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The Philipsburg mail. [volume] (Philipsburg, Mont.) 1887-current, May 31, 1901, Image 1

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HLitorica: Socity ct Montana
FFICIAL PAPER b , FFICIALPAPER0p
OF PHILIPSBURG AITOUNTY
VOL. XV: NO. 19. PIIILIPSBURG, GRANITE COUNTY. MONTANA, F i i)A Y, MAY 31, 1901. PRICE: $3.00 A YEAR.
KEEP YOUR FEET WARM ANDIRYI
____________________CO TO
McLEOD'S
Where you can get rubber Overshoes and Gum Boots (all new stock)
for Men, Boys, Women and Children: all sizes, shapes and makes
GET A NEW SUIT MADE AT McLEOD'S. HE GUARANTEES A
FIT. BEST LINE OF CLOTHS TO PICK FROM IN THE COUNTY
ANYTHING IN LEATHER GOODS
Ladies', Misses', Children's, Men's and Boys' Light and Heavy Shoes at
Prices that are Right, I buy right and can sell you goods that are new
endin style for less money then you can buy old, worn out stock
THE BOOT SHOE MAN 1 EOD TE BOOT SHO MA
: KROGER'S BEER D(ROGERN BEER
KNOGEN'S BREWERY
* Manufactures the Finest and Purest Beer in the State.
* When you buy Kroger's beer you skip the impurities that give youi
headache. You get a pure hop and mialt drink, that's why.
EPI-ZI.aZl 5 "TJ.C-, vO .LIT A..A.AIr..
DON'T PAY SUCH HIGH
PRICES FOR GROCERIES
When you can buy high grade goods from us at the same price you
pay for "cheap groceries" elsewhere. Our stock is large, new and
complete and customers can get anything they want at our store
and at the same time
SAVE MONEY BYTRADINC HERE
_GIVE US YOUR ORDERS
Pat McGurk, the Reliable Grocer
SMakes-
Pleasant Driving
,t \`'H E: fact that we furmsnh the rie fo,r yon
doesn't insure the pleasureof driving.
but thi fact that we insist on all our horses
6-eing the very best and the equipment
Sbeing plerfect; you may depend on whlatever
we will seml yon. Our r !s are right; we
want to mrove it to yo, by rendxig you one
that is right. Rine us up.
CITY LIVE Y AND FEED STABLES
BLACK ANDL WHITS HEARES J. J. Carmichael, Proprietor.
ALLISON & SPHERMAN
-DEALER* IN
C.FUNEPAL DIRECTORS+
EUpoarlBroadway, f111npsbur
.f. SPOKANE,
HELENA,
MINNEAPOLIS,
ST. PAUL
-AND POINTS
EAST AND SOUTH.
TACOMA,
SEATTLE,
PORTLAND,
CALIFORNIA,
JAPAN, CHINA,
SKAGWAY.
DYEA,
ALASKA.
G(i.. 8. JoHNsoN, At.. Ci, s. S. .:k . k . P. T. A.
PHILIPS.BURG. MrO'T.I ST. . L'\I., P NN.
VESTIBULEDI TIiAINB-DINING ('Al8,
TIME CARD-P. & D. BRAN('ll.
No. 124 leaves P'lili l lburg......... 9:15 a. m.
No. 123 arrive Philipslbur......... .I :20v. nm.
No. 14 arriv 14 r mmond..... ....10:45 .. am.
No. 123 leaves Drummond.......... 2:20 p. m.
M1AIN LINE RAIANS AT DRUMMlOND.
EASTBOUND.
No. 4-Twin City Eap-eess........ ..10:55 a. m.
via Butte amt IIelena.
No. 2-North Coast Limited....... 8"43 p. m.
via Butte only.
WESTBOUND.
No. 3-Twin City Express ....... 2:07 p. m.
via Relona and latte.
No. 1-North ('oast Limited....... 1l:32 p. m.
via Butte only.
i,-t.Trains : an, 4I mako IBurlington con
nection at Billings. Tr:.ius 1, 2. : and 4 run
throngh between St, t'uiul and coast, makirng
clses connecti,,ns with eastern trains at li.
Panl.
TWENTY-ONE MEN ARE KILLED
BY AN EXPLOSION OF
COAL DUST.
NINE 'EI1.IBLY BURNED
Flames Shoot From the Mc.th cf the
Workings Three Hundred Feet Into
the Air-Many of the Victims Buried
Under Great Masses of Debris-Sec
ond Accident of tihe Kir,d to Occur
at Dayton, Tenn.
Dayton, Ten.x., .'y 23.-2.t the
Richland mine of thl: Dayton Coal and
Iron company, Le, ou:les from Day
ton, a terrific expJLu;n of coal dust
resulted in the L.I-th of 21 men, all
white, and most of them married and
with families.
The explosicn e:as caused by what
is known am-'; miners as a "blown
blast." It is the custom of the miners
to place bla-ts and fire them off at
quitting time each afternoon, leaving
the coal th-:i thrown down to be
loaded and I::uled from the 'mine the
next mornvt . The Richland mine is
destitute cf water, and great volumes
of fine pa~ icles of coal dust, invisible
to the nahad eye, accumulate at the
roof of the mine. This dust is subject
to exrlosion if exposed to flames. A
dynamite certridge was placed in po
sition in one of the rooms for a blast
and the miners started for the mouth
of the mine. The blast did not ex
plode as Intended, but instead a long
flame shot out of the blast hole and
igrited the accumulation c.f dust. In
etantly a terrific explosion occurred
and a seething mass of flames shot to
the mouth of the mine and extended
300 feet into the oPen air, scorching
the leaves from the nearby trees.
There were 34 men In the mine at the
time. Four of these escaped with
slight injury. Twenty-one were killed
and nine
Were Terribly Burned,
most of them fatally. The force of
the explosion caused great masses of
coal and slate to cave in from the
roof of the mine and many of the
fated miners were completely buried.
Word quickly reached Dayton and
rescue forces were at once organized
and proceeded to the mine. One by
one the blackened and horribly dis
figured bodies were taken from the
debris and carried to the mouth of
the mine, where they were put on a
locomotive and taken to Dayton.
Scores of relatives and friends gath
ered at the mouth of the mine and the
shrieks of anguish as the bodies were
removed were heartrending.
The two undertaking establishments
at Dayton were turned into morgues,
where the mangled bodies were
dressed and Irepared, for delivery to
their families. All the men employed
in this mine were residents of Dayton.
'Ihe Richland mine is the property
of the Dayton Coal and Iron com
nany, compos;ed of Glasgow capitalits.
The conmpan" operates an iron furnace
at Dayton and operates coal mines in
connection therewith.
Dec. 28. 1R05. a similar explosion
occurred in the Nelson mine. situate,1
a few hundred feet from where this
explosion occurred. in which 28 min
ers were instantly killed.
IN THE ANOKA ORE FIELD.
Parties From the Mesaba Range Se
cure Options on Farms.
Ano:k:a, Minn., May 28.--t is report
ed on good authority that Patrick
Manley of Coon Creek has given an
4 option on his farm of 180 acres for
$75,000, and that George McNally of
the same place has given an option on
his farm for $32,000. The options are
given to a mining company of the
.esaba range district and run for a
term of one year and in the mean
time the l:aned will be thoroughly pros
pected.
Ore was frond ,ofo reefly that
asrayr- 60 per cent pure iron, and
assayists who have been on the I
t rcund say that the land a-'oining,
and, in fact, all the land in that vicin
ity. show traces of iron and other
min.rals even on the surface.
WEDDED AT lNTW YORK,
a-'
S.rar.Tistge f Profcrxcr Herron and
mrics Ryand Announced.
Ne.w York, May 28.-Anncu.cement
was made during the day of the mar
riage on Saturday evening last of Pro
Sfessor George D. Herron and Miss
Carrie Rand, the ceremony having
been performed in the apartments of
Dr. Charle.s Brodie Patterson of this
city. The Rev. W. T. Brown, pastor
of Plymouth church, Rochester, N.
Y., performed the ceremony, which
was extremely simple, there being no
vows taken by either party. Miss
Rand, prior to her marriage, devoted
considerable time and money to the
cause of socialism and it is the Inten
tion of her husband and herself to de
vcte their lives to socialism.
McKibbin iHats- Never disappoint. *
RUSH TO Nl)dl IS ON.
Nine Stcamshipc Arc Map:ing Ready
at Scur.d Ports.
Tacoma. Wash.. May 28.-Between
this date and June 3 nine steam ves
sels w.,i have departed from Tacoma
as:d S. :ttie for Nome, according to
presc.' ,choedules. Local steamship
ag:ni : report especial activity in
:he sai, of Nome transportation, both
passegier and freight. People are
eio:king into the city by the hundreds
from the East on their way to the
American gold fields. And the com
ing we-k will witness a greater rush.
Besides the steamenrs, six or eight
sailing craft are scheduled to leave
for Nome between now and June 1.
As a rule they are carrying very few
passengers, though each vessel goes
out with a full cargo, no matter the
size. The Nome sailings to date num
ber eight.
Plague Regulations Relaxed.
Lahore, Punjaub, May 28.-In spite
of the fact that the plague is spread
ing in the Pufjaub. where it has al
ready invaded several hundred vil
lages, the reserve measures have so
dangerously irritated the natives that
the government has been obliged to
order a wholesale relaxation of the
plague regulations.
Are in the Coasting Trade.
Washington, May 28.-The supreme
court h.s decided what is known as
the Hues case, involving the question
whether vessels plying betwven Porto
Rico and New York were engaged in
the coasting trade. The court's de
cision held they were so engaged.
Steamer Dubuque Strikes a Rock.
Burlington, Ia., May 28.-The D',
mond Jo packet Dubuque, "outhboun I,
struck a rock 18 miles north of hee
and sank in five feet of water. There
were 50 passengers on board, but all
were saved without serious injuries.
Three Fatally Burned.
Haveloc'k, Ont., May 28.--James
Post and his nephew were burned to
death and Mrs. Post, the mother of
one of the victims, was so badly
burned that she may not recover in
a fire in their residence.
After Another Steamship Line.
London, May 28.-"It is reported
here," says the Copenhagen corre
spondent of The Daily Express, "that
J. Pierpont Morgan is negotiating for
the control of the Union Steamship
company of Denmark."
Week's Operations in South Africa.
London, May 28.-Advices received
from Lord Kitchener announce that
since May 20 the British columns re
port 63 Boers killed, 36 wounded, 267
taken prisoners and 83 surrendered.
TELEGRAPHIC BREVITIES.
The new census returns give the
population of Australasia at 4.550,:;51.
This is an increase of 740,756 since the
last enumeration.
At Tilsonburg. Ont., two boys named
Harley Mann and J. B. Thorn were
.playing in a loft when the :ay be
came ignited and both boys were
burned to death.
The sultan of Morrocco has yielded
in the main to the French demands.
There are still some matthers to be
settled, b.ut the danger of serious
e,,,1l d is -ver-ted
THE BOSTON STORE
Offerings that you can=
snot afford to overlook
:70( ,I'n's Checked .Jumnr,.r, going at ............. ,c 1 `15 00 Men's Blak1; Clay Worgltd Suits., going at..$7.50
50c Men's Black and 'A hite Striped ))vershirts, going $1.75 (Children's Kue: Pants Suits, gray mixture, going
at.............................................. 20c at............. ............. .... ...........90c
$1 25 Men's White Laundered Shirts, somewhat soiled, i1.75 Children's Fancy Vesty Snits. going at......... 950
going at ........................................... 5( 2 0') Children's Fancy Vesty Suits, beantifully trsmmed
50r, Men's Mnleskin Gloves and Mittens, unlined, going goinu at.......... ....... .................$L45
at ............................ ............. 5c 10 Laches' Black Cotton Hose, going at...........5c
x1.25 Men's Bu.king Mittens, going at .............. 05c 2G5 Ladies' Black Cotton Hose, full seamless. going
50(c Light W eignt Urderwear, going at ... .........25c at.................................................10e
I t.ie Men's Linen (Col.rs, going at ......... ..........:3c 15 ('hbildrn's Black (Cotton Hose, ribbed, fnll seam
i(- Men', Cotlon Socks, going a .................... 5 l ess. going at...................................... 8c
8.00 Mena BrowU all-wool Suits, s s : to; g 30. Best Quality Table Oilcloth. going at........... 15e
at.................................... ......"5
$12.50 Men's bla:k Worsted SHits, fancy lining, gin, gin Bst Quality Amoskeag (ingha, going at ...... 4.
at ...................... ........ ............... .50 10 Fancy Colored Lawns, going at .................. 5
ALSO A LARGE ASSORTMENT OF al
RUGS, ART SQUARES, LACE CURTAINS,ETC
AT JUST HALF PRICE; IN FACT, ALL OUR GOODS ARE BEING SOLD AT A GREAT
REDUCTION SO AS TO ENABLE US TO MOVE AS SOON AS POSSIBLE
THE BOSTON STORE, UPPER BROADWAY
PRESBYTERIAN ASSEMBLY DE
CIDES IN FAVOR OF
REVISION.
SATISFACTION IS GENERAL
Commissioners Sing the "Doxology"
and Moderator Minton Offers a
Prayer of Thanksgiving-Decision
Is a Victory for No One, but for All.
New York Gets the Next Meeting
of the Assembly.
Philadelphia, May 28.-lBy a unani
mous vote the Presbyterian general
assembly adopted the report of the
special committee on the revision of
the confession of faith. The debate
on this important question had ex
tenoed into the fourth (lay and to
Rev. Dr. lames D. Moffat is (due the
credit of having brought the commis
sioners to such a harmonious conclu
sion. When recommendation B was
adopted by a comparatively small ma
jority Dr. Moffat announced that in
view of the divergency of opinion he
would offer an amendment which lhe
hoped would meet with the approval
of the entire assembly. When he
presented this amendment It was in
stantly acc('pted by the commission
ers and the adoption of the report as
a whole followed with but little delay.
A viva voce vote was taken and
when 640 ayes responded to the ques
tion the commissioners arose and sang
"Praise God From Whom All Bless
ings Flow." which was followed by a
pl ayer of thanksgiving by Moderator
Minton.
The momentous question of creed
revision having been disposed of the
assembly proceeded to the considera
tion of unfinished business. -The re
port of the special committee on judi
cial commissions was first in order
and was adopted after a brief discus
sion. This report recommended the
establishment of a
Permanent Judicial Committee,
to which shall be referred all judicial
cases which the general assembly
does not elect to try before the whole
body. There will be no appeal from
the decisions of this committee.
During the afternoon session re
ports of various special committees
were considered and adopted, among
them a supplemental report of the
committee on theological seminaries,
which- recommended the consolidation
of the Louisville and Danville semi
naries.
New York was selected as the meet
ing plact: for the next general assem
bly.
In commenting on the action of the
as.embly on t:e question of revision
Moderator Minton said: "Thb discus
sion has dsveloped and displayed far
more clearly the agreement of the
whole assembly nuon the question of
reviieon than any division or discord.
The' decision rrached is a. victory for
no one:. but for all."
Rev. D)r. Charles A. Di'-key, chair
man of the corcniittee on revision.
said: "The urll.o may ( xc, et peace
and progress: .ltring the rorning year.
'he action of the assembly manifest
ed mutual confldence. Without dis
sent the assembly determined to go
forward and dlitinetly marked out the
way for the forward movement."
HIS OPINION UNALTERED.
Dismissed We~t Point Cadets Inter.
view Secretary Root.
Washington. May 28.-The live ca
dets who were dismissed from West
Point were at the war department
during the (lay. Sneator Hawley,
chairman of the committee on mili
tary affairs, and Senator Cockrell of
Missouri, also a member of the com
mittee, interested themselves in get
ting a hearing for the cadets before
Secretary Hoot.
Mr. Hoot stated at the conclusion of
the conference that the statements
made by the cadets had not altetred
his opinion and the dtecision remains
unchanged. The secretary of war has
approved the findings of the courtmar
tial in the cases of Cadets Vernon and
Perry, who have been dismissed from
the academy. The young men in
vited each other to dinner and got ex
cused on the ground that they had
Invitations to dline out. They were
found dining together at Newburgh
b)y an officer of the academy.
WILL LOSE THEIR HOMES.
Settlers at Sparta, Minn., Disappoint
ed Over Judge Sanborn's Decision.
Sparta. Minn.. May 2N.-The settlers
(were mnluch disappointed over Judge
Sanhorn's decision in the famous Isl
and Lake land case. as they had an
ticip:atd a decision favoralble to them.
It is now thought they will give up the
fight. They have spent years on the
land putting all their money into inm.
provements and all they could earn.
Large deposits of iron ore will hbe
found on these lands as a valuable
mine adjoins them. Sparta citizens
now expect a boom, as there will he a
saw mill built to cut the lumber from
the lands, and crews of the test pit
ters will be put to work at once.
Ruptured a Blood Vessel.
Columbus, O., May 28.-Governor
Nash's physicians admit that he is
suffering from the rupture of a blood
vessel in the spine. This is the acci
dent which the governor sustained In
the high altitudes while returning
from San Francisco. The physicians
claim that with absolute rest the rup
ture may heal. The injury has affect
ed the lower 'limbs and the governor
has to be supported in walking.
Honenty PrevIans.
One thine the Campbell Bros. show can
boast of. They carry no fakirs or games
of chance. This alone has veined them
more popularity than any otherone thing.
The most refined lady or gentleman in the
comimnnity can visit their exhibitions
with just as mnuch propriety as they can
atten(d a home entertainment.
Sadld ce-horses. p: ck-horses and work
horses for sale. Also horses brought in
from the rauge for owners. Leave word
at The Mail office. *
CANDY CATHARTIC m
25e. 50c r DMert.
Genuine stamped C. C. C. Never sold In bulk.
Beware of the dealer who tries to sell
"something just at good."

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