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The Daily Missoulian. [volume] (Missoula, Mont.) 1904-1961, May 05, 1917, Image 8

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025316/1917-05-05/ed-1/seq-8/

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loss of vim
IHDUTES TROUBLE
Laziness Not Always the Cor
rect Diagnosis —Examina
tion Should Be Made.
PROPER TREATMENT
Even If Lungs Are Not Af
fected Outdoor Life the
iBest Prescription.
Br. Brady will nnpwrr all signed
letters pertaining to health. The
names of writers are never printed.
Only Inquiries of general Interest
are answered in this column; but
all inquiries will be answered by
mail if a stamped si lf-addressed
envelope is enclosed. Bequests for
diagnosis or treatnu nt of individual
cases cannot be considered. Ad
dress Pr William Brady, care of
The Missoulian.
The Girl Who Grew Lazy.
The "yourif? woman doesn't look lazy,
vet we have her own mother's word for
it, father conearring, that she is getting
too lazy for anything. Mother > pin« s
that a girl who is too lazy to get ul>
tiefoi ■ ten in Hie morning needs the
doetei s attention and she is gcnernJIy
tight in her opining.
A gitl, lather tall and slender, aged
la, blond, apparently not blessed witli
too much blond— for site yawns even
little while, and that indicates that lur
tissue's are not well oxygenarted. Bast
year she graduated from high school.
She has never been very robust, still
never seriously ill, but during the past
year she pas lost her former vivacity
und seems to lie good for nothing but
lying abed mornings and going out
nights to dancing parties.
The yotiug woman admits no symp
toms. tin cross examination she wakes
mornings as tired as when she went
to bed, even when there has been no
dance. Sin lias no ambition to go any
where or tin anything—not mornings,
anyhow. Afternoons and evenings she
sometimes has dull headaches.
I'otigh'.' Why, no—oh, she lias to
clear her throat mornings, mother ex
plains—just a little catarrh, of course.
Pulse 94 a ft I r 111 minutes' rest in
chair. Temperature 99.8- but the girl's
nervousness over the examination may
whip up the pulse rate, and \\e can't
draw conclusions from at single obser
vation id temperature nut really above
normal bounds. Still, tie re can be no
excuse for neglecting to examine the
chest.'of.a lazy girl who has slight
"catarrhal trouble." The i Nomination
reveals one sign only—a prolongation
of the expiratory sound over the right
apex.
Mother now recalls that the girl's
mint, a few years ago, died of tuber
culosis, and before lier death the mint
and the girl were great cronies. Better
1o obtain a history piecemeal than not
at all.
We give the patient a few doses of
sodium iodide tu stimulate expectora
tion. It proves successful and we ob
tain enough for microscopical exam
ination. .No bacilli. Never mind. That
is only a detail. We diagnose incipient
pulmonary tuberculosis.
We may be wrong. True. But bet
ter wrong than too late. We shall'see
to it that the treatment shall be good,
whether the diagnosis is right or
wrong.
We send the patient and family up
the lake tor the season. Fn sh air is the
hi st ot tonics. Sunshine tie strongest
germicide end restorative. Thn e
months, six months, perhaps a year of
it. will restore tie gill's health and
stri net b, win tie r sin has TB or not.
When a y ou nc person grow s imho
Cause of Shortness of Breath.
fn
j «* •
of br» a t h
L * IJ II,
aim
Wb;.t\
vuul.l !...
!
>• ' WOP- 1
c r i « m < ■ < !
y. 1
bn :M It
• win n sit - I
tine, stm
»ding
* t h .
- lying
down, but !
hav« tu
stop
b : 111 :
1 clnZlMl
times for ;
bn.itti v\
city blot
h<-n \
/.all it
g Ilm 1
• 'iii.*.i h uf v
( \Y. <'.)
!
ANSWER. Heart qi.-n-asi-,
firti-rios, li-msi-. i■ !. \ will
«perhaps ],ainli
jr hi uni hit is. I ii. ; lu si ■ma , I Iris hi x
ease, a ni in ism. o, , t in i 1
might i . use such .-hunt • ss uf in
So you see. an • \ iiunul n I-;,
doctor is I n il n rat, •
Consumption and Lune.
Kindly tell mi ii - • u r-t i- i i
3s lime starvation, also i: linn
Ruining medicines an- q i.,r
sumption. What effcei I.us coal gas
on the lungs ' \Y" Id u few drops ol
iodine in a solution be g.-ml tu km p
the misai passages clean''
(Mrs. M. R. N.)
ANSWER.— Nu, t iti-ii- is no reason
to pappose that a delu-ieiu y ui litte
is consumed with consumption. II, m
lime-containing medicines would in
worthless. However, such medicines
may be at times useful for wholly dif
ferent reasons, as expectorants, to op
pose hemorrhage, as ant-acids, etc.
Coal gas temporarily irritates tin
lungs. There is no permanent effect,
But it poisons the blood. The us, ot
Jodine would be irritating in the nasal
^passages. Normal salt solution (tabl,-
Upoonful salt in pint of boiled water«,
or Alkaline Antiseptic Solution (Na
tional i'orpnlary), diluted with six or
flight pp*s^S^varm water, would be
pood to rieten IWe nasal passages—used
fis a spray. __ _______
THE THEATERS

SELZNICMPPICTURES
para KIMR.VBB YOt'N'n IN
EMPRESS MON If A V A X1 >
utlfiil production, starring
a power
n 11 wont
Thi
Clara Kimball Young, carrir
fn 1 and ins] : ring message t
m a nil a good many
That mes
sage is s' coddling yourselves.
Mildred «tower, the character played
by Miss Young in "The Brice She
Raid" was no worse than the average
voting woman ol today. and she
brought all 1e r troubles on beg own
head through this coddling of herself.
\nd tin cause of this condition with
witli thousands upon thousands
**54: m
IL* *■
'DADDY EONt'.BEOR," M ISSnf BA THEATER. WEDNES
DAY. M \Y 9T1I.
ef women pi real lit,-, is the habit ot
fear.
We an- afraid we are going to be
mi. or hungr-. or cold, or unfashion
,1, . or unpopular. Wo create a whole
ist of possible discomforts, and then
into a pane I.iTup- them, when
i t, is not the slightest danger. And
in w sacrifice everything on Un
iat of this self-made fear.
\ career means self-denial. Not oc
isiunal, intermittent, but steady, con
ant. daily, hourly a purpose that
vi r relaxes. Every young person,
In, a-],ires and most of us do, must
,ik* -ip sarritiris and denials tQ af
in whatever that ambition may -be.
oust..at aim and an unfaltering gait
ill hut load ns in our chosen course.
This marvelous photodrama fur
i
PREPARATIONS MADE
FOR BIO LOO DRIVEI
One Concern to Movi
000 ,000 Feet.
20,
il.innln,
ilriv in
Tln-y '
■" logs 1
The Hope Bumber
inp.iny is making
iliuir annual spring:
s 1 >»rl. river.
« ,v* I L'O.OOO.UOO feet
'mg' put in the river
\\. lb Itussell and
, and l'2,0U0,0»to,000
iTana Logging entn
«•k. In addition nu
ll»» is have rollways
r Lank w hieb will be
i as the drive pro
» ivc r.
The Dover Lumber company of Do
nc». Idaho, a!"" will have, many logs
in tii« river \shieh will bo driven by
the Hope company. At the mouth of
th»- ('kill's I *-rk river booms arc
stn t« it' ll end ; sorting works is main
tain* <1 by ne ins of stamps on tin* ends
rui baik marks, individual ownership
of »a- Ii 1 « >u is ascertained, and tin > are
'ant'd fut tin \atious mill companies.
K\p« use i«r driving the logs is charged
pr»» rata between owners.
Tin driv« camp at present is located
at \\ • < ksv ille and K. K. Loss is in
charge. The rolling at Uussell camp
No. J has i.. «'n broken and as soon as
t!a —- from the Swamp creek flat
havi been hauled to the river by the
railway and the river starts
tin driv«» will commence.
The c rew drivers is at pic
gaged in driving th«» logs in tin
c reek | <>nd to the st< am loade
there they are hauled by the
railway to the river. When the
raising
Swamp
From
logging
water
raises the first lot of logs will he taken
after whic h the drivers will return to
[take down th» jest.
PRICK SHK i'Ain," CtlMlN'tl TO THE
TUESDAY. MAY 7TH AND 8TH. *
nishes not only an evening's entertain
ment, but carries a weighty anil insplr
ing lesson, from which we may all
well profit. At the Empress Monday
and Tuesday.
"Kindling" at the Bijou Tonight.
"Kindling" tells 1 ho story of n poor
woman of the tenements who is mar
ried to a man of (lermanlc extraction
with soeialistie theories. He Is in every
way a good husband, but has got a
theory that it is wrong for poor people
to have children and bring them up in
poverty and under conditions that do
not really give them a fair chance in
life. The husband repeats this idea to
his wife, who is especially depressed
owing to the tac t that a strike lias left
the family almost penniless, and she is
afraid In confess that she is soon to
give birth to an infant. At about this
i tittle sin- makes the acquaintance of a
sftt it im n! 3iork and this woman, sym
pathizing with Inr hardships, offers
her work in her home.
Then the woman goes on and on
through the avenues of experience and
you will he completely enveloped by
\otir interest in her outcome. Don't
fail to see this picture at the Jtijou to
night.
(HOOVER AT CAPITAL
(JETS DOWN TO WORK
New Chairman of Food Com
mittee in Washington.
Washington, May 4. Herbert <\
Hoover, recently named chairman of
tin* food commitleo of the Council of
National Defense, arrived here today
to advise tiie government on food con
ditions abroad and on measures the
allied governments have taken to con
ANV KIND OF CORN
I
|
;
Tells How to Loosen a Ten
der Corn So It Lifts Out
Without Pain.
to
"You reckless men and women who
», pestered with corns and who have
least one«> a week invituil an awful
death I nun lockjaw or blood poison
an now tohl by a ('incinnati authority
to us«* a drug called fre^ztme, which
the* moment a few drops an* applied to
any corn, the soreness is relieve«) and
soon the entire corn, root and all, lifts
out with the fingers.
it is a sticky substance which dries
the moment it j s applied and is said
to simpi. shrivel th«- corn without in
naming or e ven irritating the sur
rounding tissue or skin. It is claimed
tliat a epiarter of an ounce will cost
very littl«. ;i t any of the* drug stores,
but is ftnffiieont to ri«l one's feet of
every hard or soft corn or callous.
Yen are further warned that cutting
at a corn is u suicidal habit.—Adv.
serve their food supplies, tie divided
the day between conferences with de
partment heads and preparation of a
report on the food needs of the allies.
"I have been called a food dictator."
said Mr. Hoover tonight, "but that Is
incorrect. What I am here for is to
give my services to the nation in any
way 1 can be of use. Secretary Hous
ton will control the country's food sup
ply under hills pending in congress
and 1 will assist hltn and the council
of defense by supplying information
gathered in relief work abroad."
Mr. Hoover said he could make no
statement concerning the food situa
tion in Europe until he had made his
report to President Wilson.
Mr. Hoover today saw Secretaries
Houston, Baker and Bane, all members
of the defense council, and tomorrow
lie will mdtet other officials. He will
see President'Wilson, early next week.
DRAFT UNNECESSARY
TO GET GARDENERS
Children Enter Into Work
With Enthusiasm.
Tor the garden army of the Boose
velt school, which ts to wage war for
Undo Sam with hoes this summer, a
draft will not be necessary. Superin
tendent' J. U. Williams lias already
filled the ranks with volunteers.
Under the direction or school au
thorities the youngsters are to culti
vate a ten-acre potato patch south of
the city this summer. The county
fairgrounds probably will lie used.
The pupils will contribute their labor
to the cause, so that when the crop lias
been sold the profits can lie turned
over to some war fund.
"The garden work has taken from
the ordinary sehool routine all an
cient terrors," snid Superintendent
Williams yesterday. "As long as their
arithmetic problems have to do with
gardening the pupils work them glee
fully, When I visileil the Blncoln
school a few days ago I asked the
pupils how tunny hills of potatoes
could lie planted in an aero. No one
knew then, but tojjav. when I returned,
1 was given the information I wanted
in every room."
People given In self-lnvi
rivals.
■il fear mi
j
j
|
i
'KINDLING'
A Powerful Drama With
CHACLOia'E min*
* * Lotky
Charlotte
Walker
Supported by Thomas Meighan.
A Lasky Production.
"The Magic Vest"
A Comedy That Keeps You Laughing Every
Minute.
BIJOU
Tonight Only
USUAL PRICES
"The Cost of Hatred"
Kathlyn WmiAMif
TViCODOBc'&OBCOTf _
Im'TtiC CO/TOr Hatbco
LAÎLY— PABAMOUNT
St
—WITH -
Kathlyn Williams
—AND—
Theodore Roberts
This strong, virile
story of lifelong search
of a great, passionate,
domineering personal
ity for revenge, and
the fulfillment of the
search, is indeed, a
thrilling drama.
—AND—
A BRAY CARTOON
and PICTOGRAPHS
TODAY ONLY—Shows at 2,3:30,7,8:30 and 10 P. M.
SHATTERS 0F1MSM
~
jot
to
Louis Edgar Browne Sees
2,000,000 Americans Fight
ing in France.
WAR NOT NEAR CLOSE
Characterizes as "Deadly
Poison" Opinions Com
monly Accepted Here.
as
Chicago, May 4. — T.mils Kdgar
Browne, one of the best known of
American correspondents who has
just returned from the eastern war
front, and whose story of the great
Serbian retreat. Into the Albanian
mountains after the disastrous battles
which shattered King Peter's army,
brought him International fame, today
pricked a few bubbles that hnvp daz
zled Americans with their Irrldescent
Imes. He declared that from his per
sonal observation and the facts nt Ids
command the following popularly ac
cepted- beliefs are false and a "deadly"
poison"; ^
That the war is going 1 to end tills
year. Europe bas nuit speelilating on
that.
That the Herman empire is about to
break up. This gets no credence In
well Informed allied military.circles.
That the Hermans are on their last
legs and Incapable of a grout/offensive.
Mr. Browne says: "Watch but.'*
That Hie United States can get along
with giving merely moral and finan
cial support to the allies.
That the United Stales will not need
to send an expeditionary force to
France. Mr. Browne 1 oinks for 2,000,
j 000 American fighting men at the front
before the war ends.
That the European allied mean to
make America do their -ha r* work for
them. Mr. Browne says these allies
have staked their all in this war.
j These and similar little bubbles, bo
| loved by a publie which knows noth
i ing of the rigors of war, were pierced
tÇTÜPffiKvne' He enjoy» the
confidence W men high In the allied
camps and has had 1 opportunities for
observation In many and divers fields
jot operation, go that he Is we)I qiialiflei)
to express an dfctnloh.
V. P.«CYR PASSES AWAY.
V. P. ?yr, well known In Missoula
as an expert carpenter, passed away
yesterday noon after,a short Illness nt
local hospital. Ur. Cyr was 58
years old. He was a member of the
'arpentera' and Joiners' union of this
city, ns well as of the Boyal Order of
Moose. The funeral will be held In.
the Church of St. Brands Xavier Mon
day morning at 8 o'clock. Interment
will be In St. Mary's cemetery.
The inn
Poire The
Limit IvU
rairs iy t
Nettleton Shoes
Friday and Saturday
100 PAIRS
ONLY
PAIR
Nettleton Shoes for Men Are Selling in
All Other Nettleton Agende» in the
United State» at $ 10, $12 and $14
Our Price 2 Days Only $7.95
100 PAIRS THE LIMIT
Cfi.95 Women's White Kid (DC.95
«PU Button Boots y"
FR1PAY-SATURDAY
NAPES & NAPES
Next Door to Empress Theater
Clearance Sale
ON
ELECTRIC
VACUUM
CLEANERS
Never
Before
u
9S-XÏ
Prices Far
Below
Cost
Richmond Electric Vacuum
Cleaner . $7.50
"Bee" Electric Vacuum Cleaners,
complete with attachments . $10
Royal Electric Vacuum
Cleaners, . . $12 and $16
These makes of Cleaners have increased so
greatly with the rise in prices that we shall dis
continue these lines and are closing out our stock
before putting in a different line.
Only a Few Remain
You should make your purchase immedi
ately. Never again such an opportunity
Missoula Light & Water Co.
In.
» v; a » 1 î InZ
(Cpntjnuya OlW.)
their uniform. Aiwrthen.pi^ttyfeature
was the waving by baby hands of hun
dreds of American flags.
Next year, the patriotic, parade of
Missoula's babies will be even mt>re
Inspiring than it was yesterday*-good
the first time and hotter the next.
WILLING TO SHARE HIS WAD.
Teacher (sternly.)—"Willie Jones,
give that chewing gum to me.'" "
Willie—"I'll let you have half of It."
—Boston Evening Transcript.
___________ ;

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