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The Rising son. [volume] (Kansas City, Mo.) 1896-19??, April 27, 1907, Image 6

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A MISSOURI WOMAN
Proton - On the treeless steppes of I
Rui-xia. beyond the "rale.' and In the I
arlJ districts of noi theasti t n China,
thnu-.it.ds of human beings nre dying
for want of f 1. Lack of rain In the
first instance, excess of it in the see
t'liil is the caiM".
F:.o provinces in China ami 21 In
JijsvU arc affected, ami. while from
tlio former country romo awful talcs
of tho bartering of liimian uVsh for
food, of tho f ale of lit t children, and
of the breaking nut of the plague
anions the dose packed sufferers, from
Kussiit comes a wail of despair, where
nun, wi nun and ehlldreti are trying
to ( hue to life, with almost nothing to
eat and with tm fuel in a temperature
of -5 decrees helow zero.
renditions are sieh In both coun
tries tha it is estimated that what in
this coimt.-y would be the price of a
finale vir-it to the theater would save
a human life until reluming crops
bring self support.
The Christian Herald of New York,
which has taken chariro of the Ameri
can end of the Chilli su famine n lief,
pledged its. -If to supply lO.OUlt.niiil
pounds of Hour, corn, coinmeal, medi
cal supplies, etc.. in addition to what
had already bet n sent. The govern
ment gave tin.' army transport (!en.
Huford to carry this consignment from
San Francisco to Shanghai.
Government Aid Inadequate.
In Itussia the famine Is boimt re
lieved to some extent by government
aid. but the restrictions this aid car
ries with it make it very luade'pi:ite.
it involves the delivery of one pound
of bread u day only to sufferers, less
than 17 and more than ''. years of
ago. Infants under one year, and all
the vast majority between 17 nnd ,V.i
get nothing except what the untcltish
among the more fortunate are willing
to share. And, above and beyond I his.
there is the fact that the black hand
of llussiun llicial graft appropriates
for piivato ends at least one half ol
the money the government voted for
relief.
llishop Poller, of New York, Is pres
ident and I Jr. Samuel .1. Harrows, for
merly of Huston, Is secretary of the
American relief for Russia.
It is hard to Judge between the two,
but perhaps the situation In China Is
the more pitiable at present. Statis
tics gathered early In February in one
of the live stricken Chinese provinces
allowed a total of ii:i.ot deaths. This
is but a small section of the awful
nggrcuato .
A lon-ign correspondent writing in
description of the affected districts
pays: "Kvery semUlance of mass
plants and roots has disappeared, and
Ktarving pan-nis are eating their chil
dren. 1 know this to be true, and
have myself found human llcsh on
Kale."
Three Months In Famine's Grip.
The district involved In the famine
In known us "Kianpoh." meaning
"north of the river," the stream being
the Yiur-'tse. For mere than three
months this region in northern China
has been in the remorseless grasp of
famine and famine bred diser.se. Forty
days of rain and consequent Moods
lica pert cnlamlly upon the 40,niii)
Bipiare miles of territory and its 1,",
000, DIM) of people. Ilefoi'e new crops
can be raised it Is estimated that,
deHnito the best efforts for relief, the
leu th list will exceed that of Naples,
San Francisco and Jamuica rolb d into
tine.
Writing after a tour tlirouch one of
the famine (amps of ::n.n0 starving
refai'.ees. a correspondent said recently-
'Little more than an hour ioro I
saw two women, presumably mother
nnd grandmother, wailing over tho
tiny collin of a child that had been
jiait of grim famine's daily toil.
"It is nil so horrible, so overpower-
lnp, so haunting, so lieaitrending, that j
one cannot write of il In oid'-rly fash- i
l., Il seems l if otllv the rel" a I I'll I
cry of 'Help! Help! Help:1 can be
fashioned for the ears of the prosper-
ous American people, to whom Cod
lias given a year of plenty, while the
ryior of China perish from want.
"Out of the awful mass of suffering
a succession of individual pictured
conies trooping before my vision.
There whs the man, too weak to stand
erect, who bore on his back, as oldeT
brothers carry babies in China, his
blind old mother, the mere skin an
bone framework of a woman. They
wanted help, nnd pleaded for it in the
thin whine of the utterly miserable
ud I dared not give them so much as
copper!
The Motner' Suffering.
Or that uiclUa. Lard-eyed and
rigid, who stood against a wall with
her six children gathered nhout her
tattered skirts, staring out uncaring on
a company of living refugees, who are
a more melancholy sight than the
thousands of ancient proves among
which they are encamped. They had
been feil one portion of thin, watery
rice porridge for them all and now
they must wait In the cold for another
.1 linurs to pass before they can bo
fed again and even then some
stronger ones may push them asldo
and steal their turn at the meager re
lief. "Strange incongruities flash Into
one's mind as he walks about among
these 30,11110 refugees. As I passed
this morning an old, old woman, cov
ered only by a few rags, who sat on
the cold, bare ground, sharing her
small bowl of rice with a babe of II or
IS mon'hs. evidently her grandchild,
who sat on her knees, I thought of
some grandmother whom I know In
America sweet faced anil comfortable
and kindly, whose evening of life Is
made pleasant by the love of children
ami grandchildren, and who know not
the word want. And I recalled some
baby friends sweet, ruddy little dears,
wrapped in the finest linen, with ward
robes upon which love has lavished
Its generosity, and whose food is a
matter of careful consultation with
physicians and friends.
"Of course, I cannot imagine these
delicately nutured babes In dirty tat
ters and exposed to the cold winter
night and day, week after week, yet
so: lehow one picture suggests the
other, .lust so, when a refugee mother
accost ei us Ibis morning and asked us
to accept her child as u gift, imagina
tion brought instantly to view the pre
clousness of the American children i
know.
Suffering Unparalleled.
"Incidents could be piled upon Inci
dents; every one of these oO.IWO refu
gees incarnates a story a story oi a
homo abandoned, of toilsome Journeys
to ibis southern district In the hope of
finding a pittance of food to all iv that
awful gnawing of hunger; of the
eager hunt for a sheltered nook in a
doorway; of being driven from spot to
spot, until at last a few feet of bare
earth are secured out among tho
graves with the other refugees a
space no IrtgipT than, a Chinese grave
suffices for an entire Chinese family;
of the daily nnd nightly huddling to
gether In one mass for the sake of hu
man warmth; of the search for dry
gra. s with which to make a tiny fire;
of the morning struggle for a portion
of the government rice and of that in
describable, terrible, primitive, duel
between life and starvation which the
Chinese so dnuntlcssly endure.
"in all this, 1 write of the best, and
not of the worst. This is only the first
outpost of tho famine district.
Always Close to Starvation.
"The Chinese live closer to actual
rrlrvatlon than It Is possible for a
westerner to comprehend; they are al
ways poor. So the failure of the crops
not to mention the destruction of
their homes by Hood at once placed
them In a state of actual destitution,
which can only be relieved when the
wheat crop' is harvested la July.
Meanwhile, owing to lari; of seed, only
half of the spring wheat crop has been
planted."
The cargo of food which the Chris
tian Hi raid sent over to the stricken
district in China cost $U"i.Oeo, and
this sum was rulsud by popular sub
scription, lis arrival In China Is expected to
do much for the sufferers, but more
food will have to follow at once. Con
ditions have grown steadily worse, and
plague has broken out In one or two
of the provinces. The sufferers are
huddled together In thousands In the
camps,
j Millions Face Death,
in Russia tho conditions are little
less appalling. For the first tiieo In
il.e history of such catastrophes in
Russia the government itoi if is aroused
to the necessity for relieving the
stress. The famine affects no less
than .".(i.ooo.uoij peasants inhabiting an
area half as large as tho United
Slates, and while thl3 area lies be
tween tlm steppes and "White Rus
sia," tin) famine Is affecting indirectly
the people within the "pale" who de
pend upon tho peasants for trade and
commerce.
Tho peasantry represents
cent, of the entire population
85 0
TITeTr
one means of livelihood 13 farminn,
and when the rain did not come to
GMS5P
make their crops grow the past Reason
their only hope of sustenance was
gone.
Last year In more than l.r.00,000
square miles of Russian territory there
was sowing but no reaping. The peas
ants hopefully put their little store ot
seed grain into tho ground. When the
arid land failed to return a crop, not
only were they robbed of the fruits of
their toll, but their seed grain itself,
which might have served as food, was
gone. There wns nowhere to turn for
work or succor. Hundreds of miles
away there were cities, but tho few
daring ones who' reached them pent
back tho hopeless words: "No work.'
Wholesale "Grafting."
In 1S91, when the famine killed hun
dreds, tho Russian government hit
upon the expedient of forbidding tho
word "hunger," but the famine of the
present is so much greater that the
government Is fully alive to it. He
sides having appropriated $33,000,000
already, it is now negotiating a loan
of $37,000,000 more for famine relief.
Hut even this sum is totally inadequate
to the work In hand, especially as half
of the money will line the pockets of
official grafters to whom tho deaths of
thousands of poor peasants is merely
an unfortunate Incident in their own
bhort cut to wealth.
At present the relief work in Russia
consists of doling out a pound of bread
a day to sufferers. The aged and
minors get nothing.
Some families of five or six have
pi i haps two who draw bread. Other
families have none. If two of a fam
ily of six draw bread and divide it
equally it. means that each member
eats one-thin! of a pound a day. The
regular diet of a Russian peasant is
live pounds of bread dally. ' Thus the
most fortunate are now existing upon
one-fifteenth of their regular fare, or,
to an American who has three square
meals a dot; two meals in three
weeks.
The very seeds of the weeds have
been eaten and the ground has been
stripped of every green thing. The lit
tle horses have all been sold or eaten,
and tlio occasional cows, too. Nothing
remains but the hope of relief from
the outside. There is no wood for
fires and many families have Joined
together In one house for warmth,
tearing tho other dwellings down for
fuel.'
It Is estimated that !n the province
of Samara alone there will bo 200,000
deaths in a total population of 3,000.
():)0, and others of the 21 provinces af
fected will have like averages.
Seek Aid of the World.
Iietermlned efforts are now being
made to enlist the sympathy of the
world with the suffering, Ignorant
peasant.;, ana emissaries nave oeen . attend religious services It is inter
sent to this and other countries. M. j ,..stln.r to , that there Is one church
Shiskoff, who is In America to enlist
aid, says that $3 will save the life of
an adult and that $5 will keep a child
from dying.
The immigrants to Hoston from Rus
sia aro mostly peoplu from the "pale"
and they are taxed several times a
yeiir to help their persecuted friends
and relatives at home. It is estimated
that delegates from Russia took not
less than $5,000 out ot Hoston last
year to help tlio victims of persecu
tion; and probably $0,000 more was
sent acrous tho sea to individuals,
either to relievo suffering or to help
tin m to emigrate.
To the Russian Jews in this city the
famine tragedy now enacting is the
climax of misery long drown out They
will do what they can, but as one of
the men at the civic service house on
alem street said the other day:
"Where our people can get more
money to send to Russia is a puzzle;
they have drained their purses time
end time again; and now it remains
for all tho charitable In general over
here to do their share."
The famine means a tremendous set
back to Russia. At present the prob
lem is how to obtain food. Later will
come the question of the future of
provinces whose people have lost
farms, animals and savings and have
no money. Friends of Russia, how
ever, see promise of better times
ahead, although this necessarily in
volves a vast amount of work. The
hope of the peasant In the famine area
lies in his education In modern farm
ing methods to take the place of the
thousand-year-old customs which he
still follows and In the installation of
great systems of irrigation so that
crops may he grown ven when Ui
rain fails.'
Round About
Gossip of People and Things
in the Great Metropolis
RYAN TO RAISE PEANUTS
IN HIS CONGO DISTRICT
NKW
Ilya
YORK. When Thomas F.
Ilynn Interests himself in any en
terprise ho Is more than likely to got
everything out of it that can be made
to yield a profit. When he acquired
tho 70,000 acres In the Congo district
it wns generally supposed that ho
would be satisfied with the gold, cop
per and rubber in sight there. Hut
Mr. Ryan, as a Virginian, knows the
potentiality of rich soli, and as there
would be many thousands of Idle
acres in the Congo principality which
he had acquired, and as this idle land
would not yield any of the three great
crops from which the greater part of
his profit was supposed to come, he
determined to put It to practical use.
Virginia is a great peanut state.
The soil conditions in Mr. Ryan's
Congo domain are peculiarly well fit
ted for peanut culture. The best-paying
grade of peanuts that come from
the Virginia market are the so-called
Jumbo variety, a large, rich nut.
abounding in oil and general all
around nutrition.
Mr. Ryan la going to raise Jumbo
peanuts in his mid-African property.
These Jumbo peanuts will bring a big
price In this market and will be In
strumental in breaking many a corner
as now engineered by the shelters In
Mi Ryan's own state. Men with all
technical agricultural knowledge of
OUXIUXO out a romance that has
as side issues a shock for Pitts
burg society, thrills for Xew York and
Paris, a bearing on the destiny of
the world's biggest industrial concern
nnd general Interest for men and
women the globe over, William Kills
Corey noon will take to S0;J Fifth av
enue as his brkltv Miss Mabcllc Gil
man, the actress and singer.
Corey was reelected president of
the 1'nited States Steel Corporation,
largely through his own ability and
the Influence of H. C. Frick. His re
tention in that position at his record
salary of $100,000 a year is consld
eied to he sufficient vindication of his
usefulness to the company and of tho
fact that his standing as a business
man had not been affected by his do
mestic troubles.
Hut it is said to be possible that
even that large salary will bo in
creased heavily and that Corey may
go down in history as the most highly
paid corporation officer In tho world.
At any rate, the steel man's plans
ONE CHURCH IN GOTHAM
THAT IS ALWAYS FILLED
IN view of tho appeal of a delegation
of New York clergymen to. Presi
dent Roosevelt to aid them in induc
ing the people of the metropolis to
in New York that is not troubled by
the problem of filling its pews, per
haps for the reason that it Is an alto
gether new church, h.t.ed upon the
doctrine of the brotherhood and In
terdependence of man, and uniting
i:'.l creeds while advocating none.
The "People's Church," as it is
called, flourishes in tho midst of the
Fast side population, under the ans
flees of the People's Institute. Its
meetings are held during 25 or 30
weeks of the year in the largo hall
of Cooper Fnion, and not infrequently
the nttendance Is 2,000 or more.
In this unique church the personal
GF.N. HINCIIAM has completed tho
organization of a corps of secret
police, a squad as faithful nnd watch
ful as the secret police of the czar of
Russia. Not a move can be made by
any member of the police force of
Greater New York but will be re
ported to tho commissioner.
Kvery member is under the eye of
tills secret force, nnd tho commission
er now knows moro about the Inside
workings of the department than he
ever dreamed of before.
This Is the first time in tho history
of America that the head of n police
depurtnietit has found it necessary to
it sort to a system of spies. The new
foi co has been recruited from other
largo cities, mid not cue of them in
U;iGva to the kciular members of the
jp3
New York
CmCQ PtWHUT MBW
(he matter have been sent to the
Congo.
Probably the most used peanut Is
what Is called the Spanish, an off
shoot of what used to bo exclusively
grown In Spain. This Is the little
round peanut so much used for salt
ing. In Virginia a greater part of
the crop grown there is called Span
ish Xo. 1.
When the crop Is short In Virginia
the original Spanish is imported from
Sptln, but, in fact. It Is grown in
northern Africa. The conditions of
the Virginia soil make It superior for
this nut over any other section in
the world except the Congo district.
The Jumbo variety brings the high
est price, however, and nuturally It
was that variety that Mr. Ryan select
ed for his crop. He will later grow
the Spanish peanut, which, although
cheaper, has a greater salo than the
Jumbo. Hut Mr. Ryan's advisers,
knowing that the Jumbo would have
the greater sale If the price were
lower, have advised him to try that
grade first. And that Is the grade
that Mr. Ryan will grow In the Congo
district, and from the proceeds
thereof he hopes to be able to pay no
Inconsiderable part of the expenses of
the working of his rubber plantations,
gold mines nnd copper enterprises. It
Is said that Mr. Ryan will go to the
Congo before very long.
COREY RENTS HOUSE AND
WILL SOON WED ACTRESS
show he is resolved on asserting him
self not only in business but in so
ciety. He has leased tho Fifth av
enue house from Mrs. James E. Mar
tin, who is going abroad for a year.
It is not the most pretentious build
ing In "millionaires' row," but It is
the host dwelling Corey can get in
Xew York in the wealthy district and
the fact that ho has leased it only
for 12 months is taken as an indica
tion that he will provide a more elab
orate home for his bride by the time
they are ready to make their first at
tack on the inner fortifications of
metropolitan society.
Tho present plan Is that Miss Gil
man shall be married to Corey In
Paris. Cable dispatches of recent
days have told of extensive purchases
made by her in the bazaars and jew
elry stores of tho French capital's
most fashionable district and the do
mestic wires have quoted her rela
tives as saying they would cross the
ocean to see her become Corey's
bride.
views of the speaker upon controver
sial religious questions are nover
sought to be impressed, not only for
the reason that the rules forbid any
attempt at proselyting or any attack
of creed upon creed, but because tho
audienco enjoys the unique privilege
of answering back; nnd the clergyman
who speaks for the first time from
the Cooper I'nlon platform faces the
novelty of having crude thought or
inapt statements challenged, and per
haps refuted, by his hearers.
According to the statement of Prof.
ChurlcB Sprnguo Smith, founder and
director of the institute, an occasional
roll call of the audience by "Isms"
diseioses "philosophical anarchists,
noclalists of every phase, single tax
ers and adherents of every creed un
der the sun aa well as adherents of
no creed ot all."
SQUAD OF SPIES TRAIL
rOUCE FORCE OF CITY
New York force. Several largo pri
vate detective ugeneieM were called
upon to furnish members of the force,
and only tho best trained plain
clothes men have been accepted.
Just how long this force of secret
police has been nt work no ono knows
excep't the commissioner and tho men
themselves. The regular members of
the force, captains and inspectors,
know they are being watched, and
they have sent men out on the trail,
but they have not yet been able to
trace one member of the new force
It was declared that the recent raid
upon the headquarters of tho Polleo
nicn's Benevolent association In which
ShJ.OOD In cash win uncovered, was
the result of Information gathered by
one ul Inn members of tho new force
Tells a Story of Awful Suffering and
Wonderful Relief.
Mrs. J. D. Johnson, of 603 Weil
Hickman St, Columbia, Mo., says:
"Following aa operation two yean
ago, dropsy set In,
and my left side was
to swollen the doctor
aid he would have to
tap out the water.
There was constant
pain and a gurgling
sensation around my
heart, and I could not
raise my arm above
my head. The kid
ney action was disor
dered and passages ot the secretions
too frequent. On the advice of my
husband I began using Doan's Kidney
Pills. Since using two boxes my trou
ble has not reappeared. This Is won
derful, after suffering two years."
Sold by all dealers. E0 cents a box.
Foster-MUburn Co., Buffalo, N. Y.
Great Stunt by Geronlme.
In a single day Oeronlmo, when In
tls prime, ran 40 miles on foot, rode
600 miles on one stretch, as fast as
he could change horses, and so com
pletely wore out the column whlcb
finally captured him that three seta
of officers were needed to finish the
chase, and not more than one-third
of the troopers who started were In
at the finish, says a writer In Outing.
Wrinkled and crafty and cruel la
his swarthy face to-day, but the fire
of his infernal energy has died and
he Is no more than a relic of the
Geronimo of whom Oen. Miles said
after their first meeting:
"He rode into our camp and dis
mounted, a prisoner. He was one ol
the brightest, most resolute, deter
mined men I ever met, with the
sharpest, clearest dark eye. Every
movement showed power and en
ergy." Sheer white goods, In fact, any fine
wash goods when new, owe much o)
their attractiveness to the way the?
are laundered, this being done in
manner to enhance their textile beau
ty. ' Home laundering would be equal
ly satisfactory If proper attention wai
given to starching, the first essential
being good Starch, which has sufficient
strength to stiffen, without thickening
the goods. Try Defiance Starch and
you will be pleasantly surprised at tht
improved app?aranca of your work.
Cueen's Most Prtzed Decoration.
One of the decorations ot which tht
Cueen of Portugal Is proudest is the
medal of the Hritish Humane society,
which she was asked to accept after
she had leaped into the harbor at
Lisbon and saved a drowning man.
On all great occasions this decoration
Is to be seen pinned on her dress. Het
majesty, who Is a sister of the Duch
ess d'Aosta, recently visiting us, II
another special favorite of tbo royal
family, and, like her sister, was born
at York House, Twickenham. Queen
Amelia was one of the very first wo
men to qualify herself as an M. D.
She laughingly tells her friends thai
her most trying patient Is King Car
los, whom for years she has tried to
diet for "too solid flesh." Tit-Hits.
Australians Will Go Back.
Australia has arranged for the re
patrlation of 1.000 discouraged Aut
trallans now In South Africa.
The Evolution of
Household Remedies.
The modern patent medicine Dusi
ness is the natural outgrowth of ttt
old-time household remedies.
In the early history of this country,
EVERY FAMILY HAD ITS HOME
MADE MEDICINES. Herb teas,
bitters, laxatives and tonics, were to bt
found in almost every house, compound
ed by the housewife, sometimes assisted
by the apothecary or the family doctor
Such remedies as picra, which wat
aloes and quassia, dissolved in appli
brandy. Sometimes a hop tonic, madi
of whiskey, hops and bitter barks. A
score or more of popular, home-mad4
remedies were thus compounded, tht
formulae for which were passed along
from house to house, sometimes written,
sometimes verbally communicated.
The patent medicine business is a
natural outgrowth from this whole
some, old-time custom. In the begin
ning, some enterprising doctor, im
pressed by the usefulness of one ol
these home-made remedies, would take
it up, improve it in many ways, manu
facture it on a large scale, advertise it
mainly through almanacs for the home,
and thus it would become used over a
large area. LATTERLY THE HOUSE
HOLD REMEDY BUSINESS TOOK
A MORE EXACT AND SCIENTIFIC
FORM.
Peruna was originally one of these
old-time remedies. It was used by the
Mennonites, of Pennsylvania, before it
was offered to the public for sale. Dr.
Hartman, THE ORIGINAL COM
POUNDER OF PERUNA, is of Men
nonite origin. First, be prescribed it
for his neighbors and bis patients.
The sale of it increased, and at last he
established a manufactory and fur
nished it to the general drug trade.
Peruna Is useful in a great many
climatic ailments, such as coughs, colds,
sore throat, bronchitis, and catarrhal
diseases generally. THOUSANDS OF
FAMILIES HAVE LEARNED THE
USE OF PERUNA and its value In the
treatment of these ailments. They
have learned to trust and believe in
Dr. Hartman's judgment, and to rely
on his remedy, Peruna.

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