for volunteers
and served with credit. The funeral
will take place at Deer Lodge. The
body will be taken to that city Wednes
day morning and the family will
accompany it. The arrangements for
the funeral have not been completed,
but It is expected that the old sol
diers will be represented at the serv
ices.
STAKE LINE IS HUV
BY CREAT NORIHEN
Kalispell, June 7.-The first move of
signal importance locally on the rail
road checkerboard since the recent
abatement of activity was made today
by the (treat Northern. A corps of
engineers today completed more than
four miles of stakes runfing from a
point on the present Great Northern
line at the edge of the city on the
east to the vicliity of Demereville,
where investigations have been recent
ly made regarding if bridge site. The
line follows Woodland avenue, the
most fashionable residence thorough
fare of the city, passing between the
C.. E. Conrad mansion and stables,
through the front yard of Attorney I.
M. Logan's handsome residence and
southeasterly three-quarters of a mile,
thence running atnost due east to the
Flathead reservation.
KILLED BY FREIGHT TRAIN.
An unknown man was run over and
cut in two by a freight train in the
west yards a mile and a half from
Missoula at 2 o'clock this morning.
Coroner Kendrick was notified and left
for the scene of tlie accident on a
switch engine.
SAFE IS DYNAMITED
BY DESPERATE
R0O BBERiS
DARING CRACKSMEN ENTER
BAR ROOM IN BUTTE AND
STEAL $600.
Special to The Dally Missoulian.
Butte, June, 7.-The safe in Scandia
Hall bar was blown to pieces shortly
before 3 o'clock this morning and $600
in money secured. That the work was
done by professional safe crackers
there is no doubt, as a clean job
was made with the use of nitroglycer
ine, the money secured and the rob
bers made their escape by means of
saddle horses without even the slight
est clue to their identity. This in
spite of the fact that not more than
five minutes could have elapsed from
the time the report of the explosion
was heard until there were people in
the streets from two blocks around.
That the robbers made a complete
survey of the premises and had their
plans well laid before undertaking the
job is shown by the systematic man
ner in which they performed their
work. They gained an entrance to the
bar by removing the transom from
the rear door. Tom Clark, a man
who is alleged to be one of the most
noted safe crackers in the west, was
arrested by Chief Jack ' ulna before
noin today on south Wyoming street
and booked at the city jail on a
charge of vagrancy. Clark Is well
known in this city and recently was
given a suspended sentence in the
police court. He departed for Mis
soula and his first aippearance in this
city since that time is said to have
been yesterday. Ciark is a man with
only one aria. Deputies have been
scouring the hills in all directions all
day long but no clue has been se
cured.
REMOVED FROM OFFICE.
Special to The Daily Missoulian.
Spokane, June 7.-Professor 1iIram
French, for six years director of the
Idaho experimental station, has been
removed from the position because of
incompetency. The above statement
is authorized by M. F. Lewis, presi
dent of the board of regents of the
I'niversity of Idaho at Moscow. One
of the chief instances alleged is the
failure of Professor French to issue
bulletins as provided by the federal
law, the failure losing to the school
last year $3,000.
DOMINGANS EXPELLED.
Cape Hiaytien, Hayti, June 7.-The
DominIgan revolutionists, who last
week were driven over the frontier to
Haytien territory, have been expelled
by the Haytien governhmnt and will
leave June 14 Irom St. Thomas.
MOSLEMS ARRESTED.
Ieonmtantinmple, June 7.--Aim official
tolograuni received here today from
Adal, Asiatic Turkey, says that 445
Mosltmus and 117 non-Moslems have
been arrested there in connection with
the rioting and massacres of April.
TRAFFIC TIED UP.
Des Moines, June 7.-Cloudbursts
toidai caused muth damage to property
and tied up train srvice on the Chi
cago (treat Western railway between
Sharon City and Diagonal.
SIMON ELECTED MAYOR.
Portland, Ore., June 7.-Former
United States Senator Joseph Simon,
republican, was elected today mayor of
Portland to sutcecud Harry Lane,
democrat.
ASSASSINATE 0
BY FORMER
DEPUTY
PRISONER ON TRIAL FOR MUR
DER IS SHOT DOWN IN
COURT CORRIDOR.
[X-CONSTABLE IS SLAYER
Bitter Political Feud Culminates in
the Assassination of Man Who Was
Being Tried for the Murder of Con.
stable Sam Young in North St.
Louis-Co-Defendant Hysterical.
St. Louis. Juno 7.-Fred Moheile, op
trial here for murder, was assassin
ated in the corridor of the four
courts by James Kane, an ex-deputy
constable, today.
Moheile killed Constable Sam Young
in North St. Louis several weeks ago.
Will Kane, who shot Moheile today,
was a former deputy under Young.
The shooting occurred as Mohelle
was being taken to court to stand
trial for the death of Young, and is
the culmination of a bitter political
feud.
Mohel lie hd asserted shortly after
the Young shooting, that the "gang
had threatened to get him," but fol
lowing the ethics of the "gang," he re
fused to admit the identity of those
who had threatened him, saying that
lie could take care of himself.
Kane used Young's revolver in
killing Moheile. When the shots rang
through the court building, William
Wright, a co-defendant with Mohelle,
became hysterical. He begged to be
placed in jail.
Judge Fisher ordered him looked up.
Only a few nights ago Wright be
came Trencled and began shooting
wildly, under the Impression that the
"gang" was after him. Alfred Nell
son, who was passing, was mortally
wounded. Wright is also under ar
rest for this death.
Moheile killed Young April 4. News
of Young's death was received with
cheers at a nearby political meeting a
few minutes after the tragedy.
WOMAN KILLS CHILD
THEN WES OWN LIFE
Salem, Ohio, June 7.-Mrs. Eliza
beth Sharp, a prominent society
woman, killed her 12-year-old son,
Harold, last night and then herself
with a revolver. The tragedy occurred
when the two retired after spending
the evening playing the piano afld
singing.
The mother's deed, it is supposed,
was prompted out of sorrow for her
son's mental malady. Mrs. Sharp was
38 years of age.
TO REORGANIZE.
Madrid, June 7.-The Cortes today
passed the bill providing for the re
organization of the Spanish postal and
telegraph service. The measure will
result in the lowering of postal rates
and the introdut in of a paraces
post, a money order system and a
postal savings bank.
Another measure passed renews
steamship subsidies to the amount of
$2,000,000 a year.
RAIN CAUSES FLOOD.
Lincoln, Neb., June 7.-Seven inches
of rain at Hebron and four inches at
Pleasant Dale today caused floods and
serious damage in and near those
towns. More than 200 feet of Burling
ton track was under six feet of water
and trains were stalled for 10 hours.
A Burlington freight engine and four
cars went into a ditch on account of
the soft track.
LEAVES FORTUNE TO CHARITY.
Pueblo, June 7.-By the will of Pat
rick Dunphy, a pioneer western rail
road contractor, who died a few days
ago, his entire fortune of $100,000 is
left to St. Mary's hospital, to St. Pat
rick's church here and to the local
lodge, Knights of Columbus. Dunphy,
as far as known, had no living rela
tiyes.
SEVERE HAILSTORM.
Pueblo, ('ol., June 7.-One of the
heaviest hIalistorms in years visited
Pueblo today and did great damage
both in the city and to fruit farms.
It is understood that all the fruit
down the Arkansas valley was badly
damaged.
The Arkansas river is within a foot
of the danger point.
OLD SOL GETS BUSY.
El Paso, Texas, June 7.-The moaxi
mum official temperature here today
was 1t2.
HARRIMAN IN LONDON.
London, June 7.-E. H. Harrimaa
arrived here today from New 'fork
on his way to Paris
NO ACTION ON
UNIF IC ATIO N
SCHEME
STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION
WILL NOT CONSIDER DUNI
WAY'S PLAN NOW.
NO REPOHI IS 'PR[S[NT[D
Members of Special Committee to
Which Suggestion of University
President Was Referred Fail to Ap
pear at Semi-annual Meeting and
Action Cannot Be Taken.
Special to The Daily Missoulian.
Helena, June 7.--The suggestion of
Dr. Duniway of the University, of
Montana, that there be a unification
or consolidation of the state institu.
tions, will not be acted upon by the
state board of education at the pres
ent semi-annual meeting. The board
met this morning and the two menm
bers to whom the subject was re
ferred, C. R. Leonard of Silver Bow,
and Roy E. Ayers, were both absent.
In consequence there will be no re
port. It is expected the sessions will
continue two days, and it is possible
the matter of eighth grade examina
tions will be brought up. There are
about 100 applications for state and
life certificates which have been re
fered to the diploma committee.
At the session' this afternoon the
special committee on the course of
study in certain state institutions
made its report. This committee
consisted of W. E. Harmon and S. D.
Largent of Great Falls, and its work
had reference to the orphan asylum
at Twin Bridges, the reform school
at Miles City and the normal school
at Dillon.
The committee recommended, and
the board adopted, the plan of mak
ing the reform school an industrial
institution, following out the plan of
the recent legislature. This provides
for courses in farming, carpentering,
blacksmithing and numerous other
useful employments. For the normal
school it was recommended that it
be made a model training school for
teachers, and in this the faculty of
the instilution heartily joined. The
standard of the teachers is to be
raised materially. No important
changes were recommended for the
orphans' home further than the main
tenance of the institution with respect
to sanitation, cleanliness and all pos
sible profitable occupation for the -
mates and th,'tr education.
MUST SUBMIT PLAN
TO VOIERS FIRST
Special to The Daily Missoulian.
Helena, June 7.-In the opinion of
the attorney general, replying to
County Attorney McCulloch at Ham
ilton, "A board of school trustees has
no authority to errect a new building
to replace an old one, or to erect an
addition to an existing building, with
out first procuring authority so to do
from the voters of the district."
Replying to J. T. Vaughan, county
attorney of Sweet Grass, the attorney
general advises him that the clerk of
the court should charge $5 at the time
of filing a petition for letters testa
mentary, administration, or guardian
abip, and that until such fee has been
paid, the petition must not be filed.
BODY IS DISCOVERED.
Anaconda, June 7.-The body of a
man who has been dead for months
and who is supposed to have been Dan
Organ, a mining man who disappeared
a year and a half ago, was found this
morning near a prospect hole on An
telope creek. Coroner John Lawler has
left for the scene to bring in the body,
and took with him Mrs. Organ, wife
of the man whose body it is supposed
to be, to identify it, if possible. It is
presumed that death was due to nat
ural causes or exposure.
CRUISERS SAIL.
Seattle, June 7.-The disposal of the
world's fair fleet began this morning
with the departure for Mare Island
navy yard of the cruisers West Vir
ginia (flagship), California and
Maryland, under Rear Admiral Ed
ward B. Parry. The cruiser St. Louis
sailed for Samoa last night, stopping
at Seattle on her way from the Puget
Sound navy yard for overhauling.
INDUCTED INTO OFFICE.
Boston, June 7.-Dr. Richard Cock
burn MacLaurin was todvy formally
inducted into oflice, as pre:s 'lent of
the Massachusetts Instituted of Tech
nology.
President MlacLaurin was formerly
connected with the Columbia univer
sity.
MILLS ARE DESTROYED.
Three Valleys, B. C., June 7.-The
Mundy Lumber company's mills were
destroyed by tile today. Los,. $250,
qo0

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