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The Daily Missoulian. [volume] (Missoula, Mont.) 1904-1961, April 01, 1918, Image 2

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025316/1918-04-01/ed-1/seq-2/

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IR SOLDIERS
Rattlesnake Community Has
Impressive Service
for Boys.
SISSON 'GIVES SPEECH
;E
University President Talks
of Reasons for Entry
Into War.
Nothing
makes my
stomach
contented
like
Post
riES
says
• An Impressive sort Ice In lionor of the
12 Rattlesnake valley boys ami the one
Btrl who arc with the colors was held
In the Lincoln school Saturday evening
by the people of the Rattlesnake com
munity. A service flat; bearing 13
ata.s was dedicated after an address
by Dr. E. O. Sisson, president of the
State University. With the service
flag was a roll of honor, bearing the
following names;
Sergeant Ralph Starr, Eleventh in
fantry.
Frank Smith, const artillery.
Master Engineer John Taylor, four
teenth engineers.
Wardtnastcr Harvey Johnson, Camp
Cody. #
Corpora) Richard Johnson, Twenty
third engineers.
Corporal Italie Jolmson, artillery.
First Lieutenant George Scherck,
Fifth Aero Squadron.
Russell Sillier, aviation corps.
Corporal George W. Duncan, Turn
ty-thir<J engineers.
Thomas Cummings, avation corps
Willtain Howden, Twelfth infantry.
Frank Taylor. 163rd infantry.
Kate Heles, Red Cross nurse.
Siaaen Diacuaaea Cauaea of War.
Dr. Sisson discussed Hie American
purpose in the war and the influences
which forced the United States to
take up arms against Germany.
Following tile presentation of 1 D<
Rervico flag, E. F. Gross, in a speech
of acceptance said;
"Our flag is the promise (o Hie i co
pies of this world that democracy shall
not perish from this earlh, and those
Stars and Stripes, the magic symbol
of a nation's ideals, make the only flag
in all the world that never knew defeat.
No kaiser, king or czar shall dim a
•Ingle Klar or erase a single stripe,
and may it ever be unstained lin'd un
conquered.
Amarica Will Not Count fcost.
• "Millions of lives bave already been
lost, offered on the altar of liberty, and
it may cost many more; hut we live In
theassurnnee that knows no doubt that
the manhood and womanhood of free
^'America will not count I be cost, wlgjl -
"ever it may tie, that the blight of au
tocracy may tie destroyed forevermore.
""In behalf of tlds community, [ ac
cept this banner with these precious
stars, each representing a human life,
the most sacred thing on earth, conse
crated on the altar of freedom and lib
erty for us all, and I ask you to rise
and extend your right hand toward tlds
banner, and in reverent, silence pledge
your lives, your fortunes and your sac
red honor to sustain our hoys in every
way within your power, that their sur
erifice shall not have been in vain, so
when this wards over the world will be
nearer the day when men will not de
Btroy each other to gain what they can
out of the world, hut rather strive to
Bee how much good they ran put into
It."
Verses in Honor of Flag.
Mrs. D. T. Wright read verses writ
ten in honor of the occasion. Parts
of the poem, entitled, "The Service
Flag," follow:
From dreams of peace the nation's soul
Awoke to warlike might.
And echoed back her leaders' ealt
"Gold help us! We must fight!"
But misty eyes of mothers saw
The hoys In battle line.
And quivering hearts in anguish cried.
"Not mine, oh, God! Not mine!"
But listening youth heard Freedom's
voice.
And wilting answer tnadi
With steady, step they marched- away.
Eager and unafraid.
And if, iHyAoubt and selfish love.
We sought to stay them then.
In children's eyes we saw, new-horn.
The fearless souls of men.
And though our hearts shall nearly
break
For lads so far away,
And very souls shall weary be.
We still will work and pra>
That strength and courage do not fall
Tilt battles shall lie o'er
And light through all the world pre
vail
And war shall be no more.
CV0A NCE TONIGHT.
Loader of Tin il way (hmdueiots
Ive a bifif Easter ball in the Elit«'
Jkbs evening. The Ja /./. burnt is to
music. The proceeds will be
to patriotic uses
RETURN ASHES OF JAPANESE HEROES
WX'/Xv.-. '
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The bodies of the Japanese officers and sailors who fell In the destroyer action In the Mediterranean in June last,
wore cremated and the remains were taken to Japan. The photo stiows sailors hearing the urns, in which repose the
sacred ashes of their country's martyrs, on board a destroyer in a Japanese port.
MISSOULA TO ELECT
CITY OFFICERS TODAY
Active Campaign Ends After
Better Attacks
(Con tin tun! Krorn l'a*:« Om\)
l\v<
Us, and Intrust in thrir raw.
ia so keon that a record vote Is ex
pected today.
The eontrover« y between the two
e. ndidates and their followers became
ne st heated over the. I. W. W., though
pe d performances were rather candidly
tlbeussed. Houston took the position
that, the I. \\'. \\\ movement is a
Tni naeo to Missoula which should he
nipped in tin* bud by vigorous a' tlon.
M• »ore's attitude has been that strenu
ous methods should not be. used again i
ihr I \\\ \v. unless the indust riulists
ht otne actively dnnKcrouç.
Both Experienced Men.
lioth of the candidates have had
pievious experience in police work, to
which the winner will probably be :is
si -.lied by the other members of the
council, Inasmuch as Commissioner
Thomas Kemp, the retiring member, is
head of the department of public safe
tv. Moore has served for several years
aa a member of the police force and at
intervals as acting chief of police.
Houston was sheriff of Missoula conn
I In lSSlLDIt and served as eoininis
sh r.er of public safety under the com
mission form of government.
"New Time" Governs Polls.
The polls will open today at S a. m.
and close at p ill. The time, uaUir.il
1\. will he the new daylight snvimr
time, and voters who failed to set their
clocks ahead yesterday should do so
today.
The polling places will be as fol
lows :
lYceinet 1 -Prescott school. .Indies,
N. .1. Myers. Mrs. Kllxabeth Kniscly, c.
IV S<|iiires, Airs. Ceellhv Wilburn.
Preeinet. *J- Missoula theater. Judiros.
Max Henereaiix, Mrs. Clara I., Lawyer,
Mrs. Anna M. Wade. Oscar Boos.
Precinct 3—-City hall. Judges, Mrs.
Lucia AT. Beebe. Mrs. Sarah Huheart,
H. P. Campbell. J. A. Walsh.
Preilnet A Boss Avenue house,
.ludpes. Mrs. Mftnratvt Taylor. W. O.
Tornaico, Mrs. Elizabeth ('rawshaw,
John Pearce.
Precinct r*—Whittier school, .Tudjres,
Mrs. Ida Krltner. J. AY. Jones, George
Pi inale. Airs. Julia Shller.
I*reclnet U ■ Missoula creamery.
Judges, John C. Carlen. Mis Arietta K.
Bryan, Blanche Pulliam. John Bonner.
Precinct 7 Lovvtdl school. Judges.
». Mrs. Millie Los lie.
nek, A. K Anderson,
y coal office, Judges.
Mrs. Alice M. Beckwith. Mrs. Jennie
Ik ac orn. Mrs. Ella Llodson. F red C.
Stoddard.
Precinct 9 Roosov« !t school. Judges,
A H. Hartley. Mrs. Nellie A. Thomp
son, John Tat Icy, Mrs. Barbara IUk
Hat ta
fillet
10
Knowles building.
Marg.net Lemley, W. TA
Chadwick. Mrs, Harriot
Precinct
.lu dirts. Mrs
Cobban, A.
I »insmore.
PreclflCt It Britte's store. Sixth
street, west. Judges. T. S. Woodford,
H. H. Montgomery, Mrs. Britt, Mrs. J.
H. McGuffey.
Precinct 1 Pasley house. Judges
A. C. Kllsberry, Mrs. Fosterling 1C. A.
Arbuckle, Miss Orrlo Thomas.
WISCONSIN ELECTION i
PROMISES TO BE HOT
Milwaukee, March 31,—Candidates j
and orators gem-rally tit Wisconsin's '
senatorial campaign utilized Ute extra'
hour of daylight today in ilisregurdiin: 1
tin- alarm clock and sinking to the liot
tom most depths of rest after a -stren
uous week.
There was no speaking in the Wis
consin senatorial campaign today, hut
tomorrow, the one day intervening be
fore election oil Tuesday, will be util
ized t u drijAhnme the final arguments.
Rhymster
Too Light to iBe "First to
Fight."
Buffalo,
Man
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A tidal
v\ave of poetic verse threatened
to swamp the roeniiUntc office of
tin* r. S. Mai in«* corps hero re
cently, when Hurt Cdbbs, of no
where m particular, ente red the of
fice and burst out:
"My country
Pray tell me,
•alls, T wish to fl«ht,
sir, am 1 in rijçht?"
His auditors were stinhered and
one braver than the rest led the
poetic <!tbbs, still chattering', into
the office of the officer in charge.
Gibbs effected a lordly bow and
swept his hat to the floor;
"I've conn* to fight to clear the sea,
To make it sale for Democracy."
This was followed with:
"I'rlthet
fame.
\ kind sir.
I'm k
nowii to
Think a
name.
nd reflect.
Gibb.
t Is my
Burt
(îihbs m; i :
e gain
pool ion!
but net
• ■ r military
faim*.
Ho was
1 ejeetell
as idiysitally unfit.
BILL HART STARS
IN BANDIT MOVIE
Story of Western Railroad
Life at Empress.
William S. Hart in his latest photo
play "Wolves of tin* Hail." Is now be
im. shown at the f l Impress then tor.
The picture from start to finish eon
giileh come in
to please the
►f the famous
tains tliriiling seen«*»
rapid enough scmienc
most ardent admirer
star.
The story centers around a gang of
railroad bandits at work in the west
in the wild a ml woolly »lavs. Hirt,
as a railroad detective performs a
string of heroic feats, the climax of
which is his daring tide* alongside a
runaway engine. With both home
a ml engine at ■ full speed he swings
from his saddle Into the engine cab,
thrown» on the reverse lever and pre
vents a collision with a train loaded
with soldiers.
A clever and amusing Mack Seiinett
comedy completes the bill.
NOTED MINER DEAD.
Seattle, March 31.-— Krank Lauhner,
an Alaska mining man, who has made
hi> Imine at Seattle intermittently for
1". years.
». was found dead on the bank
of the Skagit river near Sedro W oolley
today with a deep wound in his throat
and a penknife grasped in his right
hand, according to word recch cd here
today. He was purported to be wealthy
and is said to have been the find man
t ' aetpiin a homestead in Alaska, tak
ing title to land near Seward nearly a
decade ago.
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SERVICE
— PINS
25c each
Well Made and Durable.
OHN
Jewelry Co.
K
s
coming In.
It is hoped that week after week
they will continue to eome in steadily,
lor our men will need books as long as
the war lasts, and the supply must be
constantly replenished. All stations
which have been ope ned for the receipt
of books will be continued indefinitely,
and tin* public is urged to form the
habit of turning in their new books ns
scon ns they have* read them. In this
way, a constant stream of fresh hooks
into the camps wlU be assured, and
most effective barrage established
against the* blue devils of loneliness and
depression.
All books received will be prepared
for use in accordance with the simple
rules laid down by the library war
service of the American Library asso
ciation, and will be shipped to such
points ns the A. L. A. may designate.
The needs of all camps and stations in
this vicinity will be taken care of first.
Most of the hook.*: collected along the
Atlantic seaboard will be shipped to
Kj a nee as rapidly a; possible. At least
half a million arc needed there at once,
and a constant stream of replacements
must Ik* maintained, for the wastage
w ill he very great. Hence the call for
hooks, hooks and more books.
The A. L. A. has built up mi organ!
xation capable of handling thousands
and thousands. That the books will
be forthcoming cannot be doubted.
----- ------------
Clues May Lead to
Detecting of Cox Murder
(Continued From 1'agc One.)
gone to see the children. At about
!* o'clock he started hack (or his broth
er's home on Sou I it Fifth street! His
way led across tin Nan Huron street
bridge and tiie lonely flat beyond. it
was dark and snowing. Somewhere
on the road COx was knocked senseless
1>> a blow from behind, hound up with
a window-sash cord, weighted with a
stone and thrown into the river.
The murder occur,-d right in the
heart of the city, and was evidently
done with cold-blooded premeditation.
SOLDIERS IN NEED
OF MORE TO READ
Library Calls for Help of
Missoula People.
1
The Missoula public library reports
timi tile people lit Missoula have eon
1 1 ibiitcd many hooks during the past
week for the use of our soldiers and
sailors, ami that *tiore books are still
456
SCHOOL POLICES
TO BE DISCUSSED
Public Forum to Hear Five
Aspirants for Office
This Evening.
'Y" MAN TO FRANCE
EVERY 12 MINUTES
! Association to Hurry Help
to Huts "Over There."
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! "We can consider only men who are
i v ill-ng to face hardship and danger,
j who are prepared physically to endure
| drudgery, long hours and high tension,
Jjarve racking work. Men with the
j spirit of service aro urged to respond,
• as have 4,00t) others, willing to serve
without compensation or fof the most
I meagre allowance."
READY FOR ANYTHING.
' Hi. Bill, hero comes a gas wave!"
"Thank heavens! This toothaches
almost killin' me!"—Cartoons Maga
zine. *
Soro Cra>aiaiea Eye,ws »
Eye« inflamed by expo
sure to Sm.DmI and «find
[uickly relieved by MuIm
. No Smarting,
}u«t Eye Comfort. At
Druggist* or *•" mail 50c pe, Bottle. Murine
Eve Sehre in Tub*. :<c. Foi ?eeb el tbe f ye
far* in Minted Eye Bract* ta.- CMuge
Eyes*®-*
e7 v *^ju«t Eye C
Druggist* or *•" mail 50c pe, B
LENNES MAIN SPEAKER
University Man to Discuss
Needs of School Sys
tem Like City's.
What <ln tin* public schools of Mis
soula need !
Five candidates for the district
si in,ol hoard will give their several
answers to that question this evening
at n spiiial meeting of the Missoula
1'iildie Komm, to be held in Union ha!'
beginning at 8 o'clock.
Dr. N. .1 Lennes of the State Uni
versity will open the meeting with an
Impartial discussion of the needs of
school system like Missoula's. I>r.
Lennes is a student of education mat
ters and will apply his remarks directly
t-i the Missoula schools.
At the rottclnsion of the opening
speech, which is to cover about half
hour, »'.ich of the five candidates for
position on the school lioard will speak
in rejoinder or response to Dr. Lennes.
Fach will have ten minutes.
The question will then be given over
to general discussion by persons in the
audience.
Two school trustees are to he elected
at the district election on Saturday,
April 6—The five candidates nomi
nated are Mrs. II. B. Farnsworth,
A. Hague, A. Besancon, Dr. E. \V.
Spottswood and F. A. Roberts.
Wants $5,000 From Man
Who Wouldn't Turn Out
j
' , , t . , . , ... ,
j < '»lom-l I. Anderson has filvd suit in
I the district court against Henry Uuek
,l(,,| s for.$.'',000 damages. Anderson Ul
J that in- drove up behind Buck
J I'""* on the Bitter Root road on Oc,
- x «»*1 signalled Buckhous to
make room for a. passing. Anderson
turned out, he says, but Buckhous held
to the middle of the road, so that the
two automobiles collided. Anderson
was injured and his machine damaged.
In order to serve the American troops
o', erse.is, to take charge of the French
foyers or huts, to extend the war work
of tin Young Men's Christian associe
tien t" the armies of the allies, it w 1
he necessary to send Y. M. C. A. war
Work secretaries to France at tile rate
of one every twelve minutes of every
working hour of every working day
'.ii-tv.i-i n now and Independence day.
A l\ Knolle 1 , in' charge of the war
I« rnonncl board of the Y. M. C. A. in
Nov, York, says that the Y. M. A.
mod- tough men for tough jolis." He
War Easter
Spring Showing Soberer
Than Usual.
Mr. and Mrs. John W. Every
body, and all the little Everybody»,
blossomed out In new togs yester
day—but with a difference. The
Easter revelation, made as usual
at the morning church hour, was
sobered by the war. The show
ing was less elaborate if not less
bright than in other years, show
ing that Thrift Stamps and Lib
erty bonds had in many cases tak
en the place of fiats and gowns.
Bright sunshine marked the
morning hours, and though n brisk
breeze was felt all days the weath
er was ideal for the occasion.
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Fore-runner of Progress
A thousand miles without changing cars;
freight from coast to coast; fast express from
afar;—all are the outgrowth of a great princi
ple first applied by
WESTERN UNION
when it brought under one system the early unconnected
telegraph lines. On this principle of "through connections''
all freight, express and sleeping car service is based today.
THE WESTERN UNION TELEG8APH CO.
JUST IN
Beautiful Silk Skirts in
plaids', stripes and plain
colors.
V
N«w Arrivals in
SUITS COATS, WAISTS
Sale
Agents
for
OODWIN
unJ
R.andG.
G
Corsets
yrgrps heyn-hq* j r
The Quality Store
WE STILL HAVE
Some Very Choice Lots Left
In
RESIDENCE ADDITION
' On
GERALD AVENUE
Also several very desirable building
lots on Higgins and Ronald avenues.
Missoula Grows Toward the
South
Go out and see if you can cither buy or
rent a satisfactory house.
e had a client who looked around for
a home for three weeks. There was
nothing to suit. Result—He bought in
Residence Addition and intends to build.
You can buy a large, level lot, good
soil, climate and perfect location, with
city water, street car service and graded
.streets.
00 oo
Down and «PÄ. a Week
Pay* for One
For the best buys in or cut of the
city, sec
SCHLICK and GÂGE
Real Estate and Insurance
First National Bank Building.
Special services In all churches
were largely attended. In the
afternoon the roads leading out of
the city to favorite drives were
crowded with automobiles.
Easter was celebrated "as us
ual," hut with the frills cut out.
'---
discharge butte i. w. w.
Butte, March 31.— Forty-one men ar
rested last week by city police during
a meeting of the Metal Mine Workers'
union, a n alleged I. W. W. organization,
have been discharged from custody for
lack of evidence, the act not being
ordered by county authorities. The men
were suspected of seditious acts. It
v as suspected that the mine workers
were contemplating a strike vote, but
that has not been confirmed.
Many a man who seems perfectly
iliappv is wearing a shirt made by his
wife.

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