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The Daily Missoulian. [volume] (Missoula, Mont.) 1904-1961, October 20, 1914, Morning, Image 4

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IME DAILY MISSOULIAO
Published Every Day in the Year
MLISSOULIAN PUBLISHING CQ.
Missoula, Montana
mEtered at the postoffice at Missoula
Montana, as second-class mail mattes
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(In Advance)
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Hamilton Office
123 Main Street, li:.:. iton, Mont.
SUBSCRIBERS' PAPERS
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the best carrier service; therefore, sub
scribers are requested to report faults
delivery at once. In ordering papei
changed to new address, please give
old address also. Money orners anti
checks should be made payable tc
The Missoulian Publishing Company
TO ADVERTISERS
While The Missoulian takes ever)
reasonable precaution to guard againsi
typographical errors in its advert:sinc
columns, printers are but human anc
we will not be responsible for errors
which may inadvertently occur.
Missoulian Publishing Company
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1914.
A DECLARATION
I warn our opponents that the
fight has only just begun. What
ever may betide in the future, of
one thing the disciples of an easy
opportunism may rest assured-I
will never abandon the men and
women who drew around me to
battle for these principles. They
and I stand with our faces toward
the morning; we will never be sun
dered from one another; and we
will never yield the ground we
have taken or flinch from the fight
to which we are pledged.
-Theodore Roosevelt.
THE ERA OF CANS
Ever notice that with the eannet
drama, canned music, canned fond ani
canned what-not, people begin to de
niand, in this busy age, canned poli
tics, as well?
Longwinded speeches and statemcent
no longer get by. People will not ,r
to hear them, they will not read theie
The candidate w\ho wants to get thenr
must cut it short.
This happy state of affairs in till
result, first, of the increasing valule o
time; second, of wider spread educat
tion. Nowadays, a larger and largec
per cent of the voters know as iniuel
about the issues as the aspirants-
and people always chafe when they err
told what they already know.
AISNE BATTLE.
More intimate details of the Iattlt
of the Aisne indicate that the suc(ess
es of the allies were *. in meains whatI
we in Acmerica li t . ! r, led to Ibe
lieve.
Berlin inow iegil ' Jo llmore co
pious reports and .,, mnay get troth
sides of the struggle.
ti war, it is only hluccnc to x icgger
ate victories tanid lcinicize defeats.
fMost collllnilll ers have i done so.
The battle Iof the Macrne, take it all
in all. was a Germcan defeat; the btct
tie of thie Aii-e \as a standoff, for
the Gerimans tooki Antwerp duriing its
culration idi pa\cved thle way for IllOre
dc cisic-e action.
A stout healrt, I riend, aid at stiff
upcer lip --th-use are ar' .c .
lid Ycc you cic out hc. piccture of the
lielgian hal,,, thie orpcIc n with hote
broken doll? That sMlouil 1--h c ,one
into your Ilible.
A grin doesn't cost cllllhl--and it
S.-ves In Lcih.
Perhaps Solomon, if he had ever
been coihsuclled oil the mIattier, would
have decided that the height of wis
domn is to know whe(n > let iiellellollgh
alone.
A fool and his ",atiey are soon
started.
Wait till you begin to pony up the
war tax.
Villareal may (become provisional
president of Mexico, but Villa will be
the real boss.
Sometimes, it is a long time b-tween
thinks.
And the laugh isn't on Count Zeppe
lin any more.
Some men never make anything stick
-pt1 tfate gives them a paste in the
OUR FINANCIAL PREPAREDNESS
The roots of our preparedness run back to 1907. In 1897
= began the reorganization of the bankrupt railroad proper
ties soon followed by the industrials. This condition of ac
cumulations following the '93 crisis was of such magnitude
that these reorganizations swept with accelerating velocity
up to and including 1905.
Clouds here and there appeared to be.soon dissolved. The
momentum however had become so great that the indif
ferents in both classes had been swept in, and then came the
; abrupt recoil of 1907.
The heretofore accepted theory that wealth under the
benignant conditions of peaceful competition increased
g twice as fast as population had been shunted into the limbos
of hasbeens, and the resources of the country was multi
plying by new ratios.
It was a period of financial drunkenness. Fortuitous
conditions in fields and mines with their combined unpre
cedented outputs were mute conspirators in this economic
orgy.
The last four months of 1907 discovered to the financiers
of the country, the futility of capital made from the wasp of
financial jugglery. They again realized in the broken reeds
on every side that only two sources, "nature's powers and
man's powers," could be relied upon.
However the cry became insistent that the source of trou
ble lay in the circulating medium-money-was falling be
t hind 'in its functions and adaptability to the new order of
a things.
Sight was lost of the economic requirement that stability
disappears when untoward capitalization becomes regnant.
The immediate result was the National Monetary Commis
sion with Senator Aldrich and Representative Vreeland as
chairman and vice chairman. After wide and laborious in
vestigation and study this commission put upon our statutes
the law bearing their hyphenated name which was first in
voked last August.
From 1908 to 1914 the country in the old-fashioned way
had been catching up to its apparent capitalization of 1907.
Six years of fair and sometimes vigorous retrenchment had
brought the circulating medium into natural relationship
with our capital.
The banking conditions of this country were never in a
stronger position to meet financial shock than July 29th.
This cataclysm, had it happened in 1907, would have
found weakness where, in 1914 it found strength that is
equilibrium between capital and demands.
We held, to only mention three items, nine hundred mil
lion bushels of wheat and sixteen million bales of cotton,
transmuted into money, sixteen hundred million dollars
to which add our gold of eighteen hundred million dollars
and in these three liquid assets we had three thousand four
hundred millions.
Back of these factors in ability wealth lay the power of
individual initiative in so moving and placing these elements
of actual capital that the future was looming bright for in
dustrial enlargement..
The clock struck with the declaration of war by Austria,
completely disorganizing for the time the productive ma
chinery of the United States.
Society is an organism, and its unification world-wide.
That the banking machinery of the country was equal to
the sudden and tremendous demands by the five great pow
ers upon its immediate resources has been already amply
proven. The first week of August and by the declaration
of war by England the financial poise had been regained
and the whole country was arranging for its new conditions.
This country, however, must realize henceforth New
York and not London will be the financial center. While
we are without the war zone our position as financial over
lord will demand the highest type of bank management ab
solved from promotions in any form.
WORKM EM'S COMPENSATION INITIATIVE
MEASURE DISCUSSED BY MADEEN
Accidents to narchinery used in in
dtusries haive litng been contsideredu an
element illn arriving Iat the cast of
production. More recently death or
tile los of ealrning power 1,by reason
L" ,L(LidenIt to ,ipersons engaged in
certain occiipationis ;Ind due to the op)
orition of the bulsiness h:\avte becoime
recognized aIs Lanother ('lemiLent in the
'ost 4f llrolu.!Ltio . (I's alty insur
ance carried ].y miilloyers is another
elellient Ihat necessarily ntlers intoll
the ILst of produltc.ion.
T't'e cont of expense Ito the oimniu
nity or state in enring for those r:il
Ipled or incaieacitat ed for self support
Iy ea.. reason Lof .cidental injuries due
to the operation of industries, and
whlihlt fall not upoiin the emlployer or
lonsulller, but on the taxslayer, is Ia
considrralle eliLntcll entering ilntol the
cost of prodrlltionl which has hereto
fore tbeen overlookel.
These costs ,f pI'ro(lLdtion are at
present bolrne l:lrgely Lby the worklmen
and taI:payers. The injustice lies inl
that the employer pocketing his prof
its and the consumer of the finished
prodiit or user of the service which
the business supplies, are not paying
their share of the cost of that which
they are getting;.
The progressive state convention in
dorsed the proposed workLman's coin
pensation act, to he voted on Notem
ber '3d. It niIy be noted that it is al
nost identical with tIhe measure passed
by the almost unanimous vote of the
house of the last legislative assembly,
but blocked in the stronghold of the
interests, the senate. It may be of
further interest to bear in mind the
sources of the present opposition to
the proposed law and the methods
employed. Literature, cards, etc., are
frequently distributed to farmers by
representatives of the big corpora.e
interests of the state, showing an un
IIusual solicitlde for the farmers on
nccoln i of the porsihle burden to him
bIy reason, is they claim, of being in
Seluded in tthis hill. If these same in
terests had heret ofore m:tle even a
plretence of hcfriending the farmers,
thelir protest:lillns might be entitled
to considra:ctin. Since when did the
invisible government of Mon'ana, in
this instince visible, becomne the guard
i.in of the farmers' rights?
In the first place, the law, by enu
Iner;ting certain industries as includ
di1, by necessary implication excludes
those of the same or similar classes
not enumerated. That is one of the
cardinal rules of st;itutory construe
tion.
Secondly, the Washington law is in
tis reslpect similar to the proposed
Montlana act and the rule established
in that state is that farmers are not
included, even when engaged in clear
ing and grubbing wih machinery, as
incident to the business of farming.
The compulsory feature is also ob
jected to,) urging the elective plan.
Some so-called elective laws, notably
O1hio, Nebraska and Iowa acts, take
away the defenses of assumed risk,
contributory negligence, negligence of
fellow servant, in case the employer
refuses to come in, thus compelling
employers to elect and really amounts
to conlmpulsory election.
Another argument advanced Is that
in self denfense, industries will not
employ any but single men, without
dependents, is equally puerile. That
iargument applies with greater force
under the present or old system, as if I
workers have no dependents, there is c
Sno one entitled to maintain an action i
or claim for damages in case of death
from injuries.
'It appears to me the question to bee
* inE Mh)3tJUIAAN
$pr of thi Mouiut
17 By Roy K. M luiton.
r-'j AN AUTUMN WAIL.
3By gum, I hate to go to school;
I'd almost rather be a fool.
y I got to set in there all day
When I ort to go out and play.
I think it is a doggone bluff
eTo make us learn alot of stuff
- Which We ain't never goin' to use,
Just look at all the time we lose.
Who cares if Nero burned up Rome,
Or if the world is round or flat?
e I don't,' and I will tell you that.
I have to get licked every day,
It somehow seems to come that way.
j- If some kid don't perform the trick,
The teacher does it with a stick.
And when the teacher licks me bad
S I always get one more from dad.
- There's nearly always somethin'
l wrong
IRight from the first tan of the gong.
IThere ain't no peace for any kid
'S Who goes to school as I hat'e did.
f It makes me stubborn as a mewl,
S By gum, to have to go to school.
d UNCLE ABNER.
j If the war in Europe keeps up
every military expert in our village
will be discredited. About twenty
five of 'em have predicted the ma
neuvers wrong, already.
It doesn't make much difference
how much money a feller has got
Sjust so he has got plenty of it, and
- a man doesn't have to live to be 150
S years old to find that out, either.
A torn without a brass band is
like a family without a phonograph.
'S It is liable to worry along and have
a pretty good time in life.
Another thing that Job never did
was to try to unscrew the top off'n
Y a glass fruit jar.
Bud Perkins is so stingy that he
d stole a ham so that he could be sent
to the county jail and get a hair cut
P for nothing.
Miss Amy Stubbs, our village mil
a liner, says compelition is so fierce in
her line that there ain't more than
800 per cent profits in trimmed hats
e any more, &kd she is thinkin' of goin'
S out of buslaess.
There i. about as much secrecy
about a courtship in a town-of 1,200
as there is about a magazine explo
sion aboard a battleship. As-boon as
a feller and a gal are seen tpgether
in an ice cream parlor folks begin to
; wonder when they are going to git
r married.
If all the church members I know
are go!ng to heaven, it sometimes
seems to me as though I ain't so
d clurrted partikler about it.
It begins to look as though corned
beef and cabbage is a partnership
that ain't goin' to be dissolved in some
time-or digested, either.
There ain't no feller who is so much
of a bore as a professional optimist.
Every feller wants to laugh most
of the tinme but he has got to cry
once or twice a year to sort of oil
up the machinery.
FALL.
I cai'e not how the birdles sing
Their charming farewell sun'mer
lays.
I cannot say I'm crazy o'er
The beauty of these autumn days.
I care not how the leaves may turn
From beauteous green to burnished
gold.
I care not for the glorious skies
O(f fall the poets have extolled.
There's just one thought I harbor
now;
A thought that stirs my very soul,
All else grows pale beside the fact,
I've got to buy rely winter's coal.
Neuralgia of the face, shoulder,
hands, or feet requires a powerful
remedy that will penetrate the flesh.
BALLARD'S SNOW LINIMENT pos
sesses that power. Rubbed in where
the pain is felt is all that is necessary
to relieve suffering and restore normal
conditions. Price 25c, 50c and $1.00
per bottle. Sold by Geo. Freishelmer.
Adv.
settled by each voter for himself is
whether or not the benefits allowed
are just. are insufficient or excessive.
For instance, is $6,000, allowed for
death, a just award? The law is
framed on the theory -that labor shall
stand half and industry or consumer
half. A verdict of $12,000 would un
doubtedly he sustained by the cotirt.
Much larger judgments have been al
lowed. But in case of a lawsuit, the
lawyer would take half, and the in
jured party would be compelled to wait
from two to four years until the case
is finally examined in the supreme
court or the case may be reversed for
retrial or dismissed. Based upon the
expectation of life, it would appear
the award is not excessive.
Employers have heretofore eagerly
availed themselves of all the defenses
known to the law, the dilatory tactics,
the absolute denial, the defenses of
assumed risk, contributory negligence
and negligence of fellow servant, that
in a great many instances have worked
untold hardship on dependents of de
ceased and expense to the community
and state, and now that the laborer
and society demands some measure of
protection, it appears rather unseem
ly for tlem to pursue the course
adopted.
A full and frank presentation of the
tacts is always in order but efforts so
obviously intended to mislead can serve
no good purpose.
I shall vote for this bill. Very re
spectfully, ,:
RECKLESS QUOTATIONS By SARA MOB
.(CO"It ht, The Adams Newspaper . er. ice)
L I . .. . .......lnr n o fu iom o
4 -
VSl~as~s
t~r rnrni A pb6Et
,ýM ý t E f
f~) · ~*`
The Way They Take It
A PLAUSIBLE THEORY.
(Miles City Star.)
There is a s:rong suspicion that the
Europeans who are alleged to have
been killed by the mysterious agent
turpenite were in reality shot with
stray bullets from the Mexican fight
ers. In fact, a very plausible explan
iation of the alleged use, of dum-dum
bullets may be found in this sugges
tion.
PLENTY OF CANADIANS THERE
(Helena Independent.)
That Vancouver architect who was
given a sound roasting by his broth
er members of the board of com
merce because he said he preferred
the stars and stripes Instead of the
British flag, should move to Butte.
"OUR TIME WILL COME!"
(Great Falls Leader.)
The millions of India, of whatever
caste or creed, are loyal today because
the English have governed them more
justly and wisely than any other mas
Progressive
State Ticket
For Members of Congress
JAMES A. BRINSON of Butte.
WELLINGTON D. RANKIN of
Helena.
For Railroad Commissioner
JOS. A. WILLIAMS of Baker.
Progressive County
Ticket
For State Senator--
J. R. LATIMER.
For Representatives in the Legisla
tive Assembly
CHARLES N. MADEEN,
L. A. DEMERS,
L. L. BUL,EN,
A. BUTZERIN.
CARL E. CAMERON.
For Sheriff
W. H. HOUSTON,
For County Attorney
JOHN L. CAMPBELL.
For Treasurer
JOHN B. HENLEY.
For Clerk and Recorder
DAN H. ROSS.
Far Assessor
W. P. MACLAY.
For Auditor
FRED J. MURRAY. o
For County Commissioners
AUGUST HOLLENSTEINER.
For Superintendent of Schools
MINNIE SPURGIN.
For County Surveyor
EDWIN 8. HATHAWAY.
Hell Gate Township.
For Justice of the Peace
WILLIAM DYSON.
For Conte
ter ever did, because they are treated
with respect of person, custom and
faith, because they are given citizen
ship rights, because the ways. of pub
lic preferment are open to them, be
cause they enjoy a constantly in
creasing measure of independence.
Thus England is able to draw half
its field army fi'om India, leiving for
garrison duty and detail only a little
over 50,000 British troops amid a native
population of 315,000,000. There are al
together 160,000 native soldiers, besides
35,000 reserves and 20,000 troops be
longing to native princes. More of
these will come if they are needed.
While the loyalty of these orientals
sheds honor on England, and while the
common practice of warfare seems to
justify their employment, the specta
cle is a rather mournful one. It means
that two great nations, England and
France, have lost their ancient su
premacy to such an extent that they
must scour the world for help against
a neighbor trained for war as no na
tion has ever been before.
It means, however, that all Asia will
watch the career of these Asiatics In
Europe; that If the Hindoos play a
conspicuous role in the conquest of
Progressive State Candidates
Wellington D. Rankin
Candidate for Congress
Tuesday, October 20th, Hamilton.
Wednesday, October 21st, Missoula.
Thursday, October 22nd Plains.
Friday, October 23rd, Thompson.
Judge Jos. A. Williams
Candidate for Railroad Commissioner
Tuesday, October 20th, Stevensville.
Wednesday, October 21st, Missoula.
Thursday, October 22nd, Dixon.
Friday, October 23rd, Paradise.
Progressive County Candidates
Will speak at the following times and places in Missoula
County:
Saturday evening, October 17, Bonita, Brindley Hall
Monday evening, October 19, Frenchtown, Glaude Hall.
Tuesday evening, October 20, Bonner, Masonic Hall.
List of Reservation Dates for Progressives
Thursday afternoon, Oct. 22, Ravalli.
Thursday evening, October 22, St. Ignatius Opera Hotue.
Friday evening, Oct. 23, Fairview school.
Saturday evening, Oct. 24, Ronan, Opera House.
Monday evening, October 26, Leon'S.lobbl.
Gertnan , every Asivtic, bosom from
the Bosphorus to Tokyo will swell with
pride; that hundreds of millions of
yellow and brown nelt will hear of it
and say:
"The white man is not invinlcble.
He is not lord of the earth. White
men have called on Asia for help. Our
brothers of India have faced Europe's
strongest' and won. If they can do
it, why cannot we?
''Europe is grown weak in luxury.
Our time will come."
TUBERCULOSIS
In addition to plenty of fresh abt
ani proper diet, those uffering from
r who are predisposed to Tuberculo
sis are recommendedto use Ekmnan's
Alterative to stop night sweats, banish
fever and hasten recovery. This medi
cine, by reason of its successful use dur
ing the past, warrants the fullest avee
tiation possible by every sufferer.
lmaun's .Alterstive is most effica
eaous in bronchial catarrh and severe
throat and lung affections, and in up
building the system. It contains no
narcotics, nor harmful or habit-form
ing druag. Accept no substitutes. Bold
blea.an_ druggLits. Write to the
8crmran .dLbornaor P15t.ls.rl. . a.1
for kaoklet tel ..ai ef*rse
Prices $1 and $2 a bottle.-Adv.
Wax obtained by boilng the bitum
inous shales of central Poland and
Hungary is used for candles by the
peasantry.

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