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The Canton advocate. [volume] (Canton, D.T. [S.D.]) 1877-1897, May 30, 1877, Image 3

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TMK LONE ONI.
What time I am afraid, I will trust in Thee
Psalm m. I
Huaht Harkl Ml#
tirolvo,
the midnight hour,
And yot no sloop liutli cloned mine eyes.
What is it thrills me with its power?
To shake It of)' I will arise.
I'll mde out at tho midnight sky
i'ergnancetho stura will glad mine
No star I seo to comfort me—
The night is dark as dark can tie.
j,istl llstl I seem to hear a cry:
ffnj that ajscream went rushing past?
Not no I the wind waS wailing by—
No scream 1 it was the midnight blast!
I'll strike alight to banish cure.
And to my children three repair
No child 1
see but comforts me—
They sleep as sweet as sweet can be,
Dear babes 1 they frolicked all the day,
And now their pillows gladly press
And yet, amid their wildest play,
They missed their father's fond caress.
when will papa return?" they cry,
And I repeat it with a sigh.
I long for thee to comfort mor
For I'm as sad as sad can be.
Now dark again! to rest I'll go—
Ah me! what visions cluster round!
Thoughts of the grave—they haunt me so—
How dark 'twill be beneath tho ground!
Dead! dead! I shrink from being deiul!
I shudder at the cold, dark bed!
No star I soe to comfort nie,
The grave is lone as lone can be.
Alas! deep horror chains my neart:
Where shall
I
fly for pcace to-night?
Ha! ha! the darkness scorns to part,
I surely see a dawning light.
Joy! joy 1 a cross—a form is near,
My Saviour's loving voice 1 hear!
A star I see that comforts mo—
Lord, when afraid, I'll trust in thee.
Lift high the cross! Shine on, bright star!
The grave Is not
bo
dismal now!
My lovod one doth not seem so fur,
And sleep is settling on my brow.
Lord, thou art mine, till life shall end,
My first, my best, my changeless Friend!
I'll come to thee to comfort me,
4»d when afraid. I'll trust in thee.
From Harper's Magazine.
ROMANCE OF A BARN-YARD.
We were all sitting on the piazza, ex
cept those of us that were swinging in
the hammocks among the trees the sea
wind was blowing over tis, the birds
were darting low here and there, and
the bantams and the spring chickens and
the big black Cochins were clucking and
picking in the grass, watched over by
the old King Charles, who redeemed us
from vulgarity, and it was a scene of
domestic comfort, as Aunt Helen said.
Aunt Helen, by-the-way, became a very
pleasant addition to the comfortable ap
pearance of the scene, as she said it. She
was just as plump as a woman ought to
be when her next birthday is maybe her
fortieth She had a soft flush on her
cheek, where the dimple was yet as fresh
as when she was a girl, and the flush
deepened sometimes into a real damask
her teeth were like rows of seed-corn for
whiteness, and her eyes were just as
brown as brook water only her hair—
that was quite white. Lovely hair,
though, for all that she parted it evenly
over her low level forenead and above
the yet black eyebrows and we all de
clared, every day of our lives, that Aunt
Helen was a beauty. I used to be,"
she had replied "but that's all gone
now. I have put my youth behind me."
Perhaps she had. But we young peo
ple used to think differently when we
saw Mr. Thornton coming up the road,
and Aunt Helen's eyes resolutely bent on
her work, but her color mounting and
mounting, till the reddest rose that ever
burned in the shnshinc was not so rich.
Mr. Thornton was it too, no doubt,, for he
always looked and looked intently all the
way by. But the truth was—I shall
have to tell you all about it if I tell you
any—that when Aunt Helen was twenty
years younger, she and Mr. Thornton
were lovers ever since they could remem
ber. They had built their house at last,
and her wedding dress was made. If she
was a beauty, he was every inch her
mate^—I know he was, because he is to
day—one of the men it does you good to
see, who look as if they could hold up the
world if need be, and inspire you with
confidencc in their power. Now what in
the world do you suppose that, with their
house furnished, ana the cake baked, and
a dozen years of intimate affection to
bind them, Aunt Helen and Mr. Thorn
ton found a quarrel about? She declared
she wouldn't keep hens! And he declar
ed that then he wouldn't keep house!
That was the whole of it, to condense the
statement one word led to another, and
another led to more, and finally, in a
towering passion himself, he told Aunt
Helen that she had better learn to con
trol her Lemper if she didn't want to lie
a vixen entirely, and Auut Helen took
the ring off her finger and laid it on the
table without a word and sailed out
of the room, and refused to see him when
he called in the morning, and sent back
his letter unopened, ana cut the wedding
cake and put some of it on the tea-table
and sent the rest to the fair. Perhaps,
on the whole, Mr. Thornton might have
been right. Exactly one week from that
night Mr. Thornton was married to Mr.
Mayhew, and inoflensive little body who
would have married anybody that asked
her, and die went into the house that had
been furnished according to Aunt
Helen's taste and immediately afterward
a hen-house of the most fanciful descrip
tion of architecture, with gilded vanes
and scarlet chanticleers bristling all over
it, rose on the hill behind his house, full
of fancy fowl, and the little lawn was all
alive with its overflow, and you couldn't
go by the place without meeting a flock
of cropple crown, or partridge Cochin, or
Leghorn, or black Spanish flying up on
each separate piece of fence to crow out
Mr. Thornton's triumph—reversing the
old tradition of the erower, and crying,
"No women rule here!"
They say Mr. Thornton grew very old
in a few years. His inoffensive little
thing of a wife turned out to be a smart
termagent who led him a pretty dance.
Perhaps she was dissatisfied with her
piece of a heart but then she knew that
was all when she took it. He treated
her always gently—perhaps feeling he
had done her some wrong in marrying
her—and 'gratified her" every wish, al
though having cared nothing for her in
the beginning, it is doubtful if he cared
any more for her in the end. The end
came after, eighteen years, when Mrs.
Thornton was killed in a railroad col
lision, and her husband was left with
four children on his hands, rude, noisy,
ill-faring cubs, as all the neighbors said.
If Mr. Thornton had ever impatiently
chanced to think that his punishment
had lasted long enough, he thought now
that it was just beginning, when he
found himself alone with those children.
He wondered that his wife had had any
temper, left at all. He grew more bent,
more vexed, and worried every day, and
and would hardly have recognized, peo-
Sle
said, the dark and splendid Stephen
hornton of his youth in this middle
aged, gray-haired man and yet, to our
eyes, he was still quite a remarkable
looking person-s-perhaps more so from
eur associating him with the poetry in
Aunt Helen's life, and making him an
object of Wonder as to whether or not
now they would ever come together again.
But there was little chance of that.
We had met Mr. Thornton elsewhere,
but he had never come across our thresh
old since the day he went out with his
bride's ring. And Aunt Helen's
liarity mis that she never forgot,
she, then, forget the words he had spoke
to her in his anger? Could she tsver for
get his marrying another woman in less
than a week? It had been in that week
pecu
Could
and a few following that her hair had
turned white. She had suffered inex
pressibly she had never slept anight
but she kept up a gay face. Perhaps
she would have suffered longer if it had
not been for our growing up about her.
Her life was thus filled, every morneflt
of it: she had but very little time to be
lonely, to brood, or .mourn. She forgot
herself in us. It gave liera quiet happi
ness, and kept her comely. And then
she was too proud whenever the thought
thrust up its head, she shut the lid
down, as you may say, and sat on it.
But one day—after the time when the
doctors had said Harry was a hopeless
cripple, and must lie on his back the rest
of his life—Aunt Helen brought home a
little basket from the county fair, and
took from tbe wool within it two of the
cunningist mites of chickens you ever
laid your eyes on. I hate them," said
she "they make me crawl but they
will amuse the dear child. They're
African bantams." And so they did
amuse him and delight him, as he lay on
his lounge in the bay-window and
watched them growing up, full of busi
ness. And that was the way, by-the
way, that we came to have chickens
round the front piazzas. One night, a
year afterward, when the bantams were
quite grown people, somebody dropped
over the fence a pair of big black Coch
ins, that stalked about as if the earth
was too good to tread on, or as if they
were afraid of crushing a bantam with
the next step. Of course we knew where
the Cochins came from—for nobody else
in town had any—but no one said a
word. Only it was sport on the next
day to peer round the corner and see
Aunt Helen, with a piece of bread in
her hand, in doubt whether to have any
thing to do with* those fowls or not,
twice extending her hand with the
crumbs and snatching it back again, and
at last making one bold effort, and
throwing the whole thing at them, and
hurrying into the house. But from that
moment ever hungry Cochin secerned
to regard her as their patron saint. She
never appeared but they came stalking
gingerly along to meet her, and at last
one even made so bold as to fly up and
perch on the back of her chair on the
piazza. Of course he was shooed off
with vigor—with a little more vigor, per
haps, because Mr. Thornton had at that
moment been passing, and had seen this
woman who would never keep hens pre
senting that tableau.
In two or three days after that Aunt
Helen, coming home at twilight from
one of her rambles by the river bank was
observed to be very nervous and flushed,
and to look much as if she had been cry
ing.
It's all right," said our Ned, coming
in shortly after her. "I know all about
it I've been setting my eel traps and
what do you think—she met old Thorn
ton—"
"Ned!"
She did indeed. And what'll you say
to that man's cheek? He up and spoke
to her!"
Oh, now, Ned! Before you!"
"Fact. Before me? No, indeed I
lay low," said Ned, with a chuckle.
But, bless you, they wouldn't have seen
me if I had stood high."
For shame,Ned! Oh, how could you
—and Aunt Helen!"
Guess you'd have been no better in
mv place," said the unscrupulous boy.
"But, there, that's all. If I couldn't
listen, of course you can't."
Oh now, Nea, please!" we all chorus
ed together.
Well, then. He stood straight before
her. Helen,' said he, have you forgot
ten me?' and she began to turn white.
I have had time enough, sir,' said she."
Oh, you ought not to have staid,
Ned!"
You may find out the rest by your
learning," said the offended narrator, I
should like to know how I was going to
leave. Only I'll say this, that if Aunt
Helen woula marry old Thornton to-day
—she wouldn't touch him with a walking
stick!"
To our amazement, oh the very next
afternoon who should appear at our gate,
with his phaeton and pair, but Mr. Thorn
ton and who, bonneted and gloved and
veiled, should issue from the door, to be
Eim,
laced in that phaeton and drive oft'with
but Aunt Helen. Ned chuckled
but the rest of us could do nothing but
wonder. Has she gone to be married?"
we gasped. And Lill and Harry began
to CTV.
Well, I'll tell you," said Ned, in
mercy. He said there'd never been a
day since he left her that he hadn't
longed for what he threw away."
Oh, how wicked!"
She told him so, very quietly and se
verely—I tell you Aunt Helen can be
severe—and to be sileut on that point.
Forever?' said he. And ever,' said
she. It is impossible,' said he. And
then he went over, one by one, a dozen
different days ana scenes when they
were young and if ever a fellow felt
mean, I was the one."
I should think you would," we
cried, with one accord.
"Now look here," returned Ned. "If
you want to hear the rest, you keep that
sort of remark to yourself. It was too
late for me to show myself, anyway.
And I'll be blamed if I'll say another
word if you don't every one acknowledge
you'd have done just as I. did."
Oh, Ned, do tell the whole? That's
a good boy I"
Well, she just began to cry—I never
saw Aunt Helen cry before—and then it
seemed as if he would go distracted and
he begged her not to cry, and she cried
the more and he begged her to marry
him out of hand—I know just how to do
it now only it doesn't seem a very suc
cessful way—and she shook her head
and he implored her, by their old love,
he said, and she wiped her eyes, and
looked at him, and gave a laugh, a hate
ful sort of laugh. Our old love!' said
she. Then,' said he,' if you will not
for my sake, nor for your own sake, nor
for the sake of that old love, marrv me
for the sake of the motherless children
who need you more than children ever
needed a mother yet, and who—who are
driving me crazy!' And then Aunt
Helen laughed in earnest, a good, sweet
ringing peal and the long and the short
of it is that she has driven up to the
Thornton house to-day, to look at the
cubs and sec what she thinks about them.
May be she'll bring them down here—
she's great on missionary work, you
know."
"Well, I declare!" was the final
chorus. And we sat in silence a, good
half hour and by the time our tongues
were running again, Aunt Helen had
returned, ana Mr. Thornton had come in
with" her and sat down upon the piazza
step at her feet, but not at all with the
air of an accepted lover—much more
like a tenant of Mohammed's coffin, we
thought. And, as I began to tell you,
we were all "sitting arid swinging there
when Aunt Helen exclaimed about its
being a scene of domestic comfort. As
she sat down, the big black Cochin hen
came to meet her, and Aunt Helen threw
her a bit of water-cracker, a supply of
whiph she always carried about her.
"Why, where's your husband?" said
she to the hen.
There he is," said Ned. He's been
up alone in that corner of the grass the
whole day, calling and clucking and in
viting company but the rest haven't
sMJl
paid the least attention to him, and are
picking and scratching down among the
cannas."
Oh, but he's been down there twice.
Ned cried Harry, and tried to whip
the little bantam, but it was a drawn
buttle,"
Well, he ought to have a little
vacation, and scratch- for himself a
while," said Aunt Helen. "He has
picked and scratched for his hen and her
family in the most, faithful way all sum
mer."
"And so's the banty," said, Ned.
"The bantam's the best he's taken as
much care of the chickens as 'the hen
has, any way and he never went to
roost once all the time his hen was set
ting, Mr. Thornton,, but sat right down
in the straw beside her every night."
"A model spouse," said Aunt Helen.
"They are almost human," said Mr.
Thornton. And so we sat talking till
the tea bell rang, for Mr. Thornton was
going to stay to tea, he boldly told us
and wc saw that he meant to get all the
young people on his side by the way he
began to talk to Ned about trout and
pickerel, and about deep sea fishing
out when he got to eel traps, Ned's face
was purple, and he blessed that tea bell,
I fancy. However, Mr. Thornton might
have found that it wasn't so easy to range
the young people on his side if he had
made a long-continued effort. We en
joyed a romance under our eyes, but we
had no sort of notion of his taking our
Aunt Helen away.
We were just coming out from tea,
and were patronizing the sunset a little,
which was uncommonly fine, and I
thought I had never seen Aunt Helen
lboking like such a beauty, with that rich
light overlaying her like a rosy bloom,
when John came hastening up.
"I"just want you all to step inside the
barn door with me, if you please, ma'am,"
said he. And we went after him to be
greeted by the sweet smell of the new
mown hay, and to be gilded by the one
great broad sunbeam swimming full of a
glory of motes from door to door. Do
you see that?" said John. It was a flock
of the hens and chickens on their cus
tomary roosts. "And now do you see
that? said he and he turned about
and showed us, on the top rail of the
pony's manger, the big black Cochin also
gone to roost, but separately—and his
wife beside him? No, but little Mrs.
Bantam!
That's who he has been clucking and
calling to this whole afternoon, the
wretch!" cried Ned.
And now look here," said John and
we followed him into the harness-room,
where the chickens had chanced to be
hatched, and there, in the straw on the
floor, sat the disconsolate little bantam
rooster, all alone, with his wings spread
and his feathers puffed out, brooding his
four little chickens under his wings—the
four little chickens deserted by their
mother.
"I declare! I declare!" cried Aunt
Helen, as we came out into the great
moty sunbeam again "the times are so
depraved that it has really reached the
barn-yard. The poor little banty and his
brood Why, it's as bad as the forsaken
merman."
Only not so poetical," said we.
Helen," said Mr. Thornton, "it is ex
actly my condition. Are you going to
have pity for that bird, and none for me?
Are you going to leave me to my fate?"
And in a moment, right before us all, as
she stood in that great red sunbeam, Mr.
Thornton put his arms round Aunt Helen,
who, growing rosier and rosier, either
from the
sunbeam or something else, could
do nothing at last but hide her face.
"Helen," ne said, "you are certainly
coming home with me?" And Aunt
Helen did not say no.
Hard Times in the Silver State.
From the Virginia City Chronicle.
The shadow of hard times seems to be
slowly creeping over the Comstock, and
the man who stands in the sunshine to-day
may be under the cloud to-morrow.
Hundreds of miners who have been out
of employment for months, go about wil
ling to perform any kind of labor for any
thing in the shape of money. A few
months ago they were striving to see
their wives and children presentably
clothed and supplied with the little
luxuries of life. To-day they think of
only keeping them fed. They have no
longer credit at the grocer's, and the
butcher will not furnish them meat with
out the ready cash. Scores of these men
are walking the streets aimlessly, or lin
gering about the mines, begging for work
miner falls down a shaft and is dashed
to pieces. A hundred rush to fill the
place, content to have their faces fanned
by the ill wind that has blown him into
eternity. They stand about the gamb
ling tables watching the ebb and flow of
other people's fortunes. A man with a
dollar in his pocket is deliberating
whether to buy flour for his family or put
the money on the board to double up.
He pushes it over a card, and sees it make
its way into the dealer's till. Then he
walks away with teeth tightly clenched.
You may see such sights nightly at any
of the gambling houses. Strong, able
bodied men call daily at the weddings of
citizens, asking for food or the chance
of a night's lodging. The funds of the
Selief Committee are exhausted.
"Lot-Jumpers" inDeadwood.
From the Salt Lake Tribune
This is what a pilgrim writes from
Dead wood: Lot-jumpers are bold, bad
men they jumped my lot. They also
dodge bullets and let the wrong man get
shot. Night before last a man jumped
his brother-in-law's lot, and when he was
upbraided therefor smote his kinsman
hip and thigh. The injured party got
his navy, iound his man, took a good
aim, fired—and killed an innocent by
stander. About a dozen of us smart
Allecks laid out anew street We did it
by stealth, like thieves in the night, as
it were, to keep out the jumpers. Next
morning we went to take possession of
our lots and found our thoroughfare
blocked up with frame shanties. We
withdrew. That's why I don't think a
lot-jumper is entitled to don angel's
plumage when he shall have crossed over
to the other side."
Stop that cough by the NEW princi
ple, Dr. J. II. McLean's Cough and
Healing Globules they cure Coughs, Colds
lg diseases. Trial
boxes 25 cts., by mail. Dr. J. H. McLean's
office, 314 Chestnut, Jit Louis, Mo.
A Honse-Bnildinp Fish.
In Lake Nyassa, in the far interior of
Africa, is a kind of black fish which
every year builds what the natives call
a house." In the mud at the bottom
of the lake it makes a hole some two or
three feet broad, allowing the earth re
moved from the hole to form a little
wall around it. The depth of the hole
and the height of the wall measured
together make a small basin from fifteen
to eighteen inches deep. In this little
lake within a lake the fish feels secure
from all enemies, and very quietly keeps
house until the eggs are laid, when it be-
comes restless, ana leaves the house as
a nursery for successors, while it roams
about again at will.—St. Mcholat.
... SURELY no one so foolish to suffer
from Cold in the Head, Catarrh, Sores in Hie
Nose, when yon can be cured by this new
antiseptic Powder, Dr. J. H. McLean's Ca
tarrh Snuff. Trial boxes by mall 60 cts. Br.
J. II. McLean, 412 Chcitnnt, St, Leais,
Cariosity Shop.
Hawks ciin fly at the rate of 150 miles
an hour.
Ducks can fly at the rate of 90 miles
an hour.
The crow can fly at the rate of 25 miles
an hour.
The sparrow can fly at the rate of 92
miles an hour.
The falcon can fly at the rate of 73
miles an hour.
Frogs live from 12 to 15 years—if not
eaten.
Three thousand stars arc visible to the
naked eye. Countless millions are re
vealed by the telescope. Some are so
remote that their light, traveling at
the rate of 200,000 miles a second, cannot
arrive at our little planet in less than
14,000 years.
The different species of birds are esti
mated at 6,000.
The different species of fishes will
probably reach 10,000.
The different species of reptiles will
probably reach 2,000.
There are 250,000 species of living ani
mals.
The wings of some animals are so
thin that 60,000 placed one upon the
other would not form a heap of more
than a quarter of an inch in height.
Twenty-five thousand eggs of a silk
worm weigh a quarter of an ounce. The
worm lives from 45 to 53 days. It in
creases in weight in 30 days 8,500 fold,
and during the last 28 days of its life
eats nothing.
Glass windows were first used for
lights in 1180.
Chimneys were first put to houses in
1236.
Tallow candles in 1260.
Spectacles invented by an Italian in
1248.
Woolen cloth made in England in
1341.
Art of printing from movable type in
1440.
O. W. Holmes on the Present Age.
Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes delivered
a lecture before the Boston Microscopical
Society, recently, and in opening said:
To men of my generation this modern
world, which most of you take as a
matter of course, it being the only con
dition of things of which you have had
experience, is a source of wonder—a
standing miracle. Science and art have
in our time so changed the aspect of
every-day life that one of a certain age
might well believe himself on another
planet or in another stage of existence.
The wand of Prometheus is in our
match-boxes the rock of Horeb gushes
forth its streams in our dressing-rooms
our words flash from continent to conti
nent our very accents are transmitted
from city to city the elements of form
ing worlds are analyzed in our labora
tories and most wonderful and signifi
cant of all, the despotic reign of tradi
tion has received its death-blow when
the angel of anesthesia lifted from wo
manhood the worst terrors of the primal
malediction."
Snperstition.
A panacea, or "cure-all," is one of the
myths of the age of superstition. Dr. R. V.
Pierce does not recommend any one or even
his whole list of standard remedies as ade
quate to cure every disease. For severe
ltrgering coughs, bronchial, throat, and
chronic mug diseases, he believes his Golden
Medical Discovery is unsurpassed, but it will
not cure you if your lungs are half wasted by
consumption. The Discovery not only
exercises a potent influence over pulmonary
aflcctions, by reason of its pectoral proper
tics, but possesses also the most valuable
alterative, or blood-cleansing properties, and
is therefore a sovereign remedy in blood and
skin alFcctions. But while it will cure scrof
ulous and other ulcers or sores, blotches,
pimples, and eruptions, it will not cure can
cer, nor does its manufacturer claim any
such merit for it as is done by proprietors of
other blood-cleansing medicines,
wno dishon
estly try to deceive the afflicted into the be
lief that their preparations will accomplish
impossibilities. By reason of its real intrin
sic merit it has a sale surpassing that of any
other blood and cough mcdicine.
The natne Cashmere Bouquet, as ap
plied to Toilet Soaps and Perfumery, is reg
istered and patented as a trade-mark by
Colgate & Co., New York. Purchasers, how
ever, need hardly to be warned against in
fringements the genuine article is so uni
versally esteemed as to have made the
names CashmereBouquet and Colgate & Co.
nearly synonymous.
Information worth thousands
to those
out
of health. Self-help for weak and nervous
sufferers. Facts for those who have been
dosed, drugged, and quaeked. The new
Health Journal teaches all. Copies free.
Address, Electric Quarterly, Cincinnati, O.
After an experience of over twenty-five
years, many leading physicians acknowl
edge that the Orarfenberr MarthaP* Uterine
Catholicon is the only known certain remedy
for diseases to which women are subject.
The Graefenbtrg Vegetable Pills, the most
popular remedy of the day for biliousness,
headache, liver complaint and diseases of
digestion. Sold by all druggists. Send for
almanacs. Graefenberg Co., N. Y.
War in Europe!
The latest and fullest news from the
Europeau war will he found each week in
the weekly Wisconsin. Only fifty cents,
postpaid, for four months. Address, Cramer,
Aikcns & Cramer, Milwaukee, Wis.
Cobn and flour are staple articles but
not more
so than Johnson's Anodyne Liniment,
where known. It is good for children or
adults, for any internal soreness of the chest
or bowels, and the best Liniment prepared,
under whatever name.
An
ill-humored critic says that Anna
Dickinson can "no more act than Grant
could lead a ballet in silk tights."
The
all-gone feeling which people
sometimes speak of, is caused by want of
proper actiou of the liver and heart. These
may be assisted, and the bowls regulated, by
Parsoiu? Purgative Pills in small doses.
If
you wish to save your hair and
keep it strong and healthy use Burnett's
COCOAINE.
THE MARKETS,
NEW YORK.
Beef Cattle—fair to prime -16 00
Hogs—live 5 25
Sheep—Fair to prime 5 75
Cotton—Middling
Flour—Spring extra. 7 90
Atheat—So. 2 Milwaukee Spring..... 1 95
Ctan—'Western
Oats—Western .60
Bye—Western 1 00
Barley 98
Pork—Mess.....
Lard
CHICAGO.
Cattle—Choice to extra prime J5 00
Medium to choice 4 50
Common to fair. 2 85
Hog»—Live 5 25
Sheep—Good to cholce~ 5 50
Butter—Good to choice. 1?
Eggs—Fresh 10
flour—White winter extra 7 75
Spring extra. 7 00
Wheat-Spring No. 2
Corn—No. 2
Oato—No. 2 ,*5
Rye—No, 2 -m-M
Barley—No. 2........
Pork—Mess
'aaiwAVKEE.'
Cattle—Choice to extra prime US 00
Medium to choice 4 00
Common to lair 2 75
Hogs—Live. 5 25
Sheep—Good to choice 5 00
Butter—jChoice...........^..- 17.
Eccs—Freeh.,
flour—
-White winter extra-— 8
Spring ewhni„„.. 7
Wheat—Spring Nol «...
Spring No. 2
Own-No. 2~oH -..IS
Oats-No. 2......
Rye—No. 1
Barley—No. 2 ...
Pork—Mow.
Wlwt li OMley'a Y«m fawdert
Do you ask my friend? It is made from
the purest and strongest elements. Among
them, cream-tartar made from grape aeld ex
pressly for these manufacturers. The result
is that the biscuit, rolls, waffles, coke, bread
and pastry produced, are beyond compari
son.
Patentees and inventors should read
advertisement of Edson Bros., in another
column.
WU.r I
Are
CONCORD!
qnaled in style,
workmanship, strength and durability.
They received the highest wriwn
•ward at the Centennial Exposition. None
HARNESS."!^"^
with mmv name and Trad* Mark. A liberal
»Hf "OTrtlwillbe glvenfbr in
JmU T* .XXXwJJ I formation that will
cimyttt any one who Mils harness aa the
CoitOrd HuiiMi that war* not mad* bjr
Bxtra inducements offered. Send for circu
lars and price lists. Address,
J. R. HILL & CO.,
CONCORD, FT- H.
Kansas display of products at Centennial «ur
Brased
all other States. KAX8AM PACIFIC
t.W. CO.
offers largest body of good lands in
KANNAN
at lowest prices and best terms.
Plenty of Gov't lands
l'KKK
For copy of
for Homesteads.
"KAJSSAM PACIFIC HOJIE-
8TEA1,
address, Lnritl Commissioner,
K. f. Jtic.. tinlinn. Kunnax.
FLORENCE,
The Only Baft,
Odorless and Durable
OIL STOVE.
It
received the
Only
Centennial Medal.
Alto the
BEST SEWING MACHINE.
SCADS BY THE
Florence Machine Co.,
FLOBCKCE, MASS.
SEND FOE CIBCUIABS.'
Agents Wanted.
Tkt Cook, with Oven.
THE
GOOD OLD
STAND-BY.
Mexican Mustang
Liniment
FOR MAN AND BEAST.
Established 33 Years. Always Cures. Always
ready. Alwa a bandy. Has never yet failed. Thirty
vdlliom hare tertnl it. The whole world approves the
glorious old Mustang—the Best- and Cheapest Lini
ment in existence. 25 cents a bottle. Tho Mustang
Liniment cures when nothing else will.
SOLD BY ALL MEDICINE VENDERS.
$ 7.'JO PER WARIER FOH TUN QUAHTt'NS.
MASON
HAMLIII
&
CABINET ORGANS. N
HIGHEST AWARDS AT
FOUR
GREAT
WORLD'S EXP08IT10H8
P1867
aris, Vienna, Santiago,
Five
mm
1873 1875
PHILADELPHIA, 1876.
OrltOmam auhj.hid Fitn Rank at Cki*tk*mau
Gnat tarittf of ttyfei at prttei *hieJ» Htmld fa impcvible for
work qfinch wtutnee without uncju%ledfaeilitu* fur manufacturt*
EXAMPLES OF NET CJSIt I'RICES:
octave doable reed organ. Hfl
with tremulant, OJ.UU
Five
octave organ, nine stops, 1 1 A
with voi-x celeste, *p!• Arr
$9ltl atio/vr monthly or quarterly rtn/'-i until
rent ptyt. A tuptrinr vrton amy note bt yurchatei Ajr ie emg
payment if $7.20 per quarter ftr'ten quarters, i'a'aloguet free.
MASON A HAMLIN ORGAN CO.
144Treraont St- S3 Uoion S|. 250 Wabash Ar«.
BOSTON. NEW YOHK. CHICAGO.
GAS-LIGHT FOR EVERYBODY!
$1 Per 1,000 Feet!
Cheaper than Coal (ins—Safer than Kerosene—A
more brilliant light than cither.
Indorsed by leading Insuranco Companies.—An
Country. Send for llluatrtted Catalogue.
THE SHAtiER MANUFACTURING CO.,
P. 0. Box 3799. No. 4 Hurray St., Mew York.
fOK ie CENT#, tad cent damp tot pottage, wt Win send
for one year, tbe handsouvs S-pmge paper,
MODXL PRINTER'S GUIDE
tad also oar anperuiy ICC page
Instruction and Specimen Boot, entitled
Circular,
&
How to Print
Worth (en times &q cost to every BssSncss
Man and Printer. Addreas, J. W. Datoha
dat Co., 783 CheaUrat St., Philadelphia.
Publishers, and llanad* of the Celebrated
PRINTING PRESS.
laeii, the best. Nine stylo, from 94.## up.
The Grand History of the World before Adam.
Its dateless origin, thrilling and mysterious changes
In becoming ant abode for man. The beanties, won
ders and realities of Plan as shewn by Seienec.
So plain, clear and easily understood that all read it
«itn delight. Strongest commendations. Send for
:ular, Terms and Sample 1 Uastrations.
HABIT CUBED AT HOME.
OPIUM
Nopublicity. Tlmeshort. Terms
moderate. 1,000 testimonials.
Describe case. Sr. F. E. MAESH, Quincy, Mich.
Tax "Paikxt Ivobt" Handl* Tabljs Knitx.
MANUFACTURE ALL KINDS OF
Exclusive Makers of tho "PATEKT IVOK*'
A POPULAR NEWSPAPER.
IF YOU WART
THE BEST
A First-class Family and
AND THE
CHEAPEST.
modo111 *11 stylo* and of
J, AlXf I every description, from (he tightest,
•neat and moat rl«(int In use to the hur
(Mt and itnnffMt required for any kind of
8UB8CRIBE
Utime*In
eat commendations. Send for
imple 1 Uastrations.
Address, J. C. MtCCRPY CO., ChleaQ.
FOR
THE INTER flCH.
The price of the Daily Kiiition is tlO tor year (dop
tage paid), tbe Semi-weekly Edition S3.3U per year
(postage paid), and
Weekly Edition $i,65 per year,
As a Literary,
Family, or
Political Newspaper
It is aneicelled by miy In the country.
The "Queries arid nswern" and tbe Agricultural
department aro worth morn than the price of the
r*rer, Sample copies SENT Fit EE on application.
Address
THIS CUT
Represents a Solid Black Walnut Chamber Set, Mar
DlC'top. feet 3 inches high, French veneered panels,
elegantly finished with ebony and gilt drop-handles
size mirror 18x40. NociiAuar: for
packing. Cut thi* out and send for an IlJuBtratrrl Cat*
alogue and Price-list
sent free of 300 pieces of Furni
ture* We sell to the consumer only, and at whole
sale prlccs. Address COliBY & WIRTS«
217 & *419 State UChicago, III.
AiiflSomity
THE INTER OCEAN,
11'.'Lake St.. Chicago, ill.
$1
arc entertained about purga­
tives. Jt i« dangerouH to scourge the stomach, to
raep the bowel*, to prostrate the nervous hygtem with
funotiM evaciianto. Katurc h»*piv«n a pjuupJe in the
famous Seltzer Springof what the bilious, const pa ted,
or dyspeptic system need# for it« restoration, ami in
Tarrant's Effervescent Seltzer Aperient
Science has improved on Natnroby combining sill the
valuable ingredients of the German Fountain in a
portable form, and omitting those which huv* no
medicinal virtues. Thia agreeable and potent ealine
alterative changes he condition of the blood and puri
fies ttll the tiuidtfofthe body. Sold by all druggists.
BABBITT'S TOILET SOAP.
pabUc The FINEST TOILET SOAP In the World*
Only the vurttt ttgtUible oils in its manufacture.
FOR
X„
the Nursery it has No Equal.
Worth ten IU cost to every motbt-r
and Tamily hChristendom.
Sample box, containing 3 caket of 6 ox*, each, sent free to any ad*
dreta on receipt of 15 cents. Address
NATURES REMEDY.
The Creat Blood Purifier.
RELIABLE EVIDENCE.
ITS Baltic Street, Brooklyn, N. Y., Nov. It, 1874.
H.R. Stevens. Esq.:
ar Sir—from personal benefit rceiveil by itn use,
as well us from personal knowledge of those whose
cure thereby has seemed almost miraculous. I can
most huurtily and sincerely recommend the YKIJK
X1NE for the complaints for which it i* claimed ta
cure. .TAME8 V. LUDLOW,
Late Pastor Calvary Baptist Church, Sacramento, Cat
Tf»ftlae i» gkld by all l)rnwrl»t«.
The Best Polish in the World."
STOVE POLISH
1
Automatic_Machino—Easily handled—Adapted to]
Dwellings, Factories, Churches, Stores, R. Depots
and Offices—From a single Burner upwards— othing
like It in the
Milwaukee Bridge and iron Works.
Hannfactnrers of Wroaght Iron Bridges.
We make a specialty of
Sigiiwny
and would respectfully lavlte Corrf»ponJ«ne«
from County, Town and Village Author!
tin. Take advantage of tbe present extremely low
price of iron to bnild bridges, combining great du
tability with economy of construction.
r. N. USUT CO.. Milwaukee.
GET
Aad-JToi
Wear Oat.
Sold bv Watchmakers. By mail, Mc. Circulars free.
J. S. BIRCH A CO.. as Dey Street, Sew York.
Prof. Hall's Magle CmpMa*
the only preparation, one package of whicfe
•srili fsrt" th« hrard to now thick and htmvy
on the smoothest fkce fvithout kqjurjj in
days in every caae, or money eh
fundrd. 3D cents per package^ postpaid
SO cento- K. W. JOKES. UitacdTMaM
PHILADELPHIA.
Hard Metal
High Polish
Adjustable^
Beams
Wootf&lron*'
Run Steady
Light Draft
All Sizes.
*EW YORK PLOW CO.
Wla.
St fSiO uSTaGEI 0^ CATALG
5^0'vViNG AMATCUR PRESSC3.
iooo tonts or ^ypt &
V1L A'AU*E A MAT JF? PE PRE 55 MR'
0
Milwaukee: wis
BUBSttiM'S LAST NEW BOOK,
oir POULTRY—"How to Raise
Fowls and lies for Market."
Mailed for 25 cts.
and 3 centstamp
by GEO. P. BURNIIAM, P. O. Bo*
131, Melroae. Maaa.
30 rtnti we will send yon (parked in
J} VfXki bo*) one Gents' Fine Watch 1
bain, one
set 8piral8tnds .one set Cuff Buttons, no Improved
Coijtti Batten, on" Onral Bosom fill, and one Ladies'
Wedding Bing. Warranted (mucoid gliit:. SatH'*'"
tion guaranteed, or money cheerfully refunded. W.
M. MAMM1MC, 67 Beaver Street. Albany. N. Y.
OB! Agents! Ohl! everybody! The
Houaiache Protector.' Only 23
cts. ircnlars free as air. C. II.
BABBOWM. WUimantic. Conn.
MEEJDEN CUTLERY OO.
Received the HIGHEST CENTENNIAL PRIZE.
TABLE CUTLEET.
Celluloid Knife, the most durable White Banile
known. The Oldest Manufacturer* in America. Original makers of the IIAIU) RVBBKB HANOliF.
Always'call for "Trado Mark" «KKIDEi* CUTLKllY OO." on the blade. Warranted and sold by all
Dealers In Cutlery, and by the WEBIPKM rBTIttBT 4» C'hMafcgni ret. Hew York.
BURNETT'S
S A N A 1
We hare been exptwuTy permitted to tiro fcb nnmcc
cf abort of the but Grocen and Hotel, in the rountqr.
|,Wc gin a lew below:
BOSTON.
Fasna Bovss. 8. S. Pirnr*.
Sitiu Hoosk. McDkwkli. & Adams.
MEW YORK.
Firm Arunntlfora. AcaiE,ME***i.i.ftCo»irr.
WisTKiitsTita HOTEL. 1'ARK Tilfokd.
-Vj
Costucextai. Hotel. Tuoiirsort, Black*Sok.
WASHINGTON.
WauM't HOTEL* I IIALI. HOME, jj:
$
BALTIMORE.
,j
Eotaw*QOOE. G. H. Reese*£bv
CINCINNATI.
BpevktHouii.B. Cataosaa80s. Jos. S. Peebles.
mm
ST. LOUIS.
SoumEEir Hotel. Dirin NtcnoLaoit.
BbeihaW Hocsk. Staxto* jtCo.
DETROIT.
BcaaaLL Bouse. o. ft R. McMillak.
SAN FRANCISCO.
Go. Pacific ft OccidentalSoteu. Cottixo Co.
MMTRIM.
Ottawa House. David Ckawicu*
NEW ORLEANS.
Smith Deos. ft Co. Cun ft Sum
A O IN
EXTRACTS*
(land, Mala*.
fflKJK A DAT to Ag«nU. Sample
O Catalogue h. ji-gTCHSB, II
$555$77"fw**',"a
ee. t»w
•y St., .1,
its. 110 OttijU Fret
.Augusta, Maine
P. O. VIi
$5 tO $30 free. ^IMBOM'TCTr.'Porfiand." Mains.
X. &
Bample* worth fS
HOW TO WAKE IT. jS»KUiVH*
audwlabU. (JOE. YONQ CO.. Bt. UnUt.ile..
@1 O*
day at home. Agents wi
tp
wanted. Outfit and
Augusta, Maine.
terms free TllP CO..
2 -J oo A IfOXTH to agents and reasonable
tjPjL perinea. III LP A PRATT, Cincinnati. Ohio.
nPlfnl l||*l)S7sbot#a HI Cat.frtt. 2JK.
IfCVULitHWkbtbiwOrmWo»k».Ohle—o.Illao.ni.M,W«tfles.
Great Chance to Make Money. Uood Agents
ed. Write at once to Buhk Mm. Co..'3uffalo.
band Warrantu Bought. Higheatcask"'4''
price paid by Oilwobe & Co.. WaghlugtoP. D. O^ALA'T
HOW
(POSTAGE PAID.) 4
$2500
•t riulk"-*
TO MAKE KM to $49 per week SELL
ING TE
,\8 to FAMILIES. Circular free. Ad
THE CANTON TEA CO., 14S Chamber* 8t., W. Y.
fk/t WATCHKM. A Great Sensation, flam*!,'®,
i||A4 ll'iUcft and Outfit free to Agent*. Better tnansjfgL
""•*Gold. Address A. COULTER 4 CO.. Chic
hicagfl.
a year to Agents* Out/U and a
$25&Aot Crtm frte. For terms sul
drcS8|/.
WorthdcCo.y
OLID Bobber Type, Stamp A llubber Uoodf. W9
SKND FOB CATALOGUE, or aikyonr Stationer^
Something New. H.8. Incer»oli. B'dwaT.S.T
$5937
AUUUII
Made by 17 Agents in Jan. 77 with
my 13 new arti cles. Samples free*
Addres&C. Jt. Zbitngtoiti Chicago*
VIM k'an learn how to make pure, choice Candies by
sending one dollar for instructions to WHO
A CO., Menomonie. Wig. Satisfaction guaranteed.
nnnn tun I can be made one day with our
1VCI»L4.foot WellinA vqku Send fori
our auger haok. U. S. AUGER CO., Cincinnati, O.'
MSN to travel and sell to Dealers our
new unbreakablo glass chimneys and
RANTED
lamp goo
lamp goods. Ho Ped(Ulnar. Salary liberal,
business permanent. Hotel ana trayelingexpenses
paid Monitor Glass Cot. 2&t Main St.. Cincinnati. O.
Tp*C—The choicest in the world—Importers' price*..
WW—Largest Company in America—staple article
pleases everybody—Trade continually increasing—t rj
Agents wanted everywhere—best inducement!—don t''
waste time—send for Circular to
ROBERT WELLS. 43 Vesey St.. N.Y P, O. Bo»l«7.
A YEAR. An eight-page Story Pap ^^,
(cbromo 16x22 "Onr Boys! Six months
("Floral Cross" chronio,) 90 cts. No free ,,b
samples. ALBUM, Box.1526, Boston, Mas'.
POP
VhKH PKll'ED PGLXTHY BOOKS I B0 cent* each
wiU buy Burnhaia'a new "Dlaeaaem" 4Heer«*ia In
Fowl Breeding." "Game Fowl," or "Hobbig Fowl*
and Eggs for Markrt." Stalled for pries by "Poul
try World," ifartfont* (t.. (Ik leading paper for
by GEO. P. VURXIIAM# lelrwe» Jha.
Fowl-rai*ers,) or
PATENTS
P*ICE.
A NO IXVEtfTOK*'
E S O N O S
8. and Foreign rates
Agents,711 GSt.,Washington,®.C. £stab. in H-6G. Fee
after allowance. Circular of instructions sent frea.
Invested in Wall St. Stocks makes
fortune.* every month. Book sent:
free explaining everything.
Address BAXTER & CO., Bankers, 17 Wall St.. N. Y.
$1041000]
TIT I mTTrn Men to travel and take orders of
IAI 1 If Merchants. Salary $1,XM a year.
If I-1 1 and all traveling expenses paid.
Address Gem MaH'fg Co., St. Loins, Me.
SOLDIER!.
X.ATK WAS, see "THE MTS
IS BI.CB," an 8-pase monthly! New
nl Bnv]t'v laws 2% a year. Sample free:
Piles!:
New Pension
coi.w.
W. HlZfiEIUltt, Washington, D. C.
KITflfOMHE. KITCnOliHC.
Soap "connted out." Ask yonr Grocer for large,
free sample package. If yon don't get it, mk again.
Agents in the trade wanted.—HAltfDEN MAN FQ
CO.. 414 GREENWICH STREET. NEW YORK.
Hcemorrhoideon! Sufferers pre
AS PACIFIC! it a trial it is
mire to give relief. One box* ill cure
ordinary cage of Piles, two boxes will cure tbe worst
any cane of.kind. Price per box, Send
red registe Letter. Best of referonccn gien. DB.
W. TBQ9. UPSHUR. McNutt Leflore Co.. Miss.
COLUNS&CO'.S
Unrivalled for tho
Toilet and tbe Bath*
No artificial and
deceptive odors to
cover cutnnxra and
deleterious ingredi*
ents. After yean of
scientific experiment
the manufacturer of
B. T. Babbitt's Be*
Soap hns perfected
ami n«w oflfcrs to the
(^Eje^Tp^l
vmm
VflW ADDRCSS ypf
C£p
VHD^MJ^CotLINS fcCoJ
212 Watch St NEW-YORK Cnv.j
ADAMANT
PLOWS.
the work o(
best steel
plows,
whilemuch
cheaper
to repair.
Agents wanted.
(5 Beekann St., X. IV
ItheClirke,expreNlyR.I.,forEheDtnd01vegetableOr-|IIIIofW.hatandyou.to£ItMetforitM^dueMetSend|YDCall.diietset.EIJrftMfywiUpurelyMisaboveillustratedandwarranted.Eit,theRMbottleDrsiijforhaveS'forYKe«edfT£vcrydon'tBladderNEUremedvNProvidence,H)druggistHunt'sthousands.yonrpositivejKlditejrft*AIfpreparedcured£.fM«.
$1.00 $1.00
Osgood's Heliotype EngrawRgs.
The choicest household ornaments. Price
One Dollar each. Send for catalog**,
JAMES R. OSGOOD & CO.
BOSTON, MASS.
$1.00 $1.00
A YEAR. AGENTS WANTED
on our Brand ComkiaallM
Prospectant, representing
$2500
ISO
BOOKS
DISTINCT
wanted everywhere. The blnfftt thins ever tried*
Sales made from this when all single books fail. Also
agents wanted on our 9a*ulneent FAMILT
BIHLEM. Superior to all others. With invaluable
iihiiirami Aiun and oiipsrb "indinss. Tbzse
beat the World KuIIpiirticnlarsfree
E. POTTKR & CO.. Publishers,"PHlLADKtiFMIA
A I E S
Imitations.
NULE FLOIIB TMLEI MAT!
H1BE FIOCB TOILET «OAP!-
—MAIZE FLOUR TOILET SOAr!
A great discovery!—a new soap compcund! It
soothes, softens, ana whitens the skin,'
KEEP'SPatent.Partly-made
Ui
O
N
E
"4,^.
m:
5
has wonderful
healing and superior washing properties, and is
equally suited for the bath, nursery, ana general
toilet. It is delightfully perfumed, and sold every
where at a moderate price Registered in Patent
Office, 1876, by the manufacturers.
MCKEONK. VAN HAAGSN *CO.. Philadelphia
The Beit.
MHIBTS-only one nualii __
Keep's Dress Shirts.
Can be finished atfeag? as hemming a Handkerchief.
The vei Ubt. six for *7.®#.
Keep's Custom Shirts—made to measure,
The very best, six for SO.M.
An elegant set of genuine Gold plate Collar and
8leevn Buttons given with each half dox. Keep8hirts.
Keep's Shirts are delivered KKE on receipt of price
In any art of tbe Union—no express charges to pay.
Samples with full directions for «elf-measurement
Sent Free to any address. No stamp required.
Deal directly with the Manufacturer and get Button
Prices. Keep Manufacturing Oo., 16511ercer8t.,N. Y.
DR. WARNER'S HEALTH CORSET.
With fkitt SiipiNHtrr u«
Mf-Mjiitisg Fnda.
SecnrcsIlEAi.TH and Comfortof
11-NLY, WMI Uiuce and Bkautyof
Form. Three Garments in one.
Approved b.y all vhyficiaiiP.
A N S W A N E
Sam pies by mail, in Coutll,$2
Saileen, 11 76. To Agenla at
25 cental CM. Order size two
inchca f-mnller than waist mea
Bute over the dreea.
Warcsr Bros. 351 BroadwayiB.Y,
INSURANCE COMPANY,
IN THE CITY OF NEW YORK,
261, 262, 263 Broadway,
•—OBGAMIZES 18IS-*
ASSETS, $4,827,176.52
SURPLUS, $820,001
EVERY APPROVED FORK OF POUC1
ISSUED ON MOST FAVORABXJE TKBlf)
ALL ENDOWMENT HUGHS
Aifir
APPROVED OJLAXH
MATUBXHQIIflirt
WILL BE
ox
4AMBSBPBLX*
.mum vnmtiN
Wi Irff*!* ivfir"'rWrWM'fiiWM 1"'

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