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The Daily Missoulian. [volume] (Missoula, Mont.) 1904-1961, April 06, 1911, Morning, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025316/1911-04-06/ed-1/seq-1/

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THE WEATHER AXBILL REIlD
T n .n a}ln r . f d4 -l rrtai r, q , t f 1 | .
=Timro l. : arrowl-lll or. teat , .... n 'a,.
OL. XXXVil. NO. 336. MISSOULA, MONTANA, THURSDAY MORNING, APRIL C3, 1911. PRICE FIVE CENTS
COME, JOIN IN THE RQOSEVELT WELCOME---APRIL 11
BIG SENS&TION EXPLODED
IN LORiMR BRIBERY CAlSE[
Clarence Funk of International Harvester Com
pany Tells of Formation of "Slush Fund."
WITNESS TESTIFIES TO SAVE H. H. KOHLSAAT1
Statement Made That Edward' Hines, Millionaire .Lumberl
Dealer of Chicago, Asked Funk 'to Contribute $10,000
to Reimburse Certain Men Who Had. Formed
the Corruption Fund.
Hpringriehl, Ill., April rt.--Clrunie H. 1
lnunk, general manager of the Internl -
tional harvester cotnpany, before the
state bribery investlgating committee,
tnlday exploded the biggest sensation; t
if the lir:lner bribery calie.
'Mr. iFunk testified that Edward
]liIces of Chicago, millionaire lumber i
dilor. IaIked him,. as manager of tlhe'
lit.rventer company, to contribute
$10,i000 to relmbhurse certallin men 'ilho
hald put tip a $100,000 slush fund to.
elect William l.orlmer to the U'nitedl
s4tates senate.
The harvesteT company manager
further teslified hat Mr. Hines named
Edward Tilden, ita 'ealllthy Chicugli
Ileker, as the collector of this fund t, I t
reimbunltrse the men who, uas Mr. Ilines
asi qllote+d as having slid, hal "Uin- I
lderwrltten" the election of Ltrlimer.
Mr. Punk said the object he had In I
giv.ng th: testimony was to sava II. I
11. Kolisanti. publishllher of tihe Cli.ago I
,Record-Hlerald, Iron a possiblle lll I
ieiinttaonce tin a result of ,Mr. Kohlsnat's
l'refunsal to give certain Information de
antlded by the committee last week.
Tile witness said he hald given Mr. I
Kohlstint information In confidence I
ulpon whkh the ('h:iago publsher hatld
h)ltedi tin editorial.
The pubilelatlon, in February last, of
this editnrial, which ellrrged the O0ne
of $100,000 nt ai frnd to elect Iirimer, I
resullted In the calling of Mr. Kohlsaat
tie it a itness before the committee.
Mr. KohinIant refIsed tor make known 1
the name of Mr. Funk. The Chicango
publisher was then given one week in +
wh:tit to divulge this name or stdtnd
In eonnirnpt of the senate etmllittee.
Kohlsast Released.
Ittnkn tentfrid tolhdt) that he vnhln
tarily relellsed Mr. KohItuant from the
piledge of nolirldeclle, when he felt llhat1
thie pIubllshert would be sent to Jail tint
tens tile ifirlnltlmtion vuas given.
The dllseinslrten mltdbt by Punk oc,
trrtled unexpectedly att it specially- .
called meeting of the senate commit-.
etee menmhers. The committee was not
schedtuled to resume Its Inquiry until
tomorrow, itt Iwhtch timle Mr. Kohisant
had been orde'red to reappetr. But Mr.
Kohlsnat and Mr. Funk arrived In
Iupringfield this morning from Clicago
alnd Chairman lelm of the inv\'estlgat
InIg committee alt once called Its mem
)Ibers in spelial session
Chairmian lelrm Was aware that Mr.
Kohlsnat stood ready to g:ve the
nnmlr of hi :informo nt. utlt no one
outside of the comnlmttee knew of the
matter. News of the disclosures swept
from tile supreme court building toA
the state hou:se nearby within a few
moments. The house was still In sea
ilon, lthile tile senate had just ad
joulrned for the day. The reports
etn Msld excitelment, much discussilot
t1and hltrr:ed consultations among cer
taln members n n oth branches of the
legislature.
Heveratl house members left their
sealts in1 the midst of the debate on tile
civil service hills to learn more of thie
d isaloet 'es.
Mr. Kiohtsant preceded Mr. Funk on
the witness stand. lie briefly statied,
thalt he was reuldy to give tlhe name of
the mlan who furnished hi with the
lrepnt of the alleged $100,000 slush
fund.
Attorneys, members of the commit
tAi lind spectators 'leaned forward
teuoiely as Knhlstant gave the name of
Mr. Funk. As the latter was called
the cnmfnlttee robin flled rpl) dly wi\ll
spectators, sonme of them members of
thl legislature who had left their seats
inl the state house.
The testlmnon.y. H. H. Kohlasnt of
tlt Chlneagn Record-HIerald land Clar
uenMt 8. Funk or the lnternPttlonnl Har
*ivest.r colmpany,, before tile senate
COMPLETE DENIAL
ENTERED BY HINES
Chlragn, April (i.---A omplete de
nina of the aurrertiflcm made before the
,Renate Invoatliptifi: eommltteo by C. B.
'F'unk today was mado.tofluht by EW
ward Hines, preuideht of the Edward
311mw. Lumher company.
SWhcen I was at the U'nion Lqadue
club at lunch shortly after Mr. Lori
mneg wus eleeted senator,' sald Mr.
Hines, "Mr. Fnuk came to me and
aukbd me It I' would introduce him to
Esnator LovImert lwyinj he had novel
Let' thb unhfe* agrid would 1like 'to' d
,n . toIld Mr. Punk I w'ould IntIoduce
.him to L .rimeru%#.foyff he deIugd.
briluerty ilnvest gli ng enmmllitlt.'. wns in
part:
Ir. lhelly-"l show you. air. Kohl. I
aunt, what purports to be n copy of a
telegram with your name attatched, ad
dressed to Senator Hllm, the chairmlan 1
of this colmmittee. It Is dated March
:0. 1911.. Did ylou send that tole
gramn?" (I:,hltlntig It plaper to tihl
witness.)
"Yes."
Mr. lPaltty-"Perhat s I lihad letter 1
read it for the information of the
whole cortt."
('h.i'rmaln Ihelm--"Yes, r-eI t ."
The Telegram.
Mr. Itealy thereupon rend from tllhe
telegarm isn follows:
"('h:cago, 'March 30; 1911. To Sel
atotr Helm, Sphingfield, Ill.:
"The first ealier at my 'officg thils
mnorllning wals the gentllteman 1w Io g10 ' I
Int thl. Informnaltion In regard to the
$100,000 lirlimer senutorial fund. Ill,
voluntarlly released ine from the oihll
galtln to keep leis name cotlfidntall
alnd saya' he' is wlling to appealr before
Y'our Commnlittet ad give you the in
formation he gave me. If yout wihll
to suhpenn him, I will give you his
namne. He can tppll ear Satulrdoy if do
sired.
(Signedl.) "II. 1H. K(IHr.AAT."
Mr. Hleay-"\V:ll yotu tell the enm
imittee, Mr. Kolllelnllt, what developed
which (ntled oult the telegram, IL copy
of whicih has ji st been. presented for
the considerat'on of tile committee?"
ChtLirlllln Holmn--"It wats 1ridriy
evenihg that I received that."
The witness-"Whlen I arrived at my
lfficer Thulirsday morning tlhe filst call
,iver the telephone Ii'u. from Clarence
S. Fu'lk, generlll maltnager of the In
tornlltlotntl ilarvectcr conlpally. Mr.
n'ltllk asked if lit could s1 ee Ine at ontce
and I told him yes to comels '-,ver and,
as nearly its I lan renleml, er, he sta!d
the following: 'I see by the papers last
nlKght and this lmorning that you have
iern sull plen'ned to aIpper In Spring
fhkl'0 and had declined to give tip my
name to the conomnittee, the senate
comllittee. I would btQ little less thaln
a man if I held youl tlnder tny further
cnnfftlener n. to Tiving' my name or
Identity. I w:Mh to Iay now that I re
lease you from 'all obligation to main
taln secrecy and that I feel that'I also
have a dety to perform that mntil th:s
time idld not feel free to, and if thile
committee wishes to subpena, me I wfll
go to Sprlingfleld and tell the whole
story.'
"lie further said: 'When I reached
his nff:ce this morning I met Mr.
Cyrus H. McC"ormick, the prelident of
the International Hairvester compahy,
and he asked me If 'I hnd 'eon the
ramolnng papers an ,to what had 'taL.':
place at Springfield. I anid L had. lie
remarked, 'liow do yotl feel albout it?'
I said: 'Mr. fTc('ormlnik, I think that
it Is my duty not only to release Mr.
Kohlesaat from all obligations of sl
lence, but `t Ls also mly duty to go ati.
tell everything I knoll in regard to it.'
Mr. McCormick answered: 'Good, that
:s exactly what I wanted you to say,
land I want you to tell that committee
everything you know, no matter whlat
the consequences may be to tile In
ternatlonal Harvester company.'
"I th.en drafted, Inter on, this tele
gram 'in c.njunction 'with' Mr. Flrntk
and sent it to Mr. Helm."
Q.-"And, Mr. (ohligat, lt tlhis the
gentleman ,aho gave you the lnforma
I tlon upon which ynol based the edtl
I torial wh'ch wus presented to tlhe
committee the other day?"
A.-"Yes."
I 'he witness-"If you would like to
ask 'me how the conversation came
about I an1 perfectly willing to tell it."
S (Continued otn Page Three.)
"Afterwards I told Mr. Lorlmer that
Mr. Funk desired tod meet him and
Senator lnrtmer Informed me that Mr.
Funk was one of his active enemies. I
never talked with Mr. Funk about sen
ator T,nrimer at any other time or
place."
I ' did not then or at any other time
ask Mr. Funk or anyone elsu to con
tribute anything to Lorimer's eleetion
or on account of his election. I never
knew that anyone ever did contribute
anything for or on account of his eloc.
tion. If Mr. Funk testified to anything
to tbi CQntIaty, it is ntruuh,"
LUGUBRIOUS COUNTENANCES
SHOW HOW THE INSURRECTOS
RECEIVED PRESS DISPATCHES
Francisco Madero and Others
Appear Very Gloomy When
Told That Independent Ne
gotiatidns for Peace Had
Been Started by De La
darra.
Il Pnno, April ,-Two- .Aiociincited
Press dlspatcher, one ,frrit al stlff
e,.rresponndent in the Itrld with italdern
andll the other froll s 'llash ntiton, per
turhed the local lienrce '.tnmp today.
Thei pibliilentlon of the Wiashingtolti
telegram, In which the fiat that )Dr.
Onmez, the 'revolt tionary agent lit
,Washitngton. iand the theen ttllanstldor,
Senor 1)e i.t Ilrlrai, halld stautedl peine
nrgotlĀ· ins oin thel r owit aeito ntl
Homl 10lt l' lays r more ago, w'n tihe'
first Jolt. It was ctalled to thie uttent .
tiont of Don Ifrlitsclluo M.tldero, father
of th1 rletol leadtlr. lie received it
after t fashitn of ointe whose tihunder
hufil ht'n stolen,
"I think It is not rs," hei remnlrked
hopeftlly, ind wtil tedl fir corroborn
"It's the truest thing that luMs Conml
out of the cimp In a long tlime and its
piullltntilon \vita nutilthtrzed both bIy
Gomeg and De I. tlarra. Nowv, ari' youII
working In hIarmiony with (llnezi?"i
"Oil, yes; certatinly. I think it its not
ltter. Itafuil Ilernanduuz, a sort of
tinofihial go-hetweeni trying to fr
ward thle peace meeting, wtas referred
to the WVntsh:ngtoun story. lie, too, re
marked "I think it is niit so." As ihe
Iltide the comlnment his lbrow w\ln ulp
lifted Int eloqutent apptp'.i for t.orrobo
ration.
lie was assured, like I)on Vranelsitsco,
that the stroy wits the Simon-pure
truth. Then he extc ise hi lltself.
The dispatch front .Mltdero's camp
west of Chihu.lunt, sttitlng amoong
9ther vital facts, that the rebel leader
would consider no negotiatlions which
do not hitve thle resIrgnutiotn of D)ilz
as ta last, si)read nlorte gloom. Yer
terdny all prlns were nmade for the
so-called peacce envoys to vis:t Madero
in camp. Tonight Ilernntndex midl they
didl not know whether tihe trip woldt
he made or not. This dispaitell wyas
in aldvance of word which It thail hen
hoped would he received rlivately from
the Madero camp.
It wns ncceptedi as nuitlentic nland
since thile present pell'ce talk hlas Ieen
Ilhaled oni the Ibllief that foritlll nego
tiitt:ons cannot he ieldl wlthotit the I'm
mediate retirement of D)lall, the in
suirrecto genertil's declarattion to the
GREAT PROCESSION
FOR VICTIMS
OF FIRE
NEARLY 8EVENTY.FIVE THOU
SAND WORKERS MARCH IN
FUNERAL CORTEGE.
New York, April 5.-Rain reduced to
less than 75,000 the army of 200,000
workers who had planned to march to
daiy in memory of th' vI. t! :'s of the
Washington Place factory fire; but
'what, the Mtormn took lit numbers It
added in solemnity. The demonstra
tion will long he' renemblered by those
who took part ntd by countless thou
sands who came to look on, but who
unconsciously found themselves joining
in the wave of emotion whleh swept
the line of march,
Simultaneously with the arrival
from the morgue for hurial of the
eight coffips containing unidentified
victims of the fire In which 144 lives
were lost, workers poured from sweat
shopR and garment factories and
formed in line.
The downtown section was headed by
500 nAn and women emlndoyes of the
Tritmgle Walst company, survivors
of the fire, and ,when they turned Into
Washington Square, where so many of
their comrades met death, one youtg
woman broke forth into a wall that
swept that entire throng,
Meanwhile the uptown division had
heen trudging south and the two see
tlons 'poured into the squaro and met.
hundred, If nt thousands, ,burstins
Into. tears: many knelt in the wet
streets in prayer, and women and mei
ombraced and wept.
The uptown marchers, flanked b)
) spectators, spread uack for 20 blocki
and the downtown line was fully at
long. Baoh person carried a sinmali
t Amerlean flag draped in crepe, Nm,
I and then the line was broken by a be.
Sdraggled hanper lettered; "We mourr
our 10los."
SThe bodies of the unidentified deal
were hurled In Evergreen cemetery
IWItere services wrre contducted In thriy
e faiths, .Je'wish, ('atholec and Protestant
STAFT 18 -hONOAARY PRE.IDENT
SWashlngton, April ;-.-Preuldent 1Tat
g hals accepted the honorary preisldenc
of the Indernational Peace forroi."
Three members of President Diaz's new oabinet who are prominent in
peace negotiations. Left, Senor De La Barra, minister of foreign affairs:
upper r ght, Senor Jose Yves Limantour, minister of finance: lower right,
General M. G. Cosio, minister of war and marine.
iontrary was, obvioslyl dii-uhilnl.
Nothing offif l hl 'mild ,be ,hltained ut
to whether Ihe trip to Itaicho this
tilll s would bL attempted <,r sit,
Insane From Fright.
Agnn:i PrletIl, Yi44ltlonrat, .~ li lo, April
surreotis to Frtiuera i, itiIurday,
President.. . 'l.ill,1 Ihl vrit i- f rav1ing
nilaithe. A rebe,,l handl a1.nlndellld by
"Rft" lIpl" anld I a iew ll I ut t" Inmmd
'Rho, ap tlured Rivra tl I it.I Il him
up to be shot, 'dihe Ih." 1p1,h.ldi llOt
tulddenly bl came inItnat'. 'I't insur
reantos than releasedi hilm.
Nl\'v 'a I11111n4,dh ely .l1 Ithe :tl y and
wj~ir not hetlrt l of iuntil todyi., when,
netording to inforallt ton -t from I'tron
tirtil 1, he w as i rtl 'a l t saiin thPe fields
only i hInlf cilad.
.The eilIs atl e e1 ta, Isii.hed it Jllno-i
verach to bt.t t Itl a t'i n, aknly trips to
LONE BANDIT ROBS
BIG FOUR TRAIN
IN INDIANA
HIGHWAYMAN, MASKED, 8TICKS
UP PASSENGERS AND OGETS
ABOUT $300.
Munch, Ind, April G.-A masked
man, tarmed with ai reitidtl, held iup
and robbd palrli!e rs in lb vItib lltll)ld
conllch attacheld to s\vlbOllllnd expllslll
train So. "2 on theI iiti TFour rall roid,
a few mills elst of Ihtr.I tonighlllt. After
taking allut $:10t is at:tah, thn robber
Idroplind off libH rII:tiar platform as the
itrain slnkened Sl ,tl I to enter the
city. evera: l shotsll. r fired ait r lal
III he rl , biut he 1 i:,iaiped.
Attention of th, :ait Iiiigen and wolnrl
in the co c t llh iii :irtl:l tell t the front
Viptlt',le when lih, N hIarld Ilte cl'ati ih
of h.!.h s, :let M4 Io11, l six lile.a ehit. A
lln then t IPlI histl arln thrllough the
brokrn glasi t i' IhI Iii i ar, unlll tched it
a nd enter'.),.
"Hands up etv.rvt l.ol, " he shouted.
Aind ithtn tid, d ".so e ftlorward
S\verybo'ly; shell n.,t "
"Onl y et sh, no t jt s ,,-- Iry," a dl tile
robber, ast he idussj I u-lung then mlen.
Tetn of then hauilI ,rtrlbluted lthhir
money ,henan;,. e.' Iih. light, marklng
the edge of Monet'', flashed iI thie air
wlpildow und the r"l,,I~r, quittinglllK hi
work, rill through ll,' car nld Jumped
flront the trtain,
FOUR THOUSAND DOLLARS
ON DRUNKEN PROSPECTOR
1 Butto, April ,.- (oeul.)-Rticharf
IBoyerlin, all ug,', proapector, was
Split.ed up by the ta ,lit ,, off the stria ett
1 early this lllllillg in an Intoxloate,
s condition and t ;i , ,r aI t i th statimt
t disclosed that h. h,.l $4,120 in h1h
r pockets. lie was It , it In jail until a
" iltd llbdeored itiup titi pletely, altihougl
I h. protested vi\'ghrI".Iy when le hll
)recovered his e.I ullllilihrlum sufflcl tl!
Sto talk somewhatll ra:',nally
MINE EXPLOSION REPORTED.
P htnlin. It ', .\, i| 5.--"A repor
1 fr1nt Ninalmllo .a, lhut thlerr w'ax ,
r eltoua explnl1onll ill the mines to
nighllt, the extent "f tho d4i flge ha
Snot been leurny."l Nanalmo Is of
V Vaicotlvetr lululll., ;u nllel.ll north o
Victoria.
rj
irI'nr 2'ter I12., iwh h, I1 2 :2n hll2l ed by till,
federnil4. 'lte I'rebel.s I.. e poorly iI ), 1
o2222l lack nlllnllll2n2itioln 11h and mno1.
Doe La Barra Hopeful.
\ hexco ('l2y, April :,.-M" nilster 1')
lta 1it'ra contf'rrm2,d I-nltht the 2t.ory
or1 i. Conll fe'rl2n2'', inll W'lll.ngt ntll before
hi22 tldepartlre for Mexlcht with 1)r. V1an
saki.d, to kt..( eell . t the prl22opo li lorrtllt(h1
a c'2on, fereneI by 5.2r . e~l. e i')that patrIot
2 2ua t ' 2 n2 na2 2 f ur 1u ttin g 222 2 n d to thelp
Ithat mati'utmllln h"*Illl"ed thaIi t all
2 12221 ; 12'2l 12. 2.I 12 I, H';22222222'21lK l I)2221 2
i Mr'x'2 lnH 2lnlle r.,i' the' p2lrpio40 of
tren lhtheling th, nliatinltl aIllty.,
.lhnihter 1 ), i.t I2 2 rr;2 itt2a2222 ) ,rel ti
I he hllopeful .)t' :n ",wrly ,, orkltlg out of
SIIt 2lla \\hilt' \1,1 Illlt imlate)'y loud to1
SEITTLERS' . DISPUTE
'TO BE SETTLED
BY 'DIXON
IRRIGATION TROUBLE ON LOWER
YELLOWSTONE TO BE DIS.
CUSSED BY SENATOR.
'Washington, Aprili. -($prelat.)
2n2nlto2 r 1.uixn vi21 l 2 II t 21 2 med1litor be
tVW'2n 1ithe lh'epartm' nt ' the' I12 1nterim,
2ilnl H iettli2ers on tIh' Lower..I\\'" YeIlnw
2t2iion2 212l try it l i ollnlilll2 2 lsol tI heIr
Idl1 1i' e 22e2n2 . 11, will 24'2n1d a d(lay
|am1;1ng thi. people of ll" t2 ' YI'2I'''2lowston
r lnlntry oin his w\ly' t M124In ilal and
'alk the' i2itl2'r o.v''r. '1T222 Y2ellow.
stine Irrigltioln elil, h, finished two
y.tars a;Ig., I2t ;t (' ec 22t $3f,o00),0 00. run
ninI frl'il (;lic'ld\te toI -olld ak, hal
bcn ho t.llh2 d by the el2tthler' bee2l2beM b
of a dlff l rlnl e it\.r walt r r'ights.
Noil moiltr m thil I,tli .iit of 411,000 lare's
toolk waiiteol' .1 A ' nlllllllsin1 We.v l.t from
I'here t2 o il\' ti.el22 lli2 lthe tro2 2111 le 22 l(and
e' T arylil'2 ill 'll r R Ie'iel 2'its repor'' 't,
but l2 t2. ;Id of ir,2.I1. ln2 tilhe ' lhiitlnrin
nmale It nurse bh arinlg; that i the
April :31, 2i)h 2r2112 ' of w2t22r W2olht he2
r+i4ed frioml $12 7,22 ., 2 $7.2 70,2. Th24
lllmade 2l l .ll ll, v' 2e1ry angry.)
Se.nallt.lr. lix,1. took 1 ip t21he matter2
w itllh l2 ''' '',t r .2 . i2 ! of tIhI r.,,2e. li n .2
th2tio2' 22r2 t,. e' and t(1. new r2' ''. t2r2y2(r
and a\111 b. iihh" to settle the f roublhe
t'[ '22 2 ll2 inli ag2 , 2 lilt, l2 e 'i2 if it l ,
p r , ,llt if ~ ill' lla t lll e to tl h propI
silill h2 ' al .l..l II2 t'an 2 2 ' l 'ying
$1 . i: u n t ,ier, ,, ti ty)' 't ill l2 12' ::, 2' 2len 2 to
, ni i c, h i,' lh 2no 'Pt... u ct'lllv,. .. , 2rg's.
untll ttt'l, 'lrop l iV live bee I'lilill.
T'h e " Iena b ,r t 1 ' i a + uically settlhd will
great . thl r. ', ' h i ' n ea122 1 .1 122)2
\ 'lllianl .hliI. $y w ill b.' cnfiir rned
1 nirii 'ii l \titho l oppo.siton,
2 llilra2 l J.2 2l2.s T '. . 2t2lfn'd, r'cel,2 i'
fur' Ithe v' lli'l-r Irri'l.22 tin 2 0 m p1la2 y, 1 i
ntI t ii ' t e V llh rt.
1I I', lllt'.YANT.
ALLEGED HOLDUP ARRESTED.
t l w ell knii twIn < h ru ai "t r, upi o suspic. toh .
of lb i..hug bln the lnne robbieP I ll;e
i hoelld p of tll,. lionlcul .atlon the other
'v','nit2ng. -h2'22 l1 ti4s ll't'l2d tif having
' li2 eld ilt r 2 n ii..2 l 2 g2 llnl2 2 t h wall l2ld2
then tap22 ping thi i210toon till for 111.
JUNGLE DINNER
IS TENDERED
TEDDY
PORTLAND COMMERCIAL CLUB
GIVES NOVEL ENTERTAIN.
MENT FOR COLONEL.
AFRICAN TRIP IS SHOWN
Clubrooms Are Turnsd Into Reproduo*
t;on of Scenes During the Famous
Hunting Expedition, With Live
Monkeys on the Job In Earnest
Monkey Quartet Is Strong Feature.
Potrtlanl, (ire., April -.-Theondore
Io~oneivelt w.Is Kiven it reception in
ortlanld toialy that w\as eqtual if nut
greater in enhttlianlm to anything he
II;It expel'rlenctd sines he began his
pre..nt tour. Ile r.ude through the
strnits hold *ltItlt people and was
Kre,',tid with il'tierls tll alotng the way.
T'lnitilt tMr. Rlaseovelt was the gutest
lof tihe IP'ortland t.ommercial club at
a hatnquetl which wasl the tmost novel
affair he hue attended since he left
New York. The clubrooms were trans
posIed Into an African Jungle and the
various featureltn ot the entertalnment.
all of which were of a tropical sort and
Iild lip nationutl and local figures to
good-natured rldicule,, were received by
Mr. Roosevelt with every evideincre of
enjoymentP , even when the Joke was on
htllaself.
lnietlittely after toli dinner Mr.
Itoocevelt waie hurried to the armory,
:whore i grluat crowd awaited to hear
hislll address. From the hall he was
takIen to the 'Pretss cluib to an Informal
recentit on aJld shortly before m:dnlght
boarded his private ear in which he
will contlinou his Journey as faIr as St.
Pftil ir.Mr. RoIsevelt will spe*nd half
a tdiY tomorrow In Ti'ouma and arrives
in H"attth, Iota In the aftergoon.
Novel Dinner.
The. dinner, whlich formed the prin
c(pal social functiionI in.ldent to Colonel
ltoonivelt's visit to Portland, war
served In the t)mln dining hall of the
C('ommercial chlub, 240 gllests being
l)present. The affair was one of the
most novel ever held in the west. The
( dlnig halt was arranged to represent
tin Africati jungle, iand the transfor
rntitioni was the, result of several weeks'
offlort fby a crpIs of professlonal scenle
arttists and decorators. The walls on
till sidles wrl. painted to give ita ano
rnmlic view of the regions visited by
Colonel Itonoevel.t on his hunting expe
dition.
The chandeliers were entwined with
heavy foIllge, and the general pano
ramle schelie carried Wilt It prodll
tions of atolmntain and lake, plain and
jungle. and here and there were droves
of antclop antd an. occaslonal lion and
tiger, white rhinos and hippos were ob
served disporting In the wwaters of a
slough or mildhlole. In one corner was
a good-sized live aligator, who gazed
upon the amnazing scene from an im
provised mudbank. Numerous mon
keys, real live ones, chattered to the
screocltling of parrots, cockatoos and
other birds of the jungle.
To give the scene an added realism,
Sand to bring bnak to Colonel Roosevelt
vivid rnemor:ts of hlis recent scientiflc
" and huntlig trip, theIre were hidden In
Shtie trees anid Iin oiRIscture pil(tes, jllst
l peeping out uplon the, scene, IL nlumber
of stttffedl Ilons alnd tigers, anti a c'orps
I of "criers" every now and then let outl
at roar which, by the use of mega
plontes, antld other contrivances almost
" made th, bravest of the guests qlail in
I expectation of an alttnk.
SIn a prominent plauce In the hall was
a tent like the one used Iby Culotl
s Ionnye'Ilt and Kiermit Itno.r\velt, while
1 they were enKIgagIed I lin the case onl
1 !Mllollhnbas fhchl. O(n.t-ll shdes were Ihto
akkll`s of bIeats of the jungle, and hloack
Snyf Colonel Itouu.ovelt' chair a eorn
SIlrpedh, he trllh.itis of the hunt. There
weri, Igu'r sitli., ilieplltint tllcks., Iiynll
hidutuc andtI othi.r yhlenldeu oif Ihi
'Tle or nhli.slta wals nad.e uip fir thl(
Sc lu'anlh l III ntill lve cu.ttalmi, tIuI tl a ilar
y ((i tllliutjllllt l u ln P1g,. Thirtel
MAY YET UNSEAT
SENATOR LORIMER
WashingtontO~l April ',.-Lltl((l lolhtl
.Xstsx it '," that aui eftl rt w i11 be
itatd. t, IrrolWI the Stenator oim)erne
rus In th piresent eon rtessoehI Ses
alofti. insurgie t it-luIlIkansi have cilon
si ed'rd tt" ju1I."ti&a i t recent eunItIr
.14c4- aitnd thle iiltti~sttnliting IM thit t
SI.tsIilotto tit the riipeinpon or the eaSe
t ill be of(firted Hither by kliietator Itnrelt
-'! 14 nator 1At1o'nttte.
Illil u, t l'.llll rs 'Y i,;l;lt at tin kart~
s. ll',!,' tor Iflel t II. llfl lll(ll salY a)
('thial to .iae in s.,tuitiiiiit along thu.'
tllhit or the testimt ny gLt"iv'tn In '$pritug
fteld toitay, biut they fahtl'id, It *Wi
lIn ti hopei of getting moub t, state
fI ahii a tIatn. rot'or a i vc eto te oappo s
'fixing a tu~ne for a~ vote al tho outs,
HOUSE ADOPTS
ITS NEW
RULES
AMID CAUSTIC COMMENT BY CAN.
NON, MANN AND OTHERMS ...
MAJORITY DECIDESI
SPEAKERS POWER Sa
Regulations Provide for the Eleetion
of Members of the Various Commit.
te.s-Democrats Evince Disposition
to "Gag" Opposition--Rally Indoere
Old Rules.
aVnehlngtnn. April 5.-Both housel of
cnngrg.r llLtened today to President
Taft', brief messange urring the adop
tlon of the re'lproclly agruement with
Canada. Then the senate adjourned,
the democratic house proceeding tur
ther with its organimntlon by adopting
new rules. These are largely a ripeUt.
tion of those that have beean anded
down by many congresses. The demo;e
crats claim their greatei reform ia
taking from the speaker his o*Wer to
appoint committees and to designate
the chairman of each committee.
The new rules provide for the elec
tinn of cosmittees and their chairmen.
The second reform Ia a return to the
formner democratic practice of permit
ting amendments to ppMoprtation blls
when the amendmentl bhtd to reduee
expenditures.
The rules continue "calendar Wednes.
day" and the unanimous consent cal
endar and neck to perfect the rule Sor
the discharge of committees. T.la
latter, the democrats say, effectively
dloes away with the former praectioeO(E
stifling legislation In committees.
"Gag."
A special order llmllplp debate on
the rules to ftour honeps ltlledlately
brought out a cry of "gat' front
the republicans. The speeches were
more or le.s of a political nattre
and there: was no serious fight on the
rules themselves.
The republicans claimed they were
debarred from making such a fight
beenuse of the further provisilon of the
special order that only one substitute
set of rules could he offered by the
minority. Even a roil call was de
manded by the republicans on , the
adoption of the rules.
The political battle which raged for
lihoursl was but a foretaste of others to
come and which are expected to make
the present congress notable. Repre
sontatlro Mann was ably Mnconded by
former Speaker Cannon and Repre-.
sentatives Dnlsell and Olmatead:
Mr. Mann charged the democrats
with nslnocerlty Innasmuch as they
spoke In praise of the rlles and sald
they had no purpose to take away
from themselves as a majority the
right to control legislatlon. He char
ac'terized the rule for the discharge of'
committees as "an utter absurdIty, not
to say Idiocy."
Chairman Henry of the now aulCs
communltte retorted that the rules thus
characterized had called out the most
doleful speech from Mr. Mann that he
had ever heard the gentleman make.
Mr. iHenry also said the fault the
Americhan people had found in the piast
was not no much with the hotuse rules
as the had appllcltion of thosei rules.
"Uncle Joe."
"I want to may hero and bow,'" Mr.
Cannon declared, "that substantially
thie rules proposed by this legislation
ar(e .n irlndorslmnnnt of nearly all that
isa tod In the., rules that have evoluted
slreit+ tile adopt)ln of the constitution
adi thereft.ore. I i. not going to criti
Is'+ thl'e rules mtirely becalus the ma
,rlit y of tile htset proposes to adopt
thelm. bSoletlrnte. majorlties and mi
norltl us tear passion to tatters aid
appelal from th'e standil.int of demo
goguery and claptrapt to people that
wuld lnot klnow ti rule or a code of
rttles if they mtet Ithem In the middle
of t stred.
m".i\d now ii Is lhl V we haveo a lnan
liiitl.u cot.iMent cailnllar. I all gladU
(Co.lhnttin| " P'agi' 'Tlhrce.)
WVhen he blrhdhI ,satltaIctiI that hio
V(ould not giet the Itr .;r'ittton desired,
hr "permittted the cure to tome to a
vote and it resultedt iii the exonerathtl r
of the Junior llllttiv s'rlatt)r.
i ,VLLendsl of .-rlilltĀ·r Lorimer t'ontend
that minder rentau.u iprctC.tnltp hae could
ant hi' unseatid wtiteC It 'was ishowit
that he had been eognizui$ at the at.
!,t orrl vo ptittti of the legislature, or
dit a nrreeicrt iunihor ut viiterii b4
'thy alite vunitemi it will nat bit sub
Liiuh~nt ti)hew that a $t(Ott.06 QO uIgt$IV
tiumidt was tused for tho election baE let t
ator .orimner utnltss It can ba wqe4:
he tinrl kttiuwhitgt of the uie tuf tbh
mntotue

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