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The Daily Missoulian. (Missoula, Mont.) 1904-1961, February 11, 1918, Image 1

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025316/1918-02-11/ed-1/seq-1/

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VOL.XUV. NO. 287.
ik
MISSOULA, MONTANA, MONDAY MORNING, FEBRUARY 11,1918.
PRICE
SMKSMMN
Five Americans Reported
Missing After Germans
Make Attack. ^
ONE SOLDIER RETURNS
SERIOUSLY WOUNDED
Sector Now Placed in Hands
of United States General
for First Time.
With the American Army in France,
Saturday. Feb. !*.—By the Associated
Bress.—Five American soldier« are
believed to have been killed, tour are
missing and one was wounded, when
an, American patrol was ambushed in
No Man's land last night by a superior
force of Germans.
The spot where the encounter oc
curred is an isolated one and reports
concerning the casualties inflicted by
both sides are meagre. Only one
American is known to have escaped the
trap of the Germans, which was laid
In front of our wires. The one sur
vivor who crawled back to the Ameri
can llties with a bullet in his chest. Is
unable to talk.
Artillery Active.
Our artillery Immediately laid a bar
luge around the ambushing Germans
and some are believed to have been
accounted for. The infantry accounted
for others, as it is certain the attacked
patrol fought to a finish according to
Information trickling in from the front
liiw.
One American artilleryman was
killed and five artillery men were
wounded by shell fire.
The Americans sprinkled the enemy
trenches with shrapnel all during the
day. There was considerable patrol
activity, but no further clashes were
reported.
One of the American patrols con
sisting of 14 men went out to inspect
the wire. Tlie men were moving cau
tiously along when the leader heard
suspicious noises ahead. ' The forma
tion.of the patrol was changed whetj
suddenly, according to the survivors,
the men found themselves almost sur
rounded by large numbers of the ene
my. A German cried "kammerad"
and then hurled a grenade. The
Americans opened fire with their rifles
mid pistols and hurled their grenades.
The Germans followed suit.
Lasts Short Time.
The fight lasted only about a minute
nml a half, the Germans all the while
J-elling "kammerad." They then re
treated. taking with them four Amer
icans and leaving behind four dead
r.nd two wounded Americans. One of
the il nwounded me crawled to where
n comrade lay groaning and gave him
water, while the other wougded sol
dier dnwAfed himself through the wire.
Quickly a hall of machine gun and
rifle bullets was directed against the
retreating Germans. Meanwhile the
wounded man, who was a sergeant,
died In the arms of a private who was
endeavoring to give him aid.
Aids Dying Sergoant.
The men In the trenches and the
survivors had a gleam of satisfaction
when the shells from the American
heavy guns and 7G's began hitting in
a barrage. Cries and yells in German
were mingled with explosions; then
the barrage widened and there were
further cries, proving that the enemy
had scattered.
Another patrol quickly went over the
lop into No-Man's land and found their
five dead comrades and pne uninjured
survivor of the first patrol, who had
remained beside the body and was
ready to give battle if the enemy re
turned.
The greatest courage was exhibited
by the entire patrol, every man of
which fought hard until killed or the
enemy had withdrawn.
U. S, Gsnsral Ovsr Sector.
An American general now commands
the sector of the front recently taken
over by ouh troops. When the Amçr
leans first entered the sector it was
under the command of a French gen
eral commanding a certain large unit
of the French army. Now we have
control.
Ip turning the sector over to the
American general on February' 5, the
French commander Issued a general
order in which he expressed complete
satisfaction with our troops and was
confident that the sector was in good
hands and if attacked, it would be de
fended with great valor.
all
no
He
icy.
I
by
eel
I
of
"1
in
ALI
ENS
WAIT INTERNMENT.
San Francisco. Feb.
10.— Eleven '
German enemy aliens, arrested here
recently by the United 8tateo mar- (
rhai's office, were in the hands of the
milltary authorities today awaiting in
tenunent for the duration of the war
on presidential warrants.
The Weather
Foreeaot—Unsettled and coldor
Monday, probably min. or snow
west portion; Tuvoday generally
fair and colder.
LOCAL OBSERVATIONS.
Maximum 60 Minimum 23
At 6 a. m.........23 At 6 p.'m.......4*
Yesterday was the warmest day of
all the year, and a grateful town spent
most of it out-of-doors. Roads were
muddy, it is true, but so fresh and
springlike were air and sunshine that
no one minded what was underfoot.
There will be more of winter, no
doubt, but spring has already won a
foothold, and the mildest of winters
within memory may also become the
shortest.
FROM OTHER POINTS.
City —
Min.
Max.
Bismarck
............ 41
54
Oil
28
............... 44
60
Moorhead .......
38
41
.......... 4«i
M
Minn* ipulis
............... 4«
44
Williston .. ..
............. 38
41
r,o
c<
................ 42
48
Helena ......
......... 54
60
Salt Lake......
........... 34
34
Portland, Ore.....
.......... 48
50
.......... 42
46
50
Edmonton .........
................-32
40
.... 40
Minnedosa ..........
.............. 32
34
Winnipeg
................ 22
32
LAYS BLAME FOR
CHINA'S TROUBLE
President Feng Kwo-Cheng
Forecasts Retirement
In Near Future.
Pekin. Wednesday, Fob. 6.—By The
Associated Press.—President Feng
Kwc-Cheng, in a remarkable'mandate
Issued today bitterly reproached him
self for the country's political trouble.
He declared he was too weak for the
burden imposed upon him and fore
casts his retirement from the presi
dency as soon ns order is restored.
"At the time of the uprising in
Hunan iast year," the president said,
"the cabinet advocated a military pol
icy. Though they have my approval,
I always' have considered the diffi
culty of the situation and been In
clined to peace. J have not publicly
declared war and this accounts for the
present trouble."
Citts Defects.
Tlie president cited various defec
tions by generals and reserves to the
northern troops which he said have
"damaged the nation's dignity" and
that therefore, ministers one after an
other ha'e resigned.
"At that time," the mandate con
tinued. "I should have upheld the law
by Inspiring the army to fight, but
the lluintn authorities telegraphed that
hostilities had been suspended and the
Kwangtung oflichils promised to can
eel their declaration of Independence.
Taking I heir words at their face value,
I suspected that war might still he
averted at the eleventh hour."
Alee Blames Governor.
The president analysed the abuses
of the Isolde's misery placing the
blame first, upon Fu i.iang Tio, former
governor of Hunan, who deserted, ami
others who failed to do their duty.
"As the «entrai government has not
acted properly." said the president,
"1 examine mys«df and feel that T have
many defects. I appointed Fu Liang
Tio and others without carefully ex
amining Into their conduct, so I am
guilty of ignorance of men. I ordered
the negotiations for peace while rebels
were triumphant. I offered easy terms
in an effort to satisfy the popular de
sire. so that I am lacking in foresight.
My effort to save from misery brought
more misery; my hope to save the sit
uation resulted In more confusion.
Says He'« Weak.
"Toleration brings undesirable re
sults ; so that I cannot make others be
lieve in my sincerity. I am too weak
for tlie burden and cannot escape pub
lic b'ame and condemnation for being
guilt » In many ways. I dare not hold
tny high position In opposition to pub
lic «ensure, hut the tenure of office is
ord«red by virtue of the constitution
and cannot be easily set aside. More
over hostilities have been resumed in
Hupeh and it behooves me to continue
helping the eauae.
"When order Is -restored and the
the populace relieved I shall retire
full of gratitude, into the country."
a
British Labor Leader
Ridicules World Strike
London. Feb. X#.—Joseph Havelock
Wilson, who for many years was a
labor member of parliament and now
is general president of the Notional
' Seamen's union, in speaking at a bum
meeting last night in connection with
( the Merchant Seamen's league said
that a lot bad been heard about serious
trouble likoly to arise üi the labor
world, but that such talk could be
written down as nonsense.
BRIGHAM WINS
FKHT AGAINST
DRUG TON LIFE
Historian Taken to His Home
After Winning Battle
in Hospital.
--!
DOCTORS' PROMPT
ACTION SAVES HIM
Took Bichloride of Mercury
Which Is Usually Fatal
Within Week.
w. H. Bingham, the Michigan his
torian, who t«H,k nil overdose of bi
chloride of mercury in his room ut the
Florence hotel last Sunday, was | laced
aboard u Northern Pacific train yes
terday and started toward home.
Science bud won Its almost hopeless
fight with death. Bingham was pro
nounced safe from tlie effects of a
poison which ordinarily is not to be
cured by any means.
Promptness Saved Victim.
Bingham probably owes Ills miracu
lous recovery to the promptness with
which the physicians called to Ids aid
acted. Just a week ago yesterday
the historian swallowed a'dose of t oi
son which was "large enough to kill a
«losen mon." Death was averted, it
now appears, only by quick action at
the time and efficient care during the
critical days which followed.
Almost Always Fatal.
Mercuric poisoning Is almost unfail
ingly fatal after a period ranging from
five to ten days. For a time little
hope was held out In Bingham's case,
but the poisOn has been eliminated, It
Is now believed.
Bingham is not vet well by any
means. He had to he carried care
fully to the train and will have ex
pert attention on the way horn«'. But
the danger Is said to be i.-ost.
Really Took Poison.
Rumors that Bingham did not take
bichloride of mercury at all, have been
persistent. It has been said that the
historian took aspirin tablets, thought
he had made a mistake, und called fur
help. This is not true, aecor«llng to
Dr. «'hartes Plxlcy. who was in charge
of the case. Bingham did take poi
son and a large dose of It. .
The friends w ho look Bingham home
yesterday threw no light upon the
man's motives. Bingham said at the
Florence hotel. Where he swallowed
the poison, that he did not want a doe
tor; that he was "going to cross the
Great Divide." Later ,lic told the
doctors that he took the tablets by
mistake, thinking he was swallowing
aspirin. N. B. Strong of Minneapolis,
a nephew of the historian, took charge
of the man and refused to discuss the
case.
REPUBLICANS GATHER
FOR BIG CONFERENCE
is
Is
In
to
Iowa and Indiana Men Seek
Committee Chairmanship.
St. Louis, Feb. 10.—Eighteen mem
bers of the Républicain National com
niiltec. which is to hold a series of
conferences an«i one formal meeting
here tomorrow and Tuesday, had re
ported to Secretary James B. Reynolds,
tonight. Preliminary interest centered
In the contest between John T. Adams
of Iowa and W. H. Hayes of Indiana,
for the chairmanship made vacant by
the resignation of William It. Wlllcox.
George W. Perkins of New York, ar
rived tonight and issued a. statement
in wfileh he sai«J that "all w<- Progres
sives ask Is that a Republican be se
le« ted as chairman of the national com
mittee. who by his record and ability
will at once give promise of being
able to harmonize and organize; for a
political party succeeds by assimila
tion. not by elimination."
Among the other committeemen
who registere«! with Mr. Reynolds,
were Allen B. James. Arizona; Hubert
Work, Colorado; Thomas A. Marlow,
Montana; R. B. Howell, Nebraska;
Ralph E. Williams, Oregon, and Wil
liam C. (Vyok. South Dakota.
German Papers Calculate
40,900 Sammees in France
Amsterdam, Feb. 10.—In their com
ment on the sinking of the Tuscania,
the Berlin newspaper Germania Ond
Reutache Tagea Zeitung affect sur
prise that the big transport only car
ried approximately 2.400 men. Thus,
mm "according to reports," 16 trans
port* have arrived in France, they cal -1
a
as "according to reports," 16 trans
porta have arrived in France, they cal-1
culate that only about 40,00« American 1
( troops now are there. This, they as-1
be sert agrees with independent informa
, tion nt hand on tills subject.
Eyes of the Big Gunsjll
l*
•raÇV- ' fuss' >»
■' i p if
v Jpr
■■iff#
■■«Hi
V.Ï
' *
iill'
M* :
*
r* t
J»!
■'i f i
This snapshot shows n French observer In a capilve balloon directing the
artillery flic from French guns. "Captive" halUipn In tills case imams that H
is held in pqsttlup by-ropes and wires leading to the groom). The balloonist
watches the shots and Instantly tells the man ul the other end of the phone
tiie results and gives him range correct ions If nece-isnry. It's ii danger*
hunter's joli, for ot course the observer Is right out In | lain view of the
enemy and a constant target for snipers.
Hun-Ukraine Pact
May Resume War
With Bolsheviki
Zurich, Switzerland, Fell. in. Tile
separate peace signed with the I'kraltu*
Is the equivalent of n declaration of
war by the central powers against the
Bolsheviki. says the Züricher Zeitung
In Its comment on the peace develop
ment. It doubts, also, whether the
Ukraine is in a posit ion to conclude an
effective peace.
Little Enthusiasm.
Amsterdam. Feb. in. -J.lttle trace of
enthusiasm is apparent. In tin G< i nujri
press comments on the conclusion of
peace with tin Ukraine. The Berlin
Vosslsclu- Zeitung, for Insinuer, says:
"'Hie young state tins placed II elf
iituler tin protection of our friendship
to safeguard Its entlang« red develop
ment. Tills fact creates n breach In
the moral ring with which British and
American calumny lias .surrounded us
during thfc war."
The Igikal Anzeiger says:
"For
the central
not 1res
the im
portance of the agr
•ellient
Vlih Hie
* 1
1'kniln
> Ilf* pHncli
ally in
the ero
nornie
lomttin.**
First Peace
to Come.
-1
The Frankfurter Zeitung reiiiarkH
that to overcstimale what had been
attained would In dangerous, but on*
of til« chief gains is "that the almost
forgotten idea of peace Issues comes
forth for the first time Is-fore tlie peo
ples of tli«- wbob- world as .'intangible
reality out of tin- unprecedented hor
ror of these times."
According to a Vienna telegram, the
news came us a great relief to Austria,
the announcement of the peace in spe
cial eflltlons of the newspapers mak
ing a d«-ep impression upon the pub
lic. Flags were run up oil numerous
buildings.
Pa ris Doprttsed.
Baris. Feb. 10.- -Cpinmcnt of the
French press on the signing of a peace
between the central powers and the
Ukraine is as a rule somewhat <le
pressed In tone. The news is no cause
of rejoicing for ns. says I-a Victor!«-.
Premier Clememeau's L'Homme
Libre points out that th«- Urksinians
are setting out upon a dangerous road,
delivering their country with its rich
resource* to German < xploitatinn.
"The right of peoples to dis; ose
themselves has received its first ap
plication unhappily."- says IVAction
Française, a royalist newspaper. "It
is tnorc in conformity with our fears
than with our hopes. The first use
made by this people of th«-ir newly
m
I
K
t
Ht
1
-
Washington. Feb. 10.—Extension of
1 time for filing Income and excess prof-1
as-1 it* returns from March 1 to April 1.
vss announced today by Internal
Revenue Commissioner Roper.
acquired liberty Is to deliver itK«df into '
slavery."
--- j
EXTEND INCOME FILING. [
Tli
* 1 * 1W 1
lollll
inul«
Tli
FINN REVOLUTION
BECOMES WORSE
70 Youths Murdered by Red
Guard; Many Student*
Slaughtered.
Stockholm, Ich. it. All diplomatic
couriers on tla ir way to lvtrogrud have
been detained in Htorkliolm because «d
Inst met Ion received bv 111«' Finnish
mildster In i* to vise no passports for
lor* Ip liera,
Scandinavian refugees brought to
Stockholm bv ilm first Swedish relief
larrnwitig talcs
by the Bed « «nurds
al Tnmrnerfors. In
noting in reports, V"
against a wall and
mowed «iowii with machine gun fir
wepl and plea«!« d tor mere)
cs then wore stripped and
expedit ion,
wholesale m
m ! b-lsingfi
I la latter ■ U
youths wen
whit* I heV
Their hod
mol Hated.
Hunting Down Students.
U* d Guards uc reported hunting
student:, remorselessly and the
lurdcra io II* Islrigfors, 11 Is cstl
wlll reach into the hundreds,
situation lias got entirely out of
tlie
hunt
h 4 »f Uh Sm iaMnt h*itf
Ig*I>
<»f
Hi»
yi>*
if Sfiiator Manner an«l
fot
iTi<*r
l*r«*i
ni*r
Tokio, Mu- accounts indi*
;• 1 «
l»«r>
oriH
familiar with Finland
*l,.<
l»i rr
Mh
llrlV
• no dnuhl I In majority
of
the
<oili
\r\ h
SiH-iallsIs are fighting
«III
Mi<
K «Vi
rntii
•ill's side. They point. «
III
hitf
t h<
dislriet where !h< Wtiii*
Sm
ril'H
Ht rr
ig«h
was chiefly recruited,
is
ior
mal
y a
Socialist si rung hold
Ik
n
volt
tin
V conteinJ, «••«uld lie
|Ui
•kly
suppressed, if it wore not for thi- Itus
slan soldiers and sailors who arc fight
ing on lie side of tin Reds on ordors
from I In- Hrnulny institute |n Petro
grad.
That la-nine, Trolzky and tin ir ass* -
riales in Russia regard the Finnish
struggle as a first step in spreading
111*' Bolshevik revolution westward, is
mdir«t«-il In an Interview with Is nine,
published in tint haul Bolshevik organ,
the Bolttlken. In Bits Lenin«! declared:
"We shall soon dispose «if the small
states."
I'pon Hie interview the Bolitlkeii
comments Unis:
"What Is going oil in Finland now Is
only a rehearsal f*.r the European dam
ag«- «if which 4hc curtain is shortly g«<
iiig up."
Incriminate Minneapolis
Police in Red Light Case
(keeping a disorderly house here, will
go before the Hennepin county grand
Jury tomorrow to tell of protection at
leged to have been given his place by
certain members of the Minneapolis
police department.
Minm-a polls. Feb. 10.—Rudolph
' Schneider, «enlem ed yesterday in Hen-
Inepin county district court to serve an
j indeterminate t«*rm of from one to five
[ years in the state penitentiary for
de;
■■■student
LISTED AMONG THOSE
Marcus Cook of 'Como and Elmer Cowan
öf Victor May Be Numbered With
Victims of Sinking«
—-- i
Washington. Feb.* 10.— Spacial— Sevon Montana msn art among tho
324 soldiers on beard the T uses ni» whose names ora not found upon tho
incoirplsts list of survivois givsn out tonight by tha wop department.
Forty-seven Montana men were on tha transport, ond40are reported safe.
The sevon m,esmg men, whose names may appear on liots yet to bo pub
lished, are:
JACK J. BYRNE, Butt«.
JOHN EDWARDS, Butt« 1
CHAUNCEY J. DAVIDSON, Ana
conda.
MARCUS B. COOK, Como.
JAMES W. SALLEE. Hot Springs
ELMER L. COWAN Victor.
LEONARD H. DETHMAN. Mc
Cabe.
It is not certain that the ma* still unaccounted for are d«ad. The war
department's list ot survivors oontains 1,853 names. There were 2,177
parsons on board, and the estimated loss is 113. That leavts 211 survivors
yet to bn listed.
The 43 Montana survivors are:
MONTANA SURVIVORS. !
Ralph S. Graves, Mlssmi!ii
Georg«* I'pham, MIhmoiiIii.
«'. M. Fletcher, Victor.
John It. rtnrk, Doit Lodg"
.lohn .1. Unison, I'lalnx.
Alex D. Davidson, Burma.
Van W. (iladd«-ii. Hidney.
Fred D. Metcalf. Kallapcll.
Herbert w. Miller, Great Full*.
Bind McCormick, lulling«.
Dille Edwiii OIcKon. Thompson Fulls.
Charles C. Hmaltack, Warm Hprlngs.
George L. St. Clair, Bixins.
Albert C. Tillman, Florence.
James J. Tucker, Kulls|s*H.
Coleman While. Augusta.
Charles G. Bennett, Ashley.
John D. Morrow, Kalispell.
Joseph I*. Bas. ye, Kaltspi'll
Warren A. Bhu Uniun, Ullwcr Gtilrli.
Emil A. Anderson, VVesI Kalispell.
James E. Babbitt, Vletnr.
Edward <'. Green, Hillings.
Beter .1. Isivulle, Kalispell.
John E. Mahoney, (iuge.
Leon S, Richardson, Bialns.
«Hiver Wetheru, Harlem.
Floyd Winn. Belknap.
Edward T. Mahom-y. «Juge.
Hidney II. Griggs, Hi earns.
Waller B. Danton, Kslispell.
Fred Krlslelison, Livingston.
I ,a w retire B. Walters, Victor.
Willard «'. Hall, Butte.
Leo VV. Stewurl, Basin.
Clarence VV. Me«'olllrn, f'ltHCitdc.
David G. Hudlloff, Butte
Htewart J CiilrneroHH, Klillspell.
Peter II. Stewart, Great Falls.
Ainu- Van Den Drl* tri be, Hteviaix
vlllr.
University Student
Li*ted Amonjc Miss in«.
MaretiK D.
listed among
the TWent it It
t'ulverslty, wl
the eel.....I of
' Como, wl
sing, enlist*
F.
Elmer 1.. «'
»wan of
VI
«■tor, a Iso is
well knnwti In
w Hot
i in
■n were pop
ula r in Miss«,
j ht him!
t hf
Hitter Boot
valley, and It
iM hM|M
i tl
al 1 1 u-y will
he 1 i1 * - * 1 aiiKii
« 1 >16' U
,r v
v«»ra today.
Both Hie Mi
hhoiiIh >»
>y*
who were on
the transport i
n ^.il«
Tl
«■y ar* Ralph
S. Graves, son
4»f W 1
». fi
aves, of Or
cl in id Homes,
and <;«•*
rut
i'pham.
Several Bitter Bo
.1 i
• ijm an alsq
among tin- nui
viv«»i u.
_
Mr*. Roosevelt Receives
Message Prom King George
dor
w York. I
Roosevelt,
rations at the
reck, is stead
ihyslclans ln-llr
overy is slinpl
i-b. HI. Colonel Theo
ylio underwent two op
Boosrvelt hospital last
I y Improving ami his
n- tonight that his rr
II matter of lime.
Mrs. Roosevelt tonight received Ihn
following hi« ssagr front King George
of England:
'The quron and I regret tin- illiu-ss
of Colonel Moose'
speedy recovery'."
i lt and hope for hb
CANADIAN CASUALTIES.
at
by
an
for
«»Hawn, Ont., Feb. 10. Tin- «'ana
iliari overseas «asualty Hsl issue«t to
night contained the following names
of Americans.
Wounded :
J. Dinning, Spring wells. Mich.; .1
Houle, ia-roy, N. Ik
Ga ssc«i:
W. A. Baird. Bremerton, Wash.; B
W. Ouirnotte, Huron, S. D.
MAYOR'S SECRETARY GUILTY.
Minneapolis, Feb. 16.—A verdict of
guilty was returned by a Hennepin
county district court jury at 11:45 a.
m. today, against O. M. Waaslng, sec
retary to Mayor Van Lear, on charges
preferred on behalf of a minor girl.
The jury was out more than 46 hours.
I He will be sentenced tomorow morn -
|ing.
I
Report* Show 345
Still Unaccounted :
Many in Doubt.
— vv- r
of
a.
-
Washington, Fob. 111.—ISIghteen ittfn
died and thirty-two namivi of Amer
ican solfilers renewed from tho tor
pedoed liner Tuscania hud been re
ported tonight to the war department.
leaving :i4.'i of the soldiers on- board
unancountod for. No official report
lias reunited (lie department to change
ilm estimate that all except M3 of tho
men wi ie saved, but tho names have
Win «'tuning In very slowly over tho
crililes mid there is no assurance as to
when Ilm list will bn complete.
List Not Complot«. '
From the names so far received amt
lie passenger list of Hie lost steamer.
Hi*- Associated Bless lias «'ompllçd tho
record of iIionc still not ' Mÿorted.
Brobably mord Ilian 200 ntjvËt men
whose names appear on Ibis r^BMrit arc
safe In Ireland, and will lie so report (Hi
soon.
•ho pe iqia ration of the list even In
it« Incomplete form represent* an ag
gregate of MO hours of labor. Th«i
war department lias only Issued an
fflclal roll of those on the ship. Tho
entmin«*' • *n public Information ha*
made no effort to compile a list of tho
missing, merely Issuing list« of »UT
ors. In order to compile a list of
ndsaiiig and unrepoi led it was neces
y lo search for each name in both
lisle, a laborious process In dealing
h inoic Ilian 2.000 names.
Survivors Fated.
Belfast. I reimt*!. Feh, 10. The Bei
sl Telegraph says that lhu party of
Americans who were rescued from
death in the Tuscuuhi «ilsaster took
farewell Saturday- afternoon, entrain
ing for the south. Continuing, tho
Telegraph says;
"As lin- Tuscania survivors moved
*mi head* *1 by a hand they were hear
til cheered by groups of men of the
garrison, who were off duty. Th«
Americans wen quickly identified In
I In- si reds. Tin variety of the head
gear telling Ils File and tho crowds
attracted by tin- stirring martial music
increased as they passed through tho
center of Hn city lo tho station.
Scan Bulletins.
"There were involuntary eyes right
as Hie unie column puaaed the Tele
graph office, the men eagerly *can
nlng the contents of tho bulletin board.
Members of the reform club raised a
vigorous cheer an tin: men of the Klara
and Stripes swung past in tli*ir fn«r
deep formation and at another point
rnroute when the general of the Ulster
division of reserves pa%dng In his
motor «ar «aime to a standstill, (he
general tisi gave Ihr» suhlte.
"AI tli*- station )ho won.were ad
dressed by r«ird Mayor Johnson. '
The musical sch étions from the
l ands were lively and Inspiring «
Auld l,ang Syne was a pvolutje to
whistle of the engine and as
moved out of the station, <
the Star' Spangled Banner
nlr, the troops standing to ai
In tho carriages as their
I anthem was played.
•"The men left with grateful
cions of the hospitality of
Following is the list
filled
■Ueutton
nation*!
board the Tuscania who. pp
not been reported among tbe'f
ors:
Possiblo Casualties!
Captuln Leo 3».
Okla.; Cuptgiu
(CBBttrae« «B l

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