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The Daily Missoulian. [volume] (Missoula, Mont.) 1904-1961, March 06, 1913, Morning, Image 1

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2 HER THE DAILY MISSOULIAN =...
THE WEATHER M A T T THE LAST DAYE
Today--o enerally fair. is not the Day of Judment.
Totnorrow Fair. That will be later.
VOL. XXXIX. NO. 305. MISSOULA, MONTANA, THURSDAY MORNING, MARCH 6, 1913. PRICE FIVE CENTS
FIRST MEETING OF CABINET
IS A HARMONIOUS OCCASION
NEW SECRETARIES EMERGE
FROM CONFERENCE WITH
PLEA6ED FACES.
WILSON HAS BUSY DAY
New President Serves Notice on Pie
Counter Brigade That Only Invited
Seekers of Jobs Will Be Welcome at
White House-"Open Door" Policy
Is Somewhat Altered.
Washington, March 5.-With the
tinsel and the military poomp, the
cheers of the multitude, the stirring
music of bands and the heavy tread of
anarching thousands, the fireworks and
the limelight only a pleasant memory,
Woodrow Wilson settled down in the
chair of president as quietly and with
as little ceremony as almost any man
who ever has crossed the threshold of
the White House to become its master.
His long day was crowded with in
cidents and filled 'with the flavor of
power that is a president's. Almost
his first act was to serve notice upon
office-seekers that they will not be
welcome at the White House unless
they have been invited. Almost his
last act tonight was to confer with
John W. Kern, chosen today as leader
of the democrats in the senate and
reputed representative of the admin
istration in the upper house.
In between, he found time to shake
hands with close to 200 (persons, con
sult with his new cabinet and with a
few friends in congress, dictate letters
and generally launch his own ship of
administration.
In spite of the reports that Mr. Wil
son might be expected to change many
of the precedents that have grown up
about the presidency, he bothered to
day with none of importance except
that which permitted office-seekers to
invade the White House. Fitting in
easily with the machinery of the ex
ecutive office, he did mostly 'what
trained officials told him should be
done, and took up the routine of gov
ernment with ease.
The president spent the morning in
his office, the afternoon in the White
IHouse at luncheon and in the east
room he received delegations. At 4
o'clock he shut up shop and went out
with Mrs. Wilson for his automobile
ride through Washington.
The Open Door.
All delegations received today came
by appointment and the reported
policy of the "open door" was ex
plained to be an open door only to
those who call upon public business.
After luncheon, Mr. Wilson learned
one of the uses of the east room. IHe
stood for 40 minutes and shook hands
with about 1,140 persons.
!Major Thomas L. Rhoades, personal
aide for a year .to former President
Taft, shot them 'by as fast as he could
get their names and the new president
never flinched at the ordeal.
'With the callers disposed of, Mr.
W'ilson called for one If the White'
.House automo(biles used by lMr. Taft
and started out for a spin around
W.ashington. No aide in uniform,
such as accompanied ,Mr. Taft, went
with him, but the two motorcycle
policemen assigned to guard the pres
ident on such trips, kept close behind
on the ride.
After the president had returned,
Lindley ,M. Garrison, the secretary of
war, had a brief conference ,with him.
"I told the president I thought I
earned my salary today," said Seere
tary Garrison with a laugh. I'ml
learning the machinery of the depart
ment. You can't get from an equity
court to a ,government department in
a day and get accustomed to it at
once."
tMlr. Bryan, the secretary of state,
called after Secretary Garrison left.
He brought with hi·n Huntington Wil
son, former assistant secretary ofl
state, and the heads of the various
'bureaus of the state department, pre
senting them to the president. Secre
tary Bryan said there were some ques
(Continued on Page Eight)
How You Can Be
An Easy Talker
¶ Doubtless you have often envied the man or woman to
whom talking seems so easy, especially if you find it hard to
start a conversation.
¶ You can make this art yours. THE MISSOULIAN will
help you. Read its pages closely and constantly. You will
find a hundred subjects for conversation-the affairs of the
nations, great philanthropies, news of literature, art and sport.
¶ You will always be well informed, for the newest is ever
presented in TIlE MISSOULIAN.
¶ Then there are the advertisements. Everybody is inter
ested in them-especially when the cost of living still soars.
They contain the latest merchandise news from the most re
liable merchants in Missoula.
T Read THE MISSOULIAN closely and constantly every
day and you will never be at a loss for interesting conversa
tion. Read its advertisements every day and you will always
be posted on where to purchase to best advantage.
BURNING OPIUM
MAKES MANY
DROWSY
Boston, March 5i.--Fumes of
$30,000 worth of burning opium
threw a spell of drowiness today
over occupants of offices in the
vicinity of the government ap
praisers' stores. Even passersby
experienced some effects from the
drug and customs employes who
assisted in destroying It in a fur
nace fairly reeled under its influ
ence.
The oplum was part of a contra
band lot gathered ill cstomsn raids.
HOUSE DEMOCRATS
NAME OFFICERS
IN CAUCUS
CHAMP CLARK AND OSCA'R UN
DERWOOD ARE SPEAKER AND
LEADER, RESPECTIVELY.
WVashington, March 5.--Speaker
Clark was renominated, Itepresenta
tive Underwood of Alabama again
chosen chairman of the ways and
means coinmittee, the entire demo
cratic ersonnel of the tariff-making
body named and all the house offi
cers renominated at a harmonious six
hour caucus today of the Sixty-third
congress. The caucus was held in the
house chamlber and 270 of the 290
house democrats were present.
The Nominees.
The following were nominated for
ratification by the house when it
meets in extra session on April 1:
Sleaker-Champ Clark of Missouri.
WVays and means committee-Rep
resentatives Underwood of Alabama,
chairman; F]ranlcis Burton Harrison,
New York; Dorsey W. Shackleford,
Missouri; Claud Kitchin, North Caro
lina; Henry L. Rainey, Illinois; Lin
coln Dixon, Indiana; Cordell Hull,
Tennessee; 1W. S. Ha.mmond, Miune
sota; Andrew J. Peters, M.assaclhl
setts; A. Mitchell Palmer, Pellnsyl
\vania; Timothy T. Ansberry, Ohio;
John IS. Garner, Texas (new); James
\V. Collier, Mississippi (new); Augus
tis Stanley, Kentucky (new)); (re
publlilitcan membIiliers to be chosen in
April).
Clerk of the house-South Trimble,
Kenlltucky.
iDoorkeeiper-J. J. Sinlnot, Virginia.
Sergieanatat-arml s --lobert U. Gur
don, Ohio.
'Postmaster- Villiam M. Dunbar,
Georgia.
Chaplain--Iv. Henry N. Cotdeln,
\Vashington, D. C.
Enthusiasm.
The demnocratic meimbers of the
ways and means committee will be
gin the final revision of the tariff next
Friday, taking up the work on which
the democrats constituting the major
ity of the committee in the last session
left it as a "tentative basis." Thero
will be a tariff caucus when the ses
sion convenets, to pass upon the rlport.
The caucus was marked by a good deal
of slpeclihmaking and ienthusiasmn. All
the ilallinal tioiis for offices were by ac
cluamation, except that for sergeant
at-arms, on which there was a lively
contest that resulted in (Gordon's
choice over former 1tepresentative WV.
1-. Ryan of Albany, N. y., on a vote
of 138 to 115.
Messrs. Garner, collier and Stanley,
thel new iimembers of the ways antid
meants committltee, were selected as the
result of a vote which stood:
Garner, 209; Collier, 141; Stanley,
137, and Sunders, Virginia, 92; Cov
ington, Maryland, and Bartlett of
Georgia, 91 each; Taylor, Colorado, 42.
(Continued on Page Seven)
HE'S ON THE JOB
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___ Tii rY S A Y H
9v THeil
41 WE U. W 4AT ý
/ o y/
'ST BOT 1 OOD wo~ t%
6 6 ' rftY !
YiASHINGTON POLICEi
WILL BE PLACED
UNDER PROBE
COMMITTEE NAMED TO LOOK
INTO LACK OF PROTECTION
FOR SUFFRAGISTS.
Washington, March i5.--Aroused over
the failure of the Wasllington police
department to maiintain order during
the progress of the suffrage pagentll
of March 3, the senate began today an
investigation to Ilace the reslponsi
bility for the lack of protection for the
women marchers.
Acting under a resolution adopted
just before the senate adjourned lMonu
day, Senator Gallinger, the retiring
chairman of the. District of t'olumbia,
named Senator Jones, Dillinghla l anld
iPomerene us an investigal ting ('Ollllllit
tee. At the 'meeting today the coIl
mittee determined to begin hearings at
1:30 o'clock tomorrow. Major Richard
Sylvester, sullerintendent of police,
probal.ly will be one of the first wit
nesses c('Olled.
It is the plan of theI commilttl'ee to
exaLint a nullllber f Ipersons to ld.eter
mine accurately the attitude of the po
lice toward the suffrage La. Itrchers lInd
the character of protection given.
Inadequate.
Superintendent of 'Police Sylv('ester
said today that the1 department c('il
not be bhlamed for thll failure to p)ro
sere\' ordelr Ite detclared tha. Ilthe po
lice force was inlltldequatel to lmeet tie
situation that confronted it- -r'11quirilng
the gual'rding of the sulfflrage linell' of
ma.rch tnd handling the arrival of
Prelsident W\ilson at. practically the'
salle time. IHis req(lulests for lllore 1e11n,11
he addetd, has Ibeen unhedet d by conll
gress for the lhst five or six years.
The fnct that st)o manly emIellliOrs of
congress are from sulffrage states is
counted upon. by thie women toI[l aid
them inl lpunishing tlhose responsible
for thte indignities thely say .they were
compelled to suff(er at the lhands of in
toxicated and ruffilnly men. They are
making every effort to obtain evidence
to plresellnt t the committee.
General Anson 31ills, I'. S. A., re
tired, and Iear Adliral Wainwright
and Mrs. Wainwright and Mliss Sophy
Stanton, grandtlaught er of Lincloln's
secretary orf w\\a!', were lamonlg those
who fare said to h:ave sublittedl exvi
dence of inldifferelne onl the part of the
police.
Miss Alice Paul, chnirman of thel
congressional commlittee of ' the na
tional suffrage organization, has taken
pensonal charge of the work of push
ing the investigation. She declares
she, had already obtained conclusive
evidence regarding more than 50
Spolicemen who refused to keep hack
the crowds along Pennsylvania avenue.
DYNAMITE KILLS TWO.
San Bernardino, March 5.-Two men
were slain outright and four fatally
injured today by a delayed shot of
dynamite at a railroad construction
camp near Keen'brock, 10 miles north
of here. Ten other workmen were
injured more or less seriously by the
rain of rock torn out of the cliff by
the blast.
LEVI MORTON ILL.
New York, March 5.--Levi P. Mor
ton, vice president in the Harrison ad
ministration and former governor of
'New York, is seriously ilI at his Fifth
avenue residence. He is 89 years old,.
BRYAN PUZZLES
HIS HEARERS
VW ashing ltonl, .1., r . \\'illinaI
Jennings I ryan. iii ..hI essiii the
"I anl nut pli. p:o t o It cusn Iil.
tenure in ofifice. ly ownll tinl
is, ias 1 waS ahout tI say, brlitc f, but
my tePlnure tls i,,t ci'll steiln. I
im Siure your l, illtr is, lthere fore,
nli 111oIe ullciiUttil thtanl illin .. 1
have not had time to tloarn from
the president the gnlirul poliey
that will he itnpressed ,n the varl
ous delpartnitnts but it is nil n ees
sary for us tio discuss the length
of tihe se'vii-e. It is s5'fii,-nit at
this time Ito l m ia eaclth ll rtls ttc
quaintance and I olt- tliht w\Vlten
the time dlieat for e1 tio reassi t
ble you to ittttio s te yol t, limy sle
cetssor I can 1],,,k bh ', nl is de
lightful associtioins is tll, retiring
secretary d,,s "
tMr. i sis'si wordts ,tis-ed suir
pri'se, but h, | 1 ,lol ed hill I with
no i-Xsttin i ,t.
M'COMBS PRESIDES
OVER MEETING
DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL COMMIT
TEE HOLDS SESSION OF
FELICITATION.
\\'cshingl .,l, 1 Ir h . 'l'h,' dehln -
<ltutic nati~onal5 '111110t, ''. illin
Ihere ltod l la .li I al it chll i.:il :' ll,
it ll t.a n l lla 1 .1 1ils, L " k I:. i illianilll. ,
\"ilinicrats 1 h'. , ( ,i iteit, ti tI e i -i illlll Ie :
Il the vWi'sh8 iiIn liaise stat. i.
"The ro sti.:tiri i itIoduc: c n ili ttrk
nid ell ' t-uip:hi, dir ect ud t'i ir. ian
rMctsoubtisn i tatl, such h ie n as hIie
W'ILLIAM F. M'COMBS.
democrats i,,' ,h.".te! to, the s,..at,., t~,
'ill thie va:, ini,-s in those stat, s.
[Howell of (. ,,aitfu, ldretevr l (hanirmlan
deems nect(ssarv to asslure thte eltio:l
of two demo ratic senators i1l Illinois
tn[ld one demtoc-rat in New l]a nlslhilre.
i In Illinois, James HIamilton Ivwls mand
L (Continued on Page Five)
CLARENCE DARROW
MAKES HIS PLEA
IN DEFENSE
ACCUSED LAWYER DECLARES
THERE IS ABSOLUTELY NO EVI
DENCE AGAINST HIM.
1I.s Angeles, Ma1rc'h 5I.---4|lare4nce 1.
(th clotlO ill" ;i1gullell( ]I h11i O \tIt dte
St'. u di mlll i lsl l H it 'lbillg aI iot Were.
l'11clh d W1ht It til e d( ot11 , .1 V01 l thirl '
4II 4. S 4era'l'll V a'4'Iil flhinted 1 liI anS
bhlolk.lt1, thvny that few obained
'44ts4, ;llhough a throng of m44ll4 and
i\ols ll4 char d ilt' ) the courtrtooml4 in
gr,.', 1tiUi q' ' .
li tih, b 4g illing 11r. )larrol w hit4 -
tPrly assailed ftirerll dg . hllg VIh'll ,ll
;. (r;il y, Speria l proSoctiltor, sVlat yes
IIltr "d c } ' l'*r, ( Ie ll'Lt r lnv-.
41 hlI I 44 lorel4." Said I)4rrow to
Ih4 4i4r 1,1hAS I 4 " 't h ad oct iTSIon I to
p1'. to tit: jiury for mI styIf (ltfe'rring
t libt' fr. r. trial, whi.'h resulted in
his a 4'4l4lilttll), 4ld o o feels. 1 on such44
tll o 0asion tlit he IlIaly say tOO
'uch ,r to 4 little4. ,I 4 wvill iry to
f,1 I.'t ti nt I l l, lawyerI and will
tallk I4 y lli:s mllal l tc Il ian, fairly,l 4
h l,,le:;tl3 Its I hnat illn 'ys tried to.
tallk und to live.
"Mid I h1 I 4i 4 rob 'ber or lurgl-ip or
a1. .el'auli ng b lIk easlitlr, anld lhalln
hIe ,l trie lld o c U llt nelt lltlvd, I1o nelt
illd 4tha '' da 4re'd nt lal, u e t ' I l l tl rial
ltint inl a mi t y tof hitell Igen
"l ht I ha1d in be tried again he
a e 4 .lt' fO '.rces wvhich control this
t'ilil.,l Stlates the greatI'l forces ofl
44il 4n 44 to d4L4stroy 4ile . They l4ri ',
hrlil 'ver'y gliutter niIpe and 1every
sel.l'\r rat thty cotuld to testify againstl
il sol tllhat their Ia ters llighl t 'g t
Belittles Prosecutors.
Ilei l 4roceeded to belittle the prose-,
cut'o' rs ard the evidencetr they had mius
4ered against i 4n4, sa-yi4ng:
"There i.li't en"ough evidlence against
Illv to wlrtlllil hd y in1 of youl Whip
ping yout" nlV,, If you ilte lone, if thaitt
.V idell¢O Wvre a gainst ti lstt h t dog.
"I don't feat you jurors. I have
been here to4o long. I4l k4ow 4 you ito
well. I no more doubt the oreult than
I would If my brothers and sisters
were passing judgment upon my guilt
or innTIOcLL
"Any conscientious man, klowing
the infamy of the plot against mne,
wVould acquit tie on that account, even
if he thought me guilty."
Others Speak.
Ileforo I-.);irrow began Iis it -gurnu ntts,
foirmer Judge4 O. Wr. Powers of Salt
l4tke ('ity, a member of the defense,
coonluded his.. After denou4ncing Bert
If. Franklin, the former McNamara
defe.nse detective, who cUonfes44ed jury
bribery; John IL Iarrington, the ('hl
cago attorney associated with the Me
Na.r.ra4 defenseq4 who becmIn'e a state's
4 itness4, and (uy liddinger, an erm-"
jioie of 1)etectihe William J. Burns,
Potwers launched into all eulogy of
Darrow.
"Clarence Darrow is a great man,"
asserted Powers.. "He belongs to that
great army of noble souls that In all
ages have blaze4 d the way for liberty
I and for human freedom."
1 Darrow spoke for more than two
('44urs, n d was scheduled to finish to
llorruw m4o4r4lt4lng.
GRUELLING GRIND FEATURES
SESSIONS OF LEGISLATURE
REPRIEVES GIVEN
TO VIRGINIA
SLAYERS
Richnh.lud, la., March 3. - hv
ernor Mann tidaý ),ranted : rt slpilo
until Mtarch 28 toi I,'lnyd Allen llit
hi 1so11n, CI 'ln1de Stwanson Alhlen,
iunder sentllncel d i t i ill l e ol tric
chlltair 't lhe sta:le penitenlltiary ion
'ridal y 114xt lfor their lp.rt ill theI
Si lls tilhl courthous, 1111urders,
Ma;rch 14, 1912. TIhe governllr an
noulaceltd that he woull Isllie a
fornmal statemenlllt tnlllmolrr-w\, l
lhutiigh lIi did Ialh t indiiatil wiuhat
[actill 1 \\'he wo lt k I (o (11 the enlid
in1 pletitil for a1 ll mllllltallIiolt.
TO0 MUCH PUBLICITY
IS EMBARRASSING
TO MARSHALL
NEW VICE PRESIDENT SAYS HE
FEELS LIKE BEING IN A
MONKEY CAGE.
lVash inlolltn, Ma111r ii' . Iundr1l 1i ,t "
11i:1l9l, a l visi ors W hlt t i l lnt I Lh d 111 to
Viesn Presidenth lll M'l s ll's office to-j
day so dislllture thll eqitlllllr t lof the
vice president 's first dIay lof officl:lI
11nwV rooll Ol vel r nll the s' 1 ll111 te O101t0 I
li ilding, where ' ll') 111 1 "111p 1 1 ' hs t'1
ii tll 1 1i., 111 1 1,1 I'.t 1 '
on the desk ifd tie nke lt ciga Ilil
wTh vlt e' presidentt s single loffice'
tooll1 atld.joinS i ' oi f ithl il ;till corl l
doIr i, 11n 111ar Ll i l" i Ito ati', 111 1 hiPI
lullg cnlstoiIl, its d.lno s l' litill lti l.op l to
the putIlic. t1r. Marshall, 'arly ;it his
esk, tfund i i t lial I thad t11 119 ui si
'iiS. ill th( ' full view of ithe, .1 lhl.i
roii ds, wh'ih fr11 Oq iuei itly s uR'od ill
i i ilt l ani l cd tlthe visitors' tprr' oga,
1i1\ of shalit og hands.
"I doni l t t111's r l i. oo1m 1111iffrs
I11 lll h flro lt 1i I 11l)i1'y I agel l'm aid the
i''ie pre1 si'lldent duri g ll Ii lull in1 the
lstai, 1 9lt rnil, "1111' Iltt lit lthl vlsitors
dio 1( olffer tlu alily {u 11110ll ."
'The Viice presidi t l IIj 11 tit a d toi
I intai'll his dgnitly thrl'tl i ghout Il
41'll, t he (11k 1 d111 11111 o his 1 ' riendl s
Iliulit )it hi Idt i tin d i gIllslt itl ll tt
ti'lilgt I to il tt" where lle c ntii drlp I111s
official pose ilia4 engjl y i little pri'ac"y.
Another change that will h," leoes
sal'y in scmiltanecoillonidatiol s to meet
th.l de( alnl of tihe Il \"w congress is lhei
providing of a spterinl 'hoir for t lenl
tor ()llio Al. 'alt e (s of lientucky, who
ljoy,-s th(e d'istill in of heihg" h
higg "st lllalll in the s1 InaI e. I i i 11nat1(1,
JA lles fondilll {he lrnirhaitrsI ii d Ito
othetr snultors "crowtlded himt ton
Sellator Penro|. te, tt, e ther , L ialt 1)l`
the S011101, ]l;a.a n, Sli s .pidl sie ch ltair,
anll i t ll)00' 0ll il' loit, ( 411s l1 llitii Ilny llo s
has owrll ordered 0I1.r 5111niat11" J naies.
OFFICIAL MONTANA AVIATOR.
11hl"Ie, Mnrch 5.- -eTrah T. .Mao.ny.
)1f this cily, 011 aVinlol" of omne rt
til)\ , twits ll;id1 Ala till ul l ' offi l l
;tVilllot-" h" ih I i , house of rn-prc nteula
tiVC-s in :t rlsolutiohnii introdult411il had
adtptell (ir ,e I igh. 1 h'Pile lction of
the house \aes called ftrth by a, dtuiring
flight aillu e by ;l'olliey for the lnter
tainiitne l of tlte legislator's it few da).
PIE BURGLAR TO PEN.
rae a |ul, Kaln., Malrch t. Iela;tise
h1' stole thrt)' plihs, valiled :t 1it cents
I"rederb k Nia llin liiust serve tr'm five
!tuthinsl n. I1e used a tskclton key
to outer the bIlr ldhig in wr il'h the pl'es
'WLre kept. t'llder the Kansas Ilimw Ihis
The Classified Ad
Works Promptly
¶ The fact that there are thousands of people who, every
morning, read The Missoulian (Classified Ads makes it cer
tain that your service will he quickly performed if youe in
trust it to one of these messengers. In no other way can
you reach so many people in so short a time.
¶ The smallness of the ('lassified Ad increLaes its effi
ciency; it tells tersely what you want to say. If you have
eggs to sell; if you have lost a jewel; if you want to rent a
room-no matter what may be your need, all you should do
is to state your desire in a Classified Ad.
¶ In every direction, every morning, The Missoulian carries
these messages on its classified page. The readers of these
messages numlbhr into th thousands. Sotme one of them-or
more--is the person who has what you want. When he reads
your ad, he knows you are the person he wants. The rest
is easy.
BOXING BILL PASSES THE SEN
ATE AND NOW GOES TO
THE GOVERNOR.
FILIBUSTER THREATENED
Cutts Informs House That Upper
Branch Must Pass "Blue Sky" and
Compensation Bills or He Will Fight
Appropriations-He Wins-Educa
tional Tax Bill Is Passed.
(tu t I' t'rrespo t'llceii.)
l'l. 'i:, Al: ittrh ' This t is :L day of
':r'ut.l! ull grin ll n the hlll'house, .land et.l
the ill, tsl' l (ld I\v s's ito()l A inmits
if i ff t i ttr i liIi ;lh h'i i ' hIullPller,
I Ii~ L fli'(t ic t sltl . t' si nt thel tI '.:tti g
Il is lll h te hill torl :l " tluet sk t' law
idi t the hill Ifor I a torntm n t.l' 8 cotmt| )pen
, itliI 'i IW xttil g l(i o tIh it'ih i t ile mtrus
tn, I s 'llllioi for fii ll Itpassiag ll o 1l
i t14 m ior ing. I tu hi tlas itO 111s t I I 1' r -
lito l t r. Ir, i tii n t d hl t s' flilit' ster
g; il l tit' big it pprolll ll' r tion hills, its
it was to force ll senate ' tion along.
these lines tlht the fitlbust etr di were
,rgatl' izl lltg.
'I r tll it v ly s)t other IltSt 'lR Wi tlPer
lpa sed it' n 1 n lll ltei t of tll ll \tholt', so1t1
thatI ith tellnate will have plenty' of
I tworl i to i tomorrow. Many other
I ills nIi I in the hi lds ofi the sto'r
iii tli ii t't1 . tiitlee, ili thesil will ie ddetdt
li ti , l.l i t I it .. is'i'stll\d oftItI.
Vote-Trading Probe.
't'he' Inw vsti itll s l ei' tuL titlo held ti
h'rIt ., t'is ll ilte' ill tihe afteriIolln, but
wII h tlltahlt to fiind ai y specific eIt 'Il
Ill'lllen ' fll t l rading' e lsll I had i n re
terredtl to in thil Cot'llins resolti in.
No i m'ti y t t illt' s'tt' s lt PXtie iSli id,
h ltii\tel , In ir in as thil I'llt li ll v iry
ll iti s i titi'il lt 'Ii Uli til oll ttl' tiow , bui t
it i' Indt'rstu lod that it will xnt'l atetll
erilodly atld ove.rythilg Ill sight.
Alit lih i i t ilius ii ter l'against the
;tplpropri, l io hills developed in the,
iiihouse lit' hil the atlt'trntoton, lutd hiy
i'nlt -f Silve . r n olu o. In P xl.ining
his ailitiIude to the lihlose. Cutts de
laored thatl th sonate wis not dip5
plosed to deal justly with the matter
of n \v Wor 'll'n oll pllsal ot n it\W,
anid he Ihroll lt'nod to hol lidp thit' sup
Illy hills until the son'nlt' canto,
Ihl'.ra tl \ith i L rIe S l.tthl3"y good law
on l 111' st illHje t in whict'ilh- i vliorklilln
of the stalte w\ rt inlerestedl.
\'i'.t'y soonll :lter the houlseI rthll ' l'
untilI 7 otu'k'lol . As soon :us tihl, 1110
I hOI1 0torecess hItd pa1sed, S"linator
IHyrlns of Lewis and 'hlark, chairnum
oif the senate 4teerting c(omlnlittee, ptut
two hit;" :ipproprblall i hills at the
Ii ,id of the hills on third reading.
'rhis action a, tutsed tilt. houlse to a
hii;ll pitch of iinger, alnd had it not
hb(- thut the bills w\ert taken off
soo :t f1'th ' th holuste rt olvelle.d there0
Walhlihl at1 , h' l fh I'i\v Ill" a eircce
scrt', Vilti thee hills out of the way
there \wvis nih o nt'stiilll for It fili l.ste.r,
ailnd Ilit,' 1i11141' lll'it' 'l !' d til tlilt, e\'ien
le"or of i' V, ay in grinding out the
hil on. e t. t m ill Miies,.
I i.4 uiilertl',o d that the 'ppropria
llnl Mills will he placed :it the head or
the preg.'nr fIr the house tomorrow
merving. If n11 change, oeeit's in the
iulllt of the Ilhor' menI ' friends
1 ipiltilliL, lth, rolW will he on i
S Il rieSt.
In the Senate.
lTih. senate thi s manling adopted
til' th (jint rcwolution inlrlthltdeed lin the
house ye' tl 'rtld to investigate, rut
mli'rs of trading of 'otiles anall l
iiemthers 1'S the assembly, and Presi
dent 1\lel) \'well ippitiltltd Senatuir'A
A|lotlt, )earhborn inll Steven4 as the
tcnttto Illinhers to conduct the probe.
The cotmmitte. receded fromu its
at iendlle.nts to the Kilh'y bill for at
State athletic conunil sion, aini passed
I the hill :t4 it originally , uil' from the
house. The hill. will notw go to the
governor.
The senite adopted a joint memorial
to congress offered by Whiteside,
prli.tg thit the abandoned military
(Continued on Page Five)

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