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The Daily Missoulian. [volume] (Missoula, Mont.) 1904-1961, February 06, 1914, Morning, Image 8

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025316/1914-02-06/ed-1/seq-8/

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IN A
CLASS BY
ITSELF
BSile Flour, sack $1:80
Dakota's finest. makes the whit
est bread, with the finest grain and
with the old-fashioned home-made
taste.
Made by the Russell-Miller Mill
ing company of Minneapolis; the
same flour as the much-advertised
"Occident."
For Hot Fires
USE
COKE
For Sale by Gas Co.
('all Phone 563 and place your or
der while we have a supply of this
clean, light, economical fuel.
Missoula Gas Co.
.pposite Milwaukee Station.
CLUB
CIGAR
STORE
PdPULAR RESORT FORl MEN.
MISSOULIAN
HEADQUARTERS
ALL PERIODICALS AND
NEWSPAPERS FOR BALI
W. B.M'Laughlin
Proprietor
HAMILTON, MONTANA
Orton Bros.
118 EAST CEDAR STREET
State Agents
Steinway & Sons
Chickering & Sons
Vose & Sons, Kimball
and several other
high-grade pianos
Money to Loan
ON FARMS
PETTITT, NEWLON & GAGE
East Cedar St.
DEMAND
CEDAR RUN WHISKEY
STRAIGHT KENTUCKY BOURBON.
J. E. POWER
DISTRIBUTER.
MISSOULA MONTANA
Use Smith's Cough Balsam
for Colds and Coughs, at
SMITH'S DRUG STORES
Agent Eastman Kodaks
111gEY,EI~GIAN & CO.
GROCERS
115 Hggine .Avenue.
Bell Phone 8?; Ind. Phone 474.
The Best of Everything in the Market,
When the snow creaks under your
brogans as you tramp along the walki
when the wind blows
A STORM the words right- from
SURPRISE your lipil whenever you
try to talk; when the
driving storm like needles cuts, wher
ever it strikes your face; when the
best ycot. can do with your highest
gear is to hit a tortoise pace; when
the snow blows up your trousers legs
and lodges around your knees; when,
every minute, you make up your mind
that you're surely going to freeze;
when the street cars quit and the
taxicabs get stalled and will not go;
when all tamiliar landmarks are bur
ied deep in snow; when you blunder
along through drift and wind, against
the pelting sleet; when you wonder
what has lengthened so the blocks
along your street; when at last you
make the haven, where warmth and
welcome wait; when you're greeted
with love and gladsome smiles, though
you are mighty late-then you settle
down in comfort shut in from the
storm's fierce strife; and again you
get acquainted with the kids and good
Friend Wife; and you wonder (if you
have good sense) why other nights
you roam, when always there's such
comfort and happiness at home.
There were more than one man-a
good many more than one-who
made the discovery on
A GOOD Wednesday night, that
LESSON home is a delightful
place to spend an even
incg. Some of them rather sheepishly
admitted it yesterday morning. But,
whether they admitted it or not, 'the
storm served the very excellent pur
pose of introducing a lot of these men
to the comforts of their own homes
comforts which they habitually
neglect through their practice of '-go
ing over to see a man" as soon as
the evening meal is done, and staying
there till the family has gone to bed.
I heard several confessions of this
sort yesterday. So there is one good
credit mark for the storm.
The storm was so unusual in its sud
denness and severity that Missoula
had but little else to
SOME talk about yesterday.
COAL It was a remarkable
incident to those who
have never experienced a regular
blizzard. But to the. graduates of the
Dakota prairies or the Wyoming
plains, the storm was just a sugges
tion of what used to happen every
winter and a good many times during
the same season. However, there
were a good many narrow escapes
and it is Missoula's good fortune that
there were no fatalities. There were
.iarming stories of lost boys and girls,
telephoned into The Missoulian office
dLring Wednesday hight, but in ev
ery instance it turned out that the
children had been housed and cared
for by somebody along the way. O.
B. . t)rr called yesterday forenoon
to let The Missoulian know that he
had cared for two boys all night,
whose homes are up the canyon, and
that they were safe. There were
many other instances of the same
al't. The coal men were the happiest
men in town. Theirs had been a hard
season, uip to Wednesday afternoon,
but they got busy and. kept busy then.
Yersterday they kqpt It up. The report
from the central heating station yes
terday was that the plant burned 70
tons of coal Wednesday night. That's
quite a, pile of coal.
'lhere .ais one serious case reported
yePterday. A little girl whose homle
is distant was sent to
NEARLY the Lowell school in
FROZEN the morning, despite
the severity of the
\weather. When she reached her
schoolroom, she collapsed from chill
and weakness and it required the ef
forts of teacher and pupils, for a long
time, to restore the little one to cotn
scioosness. It must have been that
the chilhd's father had no realization
oi the extreme" cold or the little one
5w ld not have sent out into the wind
to make tile long walk alone to school.
Yesterday al'fternoon it was reported
that. tieo girl had recovered from the
effects of the cold, though her face
andt c;.urs had oeen frozen, but she w\as
still sulffering from the shock. There
were a good many tales of nipped ears
and noses, but this was the only really
serious case reported yesterday.
--A. L. S.
JOHN OLESON DIES
RUNNING TO TRAIN
The body of John Oleson, who died
at Potomac Wednesday ,afternoon, was
brought into Missoula last evening, by
Coroner Charles It. Marsh. A brother
of the dead man is Martin Oleson, liv
ing at Orchard. Homes, but funeral ar
rangements were not completed at a
late hour laqt evening. John Oleson
was about 52 years old. He has
worked a number of years in lumber
camps of the Anaconda Copper Mining
company, and then for a year and a
half he was employed by the J. E.
Power Liquor' company in Missoula.
lIe left Mr. Power's employ to go Into
St. Patrick's hosaptal for medical treat
ment on account of heart trouble, and
only a short time ago he went to work
at camp No. .3 at Potomac. He had
been sick, and on Wednesday afternoon
started to take the train down the val
ley. It was while hurrying to catch
the train that he fell dead of heart
strain. His companions placed the
body on the train, and it was hbrought
Into Bonner Wednesday evening.
TRANSPERRED.
In the dIstrict court yesterday
afternoon the case of l)emeor against
toullier., wa.t rnasfaerred. from depart
meat 1 to department 2.
The fegpp atu
of Your 1ome
Living in the tight temperature
has m1 h to de with your health.
Unless one , has some mleans of
knowing, coomsn are apt to. be over
heated,,aetd..~o warm rooms are
often tO blame for illness.
Our stock of Taylor's reliable
thermometers 1i larige and they are
accurate.
Get two, one for the outside and
one for the inside of your home.
We have them from 35e to $3.00.
Albb thenrsoneters and barometers
combined.
Missoula Drug Co.
Wholesale and Retail.
Miesoula, Mont.
'PHONE COMPANY
MAKES REWRD
IN STORM
NINE TIMES MORE THAN USUAL
WAS TRAFFIC HANDLED
WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON.
"We passed the examination all
right," was the good report given by
Wire Chief C. ('. Hill yesterday of the
testing strain put upon the equipment
of the local exchange of the Mountain
States Telephone & Telegraph com
pany during the big storm Wednesday.
"There were eight operators, all young
women, working at the switchboards,"
stated Mr. Hill. "They answered at an
average of 160 calls a minute in the
haurs from 1 o'clock to 7 o'clock
Wednesday evening, and we have been
complimented many times today upon
the speed and tEccuracy with which the
calls were handled. The fact that the
normal discharge of from one and a
half amperes was increased to an
average discharge of 18 amperes in our
batteries Wednesday afternoon, tells
the story in another way of the heavy
traffic,
"We were fortunate also in having
little wire trouble. There were only
two cases of trouble, one near DeHor
gla, where a tree fell across the line,
and one near Evaro, which was merely
a cold-weather break. Two years ago
two.thirds of our wires would have
been down in such a storm, but the
immense amount of work done by the
company has had its effect, made evi
dent this week. -M. K. H.
VIEWING THE TOWN
WITH HILLMAN
FOR GUIDF[
MILWAUKEE OFFICERS SEE MIS
SOULA UNDER GOOD CHAP
ERONAGE AND LIKE IT.
A. J. Hillman. general agent of the
Milwaukee at Butte and formerly lo
cal agent at Missoula. spent yester
day in tow W, introducing to Missoula
business men Samnuel Wilson. assist
ant general freight agent of the
Puget-Sound lines, and E; P. Thomas,
the newly-appointed local freight
agent at Missoula.
Mr. Wilson shares with the natives
the enthusiasm with which they re
gard Missoula. "You have a delight
ful city," said he yesterday, "and I
am charmed with it. Your location
is ideal and your people have taken
advantage of it. Your improvements
are substantlal. 'lissoula has a fine
reputation everywhere."
Mr. Thomas, who is making the ac
qualntance of the city which is to be
his home, says he likes it. "I an
st re t shall be well satisfied here,"
said he yesterday. "It is a beautiful
place now, even in the midst of a
storm, and I am sure it must he
wonderfully fine In the summer. Your
mountains and your streams are at
tractive. They tell me there is fine
fishing here. I am enthusiastic over
fly fishing and I shall be anxious to
try these streams as soon as the sea
son opens."
WORK IN THE STORM
Acting in connection with the hu
mane society, the city police depart
ment caused 30 horses to be stabled
which had been left standing in
the storm, yesterday morning and
Wednesday aftornoon. Most of the
horses were found tied in alleys.
City Herder Pasley did great serv
ice in the storm of Wednesday after
noon, by taking charge of the little
children, dismissed from the Willard
school, and seeing that they all
reached home safely. Mr. Pasley
saved a lot of worry on the part of
parents and prevented a lot of suf
fering among the kiddies.
ELRODS HOME.
Mrs. M. J. Elrod and daughter,
Miss Mary Elrod, returned home last
night after hMving spent several
weeks visiting in Minnesota.
SOGIAL DANCE.
Everly Stl.natT nigbht at Elite hall.
MrAir l, .. b.M lslal Club orchestra.
Ualp4 teasr trt.-Av.
CLA1SSIPCAt.N AND SUIRVEY OF
AGR1CULTIJ*i:AL LAND IN FOR,
ESTS 1:tl! [1i PROBLEM.'
The simpitf cai.tlh of the procedure
in the elaseifieattegand listing for eni
'try of forest hesit.steads under the act
of June 11, 1908, and the rushing of
this work in office and field so that
the available land may be settled upon
without further delay were unani
mously approved an the result of the
discussion of the forest homestead
classification work as taken up by the
forest supervisors at their meeting
yesterday. In spite of all the efforts
made by the department of agriculture
in this matter there is yet a consider
able amount of delay between the time
a settler applies for land and the date
it is restored to entry. At the pres
ont time a detailed survey is required
of each forest homestead where the
land is unsurveyed before it can be
listed for entry. Trhen the final sur
vey is made under the direction of the
surveyor general of each state the
work being carried on by the forest
service. Where both the prelimini
nary and final surveys are made by
the service it is believed that the first
examination can be considerably sim
plified. A survey which will defi
nitely locate the tract of land sought
is sufficient for a preliminary; then
the same work will serve as a. basis
for the final survey. This was not
possible under the old iplan when the
forest service made the proliminary
survey and the settler was required to
provide his own final survey. But
under the act of August 10. 1912, the
service took upon its shoulders the
responsibility of the final survey as
well as the preliminary running of
lines. This saves the homesteaders
from $100 to $150. per claimn. When
it is understood that on an average of
1,:100 forest homestead applications are
handled each year and that approxi
mately 276,000. acres of agricultural
land has been restored to entry since
the passage of the act of June 11, 1906,
the significance of the simplification
of methods, the saving of the final sur
vey costs to the settler and the dis
patch with whtih this work should be
carried on is very clearly shown.
Examinations in Advance.
In additioný to examining forest
homesteads under individual applicas
tions large areas are examined annu
ally in co-operation with, the bureau
of, soils in advance of these applica,
tions. Five of these great land classi
fication projects were outlined during
the past year. Two df these are com
pleted and a third is nearly finished
and in these there are 17,000 acres
which will be listed immediately for
entry.
Rutledge Floor Leader.
The discunssiqns) yesterday were led
by Assistant tDistrict Forester Rut
ledge of the office of lands of this dis
trict. He called fromithe supervisors
many practical suggestlons relative to
the technical side of the work which
were of much importance to the forest
ers assembled, although of little public
interest.
During the afternoon session F. E.
Bonner, chief of geography, told of the
work of the crews under his' charge
making the entry surveys for the set
tlers. Three parties have been m.in
tained in the field on. this work all
this season and two additional, crews
will be needed for the. Work of the
coming season.
Today's session will be devoted to
silvwicultural problems. Donald Bruce,
assistant district forester in charge of
that office, will act as floor leader to
day. . -L. E, W.
DECSION-DAY PIO!RAM
LAST ENOEA SEICE
This is Decision day with Missoula
('hristian Endeavorers Ndt the final
progralm of the week of,eervices will
be held this evening at, the Christian
church. This will be one of the best
meetings of the series and everybody
is invited. The program, which is to
begin at 7:45, is follows:
Program.
IHymn--Union choir and congrega
tion.
Prayers-Mr. Rotbertson, Miss Anna
Davis and J. J. Joinis.
Scripture lesson-T. A. Harkness.
Special music.
Three-minute talks-(a) "Decision
for Generous Giving," Miss McLaugh
lin; (b), "Decision for Faithful Com
munion. with God, the Q1tiet Hour,"
Miss Josie Jones; (c) "Decisioa for
Entire Fidelity to the C. E. Pledge,"
Harry Schug; (d) "Decisiod for Tem
perance," C. E. Burnett; (e) "Decision
for Definite C. E. Missionary Work,"
V. L. B'ullis.
Address-"A Decision for Christ and
His Church," Rev. .. N. Maclean, D.
D., Presbyterian church.
Hymn and benediction.
Ii
LECTURE POSTIONED.
The lecture, which was announced to
be given bY Herbert Inch this evening
at the Methodist church, ..has been
postponed on account of thie storm. A
later date will be chosen and the pub
Iic will be invited to hear the trave
logue which will he given by the very
young speaker and illustrated by
views collected by the, ygung. man
during his travels.
LICENSED.
A marriage license was issued yes
terday Afternoon to P;rgk..A,. Curtis
and Nannle E. Callah, p, both of
Waram b-rings. --Bride atk-groom are
a.taches at the Satt. , . -
NEW SCHEME SQ PUNLIC MAY
PARTIC1PAYr IN ENG,.ISH AND
tiTERATURE CLASSES.
The departments of English and lit
erature at the university are offering
several courses which are open to
visitors and which should prove at
tractive to citizens of Missoula. In
most of these courses instruction is
given by lecture or discussion, so that
it is possible to get considerable from
them even if one is utable to do the
assigned readings andlexercises.
Besides Miss Corbin's well-known
courses on Wordsworth, Tennyson and
Browning, and on the Amer:can poets,
she is offering for the first time "Pres
ent Day Poets," in classes which meet
on Monday and Friday at 11:30. This
deals- with the work of poets since
Tennyson and is sure to be Interest
ing. Mr. Coffman's t'haucer at 10:30
on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fri
days is an admirable introduction to
the literature and life of the middle
ages and to a form of English of
which the very difference adds to its
charm. Mr. Reynolds offers two
courses open to visitors: The Short
Story, Monday, Wednesday, Friday,
8:30, in which the reading of a large
number of modern short stories is
used as an introduction to the prob
lems of criticism, and the Bible as
literature, Tuesdays and Thursdays,
10:30. In this course all questions of
religious interpretation are avoided
and any version of the Bible may be
used, attention being fixed on the lit
erary forms exemplified and their
characteristics. A few introductory
lectures will discuss the history of
the various versions. Mr. Holiday's
course on * English prose, though
offered last semester may be profit
ably begun at this time, since it will
deal with English prose from Elia
beth to the present. It meets on
Monday and Wednesday at 1:30.
It is hoped that all persons inter
ested in these subjects and desiring
these.courses will arrange to attend
them at the hours announced rather
than plan to secure them for special
clubs and organizations at some time
in the future. The instructors in the
department have been able to do so,
but the. courses can be given much
more satisfactorily at the university
where illustrative material is more
easily available and more time for
discussion can be secured.
Fees for these courses are as fol
lows: Present Day Poets, $2;
Chaucer, $3; Short Stories, $3; Bible,
$2; English prose, $2-the amount be
ing determined by the number of meet
ings each week. All classes meet on
the second floor of the library building.
ESTIMATE IS MADE
OF MUCH MONEY
FOR SCHOOL
MANY THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS
WILL BUY EXPERT TEACH
ING FOR KIDDIES.
An estimate of the money to be ap
propria~ted by school district No. 1 for
various uses from February 1 to No
vember 30 has. been made recently by
the committee of the city school
board. It is interesting to note that
while the amount is $700 less for 1914
than it was for the same months in 1918,
there is nearly $5,000 increase in the
appropriation for teachers' salaries this
year.
Last Year.
The items of expense for 1913 were:
Buildings and grounds, $3.547.80; fuel,
$3,482.52; water, $582.10; light, $146.35;
teachers' salaries, $52,488.99; janitors,
$5,417.50; library, $269.96; general ex
penses, $2,323.37; clerk, $1,000; insur
ance, $2,501.01; furniture and equip
ment, $654.07; supplies, $2,587.40; text
books, $1,925.57; total, $76,926.64.
This Year.
The items of estimated expense for
1914 are: Buildings and grounds,
$2,500; fuel, $3,000; water, $600; light,
$150; teachers' salaries, $57,000; jani
tors, $3,500; library, $275; general ex
penses, $2,500; clerk, $1,000; insurance,
$300; furniture and equipment, $400;
supplies, $2,500; text books, $500; total,
$76,225.
The school district is in good shape
this year. The cash resources for the
months from February 1 to November
30, 1914, are $80,000. The 'bonded in
debtedness is $147,000, including the
$21,000 bond issue recently voted. The
assessed valuation of the district is
over $7,000,000, and an assesment of 3
per cent is allowed by law.
-M. K. H.
GOOD SKATING.
Funds to the amount of $100, and
then some are needed by the manage
ment of the south side skating rink.
The clear snapping cold that will fol
low naturally after the storm of
Wednepday will make the finest kind
of skating, if only the rink can be
given proper attention. Contribu
tions, large and small, may be turned
over to A. 1. Jacobs at the Missoula
Trust and Savings bank and he will
see to their proper application to pro
vide good skating.
MONEY TO LOAN
On improved farms. Quick service
and reasoniable rates. Write or call
IThe SankihtW CorpOratlun; m eter Hit
alaii*P4 Main st4, MattpulqA-Mv..
for
c des ,,d
oaneer without It.
5c ii &&ack 8.es.
Eta .usa. a IMF wow'*9
STREET RAILWAY SYSTEM, IN
CLUDING BONNER AND FORT
LINES, ARE OPENED.
After a 30-hour shift of hard work
ind exposure to the cold and storm,
Superintendent Bickenbach of the
Missoula Street Railway company
went home and to bed at 9 o'clock last
night with the satisfaction of know
ing that every branch of his street
car system was open and that cars
were being operated as usual on
schedt le time.
Mr. Bickenbach and his crew
worked all afternoon and until mid
night Wednesday in an attempt to
keep the tracks open to the car barns
so all of the cars could be taken to
their stalls. The wind died down
about 2 o'clock yesterday morning
and as soon as this was evident the
ittack on the snow was commenced
it, earnest. The big rotary sweeper
was coupled ahead of the heavy work
car and the combined force and
weight of this train, with the brooms
throwing the snow out of the way as
't was loosened, was found sufficient
to negotiate most of the drifts and
the university line was opened about
0 o'clock. A couple of hours were
wasted when the sweeper climbed a
big drift out on the flat, but this was
the only time the car left the rails.
The Bonner line came in tpr atten
tion next and much to Mr. Bicken
bach's surprise, the same rig proved
equal to the huge drifts that had been
piled on the track eight or 10 feet
deep in many places. The run was
nade all the way to Bonner and regu
lar service was inaugurated again at
n . m.
Then the Fort Misroula route was
cleared, the ends of the cross-town
Ines were scraped clean and the sys
tem was open for traffic.
Hard Fiht.
"It was a hard fight," said Mr.
Blckenbach last night. "The boys who
stayed on the job with me are all
pretty well tired out, but they did
mplendid work and deserve the thanks
if our patrons. I am pleased espe
dially over the Bonner tino because it
looked last night as though nothing
short of a shovel crew could open it
up. But the combination train which
€Ne rigged up did the business. We
idl had a new experience. Our little
system don't seem very extensive, yet
n a storm such as yesterday's to
keel) open our 14 miles of lille was
found to he imciossible.
"The cars will all he running on
regular schodule tomorrow. Me for
the hay. Good night." -L. E. W.
PINCOT IS SELECTED
BY THE PROGRESSIVYES
Harrisburg, Pa., Feb. 5.-Gifford
Pinchot, former chief forester of the
United States, tonight was formally
invited to be the progressive candidate
for United States senator from Penn
sylvania to succeed Boles Penrose.
The invitation was extended in a reso
lution unanimously adopted at a con
ference of Washington party leaders,
group chairman, committeemen and
officials held here today.
PROFESSOR C.M.NEFF
HAS HARD FIGHT
IN STORM.
Professor C. M. Neff of the uni
versity had an experience in
Wednesday's storm that nearly re
sulted seriously. Mr. Neff started
from his home on East Front street
to the university by way of the Van
luren street bridge. When about
opposite the ball park, in the full
sweep of the wind from the mouth
of the canyon, he lost the trail, and
before he regained it was so ex
hausted that he determined to turn
back. He reached home "all in,"
and was several hours recovering
from the effects of his fight. His
ears and fingers were frosted, and
Mr. Neff could offer undliputed
testimony yesterday to the fury of
~.the storm.
we esiday .F' 1
WILLIAM MORRIS PREkiSTS8
OF
VuIRUE
By Cosino Hamilton
A great play, unfolding a
Great Truth. Everybody
should see it.
"A woman who allows her daugh
ter to struggle blindly through the
awakening years of her, women
hood is not fit to be a moher."
Prices 50c to $1,50. Seat
.sale, Tuesday, 10 a. n.;'"
Curtain, 8:15
tug a
.Progrant Today
Vaudeville
Emily Greene & Co.
DIRECT PROM THE
ORPHEUM
Presenting the iBig Comedy Sketch
A Minnesota Iomance
IT'S A SCREAM
Thomas & Ward
Comedy, Singing and Dancing.
VITAGRAPH FEATURE
TWO REELS,
Local Color
KALEM COMEDY
Only One 1int
Ruth Roland in the Lead
Bijou Orchestra
ALWAYS A "REAL 8SHOW
15c 15C 15c
Children 100
White Theatr
New Pictures Toila'r
504 No More-#-.
Sterling Mazdar
Give three tiles tbq !tht, Sad 4
better sort than the oriuinary, U !
ferior kind.
Our phone io Bell 538 black. Tell
us that we may -all asn demag.
strate those wonderful MAU3A
lamps.
J. A. CAVANDER
818 North 1N1giii4V

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