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The Southern indicator. (Columbia, S.C.) 1903-1925, November 14, 1914, Image 14

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?**BU3U?> STU DY? O y_ ,^sssr\
SAWING AND REA^INO.
Galatians 6:1-10.-Nov. 8.
"Whatxojcvcr a man sotecth, thal *hall he
' alto rca?>." Verse 7.
COI ' YY'S^Study was Intendeu, by.
i those muppiilg out, tbese les
/ sons, tp. be. JV temperance les
ion..--But the Apostle's words
hftve no reference, whatever to Intem
perance of \bne ki rid more thnu anoth
er. 'He is" addressing, neither the
worl- in general'nor some poor Inebri
ates I-ut- (he. consecrated people of
Got) as he. declares iu .tho opening
verses of\tbis Epistle.
Tb... consecrated Chrlsti ins the
Apo. . ie - Cays brethren, and Instructs
th-... b?w'^o dea} with any of their
S #" w.hd.. might be overtaken in'u
i ..'jjL, entangled with some form of sin,
by Reason, of weakness of the flesh or
hy ' unfavorable . environment. The
Divst sinrltiiul of the Church should ex
ti t '.so themselves to bring about a rcs
U iation'. of the erring one to a condi
tion of righteousness and fellowship
'Aili' G?d? This they should do meek
1} . remembering that they also are Iin
l'.erfeet. and ; may inadvertently fall
tillo slu/'con^rary .t; th?lV"l?tentions.
^ u.th!> ni??.aer.'tbvy were to '.'bear
one another's"*,burdens"-assisting one
another In-battling against the weak
nesses of the flesh and the be.<etments
of sin. Til u s
would they . 'be.
fuifllling the law,
of Christ. This
general law is
one of service
and self-sacrifice
in the Interests
of otheiv.
Those w-t". find
ing a brother
overtakr.i lu a
fault, merely
throw-back their
Jct?
Soloing Beal.
heads, denouncing tho brother lu a
haughty, holier-than-thou manner, have
not yet attained ? proper appr?ciation
of what constitutes the law of Christ
-the law of love which ts to govern
ell the members of the Body.
Too Much Self-Esteem.
The Ap'-^tie points out that one great
danger w v..-h.* besots all true Christians
is h ead tl) inking too highly of j
ne! cy'and therefore not highly enoughs
jf tho brethren, especially of those j
y ho stumble in some particular in'
Vi i.ich this individual has not yet stum
bled. Whoever thinks of himself as
somebody in God's sight should begin
to realize that he is a nobody unworthy
of Divine notice, except through God's
favor in Christ. Such a person hinders
his own progress In the good way.
Instead of seeking to judge or re
. prov? hts neighbor or his brother in
ISL. <..;. h should seek to prove out
is own work. He should ascertain to
hat extent be bas put away anger,
wrath, malice, hatred, envy, strife, and
put ou meekness, gentleness, patience,
long-suffering, brotherly kindness, love.
To whatever extent he discerns that
he is progressing along these Scrip
turally defined lines, to that extent be
has ground for rejoiciug, without iu
any sense or degree seeking to com
pare himself with others and thus to
estimate himself wholly by the imper
fections which he sees in others. Thus
each should seek to find his own weak
nesses and to bear his own burdens.
Along the lines of this teaching, there
is no room for cl?ricisni. Rather, as
the Apostle points out, those who are
taught should communicate with those
who teach, telling them of any bless
ings received or' of any clearer views
of God^s. Word which have come to
thom. He may also
have meant that,
they should recom
pense thut teach
er either with
thanks or with co
operation or in
some other way
help him to for
ward his work of
teaching.
There ls a prin
ciple at stake hero.
Heaping. God operates
along the linos ofcju'stice. and cannot
be deceived. We might deceive eveu
. ourselves temporarily with specious
i) , ? "neats, but none can deceive Elim
li . a principle of Divine arrange
ment that sii'tvhi:,' shall bring renping.
and that it shall be of the same char
acter us the thing sowed.
Thc Christian's Life-.Work.
The retitling of spiritual blessings
and of heart development will depend
upon faithfulness in sowing to these
ends. Whoever lives a spiritual life,
seeking to serve God In act, word and
thought, will reap the largest develop
meat of the qualities which make up
Churucter-likeness to our Lord. But
those wbu seek to please their own
fleshly minds or those of friends or
relatives, will make proportionately
less progress along spiritual lines.
To whatever extent we mortify the
fleshly inclinations and seek to live In
harmony with the Lord's Spirit. In
that proportion we shall grow strong
spiritually. If in our conduct we man
- ifest to Him our love for truth and
. righteousness, He will account UB
worthy of everlasting life, knowing
that when such receive the perfect
bodies of the resurrection, they will
live in absoluto harmony with God.
-^lu verses 0 and 10 the Apostle con
PhideVLb'8 argument. All the conse
should continue faithful, and
'cary of striving against
to fix character in
Jesus Before Pilote.
CB KOOK LYN r-^
r-^X-BIDLE-*TUDY?by ?*-^CTN
JESUS TRIED BY PILATE.
Matthew 27:11-26.-Nov. 22.
"P?tate saith unto them. What then shall I da
unto Jesus, who 4? called Christt" -
Verse er.
HS early ns possible in tho morn
. lng, the chief priests hurried
Jesus to the Praetorium, the
judgment-hull of Pilule, ito
man Governor of Judea. Pilate in
quired as to what charge they lind
against Jesus. They evasively an
swered that He was worthy of pun
ishment, else they would i.jt accuse
Him. Pilate reminded them thal un
der the Roman usage they had great
liberty in dealing with all disputes of
a religious kind, and that therefore
they should settle the case themselves.
The priests responded that tiley hftil
no power to inflict the death penalty,
thus revealing that they had dcllber
ately plotted to
have Pilate put
au innocont per
son to death.
Then they arous
ed Jesus of per
verting the na
tion-telliug the
people not to
pu y taxes to
Caesar and
claiming to be
the Jewish King
-Messiah.
These were serious charges, which
Pilate was bound to consider, and
were totally different from those
brought against Jesus at the Sanhe
drin trial. Jesus made no defense; foi
He knew that the time hud come fo."
Him to die. He would not attempt to
turn aside that which He knew to be
a part of the Divine Program for Him
Jesus Before Pilate and Herod.
Another account tells that Pilate per
ceived that the'chief priests and the
Scribes were moved with envy in mak
ing their charges. But he must uot
appear to treat lightly the charges re
specting another Icing than Caesar. Ile
therefore questioned Jesus; but receiv
ing no reply, he went out to tho Scribes
and Pharisees, who had refrained from
entering the Praetorium because the
Passover season had begun. After
hearing them, apparently he returned
ano asked .Jesus, "Art Thou the King
of thu Jews?" Jesus Inquired whether
the question was based upon Pilate's
knowledge nf Ills teachings or wheth
er upon the assertion of His enemies.
Pilate replied that the chief men of
Jesus' own nation had delivered Him,
and that he.wished to know tho cause
of their opposition.
.lentis answered that His Kingdom !
was not of this world-order of things.
He was not. therefore, in conflict with
Caesar. Pilate questioned Him a little
further, and then went forth to the
Jews, lo whom he said, "I (ind no
crime in Ulm." The chief priests were
alarmed They vehemently charged
that Jesus was stirring up the people;
and that, beginning away off in Gali
lee, Ile had preached everywhere.
When Pilate heard this, he sent Je
sus to Herod, king of Galilee, who was
nt Iiis palace in Jerusalem. Herod
had heard many things respecting Je
sus, and was curious lo see Him do
some miracle. Jesus made no reply to
the king's questions. The chief priests
nnd the Scribes accused Jesus violent
ly to Herod, who sent Him back to
Pilate, after having, with his soldiers,
mocked our Lord and put upon Him a
gorgeous robe. This act of deference
>n Pilate's part, and Herod's return of
the courtesies, bridged over an enmity
'.ie tween the two.
Neither Pilate Nor Herod Condemned.
On several occasions Pilate had re
eased prisoners in honor of the Pass
)ver. The multitude cheered bim and
nqulred whether he would release
?onie prisoner that year. Thinking to
{et Jesus ont of the hands of the chief
?rlests. Pllute asked the people, "Whom
Will ye that I release uuto you. Bn
'abbas. the highwayman, or Jesus,
vho is called Christ?" Incited by their
.eliglous leuders. the multitude de
nanded the release of Barabbas.
Pilate remonstrated, declaring that
ie found no cause of death in Jesus,
whom he would
chastise and then
release. Jesus
was therefore de
livered over to
the Roman sol
diers, who were
only too willing
to mock and to
scourge Him.
Shortly after
ward, Pilate
brought nim
orth to the walting multitude. Wear
ng the purple robe and a crown of
horns, Jesus stood before them.
Pilate then said. "Behold the Man!"
lee Him whom you are trying to have
ic put to death. He is one of the no
lest specimens of humanity. Behold
he beautiful dignity of His character.
Vhatever you have against Him. you
ylll feel placated when you see His
umility.
But they cried, "Crucify Him I" Pl
ito again remonstrated. Then they
amo to the root of the matter-that
esus had declared Himself to be tho
on of God, an assertion which they
onsidered blasphemy. This made Pl
lto all the more afraid. He thought
gain to release Jesus. But the Jews
erslsted.
Finally Pilate yielded, saying In des
eratlon. "I am Innocent of the blood
f this righteous - man!" They cried,
His blood be upon us and our chll
ren!" And for moro than eighteen
bnturles lt bas been so.
Pqvnp?y H. Sharper,
TAILOR
Cleaning, Pressing and Altering
Neatly Done.
1131 Washington St - - Phono 220!)
Bring or send us your job work
Removal Notice.
Dr. Jas. H. Sims has removed
his office to 1007 Lady street.
Customers and friends will
please take notice. Telephone
3105, He can be found there at
any time.
Small Farms
Fivo acres and up with <1 wei li un
productive Soil
Will rent, Soil or Kxchunge for
other property.
A. l"o\v New Lots sud Houses
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1544 Main Street, Columbia
MOKE Y TO L?S
The oldest and most reliable Ti un
office in I he op v
MEYERS LOAN OFFICE
Established 1897 1337 Main Sired
The
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Alterations, Cleaning, and Press
ing neatly executed. Old chillies
made tu look like new ones.
13. A. BLOCKER, 'PKOF'K,
L118#J Washington St. Columbia
PIIONK 2050,
UNDER NEW-MANAGEMENT
Solicits First-Class
Colored Patronage.
RA 7 ES REA SO NA Ii LE
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I'KOPRIKTOR
1018 Washington St., Columbia.
DR. W. T. SMITH
PHYSICIAN & SURG?LON ?
OFFICE HOURS I'll (?NI \tf>7
?i? ? At Office and Rc?.'dence
; lo J r. M. ... -
6 io 7 P. Mm BZO rine ?3t.
CO LU M lil A. S. C
For Rent.
A store corner W ashington and
Parks streets; also three office
rooms up stairs.' Apply J. E.
Gilmer, 1001 Wasningtnn street,
(upstairs). Phone 1833
DR. A. JOSEPH COU INS j
SURGEON DENTIST.
1510 Main St., Columbia, . .
Dffice Honrs: 8 a. ni. to 1 p. rn. :
2 p. m. to 6 p. m.
rhones: OHiee 341?; Residence, LW-'I.
SPECIAL KATES TO STUDENTS.
Office Hours : 8 toi):30 A. M. : 1 ?
2 P. M, ; 6 to 8:30 p. Ri
PHON fl L>(iL>)
DE. C. E. STEPHEN: ON
PHYSIC TAN & SURGI.1 !
Diseases Of Women And Child rc? A
Special ty.
OFFICE, N. C. Mnlind Wu ?.-lit.a
Cor. Washington and I.:. .ric
COLUMBIA, S. C,
Skiffs: s&fmf?-A&to*
#1 .i w^w^?v
The Well?noion
Visible Typewriter is only $60 cash or $65
on time guaranteed^ for tv*o years.
The Wellington Typewriter embraces every feature es
sential to a perfect typewriter. Every clergyman, teach
er, doctor, writer, or business man needs a Wellington.
Our terms will surprise you. Write to-day to our agents,
The Southern Indicator Co., Columbia, S. C.
!
Palmetto Meat Market
J. S, DENT, Prop'r.
3utcher and Green Grocer, Fish, Oysters and
Game in season.
330 Assembly[St.
Phone 172.
Columbia
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Vow Protecting You Against an
Advance in Prices
Penn Hard Coal, single ton.$9 00
Penn Hard Coal, 5 ton lots, delivered atone time,... . 8.75
Prnn Hard Coal, 25 ton lots, delivered at one time.^8 50
Dixie Gem Soft Coal, single ton. fi 00
Dixie Gem Soft Coal, 5 ton lots, delivered at one time. 5 75
Dixie Gem Soft Coal.[25 ton lots, delivered at one time. 5 50
Powell
Fuel Company,
Phones 296.297,
BENEDICT COLLEGE
COLUMBIA, SOUTH CAROLINA
FORTY-THIRD -YEAR
FACULTY FOR THE YEAR 1914-1915.
Rev. B. W. Valentine, A. B., President
MINISTERIAL DEPARTMENT
President Valentine Prof. R. F. Lee, A. B., B. D.
Prof. F. C. Redfern, Ph. D. Prof. E. R. Roberts, D. D.
Prof. H. J. Perry, A. B., A. M., B. D.
COLLEGE DEPARTMENT
President Valentine Prof. H. J. Perry, A. B., A. M., B. D.
Prof F. C. Redfern, Ph. D. Prof. G. W. Pegues, A. B.
Prof. T. j. Duckett, A. B. Prof. E. C. Morrow, B. S.
Mrs. Louise W. Valentine, Life Certificate, State of N. Y.
?>?iss Lucy H. Hammond, B. S.
Miss Ella M. Hunsicker, Normal Graduate
Miss Lizzie A. Reese, Normal Graduate
HIGH SCHOOL DEPARTMENT (NORMAL AND COLLEGE PRE
PARATORY)
Prof. F. C. Redfern, Ph. D. Prof. G. W. Pegues, A. B.
Prof. T. L. Duckett, A. B. Prof. E. C. Morrow, B S.
Prof. H. J. Perry, A. M., B. D. Prof. D- K. Jenkins, A. B.,
Miss Lucy H. Hammond, B. 8.
Miss Elia M. Hunsicker, Normal Graduate
Miss Li?zie A. Reese, Normal Graduate
Mrs. Louise W. Valentine, Life Certificate, State of N. Y.
Miss A. M. Pierson, Mechanics Institute, Rochester, N.Y.
Miss A. E. Stickney, Graduate in Music (N. Y. and Boston)
Mrs. Sarah H. Chester, Normal Graduate
GRAMMAR SCHOOL
Mrs. Mary W. Stickney, First Crade, State of New York,
EIGHTH GRADE
Mrs. Clara T. Joyce, High School Graduate.
SEVENTH GRADE
Miss Ruth C. Watson, L. I.,
SIXTH GK ADE
Mrs. E. C. Morrow, Normal Graduate, Preparatory Class
Miss Adelaide M. Pierson. Sewing
Miss Anna E. Stickney, Music
Mrs. Louise W. Valentine, Drawing
.NORMAL PRACTICE SCHOOL
(Consisting of Primer Class and First Five Grades)
Mrs Sarah H. Chester, Principal
Miss Lula M. Johnson, L. I., A. B. ^
Miss J. Alberta Boykin, L. I., A. B. } Assistants
Miss Janie Adams, L. I. J
COMMERCIAL AND SHORTHAND DEPARTMENTS
Miss Laura C. Durfey. B. S.A., B. A. C., Director.
Music DEPARTMENT
Miss Anna E. Stickney, Director
Miss Sadye E Washington, Assistant??E
DOMESTIC ART (DRESSMAKING AND PLAIN SEIWNG)
Miss Adelaide M. Pierson, Director
Miss Lula Williams, Assistant
DOMESTIC SCIENCE (COOKING AND HOME SANITATION)
Miss Lucy H. Hammond, Director
MATRON OF THE DINING HALL
Miss Luna G. Burbank
MATRON OF PRATT HALL
Miss Olive Warren
MATRONS OF COLBY HALL
Miss Ella M. Hunsicker
Miss M. Virginia Ashton
MATRON OF COLLEG^^PALL ' ri
Mrs. Florence Pegues
MATRON OF THE LAUNDRY
Miss Martha J. Chambers
BOOKKEEPER
Miss Etta M. McDonald
Mr. A. Bernard Callaham, Assistant
SECRETARY TO THE PRESIDENT
Miss Laura C. Durfey
LIBRARIAN
Miss M Virginia Ashton
PRESIDENT'S ADVISORY COUNCIL
Professors Redfern, Duckett, and PefflHp
Miss Hunsicker, Miss Warren and Mrs. Chester
SUPERINTENDENT OF THE GROUNDS
Mr, John W. Dowdle
COURSES
Benedict College offers instruction in the following
courses :
MINISTERIAL.- Regular and special. Teachers in this
course have had large experience- Special effort is
made to help men already in the pastorate, who feel
the need of further training.
COLLEGE - Four years' course, leading to A. B, or B. S,
Large place is given to the sciences. The laboratories are
modern.
NORMAL.- Four years' course, leading to the degree of
L. 1. Practice school in connection furnishes two years' ex
perience in teaching. The practice teaching is required
in the third and fourth years. Experiments performed
I in the laboratory by students under direction of compe
tent instructor.
i COLLEGE PREPARATORY.- Four years' course, preparing for
I college Extra work in mathematics and foreign languages.
I GRAMMAR SCHOOL- Prepares for entering the High School.
COMMERCIAL.- Two years' course in shorthand, type
writing, bookkeeping and commercial law. Open to
students in the College Department only.
PLAIN SEWING, DRESSMAKING AND MILLINERY.
All girls in the Grammar School and in the first and
second years of the High School are required to take plain
sewing. Dressmaking may be taken by anyone pre
pared for it A limited number of girls from the Col
lege Department and fourth year of the High School will
be admitted to the course in Millinery.
DOMESTIC SCIENCE- This is a course in cooking and home
sanitation under the charge of an expert. Open to all
girls in the College Department and third and fourth
years of the High School.
NURSE TRAINING.- A limited number of girls from the
( ell? pe ai d High Schcol Departments will be admitted
to this course.
AGRICULTURE-- This is a new department- Students
from the College and fourth year of the High School
will be admitted The work will be practical and scientific.
Music- This course leads to a Certificate of Proficiency
Benedict College is one of the leading Christian Col
leges of the South, fully equipped, and giving thorough
instruction. The laboratories, Physical, Chemical and
.Biological, are up to date Emphasis is laid upon Chris
tian character and sound scholarship. Its courses pre
pare for practical life.
All graduates of Benedict College with the degree of
L. I, or A. B., under the laws of the State are legally
qualified to teach in the public schools of South Carolina
wicnout further examination. Next session begins Sept.
30, 1914.
For futher information or for catalog, write to
Rev. B. W. Valentine, President, Columiba S. C.
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