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The evening telegraph. [volume] (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1864-1918, January 01, 1866, FOURTH EDITION, Image 2

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THE DAILY E
'TELEGRAPH. PHILADELPHIA, MONDAY, JANUARY 1, 18G6.'
TIIE NEW YORK TIlEaS.
Editorial Opinions of the Leading
Journals Upon the Most Import
ant Topics of the hour.
tOMl H.r.D fVF.BY DAT FOR EVEKINO TKLEURAm.
American Steel.
from the Tribune. ,
The IIarrib(irg and Philadelphia Journals in.
form us of the foundation, under the auspices of
eminent capitalists and business mon, of a larjje
wtabllfhmcnt for manufacturing; steel and artl.
clee composed thereof, such as axles, rails, tire,
boiler-plate, ship-plate, etc., In a favorable loca
tion In the valley of the Susquehanna. This
movement, we should ludsre from the tenor of
European scientific publications and the rcporta
of American imports, is one for which our indus
trial world is fully ripe. England, Franco, Ger
many, Russia, and Sweden have been for some
years making the most rapid strides In the sub
stitution ol ttcef for Iron for all uses where great
resistance to wear or strain is required. The
Lotnlon and Northwestern Kail road, after sub-
cciinn Biodi ruiiH 10 cruuitu lesus mis auumiuctru
hat one bar of this material will outwear at
least twenty iron rails, and, at the same time,
j his rail ill bear the most violent lat a and twists
railroads have tried steel tire on their wheels.
rwt fnunrl ilipm nn tntimtplv minnnnr in thnqa
made of iron, that immense establishments are
engaged in supplying the demand.
The most succeslul ship-buildors in Great,
Britain tlnd that their steel ships are equally
6afe when 25 per cent, lighter than those made
of iron, and consequently they can carry a
quarter more than the ordinary cargo, to the
great profit ol the owner. In short, steel rope?
for deep mine, steel ships, steel locomotive
boilers, steel wheels, steel guns, and steel shot
Appear to be the order of the day! and this pro
tean metal, this malleable, ductile, tempering,
weldable material this hardest, touelicst,
bristliest, most elastic of all available substances
is following in its proper progrejsive order in
the series ot ages "the stone," "the bronze,"
"the iron," "the steel" and is proving itself, in
this period ot incessant motion and change, to
be eminently the metal of motion and progress;
whether that motion and that progress be on
land or on scaf whether it be in the quick mem
bers of a whirling machine, or whether, in a
)olitiofil sense, it be working out a "liery gospel"
With a "thinking bayonet."
But to return: This new movement In the Sus
quehanna valley seems to have more than a
3oeal significance. The United States Is almost
utterly dependent upon England for her supply
of thn ep-jcntial articles named above, and vat a
Philadelphia paper informs us that a few of our
railroad companies of which it is cognizant have
bought, witnin the last two months, a million
- dollars of this material from the people who
four President in his message has just told us)
planred, built, manned, and maintained ships
to prey upon our Inoffensive merchantmen a
million of dollars seat over the set in two
months lor this single material simply because
the railroads must have it, and cannot pet it at
Lome. To remove this dependence is to prove
our country stronger for all purpones of war,
and hence more capable of commanding peace.
England already possesses sixteen large estab
lishments supplying all or part of the above
named articles; fcand 'continental Governments
have thought it necessary to establieh the manu
facture, at least, of cteel f or cannon and nrojec
tiles, In the lands subject to their control, bv
direct subsidies. Tbe rulers of these countries
have been unable to appreciate the argument
that England, being in a condition to turn out a
cheap product nt present, should bs allowed to
monopolize the business. And every intelligent
American, with a view to the rapid development
of our varied mineral wealth, niuttt rpgar I with
great interest a movement which will add new
activity to our mines, keep our gold at home,
give our nation another industry, and strengthen
us as a nation both for peace and for war.
Ihe Era oi Statesmen Mr. Seward and
Mr Stanton.
From Ihe Timet.
It is a happy circumstance that we have at
length readied a time in the history of our Go
vernment in which statesmen and organizers
"' .ppear in public affairs, and continue their
course of duty, despite popular clamor.
There were no " better abused men" !n the
first two years of our war than Mr. Seward and
Mr. Stanton. The scandals that circulated
against the Secretary of War could not be num
bered. He was crazy; he insulted all his friends;
he was a bloodthirsty radical, a tyrannical Ro
btfpitrre; he knew nothing ot war or its organi
zation; he carried the prejudices of political life
into the service of his counirv; he " worshipped
the neirro," and violated the freedom of the
whites by imprisoning contractors.
No one could get on with him; he must leave
his place, or the national cause be ruined. De
putation after deputation.indivldual after indi vi -dual,
waited on the President to beg Mm to re
move him. But Mr. Lincoln saw that he had
the right man in the right place. Mr. Stanton
remained indifferent to the popular clamor, lie
had his own plans, and was determined to exe
cute them. A few friends continued constant to
him;- and of two things no enemy ever ventured
to accuse him first, of the slightest suspicion
of peculation, though he was handling some five
hundred millions a year; and secondly, of any
indillerence to the hapless sufferer from the war,
the unfortunate slave. He persevered in his
office, and aimed at distant effects, not present
popularity at duty, not applause.
The retiult has been a military administration
which will be the admiration of all time for its
organization, and to whose wonderful efficiency
the Republic almost owes its sal ration. Mr.
Btaiiton has been seen to accomplish what no
military leader in Great Britain could accom
plish in the Crimean war, with a much smaller
force and under much fewer obstacles, the per
fect -equipment, supply and transportation ol
gTeat masses ol men over vast spaces. Napoleon
himself, witn two-thirds ot Eurooetodraw from.
did not effect so much, so speedily, and with
such perfect organization of immense armies, as
did this Pennsylvania lawyer, suddenly elevated
to the head of a powerful military bureau. All
men see now his wonderful capacities for his
task.
His verv faults aided him. His Impatient
energy subdued all obstacles; his brusquenfiss
was needed for meddlesome intruders, and his
arbitrary treatment of dishonest contractors
was the only thing which could check the
terrible and increasing disease of public cor
ruption. Mr. Seward again was the centre of more
abuse, and scandal, and attack, than any other
mm ol the day, except Mr. Lincoln himself. He
was negotiating with the South; he was indit
icrent to freedom; he was truckling to Europe;
he had no earnestness in the contest; he was
civen ud to intoxication, and had lost his wits,
It he continued to euideour foreign relations.
we should have all Europe joining with the
month.
The President was besought auain and again
to remove him: some ol the most prominent men
of his own party opposed themselves to him; he
uas entreated to resizn. and many most patriotic
citizens believed him to be the source of all our
misfortunes. We do not propose to defend or
excuse all Mr. Seward's savings, or every mea
snra of his diDlomacv. Some of his proceedings
towards European powers we should have de
sired to have seen otherwise; but we submit now
to all reasonable person that, fudging Mr. Sew
ard's loreipu policy by Its fruits, it has been pre
eminently eucteful.
Possibly something of its success may have
been due to accident, to the 1ealouy of Euro-
neun powers of one another, and tq the revolt!
tionary fire and prodigious energy shown by
our own people Thumay be, and yet the result
remains that in the great opportunity of many
V centuries lor our rivals and enemies in Europe
lo strike us a weakening and damaging blow,
in the midst of the most perilous and conflicting
question", with constantly oecnrrlng provoca
tions and unwise acts of suboidinates, not an
rpportunity or temptation was oifer?d by our
Government for loreign lntorlercnco, and not a
break of lnendly relation occurred with any
European lower. If such a result b'! not an
evidence of wise statesmanship, we know not
what proof can be ottered of It.
13y some means or other, Enulaud and France
never were presented with the chance which
they would so gladly have embraced of inter
fering to break up the Union, and make the
Urited States a second-rate power. It is true
that some steps ol Mr. Seward's policy have
been less bold and less confident In the asser
tion of principles tuan we would have pre
ferred. St',11 the result justifies his caution. If
Le had yielded to clamor, or if Mr. I.itcoln had
put in his place a more headstrong man, we
might now be plunged in war with halt
tlit world.
Mr. Seward's name will go down not as of a
man who could well torccast the whole strangle,
or who fully understood its bearings but as of
a prudent and self-contained statesman, who
never let present effect and popularity turn him
from what he believed would lie tor the permanent
benefit of the country. Both of the5e leader In
our civil war show tho power of independence
and persistence in a course conscientiously be
lieved right, though opposod to popular favor.
They prove that our politics have at length bo
come so earnest as to compel public men to be
statesmen, or to leave the stngo. The Pierce
and Buchanan era is over. Tha day of popular
ctl'ect, of acting solely for influence on "the peo
ple." ot the headstrong, blustering, thoughtless,
and superficial statesmanship is past at least
with our leaders. Wo may now expect inde
pendent men in public places, even though
sometimes they arc disagreeable to their con
btitucnts. Hungary.
from the Tribune.
The account of the opening of tho Hungarian
Diet by the Emperor of Austria will find thou
sands of interested readers in all civilized coun
tries. By their heroic bravery in 1848 tho II un
gaiians have found numerous admirers, and this
admiration was not diminished by the firm,
though passive resistance wh'. ;h the nation,
although conquered, made to the persistent
attempts of the Austrian Government to deprive
them ol their autonomy and reduce them to the
condition of a province of the Empire. While
Galhcia and other Slavic crown-land3 sent dele
gates to the Central Parliament, which was to
consolidate the unity of the Empire, the Hunga
rians were firm in refusing to take any part in
it. Politicians have long been speculating as to
what would be the probable end of this resist
ance. The opening of the Diet, on December U, and
the speech of tho Emperor, are a cunclusive
proof that the Hungarians, on tne whole, have
carried their po;nt. Tho Imperial speech dis
tinctly recognizes the Kingdom ot Hungary as a
country altogether distinct from the other pos
sessions ot the Emperor, and possessing 601110
historical rights, which the Emperor declares
himself ready to recognize. This point granted,
ihe Hungarians generally feci hopeful that a re
conciliation between them and the Austrian
Goveniment can be effected. There seems to be
no doubt that the Emperor has met with an en
thusiastic reception. 1 lid natives generally are
wishing to recognize Pranci Joseph as their
king, and to forget tho struggle of independence
of 1848, and the present leaders of tlie nation
express themselves hopeful that all the difficul
ties still remaining will be success! ully overcome.
Whether these expectations can be realized.
the future must show. At present, tne wish to
come to a mutual understanding seems to over
shadow all other considerations. Mill, the natu
ral interests of the Hungarian people and the
Austrian Government are so diilerent ns lo be
sure to bring on new disagreements. Hungary
demands the development ol its own independ
ent nationality, while the Austrian Government
cannot cease to aim at a more thorough consoli
dation of the empire. Whether these divergent
tendencies can be harmonized is doubted by
many. At all events, tho ultimate solution of
the Hungarian question will be a most Import
ant precedent tor an other European complica
tions of a similar character, and thus be ot great
importance for the fut ure of all Europe.
Tho Freedmen's Buicaa and the Army.
from the Herald.
Theie seems to be considerable clashing and
misunderstanding betw een the operations of the
Freedmen's Bureau and the business of tho army
In the South. The two branches of the service
do not work together at all. The best advices
we have convince us that the work ol the Freed
men's Bureau could be belter administered by
the United States troops left in the Southern
country than by all the radical loafers, who are
seeking to make political capital outot theiroth-
cial positions, put together. The best disposi
tion of the latter would be to put them into a
sack and plunge them into the Mississippi, the
Tombigbee, the Alabama, tne Tennessee, the
Chattahoochee, or any other nver in the South
that would save them from the effects of the
bowstring. General Grant has a proper under
standing of this whole business. Ho has seen for
himself, and speaks from personal know
ledge. He advises essentially that the
business of the iFreedmen's Bureau be
performed by the army; and when a
man of General Grant's practical good sense
takes such a position the people may bo assured
there are abundant reasons to back it. As things
ore now going on, the Freedmen's Bureau is
simply a Government asylum lor needy politi
cal adventurers of the radical stamp. Instead
of benefiting the unfortunate negroes of the
South, the Buiau simply serves to aggravate
their sufferings and to accelerate their progress
to ultimate extinction . President Johnson has
it in his power to reform or to abolish the whole
concern; and it it be necessary to commence
with the secretary ot war in oraer to do so, ana
he should meet objection from that quarter, let
him follow Andrew Jackson's example, and
turn nun out of the Cabinet, as Jackson did
Dunne. Some wholesome and vigorous demon
stration of this sort U required, it the President
intends to carry out, in the teetb of the radicals,
his admirable reconstruction policy.
Financial Polics of the Government.
from Ihe World.
Since the adjournment, Secretary McCulloch
has bean In consultation with the heads of the
appropriate committees of Congress on the bills
drafted by him to carry out the recommenda
tions of his annual report. We shall have no
opportunity to examine these bills until they are
reported to the House of Representatives; but it
is proper enough, meanwhile, to make such, sug
gestions as may r-eem to bo pertinent.
The subject can be most conveniently consi
dered under two heads the first including the
measures suitable to be adopted with relerence
to the public debt : tho other, with reference to
the currency. The latter is 01 more iimueuiaie
urgency; but the lormer requires more mrgenebs
of view and a more long-sighted adjustment to
the future It is this ouly whicn we win discuss
at this time.
After the maturest reflection we have been
able to bestow, we are opposed to any attempt,
bv this ConLiess. to create a sinking fund or to
adont anv other measure lookin? to the imme
diate reduction ot the principal of tbe debt,
liur'nnr the present and the next fiscal year, the
Government must be a large borrower; and it is
cVinrlntiim-v to be making a clatter about a
Kiuk-iiiT lund while we are still borrowing money
Such charlatanrv was, Indeed, practised in Eng
land during the Napoleonic wars, but it turned
nut in nractiee that the sinking-fund was di
verted to other uses than that to which it had
been set apart. The argument in its favor is, that
it nurses the public credit by the assuranco of a
sincere Intention to meet tho public engage
ments. But the ouly solid assurance is
the future ability and disposition ot the people
to pay the necessary taxes; and there can be no
question that the Hbinty to liquidate some por
tion of the public debt will be greater three or
five ypars hence than it is at presenf, and that it
wu atterwards go on with a rapid increase.
The whole energies of the country nre needed,
at present, for mere recovery irom 'disorder. If
vou have a debtor whoso barns pnd granaries
have been burned and his cattle swept off by a
pest, a wise forbearance for a year or two, and
even a further 1 Dsn to give him a new start, is
the bef.t security for ultimate payment. And if,
during those years of lenity, his sons are be
coming old enough to be taken out of school
and put on the farm, his future resources will be
still greater.
Even it the United States were an old country,
wiih a population incapable of lurther increase,
it would be inexpedient to attempt the imme
diate reduction ot the debt, while the South is a
desolated waste, our currency bloated and tin
healthy, enterprise at a d' ad halt, and our ship
ping interest not yet recovered from the destruc
tive agencies which swept it lioin the ocean.
No suain should be put upon a sick patient
during his convalesce nee. It taxes are made to
rrcFS with grinding severity on a section so poor
1 i V . 11 1 41. I 111 J
nun t-xuttiihktu un uiu numu,iuu peupiy will niuil-
liarizc their minds with the idea of repudiation.
But it tho Government "tempers the wind to the
shorn lamb," the habit ot paying taxes in pro
portion to their ability will reconcile the people
to tho heavier exactions which may be required
of Increased means. As the late President Lin
coln, with pithy common senBe, said in one of
his messages, "It is easier to pay any sum when
we are able, than it is to fpay it before wo are
able." He was looking to the great increase in
our ability to pay debts which must result from
the future increase of our population. Taking
the avcrturc increase, as shown by tho decennial
enumerations trom 17:10 to I8 i0, as a basis. Mr.
Lincoln Introduced into his second aunual
Message, tho following estimate ot our future
numbers:
1870 42.328 311
180 6ti7 216
IKS) 76 077,872
1WM1 1(W 2i 415
T'10 188 m 628
11-20 186,0X4 835
Vm . 201680,914
Our national debt U three thousand millions 5
about one hundred dollars a head tor our popula
tion in 18(10. In the year l:i00, even if the debt
underwent no reduction mennwhlle. it would be
Ices than thirty dollars a head ; in 1930 but eight
dollars a head. It it were to be paid at present,
we have four or five millions of neonle the
emancipated slaves who have hardly a shirt to
mcir dbckb, ana are incapable 01 contributing a
single dollar. A large portion of tho Southern
people are, just now, not much better or!'. If we
do not discourage enterprise and industry by ex
cessive burdens, these classes will, in a few
years, become property holders and contributors
to the public revenue; the tax-paying aollity of
the rest ot the country increasing at tho same
time, but not in so rapid a ratio. The uexc Con
gress, or the Congress after the next, may wisely
toko measures for tr.e reduction of the debt But
it should be the chief business of this Congress
to rcsloie and foster the business of the country.
Secretary McCulloch' properly aks, in his
report, lor authority to make considerable loans.
lhey are necessary for withdrawing the legal
tnders unci restoring the currency, as well as to
tide the country over the two or three years of
rehabilitation. With regard to taxes, we would
diminish rather than increase them, and make a
more just distribution on a wiser system. After
reducing the army nnd navy to the lowest point
cousiftent with safety (and considering the num
bers of disciplined veterans we could call into
the field on short notice, the army may be small
inaeed), we w ould raise in taxes over what Is
barely sufficient to pay current expenses and the
interest on tne dent. The lowest late ol taxa
tion adequate for this would yletd a constantly
increasing surplus when business becomes
healthy and robust. Thnt ever-erowing surplus
wouia naturally be applied to the reduction ot
the debt.
There are two classes who will be likely to in
sist on taxes lor the immediate creation ot a
sinking fund; not, however, irom solicitude for
the public credit, but to mask les3 avowable
designs. These classes are the protectionists, and
the politicians whose hopes of office depend on
keeping theSouthoutof the Union. The high-tariff
men want a pretext tor taxing the community
for the benefit of the manutacturers: and the
Republican politicians would provoke the South
into repudiation by oppressing them with taxes
which, for the present, thav nave no means to
pny. It is by alarming the bondholding interest
and the manufacturing interest that the Repub
lican party intend to keep the South out of the
Union, and retain their own hold on power.
Men of sense and patriotism see that our true
interest lies in making the taxes as lieht as pos
sible until the business of the country has under
gone a neaitny revival.
lUKVriOTUBIB or
LOOKING-GLASS,
P0KTRAIT,
PHOTOGRAPH,
AND
PIC T U BE FRAME S,
AND GILT MOULDINGS
No. 929 ARC II STREET,
PHILADELPHIA.
PAINTINGS, AND A GREAT VARIETY
OF ENGRAVINGS ON HAND.
OLD WORK RECILT EQUAL
TO NEW. 11 Mm
Jl R O W N & MAGE E,
MANUFACTURERS OF
TRUNKS,
VALISES,
BAGS,
RETICULES,
And all stylos ot (roods suitable for
Travellers and Excursionists.
A large stock of
MOliOCCO TRAVELLING BAGS '
AND RETICULES,
FOR GENUS AND LADIES,
Of our own Manafaotulo, suitable for
HOLIDAY PRESENTS.
112C No. 708 CHESNUT 8TKE(f.
Q It L E A N S HOUSE,
No. 031 CHESNUT STREET,
PHILADELPHIA,
J RTKl'PACIIEll,
Pbovbixior,
Conducted on the European p'an. 1125 8m
"MEW MUSIC
STORE. WILLIAM
II.
XI BOM it a. CO.,
No. 1102 CHEBNtTT Rtieet
Dealers In A merit an and Foreign Alusici Pianos, Melo-
urimiH.iiu wuniuii luB.iuuiruinui ftlirilHl aJSO
rtvr quality of btriuvs constantly on uautl.
sune-
11 Tim
CURTAINS AND SHADES.
J3 E A U T I P U L
. SETS OF EMER0IDE2ED "
PARLOR
BROCATELLK CURTAINS,
AND '
REP CURTAINS,
SUITABLE
CHRISTMAS PRESENTS
FOR LADIES.
I. E. WALRAVEN,
MASONIC HALL,
10 21 No. 719 CHFSNUT STREET.
WATCHfcS AND JEWELRY.
CHRISTMAS AND
NEW YEAR'S PRESENTS.
Fersoni wishing to purchase Frrwnta for the Holi
day, will consult Hielr own Interest ty calling on
'DIAMOND DEADER JEWEtEB,'!
WATCHES AllD HLVHIt WABK,
WAT0XES ASD iEWELBT BEPAI&ED.
And examine his larne and beautiful uionment of Dia
mond!, Watches, Jewelry Silver Ware. Plated Ware,
French Tlmcnlccei Oold Cbnlna, SlccTe Buttons, and
eta of Jewelry of all kinds, from tho uioit expensive to
other of comparatively small value.
Always on hand, a large assortment of Engagement
and Wedding Kings, Plain Kings of all sizes, weights, and
qualities.
My assortment Is complete in all Its branches. A
CALL 13 SOLICITED. 12 20
P. 8. Diamonds and all Precious Stones, as also Old
Gold and Silver, bought fur cash or taVen In exchange
QASSIDY & BALL,
No. 12 SOUTH SECOND STREET,
Have now on lian.l a large stock of
Goods Suitable for Holiday Presents
FINE WATCIIES,
FINE GOLD JEWELRY.
SILVER AAD SILVER-PLATED WARE.
A large assortment of
FANCY SILVER WARE,
SUITABLE FOB BRIDAL PRESENTS.
Particular attention paid to making 12 8 lot
MASONIC MARKS.
CHOICE HOLIDAY GOODS,
Large and handsome assortment of
COLD AND SILVER WATCHES
DIAMONDS, JEWELRY,
S II, VEU AND PLATED WARE
CLOCKS, BRONZES, E1C.
CLA.TC.K & BIDDLE,
Successors to Ihoroas C. Garrett,
6 22 Ivrp No. 712 CHESNUT STREET.
A full assortment ot above coods constantly on
band at modeiate prices the Husioal Boxos playinp
Irom i. to 1U beauuim Aua.
FARE & BROTHER, Importers.
No. 824 CHEiNTJl JsTBKKT,
11 Unnthlyrp .
Below Fourth.
HOLIDAY PRESENTS !
HOLIDAY PRESENTS !
JACOB IIAlTLiEY,
No. 6 22 MARKET STREET,
BOUTU B1DX, PHILADELPHIA,
Dealer in
Watches, Clocks, Jewelry, Silver
nnd Plated-ware. 12 61m
HENRY HARPER,
No. 520 ARCIi STREET
Uanutacturer and Dealer in
Watches,
l'ine Jewelry,
Silver-Plated Ware,
AMD ,
8 80 ly v Solid Silver-ware.
II I O II
JEWELRY.
JOHN B REN NAN,
DEALER IN
DIAMONDS. FINE WATCHES, JEWELRY,
Etc. Etc. Etc
8 20 ly Ko. 18 S. EI'iHTH 8 1 KEET, PhUada.
JOBEUT SHOEMAKER & CO.,
' It. E. Cor. of FOUBTH and E ACE Sirceto,
PHILAKKLPfllA,
WHOLESALE DRUGGISTS
Importers and Dealers In Foreign and Domcstio
Window and Plate Glass,
HANCFACTFKERB OF
White Lead and Zinc Paints,Putty,etc
AQXKTB FOB 1B1 CELEBRATED
FRENCH ZINO PAINTS.
Dealers and Consumers supplied at 1020 3 in
VERY LOW PRICES FOR CASH.
r I. B. SEELEY'8 HARD RUBBER
rV Truss Kstaullithiiient. Ho. VHJ CIIKHNITT
SJitkhu street, near liruad This Truas, unlike all
IwiBBLrMothois. cures Kuptures. Irees the cord Irom all
iTmissypresHure. will never rust, breult, chaie. or be
VV come nitny i ntted to lorui. requiring no siran 1
u.ed in bathing 1 always good as new Hupport
ers, Elastic Htucklnus, Hhoulder llraces, buspeasnries
etc., ot lmprove.1 stvles. Ltuiy sttundjuit. ('all and ex
amine, or send tor pamphlet. u ijj jlu
DR. JOSEPH II. GALLAGHER, FORMERLY
Ht the Dispensary, H. Fourth street, may be eon
suited bv ihe Poor dully, tree ol charge, athli Olllce, No.
'Hh h. THIHI l-treet, between the hours of 1 anil 2
o'clock (Sundays excepted! ,Kiitrauc on Vveiina
sued., , nam
j WATCHES, JEWELRY, &o. j
MUSICAL BOXES.
DRY GOODS RETAIL.
P. H H A V QOO 1)
S.
F. T. QUINTAN,
Ao. 4?0 bOUTH STREET.'
Now opened for sale, a largo stock ot rich Imported
Dr8 Good, in
POPLINS AND BIERINOES,
SILK POPLINS AND EriNCLINES,
RICH FLAID3 AND STB I PES,
And variety of other disirablelools.
, CLOAKS AND SI1AW L9.
We are not? oflcnnjr decidedly the cheapest goods
in this line to be found In tbls city.
PLI'EKB PFOC11E SUAWLS.
FX1CA HEAVY KLAMvEl PI1AWL8.
We will sell superior Cloaks 'at 10, fine Cloth
acqucs. ficm 13 nf, common goods at lower prlocs.
F. T. QUINLAN,
12 51m No. 29 SOUTH Street.
South street Cheap Cloak, Shawl, and Pry Goodi
Emporium, flrt Pry tioods Store boiow Fifth street.
PIANOS, &o.
REDUCTION IN PRICES! REDUO
f I TlON IN l'UK K.81
CHOkAKEK 1 1ANO VORTK MANUFACTFB
I Nil I llyl'lkV
hare now at their Warerooms, So. 1021 Cnr.BNIT
eireet, a superior annortment of thir UHKlVAL.l.i'U
r 1 A ivh, l)cb thry will acii at cream reduced prions
Hereon would do wall ht fi.Illrtcr nn ua b ore Diirohaa-
lnp elneWL, r: A sunritntee ulven with srery I'lnno
IllK. H( 110 V A K Hit PIaNO rORIP. M tKIICAO.
Tl'HINO COMPANY. 0 lOil CHKHNUT Htreet 4 t
f?? E S T E Y'S
COTTAGE ORGANS,
Kot only CKEZCKLLED, bnt VNKQPALTjF.D Li
partly f Ton and lower tkined especially for
Churches and 8i liooln. but round to be eauallr well
adapted to the Parlor and Drawing Koom. For sals
onty Dy K. M. BRUCE,
Also a complete assortment of ttaa Parfaot llelmleon
Rd. N . HKVfr NTH MtreM.
ccnmmiT on nnna. 7 II Km
HAIR ESTABLISHMENTS.
QIIIUSTMAS PRESENTS.
T. M. GREEN'S
IT A J It J E W E L It Y
ESTABLISHMENT,
No. 43!) AEC1I 8TBEET, BELOW FIFTH,
rBILADELHaiA.
OKDEK9 PROMPTLY AND SATISFACTORILY
EXECUTED. 1316 13 1
UAKER'S POPULAR HAIR ESTABLISH
.1 MENT The assortment ol H raids. Wigs Tonpee
HanAeaux. Tinplllonn, houleaux, Tonauos, Fris
Crinipses. Cnrlv, IiluBlve Seams mr ladles, cnnnoti
eouai.ed by spy other house In the United Statos.
prices lower tliun elsewhere
11 3f 3m No. Stifl rllKHNCT Street. Philadelphia.
STANDARD SCALES.
F
I R B A N K S
STANDARD SCALES,
Adapted, to Every Jiranch of Dual-
ness Where a, Correct and
Du.ratle Scale Is ltequired.
A uniform standard ot weights, and a correct sva
tem of welfruinfr, are subjects claiming the attention
of every Individual In tbe community.
FAIRBANKS & EWING,
MASONIC HALL,
No. 715 CHESNUT STREET,
8 21mthCn)4p PHILADELPHIA.
DENTISTRY.
ISAIAH PRICE, DENTIST, GRADUATE OP
btladelphla College of Dental Rurtiory, class 18S3-4,
lormerly 01 West Chester, Pa., having srrvea throe years
in the Arniv, has lexunied the practice of bis profession
at No. 241 N. ELEVENTH 8treet. Philadelphia, where
be v ill endeavor to nlvexMls aoiory attention to all who
may requiie nis pioiesRion&i services. 11 0 lj
MANUFACTURER,
AND DEALER IN
ptotoejragh gJMums,
BOOKS, BIBLES. PRAYERS,
Uaeazlnes, Novels, and oil the
Now Publications.
CARD, MEDIUM, AND IMPERIAL
PHOTOGRAPHS.
Stereoscopes and Stereoscopic Views.
Tictarcs of all Lirnls Framed to order.
803 CHESTNUT ST. 803
V,0
if
: ,11
Til
hI
I1
?5
s v; T
W B IV PAINTINGS.
JAMES S. EARLE & SONS
Have Just Opened
VERY FINE NEW PAINTINGS,
AT MODERATE PRICES,
FOE CHRISTMAS SALES.
EAXILES' GALLERIES
AKD LOOKING-GLASS WAREROOMS,
121 Bo 816 CHESNUT STREET.
PHILADELPHIA AND
REAPING RAILROAD.
t CHRISTMAS HOLIDAYS,
Excursion Tickets will be issued at Ueouced Faxes
between all Stations on llaln Road and liranahes.
fcood from SATURDAY, 23d inst , until WED-NEi
DAY, January 3, 106.
G A. N 'COLLS,
12201?t General Superintendent.
TO SHIP CAPTAINS AND OWNERS. THE
1 undersigned havmtt leased the KE.N.SINGl'ON
HCRI.W Doc K,bfK to Inform his frieuds and the patrons
of the Dock that be it prepared with Inoreased facilities
to Accommodate those having vesae 8 to he raised or
repaired and being a pracilcai chip-carpenter and
caulker, will give personal attention to the vessels en
trusted to hint lor repairs.
I'aetulns or Attents. 6hlD Carpenters, and Machinists
having vessels to repair, are solicited to call.
Having ibe agency for ihe sale or "wetterstedt s
Patent Metallic t'omposltlou" for Copper Paint, for the
pietervation of vespeV bottoms, for this city, I am pre
pared to lumUh the same nJ",'1,e u am MITT,
Keus'npton tiorew Dock,
ill DELAWARE Avenus. above LA Btreet
qMlEBTAMP AGENCY, NO. 304 CHF.SNOT
J BTBKET, A BOVE Jill hi), WILL BE CONTINUED
AM Hl'-Khl OKOHK
KTAMPHof I' VhRY DKRCRiTTlON CON8TA?tTr.Y
OK UAfcD, AKP 1M A-.Y AMOVJST. 1113
DRY GOODS RETAIL.
113 pitiCE cc wood, 113
NORTH NINTH STUlJlUT,
" ' ABOVE ARCH.
' USEFCL i RTICLES FOR
HOLIDAY PRESENTS.
Ladies' Embroidered HdktV, scollopod borders.
Ladies' Embroidered Hdkfd., worked vwlth colon.
Ladies' Embroidored Hdkfs., hemsUtohod.
I-aoies Linen Can brio Hdkfs., hoe borders. '
Gents' and Boys' colored border lidkis.
GcnU' Hemstitched Hdkfs.
Ladies' and Misses' Hemstitched Hdkfs.
One lot ol Ladies' Linen Hdkfs, 12 cents.
A lare assortment of I'ortemonnaies.
CJenls' Neck Ties and Suspenders.
Buffalo Ualr Brushes, plain and Inlaid backs.
Britannia Towder Boxes.
Ono lot of French Furniture Sets, Tory cheap. '
A large assortment of Fsnoy Soaps and rot.
lumery, "
A large assortment oi Ladles' ana Gents' Gloves.
Boys' and Micses' eiorts.
Ladies' and Gents' Merino Shirts and Dtawora. '
Ladies' Balmoral Sitlrts.
Misses' Fancy French Merino Hose.
PRICK & WOOD,
No. 113 It. NINTH Street,
N. B. Bost makes bleaohod and nnbloaohed Mas-
ins.
Wide Canton Flannels, 31 contt a yard.
Heavy Canton Flannels, 86, 40, and CO cents.
All-wool and Domet Flannels.
Heavy all-wool Shaker Flannel.
A now lot of Shirting Flannel. 1
Table linens, Napkins, and Tow Is.
Best makes shirting Linens. 12 21
JJREIFUSS & EELSINGER,
No. 49 H. EIGHTH STREET,
EAST BIDE,
Hare Jnst received a large lot ot
HAFD-MADE VOOLLES GOODS.
LaMKS' FANCY WOOU8.
w h 11 k couLS. Lacks, kmrroidf.rif.s. vzilm
HAIR N&T8,
Ana a ran uneof
LADIES' AND CHILDREN 8 KID. SILK. AND
. . FANCY OLOVbh.
Also, a large lot of
CROCHET LACES,
W hlch we are offering at reduced prices. Uly
ho 1024 CHKHNUT 8TBKKT.
E. M. NEEDLES.
EVERY VARIETY AND ALL NOVEL
TIES IN
Laces and Lace Goods,
EMBROIDERIES AND WHITE GOODS,
IIANDKEKCUIEFS, ETC. ETC.,
SUITABLE FOB
CHRISTMAS PRESENTS.
Purchase early and avoid the Crowd.
Jl I C II SILKS;
FOR EVENING DIIESSES.
RlCa SILKS FOR STREET DRESSES.
RICH SILKS OF EVERY VARIETY. '
All at Very Low Prices.
BCAELET AND BLACK PLAID TOPLINS.
ALL-WOOL WINK COLOR POrLIKS.
HANDSOME GREEN bUK POPLINS.
HANDSOME BLACK SILK POPLINS.
TTt'b" TIT lei.' TBTSTT TJftDTTBiJ
BLACK EMPRESS CLOTH POPLINS.
GREEN AND BLUE SCOTCH PLAID CLOIHS,
for mantlls and suns.
RICH PRINTED FRENCH MBRINOES,
Reduced to $1, sold early this season at $1-76.
1J YARDS WIDE BLACK QUEES'S CLOTHa,
At 81, 81 25, and 81 5(1.
1J YARDS WIDE ENGLISH MERINOES,
At 65 Cenu, worth 87 j.
DOUBLE-WIDTH PLAIN CASHMEEE3,
At 10 Cents, worth 62J.
Dress Goods of every varioty at greatly roduood
prices, to
CLOSE OUT OUR ENTIRE STOCK.
II. STEEL fc SOIV,
12 30m w
Nos. 713 and 715 N. TENTH ST.
No. 1024 CHESNUT STREET.
C2
6-1
pa
6?
628
HOPKINS'
HOOF KK1HT
UanofatorT. Ho. 62h a HCH Btreet.
Above Hlxtb street, l'bliauelphla,
Vboiesale and Keiall
Oars ssortment embraces ail tbe new aud deslrablaf
strief sixes, of every lenyiband sim walsifur LaUiea,
Ulsies and C'blldren
Tbose oi' OUH OWN iltKtt" are superior In ts
and (iuruw'ifv to auy wtberbairu mmtt, ana warrauUd
to aive satlH'uctlon
biixts made tv order, alterea, and repa ired 1 4 ly
1 a
2
G g p.
"3 ps 9 F
2 3 g
at m m
a E g
R w h
a 3 P
s if .
a Q 3 h s
cs j G R a-
g g S3" g R
a w r,
0 3 P h
w es ! w
a a .H,
? 2 I

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