OCR Interpretation


The Daily Missoulian. [volume] (Missoula, Mont.) 1904-1961, November 17, 1914, Morning, Image 1

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025316/1914-11-17/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

Ykl rl i. `rY
-110447 1· i·:.
VO.XLNº; ýý , . ISt b : C ABTU aE E 7-11
` .- w"d: .+ý1, ~' Ný. :ý:ý+ i4s `ý ",, {h kk' .i v7T. .}t;7 + ,4
·~I· v.
YILL,
Ylltl
TO:
Carr~knz. g
VILI' wQLP1L AKE
STOUR F. ST TES
He Has Long Desired to l
Come to Ame.i.a iand
Will NoW I." So
San Antonio, Texas. Nov. 16.-En
rique C. Llorente, special representa- 2
tive to Washington from the Aguas c
Calientes convention., is authorized to I
say that General Villa is ready to 4
comply with the terms General Car- 11
ranza imposed, that he (Carranza) t
would retire if Villa would resign and f:
leave Mexico, a message received to- i3
night from Jagle pass says.. .
General Villa hap, long desired . to 8
make a tour of the United States and d
will take advantage of thi9 opportunity s
to make an extended trip through this o
country. n
Has Cariranza Retired?
Washington, Nov. 16.-Peace in a
Mexico after weeks of dissension ,
among the generals of the victorious c
constitutionalist army at last seemed ti
in sight today.
Soon after American Consul Sill- o
man telegraphed from Mexico City the t,
convention and those loyal to Car-. i
ranza had ceased, came a message
from Leon Canova, special agent of a
the American government at Aguas s
Calientks, stating that General Car- c
ranza had telegraphed his intention of 1.
resigning. The message said: a
"Everything settled satisfactorily. ti
General Carranza has telegraphed
General Gutierrez that he will retire." r
TWG AOtý fiN;
BY THEINDIAN
FORCESt
BRITISH ARMY DEFEATS TURKS i1
r
ON PERSIAN GULF, INDIAN
CORPS DOING WORK
London, Nov. 17.-Since the occu
pation of Fao, at the head of the Per
sian gulf, by a British-Indian force,
Nov. 8, two actions have been fought
with the Turkish forces, which "on
both occasions have *been severely
handled and defeated after stubborn
resistance."
The first of these attacks occurred
early in the morning of Nov. 11, when
the Turks made a determined assault E
on the British outposts. Nov. 14 fur
ether reinforcements arrived from
India and' the following cay the In
dians, commanded by General Dela
main, sortied rand attacked the, Turks,
occupying a post about four miles dis
tant, assisted by the .sloops Espiegle 1N
and Odin. .i
The enemy's camp was captured y
and many prisoners and guns were B
taken. The British cassualties were a
two officers wounded, eight men a
killed and 51 wounded. si
ITALY TO AID BELGIANS i,
London, Nov. 16.-Italy has joined p
with the United States and Spain in t
Belgian relief work. A central com- A
mittee has been formed, a
ROBERTS' FUNERAL
London, Nov. 17.-Lord Roberts will
be buried at 4scot. The funeral serve
ice probably will be held in London.
COLD WAj hSRAS,
SWEPT THIE STATE
Butte, Nov. 16.-A cold wave of a
unusual severity for this time of
the year is sweeping over Montana.
Argents, in the mountains of Bea
verhead county, reported 16 de
grees below zero last night, and
Blossburg, near the .crest of the
Rockies west of Helena, 12 below;
Billings and Ia.vre both have zero
weather, while from . Sheridan.
Wyo., comes advices of 6 below.
Butte registered 5 above zero to
day in the city, but on the flat
below zero was recorded.
ixGreat unalls Pi.-(Special)
MANY H
Not Enough S~etions, to Go
Around-Sad and A is
Great Falls, N'bv. 16.-(Special.)
Mere than 600 persons took part to
day in the rush for homesteads on
the tract thrown 'open to sesttilement
40 miles west of here, the rush start,
ing at 9 o'clock this morning. When
the sun went down scores of shacks
from which curled wreaths of smoke,
indicated that human beings were
making their° home there, could be
seen ona the plain, scores of tents, too;
dotted the country and in some in
stances tented wagons, in which the
owners had arrived too late to do
more than stake opt their claims.
It was a day fraught with incidents
of human interest, ard, to many, a
crisis in their lives, for while only
about 60 per cent of the land was
staked off.by settlers, there are enough
claimants to more than settle the en
tire tract of over 80,000 acres. Some
will have to go elsewhere, and, as is
often the case, many of.. them have
too little earthly possdssions to be
forced to such hardship.
Many quarter sections tonight have
as many as four tenants, .some have
six or seven. One of the half section
claims has 11 claimants. Numerous
half sections have half a dozen and
all are confident they are entitled to
the land.
Scores of contests are certain. Two
runaways have been reported, but
neither did more than damage the
harnsses,. the .horses, having been
neglected after the shack had been
dragged on to the claim.
Houses in Collision
Two houses were in collision as they
were being dragged to claims, and
one, and the owner's hopes, are a sad
picture of wreckage.. No person was
hurt, but war of words followed.
Only one class of people, is known
to be ahead of the game tonight, that
is land owners adjoining the tract
opened. They sold privileges of build
ing shacks on their land ready for the
rush at $25 to $50 each.
MILWAUKEE PLANS
TO SPENO BIG
ELECTRIFICATION OF ITS LINE
BETWEEN .HARLOWTON AND
AVERY DECIDED
Chicago, Nov. 16,-The Chicago, I
Milwaukee & St. Paul railroad will i
spend $13,000,000, within the next four I
years in electrification work-in the 9
Rocky Mountain district, it was an- t
Ilounced today by C. A}. Goodnow, in t
charge of construction, following the e
signing of .a contract with the General
Electric cpmpany, involving. a prelim
inary expenditure of $2,000,000.
Work will 1e started immediately in
preparation for the electrification of
the Puget sound extension between
Avery, Idaho, and Harlowton, Mont.,
a main line distance of 440 miles. This
stretch of track crosses the Bitter
Roots, Rockies and Belt mountains.
COLORADO MINERS
BROUGHT TO TRIAL
Canon City, Colo., Nov. 16.-Proppp d
ings against the 19 of the 26 defend
-ats charged-with the murder of -Will
lam King, a non-union miner, who was
killed during an attack by. strikers
upon the Chandler mine of the Victor
American Fuel company, April 24,
Were continued today at the opening
of the case, by agreement of counsel;
The seven others will face trial Im
mediately.
BOY LOVER KILLS .
Portland, Ore., Nov. 16+-Miss Em
ma Ulrich, a young stenographer, wQs
shot and killed late today by- Fred
.rronson, a youthful elevator operator,
whose attentions the victim had to
peatedly rejected,
Ti T, ;' THATFASE )F#A~AGNi lL BE
; lb I D-flOO AROUND nIIXMUDE
H'ALT OPERA IONS IN V1UII4TT
London, Nov. 18.-The coming of I
wlr has, partly paralyzed the move
. .oftroops, both in the eastern
? 44_ western theaters of the war. r.:+
The ,Russians, on the border of East
Prussiae *re reported to be marching,
througil snow clad in sheepskin aclk
ets plmnlar to those, which the Jap&
pie/e first wore in Manchiria. Blsa
tards have -swept the'trenches in Bel
gium adýnorthern France and brought
grpeat suffering; t the wounded, 'as
well as to the man in the field.
Floods Around Dixmude.
A large. area'cobt+ West Flanders,
aroung Dilxmude, has been flooded by
the heavy rains and is no man's land
for fighting. :•
The French and German reports to
day are contradictory as regards the
progress of their, armies in the west
yesterday.r
Berlin says there was only silght
activity because of the snowstorm.
Paris announced that the Germans, In
attempting to cross the canal .near
Dixmtfde,' were thrust back, while
U REVENUES
NEfLDEDBY
OUIR 1IIES i
c
SUCH IS OPINION OF STATE MU- ti
NICIPAL LEAGUE, WHICH e
HOLOS CONVENTION o
Billings, Nov. 16.-(Special.)-Em
phasizing the need of additional rev
enue to carry on the wider effort now
demanded of city governments, Alex
Mackel, city attorney of Butte, advo,
cated assessment of all property at
fip f vaahe, in a discussion of the subs
ject at the opening session of the
third conference of Montana munici
palities here today. Mayor Clarence
Smith of Butte declared. people are
demanding more and more in the way
of public service each year, and that C
this requires more money. The laIn
provides that a city hall may not make
a levy of more than 10 mills on the
assessor's valuation and this restricts
the chief source of income.
Another suggestion was that the
conference recommend to the legislay t
tore a change in the law to give cities V
one-half,. instead, of one-third of the 1
revenue from ,saloon licenses.
A temporary, organization, with the
recommendation that it 'be made per. I
manent, was formed by electing Mayor d
Symes of Lewistown as chairman, and e
City Clerkl Entreken of Livingston,
as secretary.. The organization .com
mittee also recommended that the name
of the as.9ciat.on be the Montana,
Municipal league, that permanent of..v
fiers fqr one year be elected; thsat
cities be assessed in proportion to
class for maintenance of the league',
that the regular convention of the
league be held in Great Falls Decem=
her 17 and' 8, and that committees be
then appointed.
A feature of the conference was an
address this aftrnoon by Congressmas
Evans, who arived here from tidasoula.
for the purpose of making a personal
investigation, of the Crow reservation.
This evening a banquet was servedip 1
the tea room of the Northern hotel and
the night session was devoted to a
discussion of parks and playgrounds.
CROSS IS CONFERRED
ONRITISH iIES
St
London, Nov. 16.-The Victoria Cross
has been conferred on Captain Fran
cs Grenfell of the Ninth lancers, for
aidtng and saving the guns of the
Brttisb in Belgium, August 24; on
Captain Douglas Reynolds of the ar
tillery, who was wounded. in a similar
exploit: on Captain, Theodore Wrlght,
oa, the engineers, who was mortally
1yun4el while rescuing a wounded
man; on BSurgeon Harry Sherwood
Ranken, for attending men under fire,
after he received wounds from which
he died later;' on Lieutenant Maurlce
Bease and on rour non-commissioned
offioegre j.ieutenant. General. Sir
Donagas a Hai has been promoted to
thec ;ak of general for distinguished
service in the field. -
SWEDr8'W WHEAT SCARCE
Loiudon i N6Y. ' 6.-4"Thi 1i*ee of
,wheat in Sweden 53 ssmg in leaps and
bounds, owing to the dericieaciy of the
havest," gays a Gorrespondeat,
the allies reC&ptured several strategic
points, repulsed' two German attacks
southeast of lYpres and "entirely de
stroyed" a German regiment south of
Bixschoote.
An observer with the British army,
who furnished the newspaper reports
from the frotd, announces that the
German attempts to batter a wedge
through the B'itish lines have de
creased' in fiercenesa greatly in the
last few days ,tnd .thnt they bear no
resemblance to tiw attacks in great
force launched against Ypres at the
end of October.
Assaults: Not Serious
They are more in the nature of
demonstrations of force than serious c
assaults, he deciares.
The writer pays tribute to the bray- I
ery of raw German youths and men of i
middle age, who, he says, do not hes
itatp to march against the trained
British troops.
If the Gerplans have abandoned I
their furious battering ram efforts to
thrust back the allies' lines and reach I
Qalais, their failure will constitute a
distinct victory for the allties, it is
asserted here,' because the allies have
not tried to accomplish anything more
than to hold their owtn on the defen
sive.
From Petrograd.
Petrograd reports that the Russian
campaign is developing favorably in
East Prussia. From other sources it
is reported the inhabitants, of that
country are beginning to flee before
the menace of a second invasion. On
the Polish froltter and in Galicia, two
enormous armies are massing for a
battle, which may decide the fortunes
of the war in the east.
BRITISH tJITFD IN
1D11I. 1181N
IOITIN
TO WIN
GREAT WAR CREDIT IS PASSED
IN PARLIAMENT AND ALL t
PARTIES VOTE AYE
London, Nov. 16.-Thp meeting of
the house of commons today was de
voted entirely to war' measures and
partisan politics was lacking.
,Premier Asquith requested a vote
for 225,000,000 pounds sterling ($1,
125,000,000) and another million sol
diers, both of which the house grant
ed without a dissenting vote.
The prime minister characterized
the crisis as "the greatest emergency
In. which the country.has ever..been
placed." He said 1,420,000 'already
were under arms, that the war. was
costing nearly $5,000,000 per day and
that the government proposes to lend.
Belgium $50,000,000 and,Irervia $4,000,*
000, without interest, until the end of
the rar.
Timothy Healy, the Irish National -
ist, said that the money should be
given these nations.
John Hodge, the labor member for
Lancashisre, indorsed the proposal,
with the suggestion:
May Be Reimbursed
"Later on we can collect it from
the German emperor."
SWalter Hume Long, unionist, said
the. country was not likely to be faced
with the stupendous problems of un
enmployment which might have natu
rally expected and he' expected all
*the men needed would be forthcom
ing because the spirit of the country
was so magnificent. He congratulated £
the governmeqt on behalf of the op- £
position on its "steadf.t determina,
tion to carry the war to a successful
conclusion.
Soldiers' Dependents
Mr. Healy demanded 'great liberal
it" in dealinf with the dependents of
the soldiers. He said:
"We are not going to have crip
pled warriors In the workhouses again
or their dependents thrown upon the
scrapheap."
Dealing with the matter of pay the
premier· said:
"The insuffiocency of. pay of the
lower classes Of commissioned offt
cers has long bden a reprofach to this
country, but has become scandalous
and' indecent when men are laying
down their lives." ,
Little ateknes"
He announced that Earl Kitchener
had prepared a achemq fo.s cn'leeaed
pay. He closed b- deaoeha$nl that
sickness among thb fgoos 'had not
exceeded 10, possibl 11S per cent, and
that he believed no lbdbd of ien, have
ever been btlogght to~gether'. W had
conported themselves better thai the
present aerm ,
'ANTI - ADMINISTRATIONISTS DQ
NO"' WIN AN",OPFICE IN
SA6SOCIATION
Nashville, Tenn., Nov. 16.-The for
tý-aixtlth nUat conVention of the la
Stlio1ia Aii"ehcana 'Wo liansa diiffrage
e sociati8h, 'in session here sinct last
e tria "closed tbnilght with n Ali
a rsehet truce estoalisiled betweven the,
e btip6din "elements of the organisz
o toio.s ". r,
Aiiong the more important results
e of-toa8's` ession were the election of
offleats, 'the declaration by the naso
elation of: a definite policy oppostng
f etthtits 'on a political party and, the
s edoption of resolutions setting forth
the organization's stand on legislation
for suffrage and other public ques
f tions..
Administration Prevails
The altti-adminlstration supporters
worked diligently'for their candidates
I for national 'offices, styled "the rep
resentative ticket," but after the ad
I ministration nominees were elected by
La majority strength of about 70 votes
calmness prevailed.
In announcing adjournment of the
Sannual meeting Dr. Anna Howard
Shaw, elected president for the tenth
term, made a brief reference to the
opposition. She said:
"If any one has any criticism to
make against the president of this as
scciation or the official board that
criticism should be offered first to the
president and to the board. In that
way possibly all strife can be obvi
ated."
Dr. Shaw was unopposed for presl
dent. In addition to Dr. Shaw the fol
lowing officers were elected:
First vice presiadent, Mrs. Stanley
McCormick, New York; second vice
presisdent, Mrs. Desha Breckenridge,
Kentuckyi third vice president, Miss
Katherine B. Davis, New York; re
dording secretary, Mrs. Susan tV.
Fitzgerald, Massachusetts; correspond
fng secretary, Mrs. Orten II. Clark,
Michigan: treasurer, Mrs. Henry
Wade Rogers, Connecticut; second
auditor, Mrs. Medill McCormick, Il
linois.
Miss Jeannette Rankin of Missoula,
Mont,, was the unsuccessful candidate
for 'corresponding secretary.
A' substitute resolution on declara
tion of policy offered by Mrs. George
Bass of Chicago was adopted by the
convention instead of the recommen
dation approved by the executive
council. The resolution reads:
"Resolved, that the National Amer
ican Woman Suffrage association is
absolutely opposed to holding any po
litical party responsible for the opin
ions and acts of its individual mem
bers, or holding any individual public
official or candidate responsible for
the action of his party majority on
the question of woman suffrage."
Mrs. Grace Wilbur Trout of Chi
cago emphatically declared her oppo
sition to the sending out by the asso
clation of "any blacklist" of members
o~dongre ' ,
Dr. Shaw explained that under a
resolution .prviously adopted the na
tional: bldy' could not work in any
state without the consent of the state
association. The statement of policy
finally was adoped by- almost unani
nlous vote.
The convention tabled a resolution
urging all suffragists and suffragist
organizations to aid the cotton move
(Continued on Page Four)
ZEPPELIN TOSSED
ABOUT BY STORM
Y London, Nov. 16.-A correspondent d
I at Rotterdam gives the following ver- y
sion of a Zeppelin airship reported in
CRACOW IALAS.BZE
AND PEOPLE ARE
IN FLIGHT
Rome, No. 16.-The Glornale d'Italia
has a dispatch from Venice, that news
has been received there that Cracow,
g capital of Galicia, is burning and that
its inhabitants are fleeing.
ir London, Nov. 17.-A Venice dispatch
4 says:
it "The fall of Cracow is expected at
t any moment. The city is invested on
Ld the north and parts are ablaze. The
Ie Inhabitants are In flight. The Rub
4 usian forces have made a very rapid I
to advance and reached Cracow sooner
than expected."
4
SPP ODNTATF I T
OLE4 QF G~MAN ATTACK IN FANP.S
S CE APP1EtCIALY LESS AN$I TIRE
"ARd SIGNS OF ACUTE EXHAUSTION
I 5.14. D ICI (ASSAMJIS NAM APPEAR
O BE SMAL.IER THAN IN PREIOUS FIGl1m G
F RENCH ARTILLERY FIRE FEARFULLY EFFEC
"TeWT WH'I INFANTRY OF BOTH SIDES EN
GA(il " I VALOR AND ENTERPRISE
London, Nov. 16.-The official press 1
bureau has issued the following ac
count, dated Nov. 10. of this move
ments of the British force and the
French armies in immed i i touch
with it:
"In describing the operations for the
six days from Nov. 4 to 9, it can be
said that during that period the Ger
mans have nowhere along our front
made any attack in great force such
as was launched against Ypres at the
end of October. Their policy has ap
peared to be to wear us out by a
Scontinual bombardment interspersed
iwith local assaults at different points.
Prtodigal With Artillery
"As regards their artillery attacks,
which have continued without eossa
tion for days, wonder is aroused as
to when this prodigal expenditure of
ammunition will cease, for it has not c
produced its obviously calculated of
fect of breaking the defenso in prep
aration for an advance of their in
fortry.
"So far, the infantrymen have been
the chief sufferer from the tactics em- a
iilioyed. Wednesday, Nov. 4, they re
i newed their attack east of Ypres, but .
their effort bore no resemblance to 0
those which preceded it, being more s
in the nature of a demonstration in
force than serious attempt to drive
in our line, and was beaten off with
ease.
r "By then our men had been re
l inforced, had enjoyed some rest and
had time to improve their trenches in
different ways. Moreover, the con
sciousness that they had repelled one
great effort of the enemy was a moral
factor of no small value.
On Left Center
"Farther to the south, on our left
3 center, the French advanced under
cover of our guns, and made somen
a progress, in spite of the heavy fire
from the enemy's massed batteries. Oni
our center all was quiet.
"On our right our Indian troops
scored a success by captut:ing and
" filling in sosme trenches in which the
enemy had established himself only r
50 yards from our lines, under cover
of some heavy artillery brought up r
r ufter dark. t
Accurate Fire
"On our extreme left one of our
howitzer batteries, whose fire was be
ing most effectively directed, selected
as its first target a farm from which
a machine was harrassing our infan- t
try. It scored a hit at the first round I
ind knocked out the machine gun. f
"The second target was a house oc- n
culpied by snipers. This was set alight t
I:y a shell and when the occupants r
bolted they came under the rapid fire s
from the infantry, The third target c
t was another building from which the
Germans were driven and then were r
caught in the open by shrapnel.
"One of our heavy batteries also ob
distress near Maestricht, Holland,
yesterday:
"A storm-tossed Zeppelin passed
near Maestricht yesterday afternoon.
It was flying low, in an almost verti
cal position, and making erratic jerky
movements. The members of the crew
were clinging to lines to save them- t
selves from being thrown out.
"The airship was -badly damaged in
the rear, but by desperate efforts
managed to reach the German frontier
where it collapsed, a total wreck."
FOREIGN COMMERCE
STEADILY MOUNTS
Washington, Nov. 16.-The pulse of
h the nation's foreign commerce is
showing steady improvement, accord
it ing to the daily telegraphic statements
received by Secretary McAdoo from
e the 10 leading ports of entry.
Import' business of last Saturday,
.d based on reports from ports handling
it 87 per cent of alt imports, amounted
to $2,330,512; exports from these ports,
tained several direct hits on the en
el'iy's guns.
Thursday Quiet
"Thursday, Nov. 5, was another
clmparatiively quiet day, there being
no attempt at an infantry attack
against any point of our position.
Southeast of Ypres the Germans main
tained a heavy bomnbardment of one
section of our front, but generally
speaking their artillery fire was not
so heavy as it had been somewhat to
the south.
"The French made slight progress
and recaptured some ground to the
south. Some villages which the en
emy had captured and their line of
ridge close by were heavily bom
larded by British and French artillery
front the high ground to the west. The
effect of this cannonade could be seen
to some extent, though the villages
under fire were partially obscured
from view by the smoke of bursting
shells and resembled the craters of
Ivoicanies, belching fire and fumes.
"At one plhce the gaunt wreck of
an old church tower and the blackened
remains of a few houses around it,
would emerge for a moment, only to
be again ,blotted out in a pall of
smcke.
"The long and straggling villages,
wvhen they became temporarily vis
ible, seemed to melt IP'ay and assume
odd and fantastic shaipes as the houses
crumbled and blocks of masonry were
thrown hither and thither by the blast
Ing effect of the lyddite and melinite.
"Most Satisfactory"
"Tho result of the allies' artillery
work was mnist satisfactory. Whorl
the Germalns were seen to be running
from shelter which had ceased to act
as suchl, they were caught and mowed
down by the rapid fire of the French
field artillery. Against a suitable tar
get the action of the French 7.5 cen
timeter field guns is literally terrific
and must be seen to be realized.
"On the whole, the ground which
the Germans have gained in this di
rcctlon has so far proved a some
what barren acquisition. It is so ex
posed tha It it proved it death trap for
their troops and they can derive no
aildvantage from possession.
"All along the rest of our line noth
ing of special interest occurred
Exploits in the Air
'"Farther south, our aeroplanes and
those of the French scored ft success
by partly destroying two of the old
forts of Lille. Fort Englos was blown
up on the fourth and Fort Carnot on
the fifth. They probably were used
as magazines and may have been of
some tactical importance in the line
of entrenchments.
"On Friday. the 6th, the attack was
renewed south of the Menin-Ypres
high road, but was repulsed without
difficulty. Against th.e southeast of
Ypres, which town had been subject
ed to a bombardment during the night
and was also shelled during the day,
a fairly strong advance was made in
tile afternoon and the enemy gained
some ground.
A Counter Stroke
"The Fr'ench, however, made a
counter stroke, supported by us and
by nightfall had recovered all the lost
ground. A French attack on two vil
lages, which had been shelled Thurs
day, made considerable progress, one
point being captured, but the enemy
contrived to render the position un
tenable and our allies had retired from
thO hill by dusk.
"On our center nothing of 'particu
lar interest occurred. On our right,
(Continued on Page Four)
handling 72 per cent of all exports,
amounted to $10,421,551. The daily
average for these ports in November,
1913, was: Imports, $4,923,397; ex
ports, $6,983,426.
Since November 1 the total of the
imports is $51,627,759; exports, $77,
599,600. Since October 4 the totals
have been: Imports, $156,6827,759; ex
ports, $213,300,874,

xml | txt