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THE DALLAS EXPRESS, DALLAS, TEXAS, SATURDAY, JANUARY 3, 1920.
FAGG TWO
M4
V-- '
KEliHOIvS AM) YIIITFS OF KEX
Tl'CKY MKKT FOR RACIAL AD
JUSTMENT. (Associated Negro Press)
Louisville, Ky., Jan. 1.- "At a Joint)
Conference of the National Consum-'
era League," 'The Americanization
Committee of the Kentucky Branch
of the Woman's Council of National
Defense, and the "Kentucky Confer
ence of Social Work," held at Louis
ville, November 20-24 a a very
Important session, devoted to race
relationships. This Is reported to
have been the first meeting ever held
In Kentucky where leaders of both
racos cauie toRothcr before a larise
audience of both races to talk over
important matters of common inter
est The spirit of the meeetme was
encouraging In every way. At the
close of the session the following
resolutions were adopted :
1. We favor the establishing of
district sanitaria with state aid for
the care and treatment of all per
sons both white and Colored in Ken
tucky, who suffer from tuberculosis.
2. We urge all the people of our
Southland both white and Colored to
co-operate with the view of bring
ing about a better understanding be
tween the races and to this end
provide adeouato educational facili
ties for Nero youth.
To adopt measures that will In
sure the Negroea health.
To rcconnlze the good and the
higher qualities of the Negro through
press and otherwise.
To guarantee justice and a recog
nition of his rights before law and
to stand for the equal enforcement of
law on both sldos.
To labor for industrial justice for
the Negro.
To endeavor In every reasonable
way to give the Negro a man's
chance and help him work out his
own salvation as an American citi
- -r ri'
r- ' -.-!. I 3 1 1 1' ' -' f -I ' sim 1
1 -.IV
REITIMMCASS n.AX mm PUB
LICITY CAMPAIGN.
' (Associated Nogro Press)
Chicago, III., Jan. 1. That the Re
publican Party Intends to leave no
stone unturned by which the peopla
may be acquainted with the plans
of tho presidential campaign of lit 20
is evident from the announcement
that Chairman Will H. Hays, expects
to set the work In motion actively,
at a conference here In January 6,
'6, and 7th. Practically, all of the
members of the National Committee
are to meet here in consultation with
, Win. . Kert, aa president of the Com
mittee on Arrangements for the Na
- tional Convention. The Women's dl
vision of , tho Party organization is
to meet In formal session. One of
the chief features will be the formal
session of the men ard women who
are to meet and formulate a draft
of platform which will be submitted
to the committee on Resolutions; next
June. There is unusual activity
manifested throughout the country
by the Colored voters. Never before
in the history of the party have they
manifested great roneern with
reference to the platform and to
.the Republican nomln Hundreds
' of men throughout the country, busi
ness men and professional men are
taking an active Interest in political
movement. This bemg the ilrst time
women have been permitted to take
an active part in the National Con
vt ntlon, hundreds of our women are
g"tt.ing busy In this direction.
Already, various organizations of
Clilcairo are preparing to extend the
hospitality of the city to the thous
ands who will gather ' "re for the
Convention.
WHAT A WHITE XIN THINKS OF
NEGROES.
(Associated Negro Press).
Philadelphia. Pa., Jan. 1. William
AntliliiKii. (white) in a statement to
Tin- Amwiaird Negro Press, has
pome very pertinent things to say
on "race adjustment." and he hns
vi rv wlily arranged for the people
,f bin iri.p to lesm his opinion.
I If- my:
"Hl T'lfifd pippin wont is to
!,v,t ll.o .,,, fj.fcm tn llvfi lisp-
III Kit), y. Il,cf,l. SIKTIKcflll !VMI
u whiNi '-.;iln. They wlit, not to
Preparation
fftou wanf Beauty of
&TJpexof?a?(f Jovemess of
ahnMma(yJVacersYodf
rsA"CJ.WlkW
WNISHIIIS CtiW
atXN5IH&CRMM,
be discriminated agalnat in the mat
ter of obtaining employment; desire
tho same wages for the same work;
the same school facilities for their
children; the same opportunity for
the young people to a'-'lire trades,
and education in the professions;
wholesome housing conditions; hos
pital facilities, in fact, they want no
discrimination whatever, becaime of
difference of color. They believe a
niHii's ' a man no matter what his
color and he Bhould be treated as
such.
If the 12 million Negroee In Ameri
ca are to give brain-labor, hand
labor and heart-labor to this civiliza
tion of ours, they must be given the
tools of achievement and share the
reward of co-workers. They ask noth
ing of us which is not .fair and just,
and they should be treated fairly and
Justly by their white fellow-citizens.
Why not?
Too many of us, In Judging the Ne
gro, fix tthe eye inexorably upon
some actrocious or unjustifiable act
of a single individual. Is thla the
way to Judge a race? The tribunal
of history does not condemn Chris
tianity because some of its adherents
were criminals, nor the Puritans be
cause some of thorn burned witches.
Democracy can only be preaervel
by citizens as jealous of the rights
of others as of their own. There
cannot exist two codes of law in a
Republic, one for high and one for
low.
A mistaken notion exists In the
minds of many of our people, that
Negroes want social equality with
the whites. They do not They are
satisfied with their own society;
with colored young men marrying
Colorod girls; with : the companion
ship of their own race - their own
homes with the bulldlf- up of their
Rocial Institutions; they are as sensi
tive In the presence of Inappropriate
situations as white peonle are, and
are Just as adverse to forcing them
selves upon people who do nof de
sire their presence.
NF.W YORK KEGItOKS PL AN TO
REM) RACE MAX TO lr. S. CON
GRESS. (Associated Negro Press). !
Albany, N. YM Jan. I. The people
of our group in New York have de
termined to send a representative
from Uiat community to the House
of Representatives in the next Con
gress of the United States.
Committees are bclnj formed in
every country In New York state by
Negro voters to form a state-wide
organization that Is planned to be
comploted before February 1st. At
the suggestion of J. W. Thompson of
Albany, chairman of the executive
committee of the sttate Republican
council, the movemeut which will
embrace over 300,000 Negro votera,
has been started.
E. A. Johnson of New York I
president of the state council, and In
conjunction with Mr. Thompson is
planning the campaign. The other
officers are: First vice-president, J.
W. Thompson, Albany; Second vice
president, W. H. Talbert, Buffalo;
Third vice-president, J. N. Hawkins,
Albany;' Secretary, eOorge W. Der-
ham, Rochester and Treasurer, Mrs.
H. A. Bishop, New York; Miss Laura
Williams, president of the - Negro
Women's Republican Club of Al
bany, is the Albany member of the
State council.
RITES FOR GOOD HEALTH.
Austin. Texas, Jan. 1. The Texas
Public Health Association, which for
eight years has been waging war
in the state on tuberculosis, has is
sued "a dozen rules for good health."
Thee rules are to be used to fire
vent tuberculosis and othr diseases.
The Association is workln"- to pre
vent the "Whlto Plague" as well as
to cure it.
The health axioms Issued bv I). E.
lsreed, executive secretary of the
Texas PuMlc Health Association are:
"Food: (1) Eat plentv of ood,
wholesome food, but do not over
eat. 2. Do not gnlt down your food;
chew It thirouglily. 3. Do not con
fin yourself to meat, potatoes, egg
and bread; eat a variety of foodn.
"Freeh Air: 4. Have plenty ol
frond air In your home and in (be
m
S3
3'
tuwCclWiiffsi
place where -you work, and do not
be afraid to breathe it clear down
to the bottom of your lungs. 6. Ride,
walk, and keep In the open air aj
much as possible; and sleep where
there Is plenty of ventilation. 6.
Wear warm clothes in winter; wear
loose porous clothes in the summer,
and let your body breath" fresh air.
"Good Habits: 7. Keen the diges
tive system cleared. 8. Do not
stoop or slouch while sitting, stand
ing or walking; keep erect and
straight 9. Keep the body clean ex
ternally and internally, wash and
bathe regularly, and do not use
poisonous drugs. 10. Keep cheerful
and do not worry; be an optimist
"Rest and Exercise: 11. Work
hard, but take your proper rest and
get plenty of sleep. 12. Play-time U
as necessary as work time, exercise
both mind and body pleasantly."
The Texas Public Health Associa
tion, which Is sponsoring the Modern
Health Crusade among the Texas
Children, Issues these health axioms
in order to carry good health among
the "grown-ups" as well as the "kid
dles." TO AGITATE NEGltu OPPRES
PRESHION IN II. S MDLEY
FIELD MA LONE WILL SPEAK
THE AMERICAN CONGO" TO RE
l)lSl'RII(EI).
A mass meeting to rouse public
sentiment to the wrongs suffered by
the American Negro will be held on
the evening of January 5 in Cooper
Union on the occasion of the an
nual meeting in New York City of
the National Association for the Ad
vancement of Colored People, It was
announced today at the headquarters,
70 Fifth Avenue. Dudley Field Ma
lone, former collector of the Port
of New York Is to be the chief speak
er. Dr. W. E. B. DuBois has announce J
as his subject "The American Congo,"
a description of conditions in the
South rivaling the horrors of the
Belgian Congo.
The otther speakers announcer for
the meeting are John Haynes Holmes
and M. H. Gassaway, who was
threatened with assassination in An
derson, South Carolina, because of
his connection with the local branch
of the National Association for the
Advancement of Colored People.
The evening mass meeting Is to
be preceded by a business meeting
at 2 p. m at the Sage Foundation
building.
WEST VIRGINIA SENATORS NOT!
FIEI) OF LYNCHING IN THEIR
STATE.
The National Association for the
Advancement of Colorod People, 70
Fifth Avenue, New York, today male
public a letter sent to Senator How
ard Sutherland and Davis Elkins of
West Vlrglna, asking If they approved
federal action to prevent such mob
murder as the lynching of two Col
ored men in their state on December
15, constituting the 75th and 7Gth
lynching in the United States this
year.
The letter, signed by James Weldon
Johnson, Field Secretarv of the Na
tional Association, read as follows:
'The National Association for the
Advancement of Colored People calH
your attention to the mob murder,
in the Btate which you represent In
the United States Senate of two
Colored United States citizens on De
cember 15. ,
May we Inquire whether you are
In favor of federal action when as
In tho present instance, state officers
are unable to prevent such outrages
in the United States?"
TREASl'RF. OF FAXOPS ATPOXAT
TOX CLH1 DEAD.
Chicago, III., Jan. 1. Henry S.
Anderson for more than thlrty-flve
years an employee of the Northwest
ern R. IL Co.. died verv suddenly in
Baltimore, recently, while on a visit
to relatives. Mr. Anderson was born
In Baltimore and became a resident
of Chicago In 1K80 and was a promi
nent Mason. For more than fifteen
years, he was treasurer of the Ap
pnmattos club. Ills wife, Mr. Mar
tha liroadna Anderson in one of the
well known musicians and musical
teachers of Chlcam
DO BUSINESS IN THE OPEN
Itinerant "Merchants" In City of Mex
ico Flourish Exceedingly, Espe
cially on Sunday.
Conditions In the republic which
hnve crowded a million persons in
Slexlco City, or more thun 300.000
above Its normal population, have, In
creased greatly the number of Itiner
ant merchants who set up shop where
their whim wills. It Is Impossible to
find a street In the city where some
vendor hns not set up a stall.
A person desiring to outfit a house
can buy almost everything needed
without placing a foot within a regular
shop.' Let a prospective buyer merely
hint that be Is In the market for some
thing and he Is besieged Immediately
by a crowd of energetic salesmen, who
dilute In mnchlne-gun Spanish on the
worth of their wares.
Sunday i the busiest day for these
niercliunts. They foregather prlnclptil-
In the plazas, spread their goods
about them and patiently wait for cus
tomers. Their numbers arc augment
ed by men and women, boys and girls,
all of them selling candles, fruits, shoe
strings, pottery, tobacco, drinks,
bright-colored ribbons, shoes, hats,
dogs, cats, gophers and the dozens of
varieties of food of which clilll Is the
most Important component. '
The plnzns present an animated ap
pearance. Hands are playing, whistles
are blowing, newsboys cull their edi
tions, a man' will) n wheel of chance
beseeches the credulous to try their
luck! a boy with a huge basket bal
anced atop his head offers sweetmeats
at 5 centnvos each, and following him
conies a seller of lee cream with his
frozen dainties tucked away In a con
tainer which he Juggles perilously on
his head but never loses a spoonful,
and above all shines a glorious sun
which gives no hint of brooding prob
lems of existence.
It Is a happy life the nntlve lends
on Sunday, whon with a few centnvos
he may fill his stomnch with sweets,
bask In the warm sunshine and listen
to music furnished by a Mexican band.
A man from the United States, who
on a recent Sunday morning took his
seat In a pltiza, within a few minutes
had his shoes shlned, his nulls mani
cured, his breakfast served, his morn
ing newspapers delivered, his mensure
taken for a suit of clothes nnd was of
fered an assortment of diamonds and
opals nt a bargain, ne concluded that
there may be more modem methods of
conducting business, but none more
picturesque than that employed by the
outdoor merchant
Believes In Physical Training.
Marguerite L. Smith, elected to the
New York state assembly from the
Nineteenth New York district, is twenty-five
years old and a specialist In
physical training and her election Is,
she believes, the natural outgrowth of
the work she has been doing In her
community all through-the war. She
will not give up her work as physical
director In the Horace Mann Elemen
tary school, where she Is also super
visor of girls' clubs.
In the summer ' fol several ' years
Miss Smith has been director of the
physical training and dnncing at Camp
Hanoun, a girls' camp In Vermont, and
has also superintended the girls' hikes
thiough the White mountains.
When she was In a teachers' college
Miss Smith was president of the ath
letic association for two years nnd re
ceived the highest individual score for
athletics In her senior year.
"I never had any legislative or po
litical plans for myself," she says. "I
haven't now. But I want to keep on
working for the people of my own com
munity In whatever way I can."
No Wonder.
My, how her feet did hurt I It was
now two o'clock, In the afternoon and
she had been traipsing about all day
In search of Christmas bargains. It
was a balmy fall day nnd she couldn't
lay the hurting' to the weather. Her
shoes were two or three months old
end had never caused her distress be
fore. But there was no denying the aching
appcnl for relief from the lower ex
tremities and she hied herself to a
restroom irf one of the downtown
stores.
She stooped to nnlnce the shoes and
horror of horrors! She had been walk
ing nil day with each shoe on the
wrong foot
London's Fine Fig Trees.
If the average Londoner were asked
where the best show of fig trees was
to be seen In central London he would
probably think yon were pulling his
leg. Yet here It Is, nnd In pucb a con
spicuous place as Trafalgar square.'
The fig trees against the lower walls
of the National gallery, Inclosing the
little shaven lawn, flourish exceeding
ly, and give a note of desirable fresh
ness to ,that much criticised piece of
architecture. . .
A thoughtful observer suggested the
other day that the leaves of the Na
tlonnl gallery fig trees might be In
tended for use Inside. London Chron
icle. .
Hardly a Model Husband.
A young woman told the Wlllesden
(England) magistrate that she had six
points to complain of about her hus
band. He would not allow her to speak
to any one. He would not allow any
one to visit the bouse. He would not
allow her to take her little boy out. He
would not give her any housekeeping
money. He threatened her life. He
would not let her hnve her own clothes
to wenr. After all that the court mis
sionary was asked to act as arbitra
tor. SOUTHERN EDUCATORS DISCUSS
RACIAL CRISIS.
New York, N. Y Jan. 1. The na
tional crisis In race relations was
discussed at a dinner at the Astor.
Speakers were Gov. Roberts of Ten
nessee, whose stand for law and or
der attracted national attention dur
ing the recent riots in bis State; Dr
Abraham Flexner of the General Ed
ucation Hoard and Chancellor Kirk
land of Vandcrbllt University.
Harrlsburg, Pa., Jan. 1. Clause
In homo nursing for Colored women
hnve been opened at tho Red Cross
rooms under the direction of Mrs.
Stanley U. Backonstoss.
'. JUJlLi .... - I.I -. W ' W: .,: .1
Agents
Wanted
m i l i ifc i 'I dfc 1 fc '
,Tnn mi VP i ami is i il ii-
COItNEHSTONE 0 F ' BALTLHOHE
MASONIC TEMPLE LAID.
Balttimore, Md., Jan. 1. With im
pressive services the cornerstone ot
the new Masonic Tem.ple, 1429-31
McCullough street, was laid. here.
The ceremonies were in charge of
the Maryland Grand Lodge, Joseph
P. Evans, Grand .Master. John P.
Turner, Grand Master for the Dis
trict of Columbia, presided. A parade
of local and visiting commandcries
of Knights Templars followed. A
big ball was held at the Lyric at
night. The improvements to be made
to the temple will cost $30,000.
NORFOLK NEGRO BUSINESS COY'
FltS VARIOUS INTERESTS.
(Associated Negro Press)
Norfolk, Va., Jan. 1. Many and
varied are the enterprises conducted
by our group in Norfolk, Va. The
city has felt the impetus of Indus
try caused by the recent war and as
many of the camps .were located
near here, naturally civilians fol
lowed and of course our people came
too.
The latest reports credit Norfolk
with 78,750 Negroes. Among such
a large number assembled from many
places, there are many of the "he
can, who thinks he can" type and as
a result they are putting 'their heads
together and their money Into racial
enterprises that are employing men
and women of their group.
As an evidence of the progress
that Is being made in Norfolk, we
will give a few citations. The Tide
water Bank and Trust Company with
an authorized capital of $250,000 in
resources. The Attucks Theatre is
being built by a hundred thousand
dollar corporation organized this
year. A $50,000 Drug Corporation
is being organized. A $25,000.00
Shoe Store has been organized and
the building purchased on Church
street In which they will soon open
for business; about five months ago,
five men organized a baking com
pany and opened a bakery on Church
street, already they are forced to ob
tain larger quarters. They have
purchased across the Btreet from
their present location and are erect
ing a commodious building fitted for
their needs. $50,000.00 Development
Corporation was organized here this
summer and they have secured
contracts for and are erecting The
Attucks Theatre, three churches and
several dwellings. There are three
Building and Loan Associations here
in our group and all are doing big
business. The climax Is being reach
ed in the organization of a million
dollar fire insurance company.
BILLY KING'S WIFE DIES IN
CHICAGO.
(Associated Negro Press)
Chicago, 111., Jan. 1. Mrs. Hattle
Mcintosh King, wife of "Billy King,"
the performer, died here very suddenly
laBt week. Mrs. King was a nitive
or Detroit, Mich., and formerly the
wife of Tom Mcintosh, a pcrl'ori tr.
For. a number of years, Mrs. .Kins
wna one nf th best known theatrical
performers in the country, having
been twelve years witn me tamous
Williams & Walker Company, and
mripriHInir eiirbteen months i of the
time in London. She w;u an actress
as well as capable in the mu!io worm
Mrs. King's demise occurred while
tho htntHcnl comnanv of her hus
band was playing an enlargement at
the Grand Theatre ana tne rari.iy
was looking ' forward to a Meirv
Christmas, it being the first In years
that Mr. King has spent at home.
The residence of "Billy Kin;;" is not
ed for its elegant and luxi vfous fur
nishings much ' of which is iue to
the fine esthetic taste of Mrs King.
The burial was in Chicago and the
funeral was' attended by many prom
inent in the theatrical profession.
CHICAGO TO HAVE NEGRO STATE
BANK.
(Associated Negro Press)
Chicago, 111., Jan. 1 One of the
most forward steps in unified busi
ness progress ever taken in the
United States and very significant
of the trend of the times will be the
opening, shortly, aftter the first of the
year of the Binga State Bank, the
first of the kind ever established in
the North. The promoters of the
Institution are all men of the highest
Integrity and successful business at
tainments, and known throughout the
oountry. Among them are Jesse
Binga, Banker and Real Estate man;
Robt S. Abbott, president Overton
Hygienic Manufacturing Co., Chas.
8. Jackson, Undertaker; Reglnal
Smith, Physician; Dr. U. O. Dailey,
former president of the National
Medical Association. The Bank will
make a news epoch -in the business
life not only of Chicago, but of the
entire middle west 1
GOV. Hlf KF.TT, TO RPKAK AT
TISKEtiEE CONFERENCE.
(Associated Negro Press).
Ttiskegee, Ala.. Jan. 1. Dr. Robert
R. Moton, Principal of Tunkegee In
stitute has announced that Gover
nor Thomas W. Illckett has accented
bin Invitation to deliver the princi
pal address in 1b discussion of Race
Relations, whlrh will be held at Tu
kegee Negro Conference,
HREE! FREEH FREE II
Jm( atai m !u aaaraw Ml
w wiH Mtd y fcr III'MB
' tart tal teautlful CaUtoca
tax all ta late stylos Crwla
air Cto4a, Hair Not. Raw Hair,
Bactrta Comb wU Hair Worker's
tola, au. Oar Balr
tho rayvtatfaa for oelmg tho ka4
a we are Ue largest nail actar
' Creole Hair Oh4i Hoaa t
tfnttoa ItaUa.
iUran,
S4W WILLER, HUYMN IfAlR GOODS CO.
Box 298 Shrevcport, La.
lill
CONFERENCE TO LAUNCH 3I0R
ALS CAXPAIGN. .
Pittsburgh, Pa., Jan. 1. Matter of
importance pertaining to the national
welfare, such as the race question,
social hygiene free speech and Chris
tian Americanization came up for dis
cussion at the session of the Wes
tern Pennsylvania Training Confer
ence, where the program of the in
terchurch world movement is being
presented.
The war, the report read, had been
responsible for a general relaxation
of morals, and it was the business
of the church to counteract this con
dition by active participation in mu
nicipal activities. The 12.000,000 foreign-born
residents in this country
were declared to be both an asset
and a liability an asset because of
their Industry and a liability be
cause of their pronessness to ac
cept radical doctrines and leader
ships.
FLORIDA NEGROES PLAN EX
CEPTIONAL FAIR EXHIBIT.
Tampa, Fla., Jan. 1. Among the
most Interesting features of the forth
coming South Florida Fair will be
the varied exhibits made by the Ne
groes of Florida, who are expected
to be represented by a larger dis
play than has been made by mem
bers of the race In any state.
President Brorein of the fair as
sociation is In receipt of a letter
from A. A. Turner, who is connected
with the home demonstration department-
of the Florida A. & M. Col
lege at Tallahassee, stating that
members of the race throughout the
state are enthusiastic on the sub
ject of displaying their products in
Tampa. Sixteen counties were repre
sented in the display made by the
Colored people at the state fair at
Jacksonville, and the writer states
that this display, augmented by other
exhibits, will be shown in Tampa,
A. M. E. ZIONISTS CLOSE SUCCESS
FUL CONFERENCE.
Richmond, Va., Jan. 1. The Vir
ginia conference of the A. M. E.
Zion church has closed. The Rev.
L. T. C. Conquest of Detroit, Mich.,
preached the closing sermon. All the
final reports were made during the
day. The reports on education, tem
perance and missions were discussed
at great length. Church extension
in the Virginia conference also re
ceived much attention, as did several
other subjects. Over $3,471.90 was
reported for Missions from three 'dis
tricts and $110,507 was reported
from other departments, not includ
ing the total from all departments
tb be given later. The growth of
the financial and numerical strength
of the conference was declared to be
almost phenomenal. (
PROTEST AOAIXHT PROPOSED
SEPARATE SCHOOLS.
(Associated Negro Press)
Cincinnati, Ohio, Jan. , 1. Protests
against the plan to build a new Har
riet Beecher Stowe school exclusive
ly for Colored Children at Seventh
and Cutter streets were lodged with
Board with the Board of Education
at its meeting by a large delegation
of Colored citizens. They contended
that the segregation of the races
was in conflict with the State laws,
and urged that white and Colored
children be permitted to attend the
schools generally. Member James G.
Fiijit of the Board, spoke In favor of
sustaining their position. The board
took the matter under advisement.
COL. VOING DELIVERS FARE
WELL MESSAGE IN NEW YORK.
(Associated Negro Press)
New York, N. Y., Jan. 1. Col.
Charles Young highest ranking Ne
gro officer In the United States
army, urged the people of his race,
at a meeting in St Marke's church,
under the auspices of the National
Urban League, not la vote for any
one at the coming election who had
not promised the Negroes equality.
Col. Young, who is en route to Li
beria, where he is to serve as mili
tary attache' to the American Em
bassy, spoke on "The Place of the
Negro in the Present Reconstruction."
He said that Congress, instead of
erecting a monument to the Negroes
who fell In the war, coud give a far
more lasting memorial by granting
the people of hia race the liberty for
which aome of them had given their
lives.
D n a.
WOLF BROTHERS Hair Straighteainq Ostfit
No more breaking of lamp chimneys. With one of onr Patent AInohol Stovet you can beat 7crJ
btralu uteuing Comb or Curllwr Iron quickly and salelr. bauitary and iurt the thing lor Ustc Mm
vU
: Aicnhol llvatar TH cents
i PS HntisK f aid in U. S.
r J3Unt.tu.4lk)D. Welubt, Jot;
Thousands m t cslc (he outfits sad i commending Hum to (risnds. Agents Wanted
VOIF BROS. 1214 N. Senata Ave., Indianapolis, Ifid., U.S.JL
Penny We Use
Laundry Sanitary
Pressing Machines
FRED BRUSS
Ta Mori
Furs Cleaned
and Renovated
Cleaning and Pressing
Suits Made to Order
2221 Elm St
Phone M. 56b0
DALLAS,
TEXAS
HEART,
LEAF
Natures
Famous Remedy
lor growing LONG and
BEAUTIFUL HAIR.
If you have short, nappy and harth
hair, or If you ara troubled with dan-
Hruff, falling balr, breaking hair, Itch
ing scalp, DO NOT DhLAY, but use
at once, HEART LEAF HAIR TONE,
thee vaich the food results. It
darkens pray hair and puts new life
Into it.
Price SOe. Bent bv mall on receipt
of money. A: -nts wanted. You csn
-.make ood money. Writa at once for
jaspecial terms to agents. tA
SUPO-SULFHO MEDICINE CO.
- i
ATLANTA, GA.
JIME. LUE1XA HcDANIELS, SCIEN
TIFIC METHOD OF SCALP MAS
SAGE. A MODERN WONDER.
V J
ft '
1 U: jf
Will promote a full growth of
beautiful hair, one treatment will start
your hair to growing-. If you have
dandruff, tetter or any disease of
the scalp, send for a full treatment.
My Dandruff Remedy never fails
to cure Dandruff or Tetter no mat
ter how lonir standing.
If you cava a tight stub
born scalp a circular Is sent with each
treatment with full information telling-
you Just how to make your scalp
loose and flexible ao the hair will
grow.
Course taoajht through mail.
Hair Culture $10.
Dyeing and Bleaching:
Hot Oil Treatment -
Beauty Culture
Manlcurinar.
Growing Oil 60 cents.
Dandruff Remedy SO cents.
Pressing- Oil SO cents.
Temple Oil E0 cents.
Soap 10 to 25 cents.
Agents wanted
MMK. LCELLA McDANIELS,
J30J E.' Morse Bt.
Greenville, Texas.
era
GIANT ox. 9-Inch Comb T9 II
Solid Brass, CONVCX TEET. I
ALCG30L HFATER M Cfl
CIANTCCMB, both for v ul
rg Psld Anywhere la V. A
lie
i

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