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The Daily Missoulian. [volume] (Missoula, Mont.) 1904-1961, May 05, 1917, Image 5

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025316/1917-05-05/ed-1/seq-5/

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Outfield Largely Responsible
I for Pullman Runs .
Scored.
PLAY AGAIN TODAY
Same Teams Will Try Con
clusions This Afternoon
on Montana Field.
, The Inability of the Hruln outfield
Jo handle balls hit past, the Infield was
Jho outstanding cause of the defeat
bf the Montana team by the Washing
ton State college nine on Montana
'field yesterday afternoon. As long as
'the. visitors hit the hall to the in
'fiefders, they wore unable to score, but
when tliey drove the pill past (lie guar
dians of the Inner circle, they generally
piade two or three bases before, the
ball was returned to the diamond.
Montana, look an early lead In the bnt
jtle, but held it. only for a few min
utes, and finally went down in in
glorious defeat, it to 4.
Vitt Pitches Well.
• Herb Vitt hurled a. good game, and
irenlly was net hit as hard as the box
jtacofe Indicates, as a fly-hit to the out
I'field was good for a hit. most of the
it One, the fielders being unable lo gauge
'the. drives. Captain Sanderson found
!the Pullman hurler easy, smashing out
.'three safe drive«, two of which nearly
itoo(tJcjts off tin' visiting Infiehlers.
I Foil the visitors Sleenher^, Brown
.and Passmoi-p showed up well. Steen
J>erg, a dead-right field hitter, slashed
out four singles and fieldod well. Pass
more, the fall pine who plays first
base for the farmers, made three hits,
:one of them à triple. V. Brown, the
'third seeker, who was a "near-Bruin"
nt one time last fall, made Jerry Nis
Bcrt-..wish he had him in his lineup.
BroWi scored three runs, made a. triple
and -ft.-. double, and ended Montana's
felly In the third witii a classy un
assisted double play. Kulzer in left
field showed sensational ability in
Climbing up Mount Sentinel and snag
ging long flies. Three times he pulled
down seemingly safe drives up in the
gravel mound.
The Game.
Steenberg started the battle by
dropping a safety in right, and was
sacrificed to second. Bolder struck
out and immediately afterwards Vitt
caught Steenberg off second. Root
got a single in the second, but died on
first.
' Montana scored three In the last half
of the second inning. Sanderson hit
one- a mile a. minute through the box,
and Reardon singled to left. Vitt hit
to Rrown, who held the ball a minute,
and finally threw to first too late to
catch anybody. While Passmore was
juggling the throw, Sanderson made a
dash for home and scored. Kent
singled to center and Root threw the
hall over Hunter's head, two men scor
ing.
Farmers Pull Ahead.
The Pullman farmers took the three
back in the next inning, with two more
for good measure. Hunter was safe
on Gossman's error, and advanced to
third on Lewis' single. Steenberg
dropped a single just inside the first
base foul line, and Hunter and Lewis
scored. Wochncr dropped V. Brown's
fly, and again there were runners on
second and third. Holder whiffed, tad
Passmore lined out a Lit. scoring two.
Passmore stole second, and scored
when Kent, dropped Root's fly. Smul-
ley and Kulzer flew out, ending the
a gon y.
-With two gone in the last half of the
fourth,' Jones cracked out a. single, and
scored when four Ppllniun players
gathered around Sandei'son's Texas
léâgncr, and let. U-fall safe.
A . Another Added.
.Washington State scored in the first
half of the fifth, when V. Brown
doubled and scored on Passmore's
single. Gossman led off with a Lit in
Montäna's Jialf and stole, but was
calight between liases on Loranger's
grounder, ending an incipient rally.
The visitors added two more in the
The 'While' St-Strate
Sew
With
Com-
fort
and
ease
Model No. 70 Is Especially Con
structed to Meet the
Constant Growing Demand
for a SIT-STRAIGHT SEWING
MACHINE
The "WHITE" ROTARY
sewing mechanism combined with
this newest construction allows the
operator to assume a comfortable
and easy position when sewing.
Physicans Will Tell Tou—
Use the "WHITE" SIT-STRATE
Don't Delay a Minute Longer
They Are All Guaranteed
Fay $1 Weekly If Yon Wish
Hoyt-Dickioson Piano Co.
Ä Sä
a triple. Brown scored on a passed
ball, when Larry Jones forgot there
was a runner on third. Bohler was
hit, and scored on Passmore's fluky
three-bagger. Washington State made
another In the eighth when Kulzer
doubled and scored on a single by
Lewis, which Kent juggled around.
Vitt threw only a dozen halls to fan
three Pullman batters in. a row in the
ninth, finishing strong. The husky
pitcher led off Montana's half of the
last inning with a double, but the next
three batters were easy outs, failing
even to advance Vitt.
The same teams will play this after
noon at 3:30. Hugh Kent will pitch
for Montana, while Cook will work on
the mound for the enemy.
The Box Score.
Washington —
AB
R
II
PO A
E
Stecnbcrtr, 2b ..
....... 5
1
4
:: 4
0
V. Brown, 3b....
........ 4
3
2
. 2 1
1
Bottler, ss .
4
i
0
2 2
0
Passmore, lb
......... 5
i
3
S 1
0
Root, cf .............
f,
0
1
3 0
1
Smalley, rf
........ 4
0
0
3 o
0
Kulzer, If ......
....... 4
1
1
0 0
0
Hunter, c
..... 4
1
<1
* f. 0
1
Hew is, p
4
1
2
0 1
0
3!» !l 13 37 10
Montana —
AH
It
11
PO
A
Gossman, 31» .....
1
0
1
2
1
Loro nirer, 21 » .....
4
0
0
1
Jones, c .......
4
1
1
7
0
Sanderson, ss
. 4
1
1
M
Renrrion. II» .....
. 4
1
1

a
Vitt, 1» ................
. 4
I
2
1
4
Kent, rf
4
0
1
ii
VVoehner, cf
. 2
0
o


Brown, If
4
0
0

0
Totals
35
4

3 7
11
Score by innings:
Washington . •>
0 5
0 I
0
2 1
*»-
Montana it
:: 1
o 0
u
0 If
(1
Struck out—By Vitt, 6; by Lewis.
Bases on hulls—Off Vitt, o; off Lewis,
I. Three-base hits — Passmore
Brown. . Two-base hits—V. Brow
Vitt.' Stolen buses—Gossman, Vitt,
Steenberg, Passmore. Sacrifier* liil -
A'. Brown. Hit by pitcher-— -Hohler.
Passed ball Jones, Hunter. Double
play—-Brown, unassisted. Umpire -
Kelley.
UNIVERSITY STUDENT
TO AID CELEBRATION
An elaborate tribute to the United
States' allies in the world war will be
tin* State University's contribution to
the parade which is to be one of the
commanding features of Missoula's
Fourth of July celebration. Miss T.
A'. Lennstrend, a co-ed at the univer
sity, yesterday offered her service to
the Missoula Chamber of Commerce
as recruiting officer for a university
section in the great pageant.
Miss Lennstrend says that she -vill
enlist for t Le parade ait State Uni
versity people who are in .Missoula on
July 4. Her plan is to divide the col
lege division into five sections. Four
of these will represent France, Great
Britain, Russia and Italy, 1 Lo four
great allies of this nation. Alarchers
in costume or symbolic floats will
used. "Columbia" will head the fifth
division, in which marchers represent
ing the Union will he placed.
MRS. AHRENS' FUNERAL
WILL BE HELD TODAY
The funeral of Mrs. H. G. Ahrens, a
bride of six months, who died of ty
phoid fever Thursday evening at a
local hospital, will be held this after
noon at 2 o'clock at Carlton. 1 nt
ment will he made in the, Carlton
cemetery. Mr. and Mrs. William
Wright, parents of Mrs. Ahrens, rame
in lo Missoula yesterday from their
home at Florence, to assist Mr. Ahrens
in making final arrangements.
The Safest and
Best Summer Drink
I Ur

£
%
INK
%
m
%
m.
%
%
Cx
FOR
ALL
THE
FAMILY
As a stimulant, as a strong spring tonic
there's nothing better nor more economical
than
t t"
Pore Pasteurized Milk
At 10c per quart it's the cheapest food today.
MISSOULA CREAMERY CO.
Phone 163
■w
GERMAN SUBMARINE
FETED IN LONDON
*
I!
LIMIT. BRUCK R. WARB, JR., U.
S. N.
Since the arrival of the Amefican
liner Mongolia in London. Lieutenant
Ware has been very much of a hero
In that town. He alined the shot that
sank the German submarine off the
lïnglisl» coast as tin- Mongolia neared
port. Ware is :<u years old and Is
one of the best gunners in the navy.
RESOLUTION PASSED
BY RECENT CONCLAVE
'j-[Sunday School Convention
Grateful and Hopeful.
a
The Sunday School, association of
Missoula county, whose annual con
ation luis been one of the happy
features of Missoula this week, closed
its session with the passage of a num
ber of optimistic resolutions. These
were ;
Resolved, That we affirm our confi
dence in the work of the Sunday school
of today as an increasing power for
moral and spiritual uplift and that we
recognize the mutual benefit to be de
rived from district ami county organi
zations and urge as large attendance
as possible upon meetings of these or
ganizations.
Resolved, that we favor the employ
nient of no state secretary for the pres
ent year, or until such a time as the
present indebtedness of tLo state as
sociation shall bo removed.
Resolved, that tLo sincere and hearty
thanks of this association be extended
to all those persons who have so gen
erously contributed to the success of
the sessions of this convention, among
which be mentioned:
(a) Tlte newspapers and publishing
companies of Missoula.
(b) Tile trustees of tLo First Meth
odist church.
(cl The ladies of the First Methodist
church, who served the banquet.
(d) All who assisted with the dif
ferent programs.
(e> The hospitable citizens of Mis
soula.
MRS. R. L. ARNOLD,
G. II HOGUE,
MRS. E. T>. Sf'H AVIS HER.
LICENSE IS ISSUED.
A marriage license was issued yes
terday to Charles Michael Willis, 28, of
Plains and Miss Kffie Rosina Rhoades,
21, of Oliver Gulch.
TO ORGANIZE TDMGHT
Commercial Travelers Meet
This Evening at Chamber
of Commerce.
PATRIOTIC MOTIVE
Local Men Are Acting on
Suggestion That They
Help Government.
A Missoula company of volunteer
secret service men will he recruited
tonight when nil the commercial trav
elers working from this city meet in the
rhainlior of commerce building- to or
ganize for national service. More than
60 drummers have their headquarters
in Missoula. Practically all of them
are expected at llie* meeting this even
ing.
Missoula, travelers an* the only Mon
Januus who have yet responded to a
national call for organization, in
Fargo, N, ll„ the movement in tills di
rection was begun, and a call was
issued for a meeting in St. Paul on
May 12. The Missoula men have an
swered by proposing a local organi
zation, which probably will send a
delegate (o tLo St. Paul gathering.
Negotiations with travelers' organi
zations in other ciliés m the state may
malle the Missoula, man spokesman for
Montana.
The men behind Hie movement have
suggested that, traveling nun may lx*
great service to tin* nation by
spreading patriotic propoganda and
furnishing information which will lead
lo the detection, of traitors. With tills
suggestion many Missoula, drummers
agree. The meeting tonight will net
upon it.
The session will ho held in the
T HE M. M. Co/s Boys' Clothing
Store is "different." It never op
erated on the theory that "anything is good
enough for a boy," and now, as ever, our idea is to
have boys' clothing in the best up-to-the-minute
styles, in best materials and workmanship, in fit and smart ap
pearance, and thereby so attach the boy's liking to this store
that he naturally would "graduate" into our Men's Clothing
Store when he grew up.
But we have not forgotten in our consideration of l he boy to consider
also the parent who pays the bills. Specializing as we do in boys' ap
parel, makes for great economies, and right now, because of a foresight
exercised months ago, the values wh ich this boys' store lias to offer arc
not to be duplicated elsewhere.
Boys' Suits $3 to $14
A line so varied and comprehensive that every fancy can he indulged,
every taste gratified. Norfolk Suits, of hoWsptm, cassimere, cheviot,
flannel and fast-dye serge. Ever/ suit has full-lined kniekerhocker
trousers, and all the latest style touches are in evidence in the coats
pointed yokes, pinch-plaits, side plaits, double hox plaits, and belts and
half-belts. Sizes 6 to 18 years. Suits
with one pair of trousers, $3 to $14;
with two pairs, $5, $7.50, $10 and $14.
First Communion and
Confirmation Outfits
Boys' Blue Serge Suits, Norfolk
jnd pinch-back models, at $5.50, $7 50,
$8.50, $9, $10 and $12.
Boys' White Shirts and Blouses, 65c
to $1.25.
White Bow Ties, 2-for-25c, and white
Windsor Scarfs, 35c.
Boys' Blue and Black Felt Hats,
$1.50 to $2.50.
Boys' Shoes, $2.50 to $4.75.
/
*
Official Boy Scout Outfits
This store is headquarters for the official
Boy Scout uniforms and furnishings which are
priced as follows: Coats, $2; Breeches, $1.75;
Shirts, $1.50; Leggings, $1; Haversack, $1 ;
Belt, 50c; and Hat, $2.
Boys' Khaki Clothing
For work or play, nothing quite equals khaki
for wear and all-around satisfaction. Our
prices are based on purchases made before ma
terials advanced so much and are, therefore, ex
tremely low.
Hoys' Khaki Suits, with knickerlioekor pants, extra good
quality; all sixes, at $1.50, $2.50 and $3.50..
Boys' and Children'« Khaki Play Suit«, all with long pints,
cuffs» etc., trimmed with tan—$2. ;
Boys' Khaki Pant«, straight and knlckerboeker styles; extra
values, 50c, 75c and $1.0°.
at
T,
v
Boys' and Children's Furnishings
Kay-n-ee Blouses and Shirts, big variety, 65c
and $1.25.
Everyday Waists and Shirts, of ehambray,
gingham, sateen, etc., 50c, 65c and 75c.
Boys' Holeproof Stockings, great for wear,
35c a pair; 3 pair, $1.
Boys' Thermo Sweaters, all styles and col
ors, $1.25 to $2.
Union Suits, knee and ankle length, 50c to $1.
Hats, latest styles, 50c to $2.50; Caps, 50c to
$ 1 . 00 .
M
issoula
ercan
chamber of c om m erce butt ding, _tve|r! tu
ning at 8 o'clock '
CHAIRMAN KNIBLEY HOST.
J. W. Hnllett and Lief Fredericks,
members of the city civil service com
mission. and. Miss Ruth E. Kellogg,
who is clerk of the commission, were
guests of F. II. Knlslcy. retiring chair
man of the civil service commission, nt
a banquet at the Palace hotel cafe, last
night. Air. Knlsley. who is relieved of
the chairmanship automatically, though
re-appointed a member of the com
mission, took this means of relinquish
ing his position nt the head of the com
mission.
STARS AND STRIPES
FLY FROM NEW POLE
The stars and stripes are flying
from the peak of the new flagstaff on
the campus of the State University.
Yesterday tin* formal fiagraising was
held by the Associated Students of
the University. Addresses were given
by- President F. C. Scheuch and Pro
fessor William L. Murphy. Alter the
speeches Colonel K. S. Puxsou raised
the colors. Salutes were fired by a
detachment of troops from the na
tional guard now stationed at Fort
Missoula.
Hundreds of university students and
townspeople gathered to witness the
ceremony. Mr. Murphy delivered the
principal address. Ills speech dealt
with tlm significance of the flag-. "The
highest tribute | can pay to the flag."
he, said, is to cite the proclamation
recently issued by President Wilson,
which in my estimation is one of tin
greatest and most significant docu
ments which has ever come out of
Washington."
At the coneluslon of tin* formal ex
ercises the audience united in singing
"Tlte Star Spangled Banner."
James Gault represented the A. S.
T'. M. on tin* occasion. It was due lo
his influence that the formal ceremony
was held.
coum OF KFENSE
MEETS WITH EXPERT
o.
a
S.
lo
B. Whipple of Bozeman
Confers With Local
County Committee.
PLANS DISCUSSED
Farmers of This District in
Hearty Co-Operation With
Agricultural Plan.
!

1
The members of the county defense
council, John Lucy, S. J. Uol'ie, and
U. H. McLeod, yesterday met with
Professor <>. R. Whipple of Montana
Slate college in an informal confer
once in order lo work out plans for
co-operation of the council and the
western section of tin- stale, and the
extension department of the l ni\»i
sil\ of Montana, in furl hoi ing the a
t nail I ut a I campaign now m pin: i,.
throughout tin* state, wiuio n.dliur
definite was uci-nmpllsln d at th. . ,a
feli'iue, it was Hie trend of opinion
Hail it Willlld he to tin liest I a Pu est
id t he count y if an i \ pi i t were 1 ,, on cl. I
here from Itll/iluail to ail as aeto.il
superintendent of the agrieult ut a I
work throng Lout Hie district in on
oprratinn with the county agent. \ n
arnl will
d ill! lila Ie
ctïoi T
Will hr*
lunili* 1
o .
i-l.l tin ' i
m:m
ill tin* m
ill' l ilt III
'Äif un i
of 111
»* county
council
\\
ill .oil.-4
m ud
individmi
illy cvli
ini
Mil | H i
:iid It
i> funnel
s. In Ipiiur
them i
» I » MSi
i' tin ir mi
reauv. ;i
ml
to ol.l III
I icielit
of all varieties
further effort h
grleiiltui ul win
nlsn main
product iv
county.
The meiulicrs of t lie I ouie i!
farmers in Missoula enmity a
it'll Montana in general tire
into the spirit Of the WPTlt ttrtl mil
ast ica Iiy, and believe that the W#t of
grain and potatoes will be pr, 0 jduccd in
this section of thp. country.
B. F. PLUMMER REPORTS.
few
Vill»
F. Plummer is in Missoula for a
lavs from his home at, Stevjens
Mr Plummer says the pros
! plots rue better this year than lever
Is fore in Lis experience for a balnner
1 Iu'p "f cherries and apples upj the
Hitter Root valley. "The senion is
■ late, hut tile additional amount of
moisture in tin* ground means dutch
fruit and fine fruit this year. | Our
car.mt town lots un being all planted
to potatoes and cultivated with, the
enemy and enthusiasm of you til,-" said
Mr. Plummer, referring to the zealous
1 sei \ in of the SI e vi ns villi* school buys.
Li
lack
; of men u tin ita.yo'an aim ill life
mnmiiitlon.
w/iyfisy 2 o: 25:30 *
ybr patterns
mm
f HE
LAiiihS liOirft j I
JOURNAL
MM ISM
11 i t tu t nrrtNd
AND
I A- , 10 USII
it The new .1 pi on front dress
mi ladif". Unique and altogether
i-lmi tiling, with hark closing and
a two-goird gathered .kill
N O
f IIOMI 1
[ l J A I I I.RN
1C0S1SOVfK
5
M issoula
ercanli

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