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The Rising son. [volume] (Kansas City, Mo.) 1896-19??, December 15, 1906, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83025494/1906-12-15/ed-1/seq-1/

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it Pays to Advertise In the Rising Gon
VOLUME XI.
PROF. R. W. FOSTER, WHO BE
CAUSE OF HIS LONG 8UCCE8S
FUL CAREER AS HEAD OF THE
DOUGLAS SCHOOL 8HOULD
BE NAMED FOR PRINCIPAL.
SHIP OF THE LINCOLN
SCHOOL.
Of all the candidates (or principal
of Lincoln School, Prof. R. V. Fos
ter, stands out conspicuously preem
inent. First, because of his long suc
cessful career as principal of Douglas
School. Second, because of his fitness
and years of experience for such a
jKMltlon. Third, because of being one
of the greatest disciplinarians in the
negro schools of this state.
Fourth, because he is not seeking
the office but letting the office seek
the man.
The Son is supporting Prof. Foster,
for this position because he Is deserv
ing of it. As a niunly negro he hus
always stood out prominently for his
race. On every public question con
cerning his people ho has always been
on the right side. As a father of
a large family he has so raised his
children that his word Is law in his
household. As principal of Douglas
bchool he has an immaculate reeon!
as one of the best principals Kunsrs
' City can afford. He is balovcd by
thousands of negro families with whom
he has had occasion to deal from a
parental Btandoint. Again became
the members of the board of educatlt n
kuow him to be a responsible nemo.
Lincoln school fit this period needs
a young vigorous man like R. V. Foe
ttr. Thousands of negroes would like
to see him get this position. If this po
sition shall be given from a point of
merit and deservedneBS then the mem
bers of the board of education should
consider this candidate from a point of
discipllnarianship, intelligence,' exper
ience and character.
LINCOLN INSTITUTE NOTES.
Methods of Teaching the Industries
at Lincoln Institute, Dr. Benjamin
. F. Allen, President.
Josephine S. Yates, department of
English.
Methods of teaching the industries
In Lincoln Institute, the Missouri
State Normal and college for negroes,
are practical and approved and in ad
dition, contain many original ideas
that may be accredited to Its progres
sive and scholarly president Dr. B.
F. Allen, who looks after every de
tail of work In the Industrial depart
ment, ns well as elsewhere, with the
most minute care.
Every encouragement Is. given the
student to follow some industry, in
fact every student is required to com
plete several branches of industrial
work during the course and thus Is he
prepared to become a producer as well
as a consumer. As an aid to an In
creasing zeal along Industrial lines,
President Allen is now giving a series
of morning talks to the students.
' The fact is, these talks are made
by the administrative head to the en
tire school, young man and young
women alike, and outside of the class
es In whlch there particular branches
are taught, helps to emphasize upon
the mind of the average student, the
value, dignity, and necessity of labor
and to enforce th? principle that he
who would be a valuable citizen In
American, or any other progressive
civilization, must be able and willing
to do something well, very well.
DR. T. C. UNTHANK TO TAKE THE
PULPIT.
Dr. T. C. I'nthauk has been sum
moned to preach a lay-sermon at Allen
Chapel Sunday evening. He will take
for his text, "Faith, Hope and Charity,
and the grentest of these Is charity,
The other doctors, Lambrlght, Shan
non, Perry, Thompson Birch ond E.
B. Ramsey will officiate at the col
lection table. The ladies are especial
ly Invited to give their money to Dr,
'Ramsey . captain of the collection
team. The object of the sermon Is to
furnish Allen Chapel a room In the
new addition at liouglnss hospital.
Some negroes who have city posl
- lions are trimming their sails for the
; county, but their wings will be clipped.
ST. JOSEPH SOCIETY PLANS
MANY SOCIAL FUNCTIONS
... FOR THE INTERSTATE.
In view of the fact that the ninny
social and literary clubs of this city
are putting forth every effort to en
tertain the visitors to the Inter-state
which meets here during the Christ
mas holidays, it Is hoped that all del
egates and visitors will come expect
ing to enjoy themselves and feeling
that they will be well cared for as
the citizens mean to leave no stone un
turned. Local societies are co-operating with
the Ex. Committee to make the ICth
annual session of the Inter-State the
most instructive and enjoyable meet
ing of its history. , V.
The purposed art exhibit has proven
very popular among the ladles and It
Is expected to draw many exhibitors
from other cities.
Those who anticipate attending the
sessions are urged to come early so
as to be comfortably located in time
to participate in the numerous social
functions.
The following are among some of
the social affairs planned by society
folks: Dec. 23 , concert by Western
University Choral society; Dec. 2C. re
ception to delegates and visitors by
citizens; Dec. 27, (afternoon) recep
tion to delegates and visitors by La
dles' clubs of the city;Dec. 27, (even
ing) full dress ball by Shriners; Dec.
28. art exhibit and reception to visit
ing exhibitors and friends by Jewell
Art Club of this city.
Besides these there will be many
other interesting eiilertalnnuints to
nrd to the pleasures of the visitors!
and delegates.
GREENVILLE, MISS.. NEWS.
Greenville, Miss., Dec. 7. Perhaps
the largest and most aggressive body
of negro men that has ever met in this
city, was the Stringer Grand Lodge of
Mason, which assembled here during
the week, and hus brought to the city
representative men from all parts of
the state numbering 1010.
This body shows the progress made
by our people since 180.1, as In the
body was to be found, doctors, law
yers, merchants, ministers of high
standing, planters, post-masters, clerks
bankers and other representative men
of the race. The body was presided
over by Rev. E. V. Lamptou, .D !.,
grand, master, and who Is ulsp finan
cial secretary of the African Met ho
dist Episcopal church with headqiinr
ers in Washington, D. C. Dr. Lnmpton
has been grand master of the grand
lodge for a number of years and was
re-elected at the close this week.
This body stands for the highest
development of the race, self-respect,
self-Independence and self-help. It be
lleves that there Is a possibility for
the race in Mississippi, and by Indus
try, honesty and thrift the race will
carve out for Itself a bright future.
To this end home buying has been
encouraged, tiie grand lodge Itself hav
lug purchas' d 1,000 acres of land in
the Delta, it. id which will eventually
provide for tiie support of the aged
members of the craft, together with
widows and i.rphans'of deceased mem
bers of the craft.
The opening session was held last
Tuesday, and was attended by many
of the citizens. Hon. John W. Stratith
er, one of ti-e leading business men In j
the Delta, nn undertaker In Greenville,
ncled as nv'ster of ceremonies and he
was well up. Rev. C. T. Stamps made
the opening praeyr null this was fol
lowed by music by the choir St.
Mathew A. M. K church, of which the
Rev. R. A. Adams Is pastor.
Xlaor William Yemer, delivered an
address of welcome. In which he com
mended the body of colored men upon
their neat eppearance, ns each Mason
wore full dress with but few excep
tions. He said that he had lived In
the state, .mil around Greenville nil
of his life and had always found col
ored peovV -to be his friends and
he was n nlcnd to the race "And why
not?'" he ald.
flrm, M:iuti Tjinmtmi reunnniled
to the flr-t nddiess. He told theinay-j
or and Editor Smith that the negroes ,
of Missls-!ppl were not satisfied, be-
cause in s me places mmeliers of their
ruceewr. hanged without trial, burned
at the st. ke, shot down and mistreat-
for It Reaches More Homes of Colored People than any othei Paper
KANSAS CITY, MO., SATURDAY, DECEMBER 15, 190(.
ed In other ways, then In addition
to these mistreatments there was talk
of bringing foreigners Into the state
to take the place of negroes. "We
cannot be satisfied when our Job is
at stake.'
E. E. Perklsn, secretary and treas
urer of the Masonic Benefit snsocia
tlon, which Is one of the most Im
portant adjuncts t othe grand lodee
made his annual report. This report
took up Indetalls the amount of mon
ey received and paid out, the ar'ount
paid 'o each widow and orphan. The
receipts amounted to $l2fi,000 nj-id
about JPO.OOO paid out to the widow
and orphans. This was considered a
good i-howlng, and In the future enct.
will itceive at death $600. step by
step the grand lodge Is going up n-id
Isp repining for the race. It is now
the strongest organization In the
whole south, and is doing more to
Inspire the negro.
RESOLUTIONS OF THE DONOR
CLUB AN AUXILIARY OF At..
. LEN CHAPEL ENDORSING R.
W. FOSTER FOR PRINCIPAL
OF THE LINCOLN WARD
SCHOOL.
He It resolved that Prof. R. W. Fos
ter, because of his great ucls of
charity and Individual work lu Allen
ciuiiH'l be. endorsed for Lincoln School
as Its principal. He it further resolved
that be cause of his splendid work aud
help to this organization that he shall
have our entire and sincere support
for this position.
Be it further resolved becouse of his
gent ra'. fitness, scholarly appeal him e
and good disclplinarlanshlp that we
appoint a committee consisting of
president, secretary unit trcasuiei
to present these resolutions to mem
berf. of the board of education.
JOHN T. MORELAND SHOULD BE
APPOINTED TO A POSITION AT
THE COUNTY COURT
HOUSE.
John T. Moreland should have the
support of all respectable negroes in
this community for a position in tin
county. He has always been a con
sistent republican worker. He is a
great factor to be dealt with in future
campaigns. In the 9th ward, from
which he hails, he is regarded by the
committeemen ns a deserving man for
a position.
NOW LET WAR BE WAGED
AGAINST CLUBS AND GAMBLING
DENS WHERE NEGRO YOUTHS
ARE HURLED TO DE
STRUCTION. The republican judges have been
electod to every bench, except the
criminal bench. What will they do
to perpetuate their claims In the coun
ty and city. In this community are
some negro Institutions that are hell
holes and the most damnable places
for the downfall of young boys and
girls. There tin only one club at this
writing that Is exempted from this
campaign and that Is the Waiters Cat
ering Association at 1 2L:S Baltimore
a place for the gathering of all the
waiters and railroad porters who
wish for a place to stay while they
are waiting for hours of watch to be
gin. Now tho rest of the places Ine
Sou Intends with its thousands of
supporters hoth black uud while to
carry on an uncompromising and un
flinching campaign against them.
Like Frederick Douglas, the great ne
gro torch-hearer who cried out: "Is
God Dead?" Will the living get Jus
tice? Will tiie negroes rise up and
smile their greatest evil dead? Will
the negro preachers arouse themselves
mid organize a committee to wait on
the republican judges and have I hem
with all the power at the command of
the while man to close these places?
Tho preacher who hesitates in this
call from God, sliull go down on rec
ord In the Rising Son before its many
leaders as weaklings. This paper
shall not cease its writings until our
greatest race menace has been smitten
dead. Every Judge in county and til y
j takes this paper. Let them be moved
, 1 y God to do their duly by the negro
', race. Just to think of the mothers
broken hearted, thinking of the mis-
deeds and wild career of their sons
and daughters. Don't you hear that
song, "Oh, where is my wandering boy
to-night. Oh, where is my boy to night.
Oh! Stop and think of the many old
mothers tottering to their graves by
the grief of the strong Influences that
carry their children to their graves by
a premature death. Oh! Listen to
the voice of Jesus calling on the ne
groes to get right. Will the noble
mn of the Negro Race rise up and
assert themselves. Lay on MacDuCt!
Lay on! Come forth out of stygtun
darkness! Let there be light! The
great ship of Destiny in which the n
gro is riding, let there be a strong
pilot at the, helm. I-et the powers to
be among the white people come to
our assistance. Let Judges Brutuback,
McCttne, Patterson, Goodrich, Parks,
and our own noble I. B. Kimbrell
come to our rescue. Let the negroes
get a petition ami have every Judge
and white man of Influence sign to
close these clubs. Oh! Let God move
us to belter our race.
Metropolitan's New Switches Here.
Mr. ('. N. Black, general manager
of the Metropolitan Street railway
1-as received the new switches for the
McGee Street road. Because of the
delay in receiving these switches op
eration on that road had to cease. In
mot ten more days cars will be run
ning ver the road.
Mme. DT3 VAUI, VINCENT.
1018 Michigan Ave
Madame De Vaul Vincent,' expert
seamstress and dressmaking teacher.
Mrs. Vincent's work is doing a great
good among the negro women. In
this community Is a lady seamstress
who, because of her Individual efforts
has rallied around her a number of
negro girls who are learning every
day the art of sewing. Mrs. Vincent
has been especially fitted for the
work because of her training In the
ladies tailoring schools of New York
and Chicago; having attended "S. T.
Tailor" school of Tnilorlng In New-
York ond the MacDowel Systematic
school of Chicago. In addition to
this she finished the technical course
or Ladies Artistic Suit, designing In
the New York School of Kansas City.
After this she took the post graduat
ing course of Systematic Waist de
signing which gives to her four di-
ldninas In her trade. This undoubt
edly puts Mrs. Vincent. In the rank
whb the best, dressmakers of the
city white or black. Mrs. DeVaul
Vincent was born in Dayton. ('
ISTl' ami since coming to this city
fourteen years ago she has followed
Hie dressmaking trade exclusively, ns
she tint worked in nil of the first ckiBs
while idaces of this city until two
vi;iru niro when she opened up M
school for the training of colored wo
men In that. art. Her work entitles
her Willi the support of all the negro's'
Any girl who lacks n trade or some
tiling by which they can become
bread winners should apply o her
f.ir medal course. Mitfhcrs who
have daughters should also send them
to lier for nn entire sewing season
.5?
Moved! Moved!
Take notice, the office of the
Rising
has been
I
Come around and pay the new owner a visit. Conic
around and pay your subscription as a Xmas gift to the man
ager, or perhaps, send it in by mail. Thanking you for what
you have done in the past.
Bring us your news, and let us know what is going on
in society. Phone your news to 780 Main, Home, or 780
Grand, Bell. Now come on, all together, and let us make
this paper the Leading Journal in the West. Let us have
from 10,000 to 15,000 subscribers.
HOMES
FURNISHED
For O
r o r.
Western Furniture
& Stove Co.
Home Phone 3218 Main.
JohnB. Stetson's Hats
Whooovor you want, a MAT
Always go to LEWIS' FASHION
n Btyles arid quality they excel
They always carry -the latest
Every hat is guaranteed
Pernember the name and locatioi
See big display In their windows
The Hat Store on the Corner.
OOMPTON'S HOTEL
I Oharlotta Btraet, Kmrtmm City, ISIo.
STRICTLY FIRST-CLASS ACCOMMODATIONS
OaU I'boo 2U Uflb A. CO.MI'J'ON. Mur-
In the State.
NUMBER 11)
moved to
sh
a s y
1)22 Grand Ave.
Bon
K2? M21
NOW
'UK

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