OCR Interpretation


The Daily Missoulian. [volume] (Missoula, Mont.) 1904-1961, March 02, 1912, Morning, Image 10

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025316/1912-03-02/ed-1/seq-10/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 10

TATE
to our many patrons and
Miends that our spring
puirchasee are all at hand.
pa jewelry we have the
teat productions - and
one of the finest displays
we ever made of them-in
both ladies' and gentle
men's Jewelry. All the dis
tinetive, new deslgns. In
silverware, cut glass, etc.,
We have she most graceful
and beautiful offerings to
be seen. All stocks mod
erately priced and of high
quality.
Florence Hotel Building
Phene 43$ Red.
; r Thia'T a 'agll li8nI1
Never takes advantage of the in
experience of new housekeepers by
giving them poor cuts or light
weight. We treat all our patrons
honorably and In the same courte
ous manner, and cut them the best
of the kind that they ask for
and when we do that, you couldn't
find better for love or money.
UNION MARKET
Bell 117 Ind. 431
Rowland, The Jeweler
Wia.hes, lumids, Jewelry
pe*nl attenUton given to
PINE WATCH REPAIRING
114 E.at Main Itreet.
J. W. LISTER
Stationery, Blank Books
and Offlee Supplies
114 East Main Street
INSURANCE
FIRE-LIFE-ACCIDENT
GOOD SERVICN, GOOD CO1MPANIES
Peckham, Pettitt & Osborne
108-110 East Main Street.
Window Glass
-AT
SIMONS
813 Higgins Avenue.
Union Iron Works
$16 West Main Street.
Independent Phone 1640.
Bell 10618 Blak.
G(neral Foundry and Machine Work
Take Your Prescriptions
Sm th's Drug Store
3 AT SIDE PH11MAOIA
80-Passenger Tally-Ho-- Horses
Across the Reservation
DAILY SCHEDULE
`"djsves Ravalli a. m.; leaves Pol
e $ . m. Arrivte Poison 2:30 p. m.;
MlWV.. .RavallI 2:30 p. m.. via. Ronar
4 $lssion.
t I" L ATEMAN, Ravalli, Mont.
NLEY, EIGEMAN & CO.
GROCERS
110 Higgins Avenue
Seill Phone 87, Ind. Phone 474.
kbet of everything in the market
!L-le lnsurance
e$gis, Reel eatat.
1M1 Pl ats for Rent Close In
BA t w. HEDGER.
-g,.O ,Spbway B. & A. iBld'g.
Produc.ts
Z JdG, 186
Never mind if March winds blow;
never mind a (lash of snow; never
mind it roads are
HANK'S rough; never mind if
SEEDS going's tough; never
mind the awful rate,
charged for butter-all short-weight;
never mind the price you pay for your
living, day by day; never mind if buy
ing bread brings gray hairs upon your
he.ad, never mind if children cry for
the grub you cannot buy: never mind
if kidldies groan, asking cake and g.'t
ting non: never mind if prices high
quits ircvent your buying pie; nevr
.m:nd if plain neck beef by Its price
brings yaou to grief; never mind if T
bone' steak makes your total assets
break: never mind if you can't eat,
'cause the prices have you beat: never
mind if every night 'with your appe
tite you fight; never mind if you are
thin and your stomach's caving In;
never mind if you are broke-just con
sider It a Joke- soon we can supply
cur needs from Hank Myers' gar
lden seeds; they are coming by the ton,
under frank from Washington: all
ti.he seeds are bound to grow; they're
thl government's, you know; seeds of
melons and of peas, seeds to plant Just
as you please; seeds for climate hot
or e.hl: seeds for, young and seeds
for old: satisfled are all desires by
lthese s.eeds from good Hank Myers;
vanished now is every care; we don't
mind the winter air; Jimmy Wilson
ome' we thank, but mostly we're
obliged to Hank: he's the boy front
Apple Town and he drives away care's
froan: all the Bitter Root aspires to
get some seeds from Henry Myers.
Superintendent Burt of the Northern
Pacific is waging a campaign all along
the Rocky Mountain dl
KEEP vision for cleaner
CLEAN towns. He Is setting
the example by having
the railway premises kept clean and
free from litter and he Is talking to
the towrspeople and seeking to have
them realise that the first impres
sinn which a traveler obtains of a
town is that which in formed by what
he sees when he looks from the train,
(in this account, there should be an
earnest effort made to have all yards
along the railway, neat and clean.
This, too often, is not the case. The
tlear which presents a clean front
along the railway Is pretty sure to be
clean all the way through. "In most
plices." said Mr. Burt the other night
to the Man About Town, "the peo.
pile see the force of the argument and
are willing to carry out the sugges
tion. I started the campaign along the
Bittier Root branch and there has
bIen a notable improvement there
lt'tly I think Missoula should have
an official cleanup day. It would
brighten things up amazingly. In
other cities where they have this pla,
In effect, the results are god. Ii
haIs been tried out and I am s'urs
Missoula would benefit by it. l.atit In
March or curly in April, the whole
IWto shoull turn iout with rakes and
'.,hovels alnd bronlll. Tile effect would
lie surprising"
At the Isis theater this afternoon, I
.1Mr. W. l. Higgins, state regent of I
the American Woman's
WORTHY league, will deliver an "
CAUSE address, which will be c
Illustrated with slides,
-hIowing something of the actual work
which the league is doing, the bulld-d*
Ings in which It is done and the prod- c
ults which are turned out. It will
i,)# an interesting lecture on account
of the subject and its relations, but
monre especially by reason of the per
sonality of the woman who is to speak. t
Mrs. Higgins has been for a long time
in the forefront of club work in Mon- c
tans. In cilvi imnprovehient and t
in the moviemllent toward the beau- I
tifying of cities, Mrs. Higgins
has been prominent and prac
tical in her work. Deer Lodge, her
home, owes much of Its ,beauty to her
personal efforts and the woman's
eilubs all over the state have felt the
glod influence of lher enthusiasm. "I
hopelI there will he a good audience at
tile sils S4aturday afternoon," said a
ilmemlhler ,f the Amnerican W'oinan's
league to the Man About Town last
night. "Mrs. Higgins is an interest
Ing r,ilwaker ntsl her subject Is one
which concerns us here in Missoula
mut a little e he is thoroughly fa
,miliar with the work of the league
and with the unjust Ihar which has
been waged against its founder. 1 hope
manny Missoula people .will attend the
lecture Saturday afternootn at the Isis."
Becausc. The Missoulhin, yesterday
morning, gave deserved credit to Joe
Dean for teleplioning a
DEAN IS 'warning of the ap
I.AMED proach of the storm,
there seems to have
been a dlispositlon In somie quarters
to blame him for the wind. As a mat
ter of fact, Mr. Dean's part illn the af
fair was considerate and kind. At
his home on Vine street, he heard the
approach of the storm as it whistled
down the Rattlesnake and he made
haste to put his friends .wise to the
danger. He merely sent warning. TO
hold him responsible for the disturb
ance is to do an Injustice. Joe couldn't
have made such a storm as that if he
had wanted to. It was a good deal
"tter than the work of an amateur.
qilanan experienced professional could
.ti.,a't`fde such a wind as that was
hic"' jrived soon after Joe's ltwarn
'~tl d.ssgo came over the phone.
The ;Mtfoullan hopes that there will
he no further ,blame attached to Mr.
Dean in thils connlection. It Is cer
tain that he had nothing to do lwith it.
And, anyway, Joe has enough to an
swer for without piling up any further
charges at his door.
The membership rolls of the 'Missoula
County Roosevelt club yesterday re
received a good manyl
GETTING additional signatures. I
BUSY INOW The actual opening of
the Roosevelt campaign
In the east served to quicken loca.
sentiment considerably and there hwis
S general inquiry as to the manner of,
,acquiring membership in the club,I
President RH.hes head lot ,of ques
tlons to 'at.swe during the day,
I. ".oosevelt, has a 00od tany' trlei4s
We employ" every poe
for lor uring accurate
dlapehdrit, .and there Iar
no Scaice of an error I
our prescription clerks
uttes of a college of ph
registered In Montan '
been examined by the
of pharmacy, and have
of experience. PhysIala
confidence In ua and
they are always glad to.,
label on their patients'
That label stands for p
sredlents, standard
sIlentfito compounding.
excellent service when ?11 °
medicine. Telephone No,
us. We deliver free to' r
of the city.
MISSOULA Drg
'1D J. COFrEE, P ,.~
Hammond 51k., Higgins Av."w[
and Pront Streeq
. .totd, M. c-:
here," said Mr. Hughoes "lut'
"You may say that each
the club's executive commle.tt
membership roll, which may be gi
by those ewho wish to beoallme
hers of the club. There wtfl tb I
a.l the time at the Glapr .Ik
In the SMontana building uat1. e
be found at The Mlasoulal office.
shall be glad to have everybody
The more,'the better. We are rd
to get things moving in this county itk
good shape."
"FATHER" IS iE
OF SERMON
EVANGELIST STIVERS POINfI
OUT THE PLACE MAN FILLS
IN CHRISTIANITY.
dvangelist Stlvers preached tp a
well-fillad house at the ChristHia
church last nlight. The 'weather, of
course, cut down the attendance, yg.
the meeting was a success.. As M re
suit of the preaching and the e~
appeal for men and women to enbiLtt
the cause of Christ, four personsi 1Ig
nlified their desire to begin the OhsltE
tlan life.
Mr. Stlvers spoke on "A :Man's
Work in a Man's Way," pointing out
the place which man has to fill In
Christianity. Attention was called to
the fact that there are two geat
problems confronting the religioul
world today that require the .
of men for their solution. These t11
problems are the overthrow of the
liquor traffic and the unifloation of
all Christians. "When men once awake
to the seriousness of these issues and
combine their forces, the prpblpms
iv4ll soon he solved. Christ needs
men for the advancement of. his king
dom. It is a masculine klngdom and
we must have a masculine (Christian
ity. Christ was a man and a' mialy
man."
Professor Ridenour did effective
work last night with his stereopticon.
Illustrating the famous solo, .Whtere
Is My Wandering Iloy Tonight?"
Views were also give. of some noted
cases of Ireformned drunkards, ladl
cating what a radical change religion
can make In a man's life. It has been
decided that the interest In the revival
Justifies its continuance during the
coming week.
POLICY PAID.
iFrank Kern, secretary-treasurer of
the local lodge of Ro11yal Highlanders.
yesterday received a draft from the
company's headquarters in payment oe
the Insurance on the life of ?raRfk
Evans, who died December $0. 'The
policy was carried In tayor of his
brother and callaed for $866.17.
MARRIAGE LICENSE.
Harry A. Moore. and Jane 81. Tay
lor, both of Milsaula, were issued a
malrriage Ilceine by clerk of the
Court Conli, yesterday.
Notice to Holders of Mertgaes.
It has frequently occurred thbt par
ties holding imortgages have failed to
release saml on records of op. Lnt
Clerk and recorder when paid. In or
der to avohil assesi,'nnt and 4.tts on
paid mnortagatgs it is tarn~ttly re
quested tha: proper release he made
on or before :.lurch 4, 1913.
I. n CURRIE,
c',unlty Assessor.
Notice.
The Missoula ('lub orrlhestra Wish to
announce they are still prg paWd to
furnish the beat Inu~ic for all oca-.
stuns. Those wishing their asrvices
will please call on J. H.' Moyer at
Llchti cigar store ",r 2iell phdne $18
red.
Barber &
609 South Higgins Aid We
Bell Phone 20. Ind. Phenk 4R0.
COLD WEATHER POOD
When it is col,. eat the things
good in cold weather.
CORNED BEEP AND CABijAGE
"R.EX" corin beef 36e and '1o a
can. Very little fat, no waste,
CABBAGE, HEAD, 10., 15k, be.
Mostly small, hard, solid, white
heads, of Danish Baldhoa Oabba0go.
BACON AND EGGS.
Some thin slices of that deahllou.i
;i sugar cured "Premlium" bMio apnd
I some of our strictly fresh cotUntY
Seggs,
HOT CAKES AND SVURP.
' The Old-fashioned Ne "y 1orl
f "Pet Yan" Buckwheat man ' I't
, Ivender sular syrup, Tom -
wheat Will cost you 60e I
htil syrup 260 a quart,
40PIýýsnese : i0' ýý Alibi !or 'Man
;A;ijrion...Itl i i·giii He Was ~Hd 't~', Workilng:Fi
on Night of Fire.
was on the first day of Marth, 6
Ite hfalr that lent cold 'ven into
. ourtroom, that the deflhii.%l" the
igny arso 'tilal outlinedIte klan
mpalsg and brought to b. its
vlest artillery. yesterd. th
h day of the trial of J. I, OhChs
F accused of burning a rooming
at 317 West Spruce street/ saw
defendant, his wife, his daught*e'
_'lll niece on the stand, all ttdltlt
Wrd the establishing of ian.libi.
iattnesses for the state his been
. ' and examined briefl3' ester
-ald the prosecutlon had all of its
evldencq In when Attorney Mur
'for the defense made the eustom
notion that the case be taken fram
ry by the judge, who shouMd In*
the jurors' to return a not*
verdict. After this had beer
led. Mr. Murphy made the de.
s opeining statement. He stated
the defense would attempt to
as an alibi, that the defendant was
m with his family when the fire
out. "We will attempt by the
lany of four witnesses to show
it would have been a physlelal
slbility for him to have been
a he would have been, had he set
fire. We will attempt to show by
- stimony of smix itnesses that the
nt had no motive of financial
r , hatred or revenge. We will st
to show that if the fire was of
2 dlary origin there is a strong
billty that it was set by some
'else. We will show by reputable
asee that several rough-looklint
a were seen entering the house
the fire. They were not look
af or anybody, these men. On the
hand, we will attempt to show
.the chief witness for the prose
has every motive of revenge
hatred and profit to himself."
The first witness for the defense iwas
Mrm. Angellina Chevlgny, wife of the
6 dant. She proved an Intelligent,
witness and could not be shaken
ont single point. She began her tea
-ti. y by answering a lot of questlons
-o-rning the property that was the
aiSe of the trial, as to its history and
'thd manner of its acquiring by the de
feditnt and herself. She said that at
th( time of the fire the Catholic ladies
w giving a fair and that she was
d ,arge of the doll table. On the
l, of the fire, however, she did not
the fair, as she was ill. Mrs. A.
lette, at her request, filled her
ihde She said that her two children,
a lseee, Marietta Paul, Mr. Chevlgny
mad herself were the only people In the
Chevigny home on. pruce street, a
-blpkh.west of the lilfated rooming
'~o.ae, on the night of the fire.
"YIa husband left the htouse early in
f:je evening, before 7 o'clock, and came
ba1k between 8 and 9 o'clock. He
ntauy a while, then said that he had
an ea ement with Mr. Morln of the
Bledy Lumber company. 'figuring on
some lumber.'" She said that he had
a blueprint when he came back the
first time and left it on the dining
ropm table when Ire went out agaln.
'hlis stme he returned between 9:30
and 10 o'clock. She retired about 10
o'clock.
It was noon. Attorney ulurphy ez
pailifed that he would place the de
fendaot on the stand daring the day,
but Would examine him on the times
of his comings and goings of the night
in question only, but that he would be:
recalled later for general elammination.
After the lunch thour .Mr's Chevigny
aent on to tell hrll story of that
nlght. She said that 4fter she thad
been asleep she heard a commotion In
the street, cries of "Help!" then
"lire!" and, again, "helpl"
The witness said that she called to
Mr. Chevigny, who was still down
stairs In the dining room figurlng over
he bqlueprlnt plans ,Je had brought
onime. She said that her husband le
"hard of hearing" and, therefore, did
not hear her until she Went out into the
hall and olled downý **Teff, twhat's this
,noise?" Slhe said that she could see
that there was a lllt In the dinlnl
roopt and that her utsband came to
where she could see him. Then he
came up the stairs sa both looked
out of the front window, the wife's
roots' being In the ftrot of the second
floor.
"We saw that It W it fire and I
thought it was in nPlstette's house.
'I'll .nd see," said a luband. 'Are
you ' sle It's a house?'
"He Went unto the porob and said,
'Why the fire department's out in
front of the Holden house.' Then he
oame. back Into tile house and said
that he was going to the fire."
Mrs. Chevigny stated that her hus
bind wore a black atleen shirt and
house slppers, {having taken off his
coat and vest. She stated that he came
to isr Wit.hout the appeiraeoe of a man
who had been out in the cold, She
hrm1oired that t It Wal very dwndy
' flted that, h4VVI g oared for
yesjisl ' an Invalid son, the Was most
pJpy,erW'ak'ned, Also, afterward, she
|toat, on account of this ease of
btl.g awakened, It weold have been
tmpeOeiWe for Mr. Chevlgny to have
losre ot without awakening her. She
hot the doors to h louse, the
,. doors, were loo4d when she
St il b'.ed. Also 1l` a . l.rted that
Siei`W ,tcr 11:0 o whei hes husband
left the oMuse for tile oi.io.b "o the fire.
0p~I 0 ..s-examinattoAi on e. Qlhev
lg'$'4 ntimony was ntri ~J, eD. She
went Owe c4,lth the coit e rn~ey-the
ffcts or her pv no
explained tt' ee h
vigny hou
a .model o I.t oust on
eoya' table,
d briefs, wi r
SIts and tf 6 reai
of the Mldence.
,,f º leading qe this, t
i ney put to
SIf, when"
t wlndqw,:
In your
thusbazd,
the mnatterr
qiletteon, "It never happened that
IPd you nqt tell Mrs.. Cash Brunelb
that?" asked Mr. Mulroney, and, ',
never. told he anythng of the sort~"
snewered the witness. , It was he"i
that Mrs. Chevigny asserted that .,i
wuas ure she'd thave been awaken!
had her husband left the house, nb
matter how quietly.
She saId that her husband, on Neo
turning, told her that the fire was uD.
dbr control, but that be made no fuIr,
ther comment then or In the mornin
"M$y husband had no oil in the houP
or anywhere around."
On fudirect examination the wltnee
told of talkin with Mrs, Brunelle, bu
denied having made the atement a
trlbuted' to her by the progoutor. Bh
Th1 h t she tend first heard her bti
band donnopted with the fire two jiaL
kater It. ,
."I was at the home of Mrs. Owefn
(who lived next door to the burned
building), just after the death of Mr.
Owens. He died the day after the
fire. 'There I heard that 'the man who
held the mortgage on the building set
t 'afire.' I believe Mrs. C"hadwlct
said it. I thought It was a joke and told
nobody but Mr. Chevigny."
That was all Mrs. Chevigny testlfied
to. Her evidence has been given IlO
the above paragraphs In 'practlcally the
Words ussed In' the witness .box.
Next came Marietta Paul, who liven
near Frenchtown, Is aged 14 years and
Is the defendant's niece. She told of
being a guest at the Chevlgny home
dtring the faitr 'last October and as tO
what her uncle had done on the nlott
p#iceding the fire, which caime at 12:30
o'clock or early on the moruing of Octo
bar il "He read smihlle," she said,
"then went down town and came back.
He left a plan and went away and I
dat't know when he came back again
ft.r I was In bed. I don't know how
Irlt h, stayed the first time he came
beck, but it wasn't very nln."
She said that her aunt called her
and the two Chevgny hobildren during
thu night to see the fire, saying that
she (the aunt) did not know where
It was. "We went Into the front room
and uncle and aunt were there." This
was the essential part of her testl
mony. Miss Paul was not at all
abashed by the fact that she was fac
ing an audience of several hundred
men and gave her testimony clearly
and with little hesitation.
Little Yvvonne Chevlgny, "IS years
old In August." b!ack-eyed, red-lipped,_
came next. She said that her mothe"
and fdther were In their room at the
time the children of the household
were awakened to see the fire.
The defendant came next. Mr. Chev
Igny told of the length of his residence
in Montana and in Missoula, of his
birth In Quebec 45 years ago and of
his coming to the United States at the
age of 20. He told of his business and
orf his family.
He said that he was engaged in fill.
Ing his contract at the Misioula hotel
-it called for tl'e remodeling of the
second and third floors--on October 24.
the day before the fire at 817 West
Spruce street. He said that he ar
vived home about 5:30 o'clock that
night, a trifle later than was usual.
"After supper," te went on, '"1 went to
the hotel on my bicycle to clear up a
little. There were many people stop.
ping there. I mwent back home, this
work took me 15 or 20 mintes, and
split wood and carried in kindling an4
coal. Then I read the paper until T
o'clock. Then I went to the Rlberdy
Lumber company. There was a fellow
named Morin there, the manager, and
another fellow, the bookkeeper, a
heavy-set, clean-shaven follow. I went
there to chook up the list of millwork
made for me by the company for my
work at the Missoula hotel."
He told of being compelled to wait,
as Mr. Morin was busy, and of calling
up a plasteror and bricklayer. Mike
Rafferty, over the Independent phone,
He made an appointment with him at
Corbett's saloon. Then he and Mr.
Morin checked the list over and found
that the company had made a mis.
take. He was there about two hours.
He and Mr. Morn loeft the office to
gether and walked part of the way
home in each other's company,
"I went right, straight home," said
the mdtness, "and left the plans on the
table. Then I went to Corbett's saloon,
There I met 'Foxy' Cyr, another mani
who used to be a gambler, and Cor4
bett. They were the only men in the
saloon. No, I am not guessing abott
him being a gambler. I know he use4
to be. Yes, that's all there' were I
the' saloon and nobody came in while
I was there."
He told of the conversation in the
saloon-the men there were .discussingls
the new closing law-and of the faei
that Rafferty didn't show up. "Then'/
he said, "I went home a few mlnutHe
before 10 o'clock; I know it wasn't
10 o olock,"
Next, he explained that he "went
home, made himself easy by removing
shoes, cap, coat and vest and puttill
it .house slippers, making ready tip
WoQk over his blueprint plans, to
which previous reference had bee.,
n)ade during the day. He said that hit
wife, after cleading the dining roost
table for hIm, had gone to bed and
that he didn't see ter again until she
called to him about the fire and til
noise in the street. In answer to
guestlon, he, said that he had not left
thie dlinog room from the time hli
WifO retired until she called to hllp,
" tJeff, what's this noise on the out,-:
aide "'
He told of goIng to the front of thi
huse,4 as htsl wife had t aestfIed tlt
lhed..,tne. .Then he wqa deposed fto
ai ttiut to make way fdr .J: H. ?,
Rtman, dashlp of the Western Moq
tant N Il6el benk.
ra; intn brought the In-er
I'qp
W . .i 8 ey wtw. ........................e
In euW' ial. Loune. o
11utd n s - 1a pte »..... .........."w ............. .... .... ..: .
170840-lM til t ,Muta w . n..... ............. ...... .... ..-,":...... m. ei....
17o83--31e7 Ppier '(A ply.Rag, Banjo) ....... ..,............ .,
The IobitbaV Promenade (Humoresqoe, Banjo) ...;..........,V.p Y
SThe Harbor of ove ................................................ ........... a Brunt
17087- That Haunting Melody ............................................... ...... .....Al Jolson
Rum 'tom Tiddle .......................................................................Al Jolson
1708--Plckaninny's Lullaby ............ Elste Baker
Mammy's Song .................... ............. ...... ............ John Barnes W ells
17041-The Skeleton Rag ....................................................American Quartet
I'm Going Back to Old Virginia...,..................Campbell and Burr
17042-Love Never Diem (frmn "Little Boy Blue")..Barbour and Anthony
17 = ren ..................... ............................. .. . an ruer
come Kisa the Blarney, Mary Darling .......................Hinderiney
81861-Natlopal Ainr of All' Nations............................. VYictor iaxe4 Chorus
Ore. t .ritain,. "Rle Britannia." AUspttI "
e preserve the Emperlr." RUaia, "God Wve te
Calr." Prance, "The Marsmelliaise." Italy, "
ibaldl Hymn." Germany. "Watch on the Rhine."
1U.sited Statue, "Star 8pangled Banner."
28618-Louislans Minstrels ................................Victor Minstrel Company
"'Push Dean Clouds Away." "I Don't Care Itf Yo'
Nebber.Clome Back," "Goodbye Sweet Old Man
hattae Isle."
Arkansas Minstrels .....................................Victor Minstrel Company
"Alabama," "Goodbye Tliasa Jane," "What 'the
trass 1 and Played."
8k614--Trovatore: Pea,!to l Was the Night ............................Edith Helena
(Tacea ii. a tte) (Act I) English.
Lucia; Mad Scene (Act ) English.............................dith Helena
315--bForsa del.Destino Overture..................... .......................Pryor's Bat.u
Orphpus In Hades Overture (Orfee aux Enfqrs)......Pryor's Band
90068--lAfrl.ialne: Indian March ........... .................Herbert's Orchestra
S (Marche Indtenne) (Act IV)
8888-Elilsir d'amore; Una furtiva lagrima (Act II) Italian..........Caruso
36840-Rigoletto; Povero Rigolettot (Poor Rigoletto! )........................Amato
(S.ene from Act II, Part I) (With Metropolitan
Opera Chorus)
88841-. fsoletto-Cortigianl, vii ramsa dannatal Italian................Amato
(Vile Race of Courtiers!) (Scene from Act II, Part II)
4-D0po (Afterwards) Italian ............................................Emma Eames
4- fx rench .. .............................. . . ........Caruso and Journet
5211-Lomnbardl: Qual volutta (With Sacred Joy) Aide, Carusa, Journet
(Trio from Act III) Italian.
iy It d sonII Piano Co.
HOME OF THE VICTOR
223 IIggins Avenue Next to Golden Rule
O, July , 1911. Also, it was shown
that the property is still on record In
the defendant's nane.
Then, the defendant was placed on
the stand agaln. He said that he had
hot heard the noise to which his wife
rad toeerred, that he went up to her
loom and that he thought the chil
were ththen. thre then. He said that he
t remain there long, but went out
thp poroh, uhere he saw the fire
dIpertment's truck stopping in front
pt e Ios raet -house. He then went
aW' tpld his wife that the truok was
befaviethfo Holden house, and said that
he wanted to goe'to the fire. He told
of putting on the rest of his clothes,
;0leg tleitg hal shoes. "It was burning
sagreely when I got there.," he said,
"llad -hey niere throwing water on the
flkmnes."
,Then it was 5 o'ctook and the fourth
SPy of the Chevlgny trial was done.
The crowd blhd continued larger than
rpTe4ay'ls ,vlidence should be of
I L hq tfiial Will be resumed at
:8 thli m'in.tln.
0arly yesterday morning H, L. Con
n.or. A. WK; P.Ira J. Vert, Mrs. Minnie
Perand I s4 'Moe were recalled.
ifst-naumned witness denied again
e Iputatibn that be had been under
wit ent for murder.
Uo* of O.agrt Conlon was Ill yes*
01yr sand he senior olerk, William
]ej1Or, ooupled the desk with graco
a 1M' dignity.,'
5 .',4.OTn, wa well-s
and w riand Gerabut M oula
ý , ntana° ` ·ale to talk at length
Sar' wa tion welothoug he twohe
t l agr iw a tiis t they both
t finma to MSI "Peelng ie, thank
# t Mall toa ). better health now
Ithan be has been, for thre or four
t and, 34r. Itig is 4( in prime
and' woroi~twi 1 3ii4, but Missoula
arp ad t welcome the two
SHOES
AT COST
Men's, Ladlee' and Ohildren's
Best Shoes In Town at the
Lowest Prores
T. A. SMET
Opposite High toheol
825 Bouth liggins Avenue
WIOOD 0
11.00O Buys TweoCord Load
$6.00 Buys On.Cord Load
Best green-out and seasoned wood
Get our price on oar lots.
We Are Headquarters
feor Swed Wood
Grooerle, Hey Grnin, Flour, Ste.
. A. MItx Soni
"30o iN, iird.. ltrget.
IMie Medt
Home-made; nothins but the best
fruit and meat .lled. On.q tgld,
always used. Phbone us jour pirers
for everythtng In our itne.
ROYAL ( *y
Bf !, Phone 416; InQ4To deut. 11
L. W. AUSTII
follow the whole pýrae as ,rom
time of tre 'ar o -t NI R4s
In `Chtg to
too oh
Of the Strowy.
t d i ly e B u r e ' ,
%?dtiIl
4LA l

xml | txt