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The Daily Missoulian. [volume] (Missoula, Mont.) 1904-1961, October 13, 1914, Morning, Image 1

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THE WEATHER TE DAIT MTSSOU AN HEWEA
VOL. XLI. NO. 161. MISSOULA, MONTANA, TUES ..Y MORNING, OCTOBER 13, 1914. PRICE FIVE CENTS
RUSSIAN ARMORED CRU SER SUNK BY TORPEDO BOAT
BERLIN iOFFICIAL LIST~ RECORD TREMENDOUS LOSSES
GEN ZAP ATA
TERRORZ ES
MEXICANS
Outlaw Chief on Raid to
Suburbs of Capital
Heavy Fighting
HE FINALLY AGREES
TO ENTER CONFERENCE
Capital Deeply Stirred By
Raid - Washington Is
StiM Hopeful
Mexico City, Oct. 12.--An attack on
the night of October 10 on San Angel
and other suburbs of Mexico City by
adherents of Emiliano Zapata, caused
a reign of terror in the capital until
today. The suspense was relieved
when it was officially announced to
day th:at Zapatn's followers had agreed
to cease all fighting until the termina
tion of the peace conference between
the northern and son:hern constitul
tionalist gecnerals at Aguas C'alientes.
The invaders entered San Angel at
7 o'clock Saturday night and heavy
firing was, begun. The government
immediately impressed a number of
the striking streetcar motormen into
service and rushed 1,500 men with
arti!llg..to.,an p.el to reinforce the
garrison there.
Fighting in Streets.
Fighting in the streets between the
invaders and the defenders followed.
Xochimlle was completely surround
ed by the Zapata men and reinforce
ments were also rushed to that place
on tram cars, 'which were pressed
Into service. The authorities in Mex
ica City expressed a fear of a general
attack and families living in Coyoacan
and Mixcoac began moving into the
city.
Capital Spared.
The feeling of intense suspense con
tilnled in the capital until the official
statement gave assurances that Mex
ico City proper would not be at
tacked.
Delegates representing Zapata pre
sented a land reform scheme at the
Aguils Calientes conference today and
the matter was debated at length.
It is reported that a plan calling for
a commission form of government will
be introduced and voted upon in the
near future. This plan, which would
do away with the vexing question of
the provisional presidency, calls for
a commission of seven members, rep
resentiug all factions.
Washington Is Hopeful.
Washington, Oct. 12.-Hopeful re
ports reached Washington today of
the progress of the first day's work
of tlhe military convention being held
at Aguas Calientes to determine the
personnel of the future government of
Mexico.
Not only are Generals Carranza and
`Villa represented, but General Zapata
has sent three delegates, whose cre
dentials have been accepted.
GHENT IS iCCUPIED
London, Oct. 13.-The Belgian town
of Ghent is now occupied by the Ger
mans, accorcing to an Austrian dis
patch to the 'euter Telegram com
pany. Uhlans have arrived at Selzaete,
a short distance 1p.m Ghent, and the
commander announced that 6,000 sol
diers must be quarter,:d in the village.
YANKEE RED CROSS
ARRIVES IN BERLIN
Berlin, Oct. 12.-(By wireless.)--The
American Red Cross unit, which is to
serve among German and Austrian
f11 W1 ' P If
BIG WAR SNHIPF
IS SUNK BY
GERM.ANS
Russian Armored Cruiser
Pallada Torpedoed in
Ba'itic Sea
Petrograd, Oct. 12.-An official com
munication, issued today, announces
that on October 11, the Russian ar
mored cruiser Pallada was torpedoed
in the Baltic sea by a German sub
marine and sank with all of her crew.
The communication follows,:
"On iOctober 10, German submarines
were sighted in the Baltic sea. The
same day early in the morning the
submarines attacked the cruiser Ad
miral Makarov, which had stopped to
search a suspected bark flying the
commercial flag of the Netherlands.
"A submarine of the enemy launched
several torledoes, which luckily
missed the mark and caused no dam
age to the cruiser.
Second Attack.
"On nclohcr 11 at 2 o'clock in the
aflernorn tli submarines of the
enemy again , attacked our cruisers
Bayan and Pallada, which were pa
trolling the Baltic.
"Although t-he cruisers opened a
very strong fire, one of the sub
Imarines succeeded in launching tor
pedoes against the Pallada, whereupon
an explosion resulted and the cruiser
sank with all her crow."
The armored cruiser Pallada car
ried a complement of 560 men. She
measured 443 feet and had a displace
ment of 7,775 tons. HIer speed was 22
knots. With the Admiral. Marakov,
and the Bayan, she constituted a
group of cruisers known as the Bayan
class.
The Pallada carried two 8-inch
guns, eight 6-inch guns, twenty-two
12-pounders and four p-rounders, in
addition to torpedo tubes. She was
laid down in 1905.
OMINOUS SILENCE IS
KEPT BY THE ALLIES
THEIR FAILURE TO GIVE DETAILS OF TODAY'S
FIGHTING BODES WORST-PROBABLE THAT
RUSSIANS HAVE BEEN GIVEN BEATING
London, Oct. 12.-The finger of the
censor having twisted the tourniquet
on all sources of news from Belgium
just now, perhaps the most potential
ly important scene of the fighting in
the great war, the British people were
forced to content themselves today
with the official communication from
Paris and even a close analysis of
this showed no marked change in the
situation favoring either side.
From the east came tidings of a
decided reversal in form, the dis
patches both from Vienna and Petro
grad indicating that the Austrian
army at Przemysl, so often reported
surrounded, hopelessly outclassed and
on the verge of surrender, had turned
on the Russians with the aid of rein
forcements, and forced them to re
treat.
Przemysl Siege Off
The first news of this claim eman
ated in the morning from the Austrian
capital. It was followed later in the
day by what purported to be a Petro
grad administration that the Russians
had abandoned the siege of Przemysl
for strategical purposes, with the ob
ject of drawing up a new line against
the Austro-German army at other
points in Galicia.
Whatever may be the truth of the
situation, the Russians have been
claiming an unbroken series of vic
tories in their sweep through Galicia
and the coincidence of today's dis
patches, supplemented as they were by
more circumstantial accounts from
Vienna of a vigorous Austro-German
offensive, seemed to presage Im
portant news.
Armies Lost in Silence.
The Belgian and British troops who
retreated from Antwerp, with the ex
ing of the Americans was gratefully
acknowledged by the government. Two
groups will go to Austria and two
others t Breslau, when they will pro
,ef owshoplt appi .
IVAINI[E IDAHO UM.SATINON AC PLACES ALLiTHE iBR0EN
: UPON10$LRA TAXf__l OT_ TIN IHfIUSmI[SAFFECTED
MORE OF MR. J. H. C. REYNOLDS OF IDAHO AND HIS PROBABLE MOTIVE
IN COMING TO MONTANA TO ATTACK COMPENSATION-HELENA
"MASS MEETING"--CONVINCING PROOF FROM WASHINGTON
WASHINGTON ACT, ON WHICH PROPOSEB MONTANA STATUTE IS BASED,
DUES NOT IiNtUOE ARMERIABOR OR INMtNTAL WORK ON FARMS
Helena, Oct. 12.-(Special.)-There
has been sent out broado.lst to the
people of Mnlltana through the press,
under Ilelena date line of October 11,
a purported address delivered before
the Helena Commrnrcial club on the
evening of October 10, by .T. H. C.
Reynolds, chairman of a commission
appointed by the governor of Idaho
for the purpose of framing and sub
mitting to the next legislature of that
state a woriklen 's compenllisat ion law,
in which he is credited with severely
criticising and condemning the work
men's compensatlion la\. now before
the pe')le of Montana.
It is untdersil od that Mr. Reynolds
has been brought to this state by the
State of Montana Advancement ns
,ociation for the purpose of further
ing and hboosting the efforts of that
organization to defeat the proposed
l0ontan1a aI\w.
The "Mass Meeting."
At the meeting at which he made
his mnuch heralded address, there were
present but 1:, persons. all opponents
of workmen's compensations legisla
tion, inedluding 1M. S. Gunn, attorney
for the Northern Pacific Railroad
company, and one of the executive
committee of the Montana Advance
ment association, but there was no
stenographer there to report the re
marks made by Mr. Reynolds.
Following the so-called address of
the gentleman, it was suggested by
the president of the commercial club
that it was unfortunate tlhat a steno
grapher was not present to preserve
the remarks made by the gentleman
so that they might be sent broadcast
ception of those who now are in
terned on Dutch soil as a result of
having crossed the border, have been
swallowed as completely as if they
had, been buried under the ruined
forts. For military reasons, their po
sitions and the area of hostilities in
Belgium must remain obscure until
the turn of events brings them sharp
ly to the fore again, as was the case
when, after the fall of Antwerp, the
British public learned for the first
time that the British forces had as
sisted the garrison.
Optimistic," as always, the British
(Continued on Page Three)
FROWNING CANNON TO OVERAWE BUTTE
SOJMEGUARDS WILL GO, ]80 WILL STAY
Butte, Oct. 12.-(Special.)-There
will be another radical reduction in
the military force, stationed here, next
Friday, when three-fifths of the na
tional guards composing the present
command under Major Donohue will
be returned to their homes in various
parts of the s:ate. It is planned to
send home 250 men and keep about 160
here.
The reduction in the force will be
accompanied by an equally definite
change in the manner in which the
military will maintain law and order
here after Friday. It is the intention
of Major Donohue to turn control of
civil affairs in Butte back to the civil
officers, the national guards to be
held as an auxiliary force to support
the sheriff and police in case of need.
The present five companies by this
arrangement will be cut to two com
panies, under the command of four
officers for each. The guard lines will
*be discontinued and the streets around
the courthouse and that building will
be reopened to the public on the old
footing. The purpose of this plan is
to put` upon the civil officers the en
tiJe.diluty of upholding the law and.
lnehs9 ,oveaet noi the "it
to the people tf the state, to which
Mr. Gunn was nllik to respond that
that feature of the unatter had been,
lproperly altended to, and that full
publiceity would he given. This, of
course, meant that Ithe iMontani Ad
v\'anmeent "as.,i:tlion liad nmade all
necessary nrranglle.melntsl to hplay its
part of the gane', which was satis
factory.
No Burden on Taxpayers.
The Montana law, which iMr. Reoy
nolds so roinmily contldemnellld, esple
cially provides that the cost of ad
ministering that law shall he borne
extclsively by the industries ecoinilg
niider its provisions. tllus relieving
the taxpayers of the state of thatl
bu rden.
The law which Mr. lleynol, stands
splonsor for in Idaho, anld whicth het
has helped to prepare, lacmes the
lburden of its adtllllillistation upon Ithe
t:ixpa:yers of thatl state, and relie\es
the industries of its payiment.
Thei Idaho law is a law framed in
the interest of the corporatilons oC'
that state, and to thle disaidntalta.lage
of the people as a whole, and this is
the law which Mr. ReynOlds says is
better than the Montant law, and
which tie Montana Ad\'vancement as
sociation desirs to have\ substituted
in place of the "ieitian law. And the
fact that MAr. Reynolds participated
in the preparation ,of the same, and
stands sponsor for it, discloses his
disposition to serve the interests of
the corporation as against the inter
ests of tile people, by making that
Proposed law tmrovide that the peoplle
shall bear the burden of its adlmin
BERLIN CONFESSES
TREMENDOUS LOSSES
GERMAN OFFICIAL LISTS GIVE 211,000 KILLED,
WOUNDED AND MISSING, AND THE NATIVES
OF SEVERAL STATES ARE NOT INCLUDED
London, Oct. 13.-The 44
lists of losses in the Prussian
army which have been pub
lished contain a total of 211,
000 killed, wounded and
missing, according to a Reu
ter dispatch from Amster
dam.
The lists do not include
losses among the Bavarians,
Saxons and Wurtemburgians.
and county, with the assistance of
the military if required.
This will mean practically the re
sumption of civil law, although it is
not yet announced that martial law
will be withdrawn. The plan is yet
i o be worked out in detail, and this
may involve Home changes. All the
machine guns will be retained in
Butte, and one of them will be kept
with a guard in front of the main door
of the courthouse and another in the
same manner In front of the jail build
ing, ready for action.
As a part of this plan the sheriff
will ask the county commissioners for
25 additional deputy sheriffs.
LONDON PREPARES
TO GET A BOMBING
London. Oct. 12.-The only notice of
the arrival of hostile air craft in the
neighborhood of the Thames and the
Mbseway, says the mayor of Gravesend,
in' a proclaman posted today, will
be the firipg >as iU the defteue.
istration instead of, the industries :f
fected by it which are in fact the cor
porations. And tha ut is Jt what he
is endeavoring to do here in Montana,
and indicates why he ha1i I oonl
brought here.
Farmers Not Included.
The great cry of the Montana Ad
vancement association in its cam
paign ag.ailnst ,thie iroposed compelin
Ration law In this state, is that the
farmers com wivthin i ts pro\ isiols,
and they aire being alippealed to to
defeat the samte for that reason.
In treating of this feature of the
matter, anld its show ing how eeio'llusly
he considered the queIstion, the follow
ing is whatil Mr. lte:nIoIlds had to say
on the subject:
"Thoere seems to bIe some discuslson
In the indlns of sumo of the lpeolle
I hlave taltkad to here today im to
whether the W\ashington actI (which
it the same is the Monto act ) c'ov
ors the furtmer. There is absolutely
no question of this, either i11 theory
or in' pracltice, as in a great lmiany of
their operations farmters are contribu
tors to the state insulralnce fnllll."
A carefull realding of thiis statoineint
discloses the fact that the only reason
advanced by Mr. Reynolds to sustain
the assertion that the farmers do
come within the pro\'isions of the
Inw in Questslon is the fact that "In
a great many of their oplerations
farmers are contributors to the state
illnlran ce fundl."
ii will be nolticed that the geintle
man is careful to avoid the direct
(Continuel d Froml Page Iive)
ARMY OF PRISNERS
CAPTURED WITH
ANTW[RP
BELGIANS ALONE LOST 20,000.
GERMANS GIVE ACCOUNT
OF AISNE BATTLE
London, Oct. 12.--The fi,llowing of
ficial statenlnt hias oon revcleved
from Berlin by wirel.as;
"Enormous (quantties of pro\'ilons
of ill kinds were capntured in Ant
w Trh. The garri.on of the northern
fort and 13,000 English fled to II[dI
latnd, where they were disnarmed. The
Englisih themnselves are siod to ha ve
hlown pilt 10 of the Antwerp forts. The
Ilelgiunt estimlnate tlhat they lost 20,
000 mcn asl Irisoniiers. W.hen the fall
of Aontwerpl was malllde known to the
allies, the F'relnc:h cavalry was with
drawn In the direcetion iof Arlas.
"The inierrupted artillery en;tagv
ment in the Woever region, was re
simned October 11. At the saome tillme
the German right wing and center re
s.lmed the Ibombarldmnent of ltholtns.
"On the whole, the situation for the
Germans is favorable.
"Before his deplnrture for the front,
Emperor William promoted Prince
Joachin, youngest son of the emperor,
to the rank of cavalry captain."
The notice adds: "Persons seeking to.
gratify their curiosity will do so at
their own risk. When firing is heard
the people should immediately take.
shelter in the lower room.l or cellars
of their bu lugin ,;
TWELVE INNINGS OF BASEBALL
WITH VICTORY _FOR BRAVES
IN ONE OF HARDEST FOUGHT CONTESTS OF ALL'
WORLD'S SERIES, BOSTON AGAIN TAKES
ATHLETICS DOWN LINE TO DEFEAT
EVENING STAR SHINES DOWN ON CLOSE OF NIP
AND TUCK CONTEST, IN WHICH BAAVES NOSE OUT
eit fought ;111ie.t' evir Itl;i 1 in u
worl'ld's s.ti'les, 'the Iornton BIr;vtes dr
iaited the Phllaidelpl hia: .\ thhtlic. :iI
F"enway piark today hI I ore ofII
to 4. Twelve innings of lthrillinlll
Iasebaill were nileeH:IyiI' lie fole h11
National lnagell representi.:lits cotvi il
record their thirdl consect'illiie victory
of the series.
Hardest of All, Perhaps
So blitterly was the stirniule cotntest
ed by both teaiiisi that, with ithe pos
sible exceptlition of the finitl gile lle
twienll the New York (l;ants and thell
lHotton Iedl Sox ini 1912, nothing
equlilling todaiiiy's plaiy lias bIon re
corltdeld htlicee the world's seritH hini:in
iletor natitonal cot mission anllslpitsH ill
1905.
Nearly Dark
lFor lthre hotirs mitl ix mlilllnit thI
two tniisll -i altel'rnatelv, Ihtl , lied, or
c'"tlirg ahel ld tin the score ;t"h l thi l
gaiine thait luiuuiin in hiight sinlighl
wais Viwon in detil, twilight with ehlctrih
signs flashing outsile 0t, i tnltk and
tlho OV'tilng tair glitlnlirll t ovel heatd.
While trot the hioet phlyed 1.1t ifi'
thoe series fromn tile viewloint oi l
technicic il haiiseltll, It wvtq ne l; tilollid
t .g in iidrnni tilt ttinentsM, thrilling
plays iiil lhialittll strtili. lirit ithe
,35000 slpett,( i' +,ors who filled t He ta:lllls
were lifted to giretti hihtts ou1 i h:
isi bliy the ttrugglie.
Now palaiyt.irs Iiinnlii to nli lihes in
lthe worldl's sleries hnll of ftloame iltd
others suffered the tnill'orarv censure
of the fiiins, ibt when Ih winn inlig inli
fiinlly crossoed lhe pintl in the diiusuk
thie generall slentimenliiit x 1 fei W It x- wias
a splendid iguno to \in ;1 a trying
one to lose.
Braves Joyous
The Brltiveis riushed jol,i ousl fromii
the field, detlermhineld o clinc'luh the
chianpionshiit litle of 19lt iwith ia
foiurth victoliy tiinorrow, while thll
Aliletes, tiil itin iid i 'l r ve, filedi
slowly out iol thl park still hopleful
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7

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~Pi
LESLIE IBUSH
that their famous machine would yet
arise to the emergency' that 'aced it.
To retain the honors won last fall,
the ulacknoen must win thle ntext four
games, a task generally considered
impossible by followers of baseball.
The odds on the Boston club tonight
are three to one, with little Athletic
money in sight.
Fighting Spirit
,.The most striking feature of the play
was the fighting spirit shown by the
youthful combination that Manager
George' Stallings has gathered around
him to represent this city In the sen
ior league. Repeatedly the Philadel
phia team would battle its way into
the lead. only to witness its rival
draw alongside again in the same or
the succeeding inning. Never once
Ma tho c
STRUNK IS OUT
I'hil:l Illh, ()et. 1-t.-ltrnl,
.1tl·,rfi'hlh ·r i lo t lllii thihll.ll ltlhia
l 1Th, \\ill t Iout of the v:lllni for
hlh rs'l t, the se.t'1iet, it V:a ls ,g pt hd
tinll ht. \VhI ,I thu,, Pi h i iidolc 1111h
I r n" e 1"i:I 1 t lit lll' , flol llllFo i\ttvoy park
ih. fm l ltilnd trunlll t hail onet hand
SIll'i nh ll iitn ili d tll o ieti lll t of an
b1 IescT W'hiill h:Is hool llf O lll l l for
rt il tliys. tis losest will hi felt
lnrlit'ullrly ity tl' .\lhhleties he
'allisi, liin l todayl lie W thl,' only
laillu oft l t e Anti o i n l.nI.' irse to
il l l l t in l formll 'Il
l'h, l'hill lelphiiiln tolight snlid
lth y \.tiul etlt i the series. It
i 1 t toed I Il th Im ith t I tll l l ral' Oe
li rell fI rtlig ilt thl top oi f their
h.i thiil h le Athlletiis \vtfrO far
bhlo theIt' ul ial T ly.tiig ability,
li Ik.r, in liarticuli r, pointotl out
his sluip in hulling. 1II declared
li T i, not ull der ilii staiu.tll why he
shuhl ik t t\ ti i t ict t in sTilleces
iioltslll did Iho itfr',ein (ce ise their at.
tlia tk. thit frilll an indivi lual d rand
slldheli\th ,hiewptoliut they d(sertVed the
t i arill'y ltl y \Vt l.
How They Tied
tit score-, +.l!,lll il rilt itwrloss the
plate in Ito olening. inning; on M rti
pity's itwo-h..t hlilt off Tyler's dellv.;
,ry. II mo ted to third oiln (ldring's
sacriflce ailtl sorlld when Connolly
dropped ('1inhs' high fly. The Braves
tlhI lil t score in tiho stond Inning on
Miranville'h \valk, stial of second, and
n sprint I, the plate on Golvdy'sy dou
bl' into h'lft fihi bleach rst.
In the foirth oeih team added an.,
othei.r 1-ili. I'For the . thlh tics, Mclinni
tlunihall il the same sprit ant scored
(in \';ilsh'.s single to left. Hohmidt re
splondled for tihe home l ant with 14
single over second. :dvanced on Deal's
out 1nd1 counted on Maranv'lle's single
to right.
With the score 2 to 2. the play con
tinuitl \itlhout advantage one way or
tho other until tihe tenth inning. The
;lacknllen begtan the extra session by
scoring two runs when Schang singled
to left and was safe on Tyler's late
throw to second on Murphy's grounder
to the pitcher. After Oldring was out
Collins walked and Schang and Mur
phly scored on Baker's single.
Gowdy Starkts Rtsly
Gowdy started the Brnves' :.glvp
with a home run in the bleaobers beck
of center field. Moran got & u.atoft
Bush, went to third ott , - <<5l.'
over second and carse hore on CCoal

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