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The Daily Missoulian. [volume] (Missoula, Mont.) 1904-1961, October 23, 1914, Morning, Image 7

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025316/1914-10-23/ed-1/seq-7/

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ý NAVAL
FIGHT
BRITISH TELL 'HOW THEY BEAT
GERMANjS - SUBMARINES
!* COMMENDED
London, Oct. 22.--Graphic descrip
tions of the battle oft Helgoland, in
which the British fleet -unk the Ger
man cruisers Mainz, Koeln and the
Ariadhe, and two trpendo t:eats de
.troyers, are contained in the official
reports issued tonight of Admi il Sir
David Beatty, Rear Admiral Arthur
Henry Christian and other officers
who took part in the action of August
28.
The report shows that whi!e the
Germans 'did not succeed in destroying
any British r14tps they fought with
great determination, and before the
arrival of the cruisers the situation, in
the words of Vice Admiral Beatty,
"appeared critical."
.The Lure.
The British fleet when it went into
action, was only 25 miles from two
Germin naval bases, and the ships
were maneuvered in the hope of bring
itig out the main German fleet, but
without success. 'The British were at
tacked, however, .by submarines, de
stroyers and light cruisers. One
British cruiser, the Arethusa, which
had been out of the builders' hands
ohly 48 houirs, '.s so severely handled
she had "td be t'akdn in tow after the
actiOh'wvas over.
'Vice 'Admiral Beatty commanded the
first 'battle cruiser squadron and first
light"croiser squadron, while Rear
Admiral Christian' comman'ed the de
stroyers and the Arethusa.
Work of Submarines.
"A special report was also issued to
night on the work of the submarines
since the beginning of the war. It
says that three hours after war broke
out, two submarines, unaccompanied,
carried out a reconnaissance in Helgo
lan 8t'Rightannd- returned with' useful
. t. dii. llatetna;ori. r;;, "., t..
.; , ~nS. inesalaso ,stopd guard night,
r n.·.ad nx whitera e,..pxppditonary
a. .forces~i v besIbe lag r A tryperbo, te 't le
It 1L qo6tinaa.:;,and ,hale been Lýi santly
,.P emltogedor theipeaeny:ss , castF' iii
I,. .uI:JlelgpldmndtiBiht. Aa ceiseeheee.
vc I ,arpaott oantfnuet , .. ':
I! :1 !:d hey.ha1e plbtained .auob v
" . itmformatitaenregardfing the comppsition
: a: ,.' sdsai remnttaeot his 'patrotsi They
'- ;":.te cGpedhid Waters and recon
a l"nieiteiiati.s4 atalldragd5, andww ile so
i: ,,eh'iagtl .hd.v be. ' r ubjected td skill
ful and:'Well-~iecuted 'tntilsubinarine
tct' h~, tflif''tdfor 'hurs atla time by
' t: y. tdb 6&'ft '~itid 'tttakef"i hyr gtn fire
{v 'dihd'(tjditbb dodi:; '' t J , . ,,.
StiHtfarlies tooblk pat in th' Aeg s
'"i&n';'tlittle, bdi- conditiord" '*ere not
' faoribie,' th. intvsi~bility being Ibw'
and' the sea' calm; tihere was' no op
portunity of closing with the German
cruisers to within torpedo range.
E-9's Feats.
Reference is made to E-9's sinking
of the German cruiser Hela and the
destroyer S-126. Dealing generally
with the use of these crafts the report
says:
"Against an enemy whose capital
ships/ have never and whose light
cruisers have seldom emerged from
their fortified harbors, the opportunity
of delivering submarine attacks have
necessarily been few, and on one oc
casion only-prior to September 13
has one of our submarines been within
torpedo range of .a cruiser during
daylight hours."
SANE DEMOCRATS.
Washington, Oct. 22.-President
Wilson . congratulated today J. F.
Duckworth, a North Carolina moun
taineer, on having been the father of
25 children and having voted the dem
ocratic ticket for 65 years. He told the
president he had 19 democratic votes
in his family.
III nas .umuly.
Where
Is Your
Rupture?
If You'll Mark Its Loostion on the
1elow Diagram ad Send It in
We Will aiL Treatment
ABSOLUTELY PREE.
THOUUADS WRIT Us or0 OURB.va
The Rice Method has brought such re
markable results to such a multitude
of former rupture sufferers, that it
scarcely needs any other ptoot of
Iti value. However, we are alwysr
wrlllng to prove it toany one who
may be Interested and -the beat
proof Is an actual trial. That'
why we now olffer yiou arbsLbsb.tr
treatmnent to asos what this
wonderful method can do In
as you can) the loelionofi your
trpturo on this diagram ofer
body marking or er
the ype. Bend this to
. RIO.. m, ,B
Main St.' Adams,
I ew ork. s
at aee. r
oreasas Itho beas-red-a
world' why youll rom so
should conatiou to through tie with
saffer hAe dooooe that repatre-It
for sand sartare of you don't do some
tbbichtb ,aas tb about I. Why
loag an sort 4 what this free
free Yourself ketmeastsade
tfnm its slavey - you? et. ea
Sead for this for It right
free treatment awa -this
s ed ly . vr asa l se. I
MANWITH ARMY
IN FRANCE
DIRECT NEWS FROM THE GER
MAN LINES-EFFECTIVE USE
OF MACHINE GUNS
Berlin, via The Hague and London,
Oct. 23.-While the German armies on I
the west wing are slowly pushing for
ward against the strongest opposition
in the region between Lille and the
channel,, in a campaign to straighten
out the flank, which, in the earlier
stages of the struggle, was bent back
almost to the Belgian frontier, in or
der to cover the communications with
the home land, the situation to the I
eastward, on the fortress line of Ver
dun, Toul and Belfort, has changed
but little since the end of Septem ier.
At St. Mihiel.
A report received directly from that 1
region by the Associated Press shows
that the German armies between Ver
dun and Toul still retain a foothold on
the west bank of the Meuse before St.
Mihiel, despite the repeated French
efforts to eject them. The Germans
apparently are content to hold .the
positions gained, p'ending the inaugu
ration of an artillery attack against
Verdun.
The captured barrier fort of Camp
Romains, now a part of the German
line, and a German bridge across the
Meuse protected by formidable works
at the bridge head, offer a thorough
fare for starting a wedge against the
center of the French line whenever
a resumption of this mass play is
deemed advisable.
The French attacks seem to come
more from a southern, even a south
easterly direction from the region of I
Toul, Nancy and Pont-a-Mousson
against the original flank of the .Ger
man position, then against the point
of the wedge at St. Mihiel.
Toul Is Too Strong.
The fortress positions at Toul are
too strong to offer the possibility of
taking them by storm and thereby
forcing a retirement . of the French
line.'
Southward of Toul, particularly in
the, Vodges `:moultaih regions compara
tive quietly prevailsi arid no 'major
operations appear to be In progress.
dug tY lho-L- -
trenches are marvels of ingenuity a.nd
the an o are snugly -en-,
sco 4e i-. ýelter pits. Even
the .eimMihg eral far in the
rear, ha mb-proof beside his
headqua l which he takes shel
ter if t my's . heavy attillery
chooses o d*, a shell or two in his
vicinity. . .
Machine Guns Effective.
"'Th macif'n 'guh is' W effective in
this warfare that advances require al
mqt as . elaborate sapping and dig- I
ging as did the old-style attack on
fortresses. The attacking force pushes
forward a successive line of trenches
which sometimes approach within 20
yards of the enemy. Mining and
counter-mining are used in the strug
gle for the trenches.
Aeroplane scouting is so effective
that batteries must be completely
masked by branches or even placed
in regular sod houses, to escape de
tection. It is regrettable that mili
tary requirements forbid a descrip
tion of some of the ingenious meth
ods of concealment.
Aeroplanes in turn have been driven
to high regions of the air by artillery
fire, particularly from anti-balloon
guns. They now scout at a height of
7,500 feet instead of 4,500, as they did
earlier in the war.
0. S. DRAPER NAMED AS
GRAND MARSHAL OF
ODD FELLOWS
Butte, Oct. 22.-(Special.)-The
grand encampment of the Odd Fellows
of Montana today elected the follow
ing: Grand Patriarch, F. E. French
of Kalispell; grand high priest, J. J.
Berkley of Great Falls; grand senior
warden, R. A. E. Collins of Butte;
grand junior warden, W. D. Bennet of
Anaconda; grand scribe, R. W. Kemp
of Missoula; grand secretary-treas
urer, Philip Dodson of Bozeman. The
four-day session of the Independent
Order of Odd Fellows came to a close
tonight with the installation of the
newly-elected officers of the encamp
ment.
Grand Master Wiley Mountjoy to
day announced the appointment of O.
S. Draper of Missoula as grand mar
shal and named various committees.
GERMAN EMPEROR
MOVES HEADQIIUARTERS
London, Oct. 23.-Emperor Williail
and the German headquarters staff
have retreated from Caenstochotva; in
Russian Poland close to the rilesian
frontier, into Silesia, according to a
dispatch troa War3W ri 9 Potrograd.
. ARE GREAT
IN CHANNEL
BATTLE
GERMAN CASUALTIES AS HIGH
AS TEN THOUSAND MEN
SAYS REPORT
London, Oct. 23.-"The total Ger
man casualties in the channel coast
fighting are estimated at 10,000," de
ciares a dispatch from Dunkirk. "Sev
en hundred Germans have been buried
near Nieuport. #
"Thirty thousand Ocrmans, who had
entreniched themselves between Os
tend and NeluDort. retired to Ostend,
leaving behind a great quantity of
equipment.
"It is reported that during the Brit
ish fleet's bombardment of the Ger
man line, the Germans lost a convoy
eight miles long, which was wrecked
by shells."
WASHINGTON THUGS
IN BATTLE l :ITH
OFFII[
ONE ROBBER SLAIN AND ONE
MEMBER OF THE PO.SSE
SHOT AND KILLED
Blaine, Wash., Oct. 22.-The band
of five men who robbed the First Na
tional bank of Sedro Woolley of $20,
000 last Saturday night and whose
progress northward through the
sparsely settled parts of Skagit and
Whatcom counties has been continu
lous since the robbery, fell into a trap
three miles north of the international
Ibundary here at 4:30 this morning.
and one of their number is killed ndI
a third wounded, when a posse inter
cepted them, A member of the posse
was also .instantly slain. The dead:..
Clifford Adams, aged 25, Canadian
4mmigratiot - inspector; shot throughl
brtin and heart
belt ,heavy with glgp coin.
, Wounded--E. H. Keith, special do
tective, Great Northern railroad.
: Unidentified robber.
The Battle
I The robbers, walking north on the
Great Northern railroad track were.
observed when they passed through
Blaine and word was .elephothed to
Canadian immigration inspectors at
Hazelmuir, B. C.
Adams, Keith and Canadian Immi
gration Inspector A. E. Burke, met th,
.robbers on the track and Burke or
dered them to halt. Instead, the fore
most robber drew a pistol.
Burke immediately shot the fellow
dead. Firing then became general.
Adams was killed by the robbers' first
volley. Three of the surviving rob
bers took to the woods. The fourth
fled down the track and was brougnt
down with a bullet in his thigh.
The robber killed, and who seemed
to have been the leader, was short
and strongly built and had red hair.
He had $4,500 of gold in his belt. The
wounded man carried $1,700. The men
appeared to be Russians.
Are .l ala m.ea
GERMANY'S
COAST DEFENSE
Not Only Affords Protection
But Provides Base for At
tack.
Military experts say that the Ger
man coast defense is better equipped
than that of any other country in
Europe. There are about 200 miles of
coast line on the North sea and some
thing like 600 miles on the Baltic sea.
The great range of German batteries
and the broken in-shore of the North
sea will help Germany to prevent any
great onslaught from that source.
Along the coast line of the Baltic sea
are German batteries of great strengt'i
and range, and these fortifications
will doubtless prevent any enemy
from making much! headway.
Readers of The Missoullan will have
an opportunity of following the events
in this great war of nations through
an official map that is being pre
sented on the popular coupon plan.
Every day in this paper is printed a
war map coupon which is good for one
of these handy guides when presented
with the bare expense of distribution.
Out-of-town readers may take ad
vantage of the offer, as explained in
the coupon.
Owing to the great demand for
these maps the supply is limited, and
readers should present their coupor.a.
as soon as possible.
BRITISH GUNBOAT ASHORE.
London, Oct. 23.-The British torpedo
gunboat Dryad is ashore at Kirkwall
in the Orkneys. HEr crew was saved,
RIMR SAYS DIM
DIEl YESTERDAY
IN MADRID
MEXICO PEACE CONFERENCE HAS
FAILED, AS GEN. CARRANZA
WON'T YIELD
Mexico City, Oct. 22.-An uncon
firmed report received here tonight
stated that former President Diaz of
Mexico died today in Madrid.
Carranza Will Resist
Washington, Oct. 22.-The Mexican
national convention at Aguas Calien
tea, which recently voted itself the
sovereign authority in Mexico, has
appointed a committee of five "to as
sume the duties," of five cabinet po
sitions in Mexico City, according to
advices to the state department.
There are intimations that General
Carranza has refused to recognize the
sovereignty of the assembly.
Has It Failed
El Paso, Tex., Oct. 22-Advices from
Mexico City tonight indicated that the
Aguas Calientes convention already
had resulted in failure and would not
be renewed. An official telegram
from Guadalajara said military bulle
tins from the national capital reported
that General Antonio Villlreal and
others pf the a('arranza delegates re
malied today in Mexico City.
From the Villa side came little de
tailed over the censored wires running
from her south to Aguas Calientes.
Nothing has ben heard from General
Villa, who is at the head of a column
moving into Durango state, which has
been disrupted hy the revolt in favor
of Carranza by the Arrieta brothers.
AMAZING VICTORY
S WI[DIIEOTO
.... I (t
Lond~r) ' 43 f Victory is with
thousnid Irie
.4Qoners bettween
w. Threoe guns
encaptured."
' the burgomaster
+ tsnp, " n, is givdn in ad
sam td thq Central
uyne ovince of Wtt'
Is. on t an coast. Chal
SLou S pspectivcly in
p'Frenah dep ý;,t. of Marne and
Meurthe-et-Mo nearly 200 miles
southeast of #13 Belgian province
from which the above dispatch emta
nates.
SMruiln itrI Eflht la in
MEXICANS COALING
GERMAN WARSHIPS
Bordeaux, Oct. 22, via Paris, Oct.
23.-The captain of a British stennier
which has just arrived here from Mex
ico, declares that German cruisers are
being coaled by colliers operating
from Mexican ports.
Six colliers flying the Norwegian
flag, according to the British captain,
lay alongside his vessel at Vera Cruz.
BELGIAN VILLAGES
REPORTED ON FIRE
London, Oct. 23.-"The villages of
Schooten, Leftinghe, Wilskerko and
Slypi, in northern Belgium, are all
partly on fire," according to the Daily
Mail's Flushing correspondent.
"The Gcermans," he adds, "sere nmak
ing trenches and bringing guns and
machine LHuns to Zeebrugge, Ilppar
ently in preparation for a retreat."
W. A. CLARK DENIES
TALES OF ATIROCITIES
ATTRIBUTED TO HIM
New York, Oct. 22.-Former
United States Senator W. A. Clark
of Montana, who arrived from Eu
rope today, denied the authorship
of a report attributed to him, relat
ing to alleged atrocities against a
Belgian family.
The report was given out by
Prince Engalitchliff, former Rus
sian vice consul at Chicago, to the
effect that Mr. Clark had author
ized him to tell Americans that he
had care of a girl whose father had
been killed and whose mother had
been ravished by German soldiers.
WHO WILL WI
There is only one way to judge the probabilities in the terrific European conflict
of nations. Get your information and statistics from a reliable source. So much
contradictory- matter has already been published, that the average person is very
much at sea regarding the true conditions as they really exist. You want to
KNOW THE FACTS exactly as they are-the naval, army and aerial strength of
each of the great Powers involved in the big European war. Only then can you
judge the possible outcome.
Everything About the
WAR
The MISSOULIAN'S latest European War Map gives you the exact facts-the
number of men available for duty in army and navy, the classification of naval
vessels and aerial craft. There is also a vast amount of valuable information
about each country, national debts, population, previous tdecisive battles, etc.
Besides this there are sixteen portraits of European rulers, maps of the leading
,European capitals and strategic naval points.
The MISSOULIAN'S Big
War Map
Presented to ev- What You Get for lOe Besides
ery reader for the War Map M AIL
ONE Portraits of European Rulers
Army Strengtb European Nations ORDERS
COUPON Naval Strength, Men and Vessels
S Aerial Fleets, irltoibles and Aeroplanes This big Europe
printed daily in Chronicle of Nations Involved an War Map will
another acolumn Triple Allance and Triple Entente 'be mailed iri city
arid H'ague lte r al Pc.ilerence or out for
Area of European Countries
Distances Between Princpal' Cities
BDedsivel baitles of Past Cenlury Postpaid. Send
to cover promo- Maps'of Leading Capitals and Strategic coins, stamps or
tion expense. NBval Pollts money order.
This is positively the best, latest and most complete war map issued.
Don't be satisfied with an inferior 2-color makeshift. This map is printed
in 5 colors from plates by the best European map makers.
BOOT NOW ON OTHER
FOOT, DECLARES
BRITISHER
WE NOW STAND WHERE BRITISH
STOOD DURING THE CIVIL
WAR IN AMERICA
London, Oct. 22.--"Evidently an im
pression exists in the Ilnited States."
says the Morning post, In an editorial
today, 'that there has ieen criticism
in the British press of President Wil
son's regarding peace. This Impres
sion was fostered by undiue import
ance attached to certain Amnerican
newspaper ultterances.
"During the civil war our position
toward the United -t'late was tile
name as the United Stlates hold to
ward England today. We desired to
see the differences of the north and
south composed for ethical as well as
material reasons. Then, as nowv, (cot
ton was the cause of our anxiety. We
wanted cotton and could not obtain it.
Today the United States has cotton
butt cannot sell it.
"All this, perhaps, explains the
rnovement In the United States in
favor of mediation, a movemelnt whicth
is, no' doubt, encouraged by our one
mies. But the machinations of our
enemies and the schemes of others
who would turn the altar Into a
huckster stall, are well understood by
President Wilson, we are told, and
there Is no fear that the pr aident
will walk Into the trap."
BIG WAR CREDIT
IS GIVEN KAISER
Berlin, Oct. 22, via Amsterdam and
London-The Prussian diet met today
and passed war bills, including one
granting a credit of 1,500,000,000 marks
($375,000,000).
The house and the galleries were
filled. Many of the deputies, some of
them wounded, attended the session in
their military uniforms,
PORTUGUESE REVOLT
WAS SOON CRUSHED
Ilondon, Oct.. 23.-The attenmpt to
start al rcvolution in Portugal by roy
alilIs has been complleltely asupipressed
ays a. Lisb)on corr(esponldent. The
leader of the movement, LIelentn
('onstanilio ald 40 of lh?.' nthIerent are
said to Ihave beenII arrested.
BANQUET CLOSES
BAR CONVENTION
WasIHIIIIIgtOI, ()et. 22.--A dinner to
night in honor of the I'lited StateaI su
premlle c(ourt and commemlnorttive of its
1205th unnivert.:ry, plresided over by
former Prl(ident William II. Taft :and
attendll d by (hieif Jusltiho White and
the assnoi:ntlO justice s of the court,
closed the annullal meIlting of the
American liar association.
Peter W. Meeldrtim of Savannah, Ga.,
was elected presitlent.
The executive committee waIs em
powered to pasls upon the admission
of wolmen, three of whom have ap
plied for membership.
In at bristling defense of the supreme
court against its critics, former Pres!
dent Taft declared it was a permanent
and logical body. It outlived presi
dents and parties, he said.
"Look back through the history of
this country and you will find the op
position,"' he said, "and it usually
comes from the most popular presi
dents." I itu
Some scientists are predicting that
when the earth passes through the
tail of Halley's comet next month
the atmosphere will gain a supply of
carbon much needed by vegetation.
NOTICE
All bills payable to E. M. Demers,
e electrici4s, should be paid to me.
f SAM PULLIAMf,
S 'onstable Hell Gate Township.
-Mv.,
COAST DEFENSES
ARE IN BAD SHAPE
Washington, Oct. 22.-An urgent
a;,l for more tmen to garrison the
country's coast defense was made by
Itrigadier General E. Md. Weaver, chief
of coast artillery, in his annual report
to Secretary Garrison. Cailling atten
ti,,n to the fact that many of the for
eign warships of latest designs are to
carry guns larger tlHan 14 inches in
rclliber, .enrral We,'ver asked that
1i-ijll, guns Le provided for Cape
HIenry
ONLY TWO DAYS MORE TO
GET "HEART SONGS."
()tlr distribution of "Heart Songs"
has been wide and far-reaching. We
only regret that we cannot renew our-.
contract with thie publishers, whereby
no have been able to distribute thei
century's master work of song mtusic
ilamoing our readers at the bare cost
if distribution to ourselves. ebltlotl
Ilhas a book seemed to so completely
satisfy a want among the people. Thit
ist not to be wondered at when we re
flect that for more than 50 years past
the greater part of the present pop)1.
lation of this country has been prac
tically raised on the songs that appear
in "lleart Songs." The descendants of
the old settlers and of the soldiers orr
both sides in the civil war, heardr
their mothers, sisters and sweetheartsr
sing the only music that was then
known. The memories that extend
back over a lifetime are not easily for,
gotten. And this may be the reason
that the distribution of a book likea
"Heart Songs" has spread like wild
fire. Certain it is that none of the
more modern song music has taken
the place of the old melodies that.
seem always new and fresh. Comitr
operas come and go, ragtime flares up
and fades away, but the songs of our
fathers still abide with =ls. This, at
any rate, is what constitutes the pop
ularity of the book we hor'e been dis.
tributing far and wide. Our offer 5i'
to be positively withdrawn on Saturi
day next, which gives only three days
more to our readers. In order thba
none may be dlsappointed. we .pr.$.
thi notice. The coupon is pubt
elsewhere il toda;'s paºpe>l

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