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The Nashville daily union. [volume] (Nashville, Tenn.) 1862-1866, January 14, 1863, Image 1

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MA a TTTTT TT.7T .. TT ,1173
VOL I.
NASHVILLE; TENNESSEE, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 11, 1803.
NO 230
B. B. CONNOR & BItO.,
oto.tiisnio nt:Hvu.NT,
NO. WULVIK KTRF.FT
vv Mtocic Jut received and for al
low to clone out Conatziiiaents.
200
Bbl. Plt,t' sale by
p 8
CONNOR A BHU
100
imuwi rAlr, for bk'' by
ap
CON NUB k Ul'.o.
r; t Colle KOI'E, for aale bv
ap 8
40
bb'.a. Coal Oil., tor aale by
apS
CONNOR BRO.
CONNOR BP.O
1 f blf bbls. Cofcl Oil., for uh by
150
CONNOR BKO.
doion H ROOMS', for le by
p t
Connor n::o.
' Kf boxeaSM!', forsl by
t)W npS
CONNOR BRO.
. box HTARCH, for by
ap 8
CONNOR BRO.
12
obeaUiTlEA.foi Mle by
ap S
CONNOR BRO
1 0 kilt oheeU TEA, Tor tale by
1-5 apS
12
CONNOR A BRO.
oadlta TKA, f'ir Mi by
ap (t
CONNOR A BRO.
io
20
born-i Yeaal POWDKRa.for r
p
"eaaki SODA, for sale by
ap 8
CONNOR BRO.
CONNOR BRO.
1O0
;7sMAT0U'fr",eCNORBRO.
25 1 8'' C1Lta-fOrW!NS0RBRQ
05 COKFKE, tor ! by 4 CO.
DIRECTORY,
CITY OOVERNMENT.
JOHN IJUOn SMITH, AUj,.r.
WIUtAM SHANE, n-cvd-..
JOHN CliUMBI.KY, HartKal.
!-,'' tTanhaUW. II. WllklaSou, A. C. T irk-r,
end James A. f tei'le.
ttei-J o(fc Mark John Cbumbley. -''', 1r-t;
Jacob .'roih, scoud j and Thoa. McCarty . ibird.
7our Aeeenr William trtvr.
Bevrnus ColltetorA. f. Sbaul-.Und
Bler Tj Cfc((r K. B. iarnlt
7VomrfT R. Ilnry.
HW Hater Thimas Iyk.
fp-iiiKnl 0 Ihs Workflow f. Q. rdd.
Super inwiT 0 A Water Work Wm. StfWHi t.
Chi' 0 ths V Jp-rmei John M. Seebory.
Sacoh of If Oeinrtery T. U. MrrVMi.
( Ottiht . J. L. Hltwurt
CWy iltforvy . F. Mullay.
ushvitic -Union.
Tuhlili by an Aixi'th'rn of Printer.
Off Ira on Irintcr Alley, boturcn
. I'nlon and isearterlrk M recta.
WKDVFSDAY M UN I NO. JAN 14' li;:t.
CITY COUNCIL
Boanl of Al'trrmmr M. M. Firten, prenldent ; John
Carper, Jos. J. Hobb, Kl Mulloy, H. o. Scowl, W. 8.
Cheatham, M. U. L. Claiborne, and J. C Smith.
Uomrno Council Audow Amlrion,Prildant; Jal.
Turner. William Holrla. G. II. 8outb rata, Abrabam
Myri, Alfi. 0Pbbi1, I B. Hough, cnanea oayera,
bil. Vl.NfcUAR, I' r by
1 A
t klta SALMON, f r aula by
CONNOR A BRO.
apS
(XJNNOB RRO-
"klU M AtKUU'.L.for ' by
rt 1 1
yi'-k apt
r kiu'lltk'klNO, for aale by
1) ipD
il kibt IIAI),ffr aale by
Z apH
I 0NN BRO.
CONNOR BRO.
CONNOR URO.
19
blila. TK'jLT, lr alc by
up 8
CONNOR RRO.
Sword Presentation.
Tbo Olllcers and Soldiers of tho 3rd
East Tonnessoe Infacrjr, having deter
mined to present their Colonel, L. C.
lIouK,Vith a beautiful and coitly Sword,
on Friday, the 9th, at dress parade, Capt
James A. Doughti-, of 1st East Teuoes
see, on behalf of tbo regiment, inadd tLe
presentation, with tho following remarks
Col. L. C. ITottk:--! hare the honor
and the high privilege, on behalf of the
regiment which you havo the honor to
command, or presenting for your accep
tance a small gut, as a token of esteem
3. b. Kniwim, w. a. McCi'iiaod, t. J. Yarbrnurb, I and a memento or the uiitq regard in
Wm. iriver, Wni. Biowarl. in j. CTcauy, niu. uuajr i ,k,. inn in hnlrl mmm.nH
. , ..... I TTUVU T V" w. . J I V V. k UllllUUIlU
uunuLciaiuiy. Itm:. . U!lT :n
lis ,i preseut ttuicu juu win more
Finance Knowloa, icOTeI and Brlea.
Waltr H'orto .Vildrioa, Smith and Clalboroa
MrteltHM. Tumor, Myerg, Mulloy, Cbratbam,
Yarbrouf(h, urcady and llviiy.
H W Turner, Carper and McClelland.
tchool Choathum, Mulloy and Knowl.
f'ir DpnrtnttitSyar, .Htowurt and MuClaMnnd
ttu I'rlver.Cready and Hyera.
VtmeOrt) t'mlth, fttnborn and Stewart.
Market lloute Yarbrough, Roborta and Carper.
Mane M'liloy, MoOanlol and 8tcwrt.
folk itbrn, Brlen and Hnyer.
flpn'nyn C'roaily, Cluilxirne and Myora.
H'rloM Hnyi-rt, Robb and Mol'u el.
mm-ortiin ami Expenditure M'CI.lland
and ton born.
tnl'lie iVorl;; Robb, t-tewart aud rtrlrer.
PM Jloute 0rpr, Soiitlmata and Ilailey.
tftr Trie Board ot Ald.rnion nmata tbe Tueta-
Dcsi p'rrpilintt Uie ei ond aud Gmrih Tbiirsdsyt tn
th ninth, iid Ibe Common Oounril tub oud
and (onrtb lh'indaya in each month
the inhabitants of every nation under
Heaven ghall be permitted to recline In
its shade in (he full enjoyment of that
freedom known only to tho Constitution
of the United States, and the benign in
etitutions of our glorious Union. And
it is my prayer to the die at 1,'iiler of the
Nations that, when the sun shall go down
for tbe last tunc, its golden rays may
fall back upon us a rc-unncd people,
happf in the citadel of a restored Union;
and flat, when we hall have ended our
labors upon earth, we may be permitted
to carry with us to tho society of
founders of this mighty Kepublic, in the
celestial courts of the great Union above,
the glorious flag of freedom, and lay it
at the feet of the patriots of the Involu
tion as a last and true witness of man s
capacity to govern himself. I- end, as I
began, without an attempt to express th
gratitud and prfde of lny heart in re
ceiving this present,
bhia. CKiiW, tnr tale ey
LV ap
1 h.X'' 'In
10 P
p 8
CONNOR A BRO.
I "uSrtfN''. fr lo by
CONNOR A BKJ.
Brkn
16
SO
NA li.t, ri.rMMlr by
up H
CONNOR no.'
bb. r.hci for $SNoll-A BKO
Hp o . i i -
50
1 ifx " MKAl , tir a.ilf by
up
(Xinkor nr.o.
bbi rU'l'K. for iwle by
til 11 I ccnsor nr.o
t v r " '
pp ft
fi. r?i. i"" ! by
ap 8
;i.nNii BitJ.
CONNOR 4 URO.
..20
20;
201)
' Q W-l.;'.non eKW. lor le by RR0
Dliic "linn 1MTATOKX, br as la by
,.IlS CONNOR X BRO.
f-V-v'.i........ '.n......,i h ams, with a Inrne lot ol all
I I ,.i c.i. lu.th n will oloau out low. at
-r M atand, No. XZvKKm BRO.
Charles H. Green,
AliKNT FOB THK
-cQiunioR oi'xuiys
A3AINST THK
TJ. S. GOVERNMENT.
DSico, Na 33, Cherry Street,
(CI 8IAIi)
. uly 20 tf.
NIGHT POLICE
tVijtfum J"bn Banth.
Urii LiriUrtumt Andrew jy,:f.
eeeond I.ieulntant Jolm H. Il.viJ.
HitirfnMi Win. J.koii. .Kilin Cuvtvior. Nii'h l
rt,Joel I'lul'ipa, Win. Biker, .) Cntnll, Wlll'nin
i.vi. John Koulaa. J. W. WriulU. John I'uoketl,
Hohert tx)tt, W.C. KranciH, liid VtH, Cliaa. llii-
liU and W. Itonliy..
r Tbo PoJioe Court lsopi'n.xl evry niortlun at
nine o'lltick
Ct)UNTY OFFICKUS.
highly prize, under present sun oundings,
than anything of its intrinsic value they
could bestow. lis a sword a weapon
of offence an emblem of power and au
thority an insignia of war and an em
blem of triumph. I his gift shows how
our command appreciate your bearing
as a champion who well deserves tbe
honor dono you in thus presenting to you
the figure of power and of might, liar
ing seen and suffered with you when the
tide of war seemed overwhelming; they
knsw how you demeaned yourself as a
hero should do in times which try men
Houls. Take this sword, sir, in the spirit
in which it is tendered, and may you
live to wield it in the service of our com
mon country, until every armed foe shall
have been driven from the land, and
never sheath it until tbe bydra-headed
monster, beeessiou, shall have been driven
o'er the rampartsand embattlements of
oblivion, never to appear again. May
you be able to wield it until peace and
prosperity shall again return to our once
happy, but now ritted, torn and bleeding
country. M yu live to honor it in
war and take it homo to tho bowers of
peace, and there cherish it as you would
the heart s most choice bleeding. It is
the gift of full, swelling, and oveillowing
hearts, in honor of your bold intrepidity
your daring prowess and chivalry.
Thug
To which Col. llouk replied: -A
Sir : With a heartfelt gTatitude, impos
sible to express, and to convey the least
conception of which would bankrupt the
most pliant language in tbe world, I
cheerfully accept the beautiful sword
you now present me, in behalf of the offi
cers and men or my command.
I am the more proud of this beautiful
present because I am constrained tobelieve
that, overlooking those faults common in
some degree to all mankind, those who
conceived the thought or thus honoring
me, were animated alone by the desire of
.-Th J,!.!,.' Can me t tin urat Mon.iy in expressing ineir appreciation oune man-
each month, aud tho guartoriy court, oouiptwd of 1 ner jn which I have seen proper to ad
minister discipline, and execute orders,
,t,rr,J .Uuii.-a M. Hinton.
iu auu.l. K. IM. Iiaihu.
Hiyitler rbiui aa Garri'U
IVthIw W. Jaipur Tyl.r
Onxmrr N II li l. tw.
Vimjf John Corbitt.
Hnettu Collector W. p. Rnt irtM-v
Uailroa.l Tax OolletUm J. O. BriU y
Onutablf for tits f.Wiri DiitnH Inhu I'. Cnww
and J. K. Newmitu.
COUNTY COURT.
jwtWxa, James Wbltworth
Clerk 1'. Uiiiialey Nichol.
the Mnmraitol County, la b.d tbo !lr Mon
day tu Janutry, April, July an't stfr.
V
a
r-
jovernment Claim3.
ANDREW McCLAm
ril,t, 01VK UtOMPT ATTENTION TO THK
I collw lion of cUiiua or ev.Ty kind aK'niunt the
atuiiu ut of the Culled BUies tutiiull lo bin
OFFICE ON UNION STREET,
lx, u C(.l'.n and f tirrry tr-t, (upatairH) oral
" ork'a Book ijiore, Naii lLt a, TnKaaaaaa-
F, 1? t K li Kfl C Kf.
funy Kilward H. Et,S.unucl K.IUr.
11. llnrrwii, A. J. imiiuju.
.n ixmaiii Hon. J'T.l in M' kH.
I ,)lb -1 ol. W. H. Ktomv.
M 1 r,r. nmiiiu Robert C:l, Uwirga i. HtublrBi-ld
I Kits wlir-William Iioi-wn.
IVtknfurtl eounlu tdard tu. J uilun, Wl It
lll'. lU J
.2'
I
I .(;W atiBa' William II. Winner.
i Tilmlilu
:ikull rotiM.'u Ahlior Mt!.l.
,a con hi if II Uie IVyton, Thoni
.L..... .auuf. llavi.l Mit'ithrrd.
, )..wd lloU. T. A. II Nr:on. Hon. Bberi
.junrji eiplU-U
qirUrr-isMcrs' i'ttlifif.itis
I r i m ii a fi i:n n v
JTICE, j. 33 Cherry St., (TJp Stairi.)
i )
i . I J S J. . I'llll I'l u
1
tAl.'AN PITSFSELD,
' JCo. 15, Do.iclorick Street,
V l; l
t r
j i-cv.iviMi I'.Mi.Y, oVsu:i;i, imi:,
',
N .i-v i. . i
1 t '' v
t f i i'
i .ii i
I V I.
- , ttli I I ..ili'lol i a
v il i a is u 1 lit'. ' I-;
. no; U.' H i'i .'i
!y 1 . mi ri.iti,,, aiiL
I u 1 1 . i a lli V' 'if ti' it i..lu.
CIRCUIT COUHT.
Cisrk lhvid C. I.oTe.
rTt" Court mi.-.'U ihe Urt Mou'lay lu Mr;h
and rVpteinber.
CRIMINAL COURT.
jml,j,Hu. Willbim K. Tnrn.T
drrk Charles K. DigKOUa.
-Tbe Court ineola the firtl Monday ill April An-
iiai uud Ueceinber.
CHANCERY COURT.
tl.n'(.ii H n. .aoei,-l r rnen
tW o-l W..Vr-J K. ;tr-a.
t,m The Com l nieeu the iliat VI m lay In My un.l
Noveiiih.-r.
MILITARY.
DEPARTMENT HEADQUARTER8.
n. j,(.,i.l-,Haid.iuart..t --f. .fr.'et. Maa.
sunviui., iviulUHBOIIl,,'.
t'ki'f Quartmmuter HeaiUiiiarleri on HIkIi trwt,
near Cilur. i.icui. ioi. juu. it.j.l.i.
Chief ( Wou'mii ' f Ildiilipiai terH onr,uiniii' rtr''i.t1
near llroad. Uut. Col. b. Miiuuona.
J'i'orwat Miirilotl Cmmtl IIi-iiddiiartiTH on lli;U
Htiett (apt. V. til. Wiled.
tMicnl IKreilor Hradiniirli'm C"rmr Huh and
I hup h olri'fta. Miryoou 11. Murray.
POST HEADQUARTERS.
J1,..- Hrail'iHirtcn on Colhue alrei t, lu 'tween I'm
U.i. audl'liun b etreeta, (I'r aU -ra' re"al 'uee ) l.eu.
It. It. il itclo II, Couuu iieinu.
A .'.o. gu.irrriutii. I'i.lnir luf iiu l lu-pfi (ii g
oun r. on i i i i y i-!io t, ti lut eu i Intr' li -ui'l llivud.
I apt J. ;. 'i.'li'le r.
A .' "" .' 1 1' ' ' "Tiir-a of T; ani'.irii
li. iii, eu i'l" iij -1't I, '" I a ivu I Hi"" Hint C'nirrti.
I H I. J. I'. li.:irl.i.iu.
A ...; hW u l.n.in.ii i-lu 1 1, .i v .'I'l In! M i.n, op
iiinl I. a i n"u k iuip v,! , N". 17 M .rka-t air I. Capt.
i li'M. .1 t
,t.i.a'' .tiiiiHm.i...i li liii',: of yi'Mia i-f
TlauM" l ' ill'"' ana IJ.ial li..; Iu-..ti I a' r l"i ' "' I heriy
el iv li I" .11 ' Ha;. He. I'i ul. I ha. 11. Ini'i. '
.l..f'.i.f i,ii...'- ..M- Iii vh.r!.-e if lu.1,' F..r mre
Hiil M t-aoij. ; o,- "U' k ;'" t. L-ait Wia.
bi-.U.
.lt-i-tnt -Jo rr.'. . . 1'i.r S'a" A-i Jli In lit if
Oa'.-.rt t ;a. i " : ai.-t laaau i W-J Mci.w.
Uipi. C li.fuai;.iK
in my command.
It has long been a source of infinite
pleasure to me that the officers and men
of the .jd regiment of loyal hast ieu-
nesseeans, have always been ready to
second any effort of ray own to promote
our common interests, as soldiers lighting
in defence of an invaluable country, and
the most cherished institutions ever de
vised for llie enjoyment of man.
1 have otten had occasion to express
my satisfaction, that, whilo in some regi
inents the uMnost harmony did not at ail
times prevail, in tho one 1 have the honor
to command, the most pci lcct good feel
ing and social friendship has ever existed
among all grades, and between every
rank.
My health has long been ftich that
neither tou nor I could tell when I
would be forced to sever my ollicial con
nection with you.
NVhen I have contemplated such con
tingency, it Las been with emut'ous
which I iinaghi ' hie" near akin to those
experienced by Moses when he bid adieu
to the children of Israel, whom he had
lead forty years, and started op the
mountain on which he had to d.
In accepting this sword, you will per
mit mo to say, that I hope, always to
draw it through, patriotic motives, and
never ahcath it in disgrace !
And, looking tu the character of those
who have honored me with this presen
tation, as rellected from tliw Rnuke of
battle at London, lig Hill, lUchniond,
and l'erryville, Ky., I am compelled to
declare, that, if dishonor should ever fall
upon their present, while 1 am leading
1 hem, the blame will bu mine, and the
shame ehimld rest on me alone.
1 have fiii 111 in (Jed, and a eLerislied
hope in my l.eart, that the great l;ee of
Liberty, planted by our fulluis, now
being watered by the blond of the patri- j
oU of the nation, for ti e defence of hieh '
Mumford, the New Orleans
. and Rebel-
Jeff. Davis, moved, doubtless, by that
fellow feeling which makes scoundrels as
well as good men admire each other, and
binds them in eternal friendship, in his
Anti-Batler proclamation of the 23d of
December, says, that "William B. Mum-
Kor.D, a citizen of the Confederacy, was
actually and publicly executed in cold
blood by hanging." Of this fact he de
clares he has indubitable testimony, and
he therefore pronounces Butler felon,
who is to be hung whenever he shall be
captured. In addition to this, Mr. HiCH
ard Yeadon, editor of the Charleston (S.
C.) Courier, publishes tho following ad
vertisement in his paper i
Teh Thousand Dollars Kewaro.
$10,000. President Davis having, pro
claimed Benjamin F. Butler, of Massa
chusetts, to bo a felon, deserving of capi
tal punishment, for the deliberate murdtr
of William B. Mumford, a citizen of the
Confederacy, at Iscw Orleans, and having,
for that and other outrages and atroci
ties, pronounced the said Benjamin F.
Butler an outlaw and common enemy of
mankind, and authorized, in tho event of
bis capture, the officer in command of the
capturing force ro cause him to be imme
diately executed by hanging, the under
signed hereby oilers a reward of ten
thousand dollars ($10,000) for tho cap
lure of the said Benjamin K. Butler, dead
or alive, td any proper Confederate au
thority. Bicuari) Ykahon.
Charleston, Dec. 2'J, 1802. Gt.
It will be noticed that Mr. Yeadon or
ders this bloodthii'st y advertisement to
be inserted six times. In another column
of the same paper we find that Mr. Yea
don s assassiu is ready but he wants
more money, llie comments are the
Courier s.
We find in the Winchester (Tenn.)
Bulletin- the following curious advertise
ment, which we are assured is genuine :
" I understand iO 000 is oilered as a
reward to whoever will kill the beast
Butler, of New Orleans. I accept the
offer, and require $2.",00 f irfeit, to bo
placed in some good hands. When I ac
complish the noble deed, I am to be paid
the reward. My name can be found
when desired by the proper persons."
1 bis is dated " incbester, lenn., .No
vember 2." Shall it go begging?
Nothing proves the great dearth of
materials for the manufacture of heroes
and martyrs in the Confederacy, than
the foolish rant of Davis and Y'eadon
about the execution of a creature who for
years has been the fellow of the Thugs and
brass-nuck ruffians of New Orleans.
His real character and otVnce, and the
dangerous character of the ruffians of
whom he was tho ringleader, are cor
rectly described in the following remarks
made by General Butler, at his reception
in Philadelphia :
You have been pleased to allude to an
act of - Lih executive responsibility,
whkbin the performance of duty, be
came a powerful necessity, and that is
the execution of William B. Mumford.
Applause. Owing to the teiuia in
which the so-called Confederate Govern
ment chose to demand from my (itvern
mcnt au account of that act, it was ren
dered impossible that any explanation or
report ever could be made. Having by
their oll'ensive language cut oil all possi
ble Government communication on the
subject, it was asguiued llir.t some wrong
wa done, and the proclamation which
you have doubtless all seen has been is
sued as a consequence. Perhaps it may
not be indelicate were I for a nu nient to
apeak of that act.
On the 2rUh of Apiil. if I
llie
so, and would not bo interfered with in
that act. Accordingly, on the next morn
ing, the Hag of the United States was
raised over the Mint the property of the
United States. After flying a short time,
a mob, headed by a drunken gambler, in
the presence of the fleet, in broad day
light, tore down the symbol of our na
tionality, that we ali reverence, and
dragged it, with, infamous outrage,
through tho ttreclg, tramping upon it and
fearing it in pieces, after which each went
his way.
j That act, in. its consequences, might
have been most calamitous. Ihe com
mander of the Federal fleet and the army
then coming up the river, had a right to
suppose that the city authorities had
come to the conclusion to renew the con
test, and the evident of thitt renewal
was the hauling down of the Hag. Ihe
commander of the fleet had no means of
knowing that this was done by mob,
and the act might and ought as a military
proposition, to have brought down npon
the city an lastant bombardmcut
But, through the very proper prccau
tiou of Commander Farrago t, but a shot
or two were fired, and no resistance fol
lowing, no special damage was done, it
resulting in the wounding of a single per
son. But, mark you, sir, it was not the
fault of Mumford that New Orleans was
not laid in ashes, and tho women and
children crushed beueath the 'shells of
the Federal licet. We were about taking
other towns and cities on the Mississippi
river. If every drunken rullian, by tear
in, by tearing down our flag, could bring
bombardment on every city along the
Mississippi river, thero was no safety to
tho non-combatants from tho operations
of war, nor in the surrender of places ;
and it was in mercy to the towns that
wn should take hereafter, and their in
habitants, that I felt it necessary to pun
ish, according to the just laws of war,
after a fair trial and full confession of
guilt, Wm. B. Mumford. To save hu
man life, and ameliorate the horrors of
war, it became necessary exemplarily to
punish this crime. I have a right to
say hero that, in no unauthorized man
ner, in the Department of tlx Gulf, has
any other flag of tho nation been taken
from tho place where it has been put bv
loyal hands. Loud applause. And
whether rightfully or wrongfully done,
that act still commends itself to my
judgment. More applause.
And seeing the utter worthlessness of
the man that treason has attempted to
exalt into a patriot, I was inclined to
spare Mumford, but that was not permit
ted to me. Hitt aoauciates, the Thugs,
rough, rowdies, gamblers, assembled in
New Orleans on the night before his ex
edition, and solemnly voted that Mum
ford should not be executed. It then
became a question whether the mob
should rule New Orleans as it bad done
for fifteen years previously, or tho com-
munding General of the United Hlates
forces. Lonir applause. From that
day, however, there has never been any
question on that subject. Laughter and
applause. J
I have been betrajed info saying very
different things from what I intended.
It was my simple purpose to thank you
for the kindness with which you have
sustained mo, and to add my congratu
lations to you and the country for the
avalanche of victories that is now How
inc: upon us. Applause. .1 look upon
the campaign in tho Southwest as now
substantially ended. The dan of the
rebels in that campaign was undoubtedly
to concentrate their forces upon Hose
crstis, and after having routed him, to
fall with greater concentration upon
Grant, and overwhelm him, rclievevicks
burg, and attempt, perhaps, to regaiu
rnew Orleans.
But it is the first step that costs; and
the first blow to conquer Ilosecrans hav
ing failcdP I do not think we will have
anything to fear in the Southwest. 1
think we have net yet sufficiently appre
ciated the services of that brave and no
ble soldier, liosccrans, and what he has
accomplished by the battle of Murfreea
boro'. Applause. If there is any thing
iu the world a man might desire, it is bis
fame, nobly won on the lield of baltle,
even in the face of defeat.
tho civil emigrating party to Cuba is, by
reports, now over 2i,000. Of this num
ber about 7,000 or 8,000 s re ready to '
move for Cuba; and as your Excellency
has told m you had every confidence in
me, and you, tho Hon. JMr. Thompson,
have assured me that the Federal otllcera
of New Orleans and Mobilo would be in
structed to "let me and my emigrant
friends pass." I now very respectfully
request that you place in the hands of
our mutual friends, Mr. C. Gallaway and
- r a sm . . . . .
v. At. campuew, or the "Memphis Avn
htncht,'' your most faithful supporters,
the necessary passports for my bonont,
and the sum of $10,000 secret service
funds for the use and benefit of v
those editors as above in supporting your
cause in acquiring Cuba by civil emigra
tion, and with the use of that amount
they will be enabled earnestly and effec
tually to co-operate with you for the ac
complishment of that great object. Tbe
political position of the "Avalanche," as
a true Democratic Administration paper,
enables that paper to wield the necessa
ry influence in successfully accomplish
ing the acquisition of Cuba before the
termination of the present Administra
tion, and the political aspect now loudly
calls for it.
e
Although this proposition is made to
you without the knowledge of those gen
tlemen, I know from conversations with,
them that their feelings are deeply inter
ested in the success of this great object,
and they are ready to act whenever they
are placed in possession of the means to
do so, and without those means I sm in
clined to believe that they are powerless
to do anything. I shall, therefore, be
pleased to have you place in the hands of
M. C. Gallaway the necessary passports
for me, and place in tho hands of C. M.
Campbell $10,00 for the support of the
Cuban cause. This you can do by
special agent, or by forwarding to me a
check for that amount for their bo tie fit.
I had contemplated leaving here by the
101 li instant, but preparatory arrange
ments will prevent my leaving before the
loth of rovetnber. Iherefm-e, your de
spatches will reach me here, and, while I .
awtit your reply, you will easily appre
ciate my anxiety to hear from as early S
may l your pleasure and convenience.
I Si.vo the honor to lie, your obedient
servant, N. H. KKNKAU.
Hon. J. Iuomi'Son.
Please reply by telegraph, and oblige
your friend,
fornet Hid
. . . . ii e ii..i
uale. llie Oiavur tu .-ew wueaii, .. . , i .,,.,. i tJ ,.:, ,..,
I . . . ' ..III Iv a 3 loutl'x I'ui'ii,:, in.- .i i. '. '""
jwriiing vt inline I I'm oi inn nun. i ii in
Koule, iiilwimed t'oiiiino'l'ue 1'arramil.
that there wa8 im man base enough to
lake down the llj;' ff L'iin'na, which
The National Jtitvlligewtr publishes the
letter below with this introduction:
TfiK FiLincsTfcR Dk.oI'in os Cuba in
185',). The Western papers have given
publicity to another letter which was
found among the confidential correspon
dence of the Hon. Jacob Thompson, late
Secretary of the Interior, upon the reeeii'
occupation of hi residence at Oxford,
Miss., by United States troops. We give
a place to this letter as connected with
the history of thn former deni;us of
Southern politicians upon the Itdnud f
Cuba. In d iin h i. however, we ;ike
ncraxinn to say tliVl, tlioiij-.h the iiaiwuiil
Mr. r.nehaiiati is used in this letter, yet,
a 4 il. ii endnrsed lo Mr. Thompson, tuul
s e
t'niibt whether it ever reai.ted the ln.ii'ts
of the foiioer (,e nt'emaii. Toe wrio r of
the I Mer i now a Colonel in tb" ' I
Liaut. Col. llaresoho.
writer in tho National Intelligencer
pays this officer the fallowing tribute :
In the death of Lieut.-CoI. Garesche.
Chie f of tbe Staff of Maj -Gen. Ilosecrans,
we have lost not only tho services of au
accomplished officer, but the presence nd
influence of a high-toned, earnest, nd
liuiti ah man. In giving himiM If to
lie life he found no occasion or excusn
for giving up privato virtues ;. he retained
always a quick sense of right, a delicate
sensitiveness of harat, a ready sympa
thy with suffering. The arduous duties
and tedious, details of his tiSRcia! labors,
when Assistant Adjutant-General in,
the War Department, never made him
forgetful of urbanity of manner, gentle
ness of speech, and readiness to listen
patiently to any one who rightfully
claimed bis help. I remeiubrir well how
kindly, almost tenderly, ho one day
turned froni his desk and took up the
papers aud the cause ot a poor blind wo
man who came pctioriiDg that her only
sou, a mere boy, might be given back to
her from tho ranks of tbe army; and the
very last time that I saw Col. Garesche,
I chanced to meet biru at the office of (he
Sanitary CommUniou, where be had
gone lo leave with bis own hand a dona
tion for the bene lit of the soldiers; for,
as I incidentally learned, when lie waa
promoted from the rank of major to that
of lieutenant-colonel, be agreed with a
fellow-officer promoted at the same timo
that they would give to the Commission
for tho first month what was added to
their salaries by increase of rank. It Is
a simple incident, but it illmtrtie Xfom
ie point the man. UartHche was
one of tho founders and cllk-uni worker
of more than one charitable association,
as those who have received Ihs kindly
benefit of the "St. Vincent d l'-ul flo
cit l.v" and "St. Patrick's Coiif. rcnoe"
can' testify. Neglecting no cfliiiia! duty,
he found limc often lo minster i tho
poor and sick with his own bands. My
the country and the service bate many
such men, and llie wir call fur fmr
enih sacrifices !
hunilreiU of tlio'ii.t ds have liu. k'.ed e
Wa I sised 11 ji
ii V was al t:
the City Hall, but llie
nu ray of the liiUr.l
the ein'di. r's aruaor, mid a cn-ulum r loice, ami ii t,. - lerieial t. niiio'"i. r
iu whiih kaiTid e.uie yon tender me J h"e V. t k e d'v. n tl f of tl.u Slain,
thit, I''.'.nvif r tu fort, may v ml ia- in tokeii of tha su: under of tbe cuy, uw
tmtic'hwa lima" con;. try lo cuuiirr y, iinail Coiiiioovloiv bad tbo physical j'0: to d j
army
Mr iteu if, T.N.i., O . '-.., 1-',
Dtfau Sins: T..o
'.mieriea! atn-iuth ot
Hun. Win. L. Yauiiy, tm, Lai been
tciitlUting views upon Ihu Northern
IK iHin ra'-y, in a s-peeeh, just d livered
In f ire I'm Alabama Legislature. He
nays : .
' Thin is. i'l my opini'm, as iiiui.'Ii
buj e in Ibe Northern Ab ditiiutU as in
Hi.- Northern Democracy. If Liucola
ItV' it l' Hitiiibaw bis Proelauv-iW -m of
Liiiaiiripali in tit-moi row, und pioolaiiu
Ida! be would uphold tdaw ry, as ho find.i
j it in the Slit tea, tho N rtifru IVi'no-racy
( ivii'iM rally ;ir.i!iiid his utauJ.nd, and
'.v.ic .i.u ri in t,i ui a liji hi upon
1 t'i , 1 1 riu sii'ie I ho Abolition Oou-
(T'" v i I'd at iimi e, i i my opiui i i put
a s'.-i u the vr tr &a t tu.Ks pwe."

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