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The evening telegraph. [volume] (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1864-1918, January 02, 1866, FOURTH EDITION, Image 4

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Js published every afternoon (Sundays ctoeptod)
at No. 108 S. third street. Price, Thru Venlt
Tcr Copy (Double Sliect), or Eighteen Cents Per
Hrorfr, f ayablex to the Carrier, and mailed to
Subscribers out Oftiie city at Nine Dollars Per
Annum ; One Dollar and Ftfl-j Cents for Two
Months, invariably in advance for tlie period
ordered.
io insure the Insertion of Adztrtisements in aU
of our Editions, Vtcy must be forwarded to our
office not later tiian 10 O'clock each Morninrj.
TUESD4Y, JANUARY 2, IMG.
JUceting of the Union State Central Com
. mittee.
Bepfom), Pa December 20, 18':.". The Union
State Central Committee of Pennsylvania will
meet Id one ol the Committee Rooms ot' the
llotthe of Representatives,, in Ilarrinbnr;, on
Krldav. the lDth of January, A. D. lHtifi, at 3
o'cloe'k I. M , lor the purpose of tixin iho time
lor holding the next State Convention and trans
acting such other bu Fin ess as may be presented
tor consideration. Jotix Cessna,
Chairman Union State Central Coniniit!e'.
Onr State Legislature Its Duties and It
Privileges.
These assembled this morning at the State
Capital the Legislature which is to guide our
State through that depressing period which
always succeeds a time of extraordinary ex
citement. Our civil polity', like the human
frame, must have a depression in correspond
ence with the previous unusual exertions, and
it is the gravest duty of a legislator to recu
perate the strength of a Commonwealth with
out the use of unwholesome tonics. Such
will be among the duties of the members of
our State Legislature, and to successfully per
. form It thej must exercise discretion, possess.
. ability, and have a talent and experience
which we greatly doubt whether they possess
. The caucus nominations made yesterday were
. of course unfavorable to Philadelphia. Mr.
James Kenny, the nominee for Speaker
of the House, and whose election totvk place
this morning, is, of course, a member from
the country, while the old Clerk and his
assistants will without doubt be rechoscn.
In the Senate the Speaker was elected last
' year, so that the only officers are the Clerks,
all of whom Lave been elected. We hope
that honesty, devotion to State, not party in
terests, and an unswerving devotion to free
dom and duty, will be the characteristics ol
1 the session. The immorality and bribery
which has been too olten prevalent in the
: capital, can be checked it the members de
sire. It is in their, own hands whether they
acquire the reputation of respected, honora
ble legislators, or whether they be placed
upon the catalogue of their corrupt, dishonest,
worthless predecessors.
' The issues which they will be ca'ledupon
to settle are of vital interest to our State.
If they but do their duty, protect our trade
and encourage our manufactures if they put
forth the mnited influence of our legislation in
fayor of our rights, they will be able to guide
the State through this roost onerous period of
reaction. If they fail to do right, and waste
their energies upon sell-ag?randizement, they
will blast the private character and seriously
injure the State. Let them decide. Either
way is open to them, and it is for them to
choose which way is right.
Is Philadelphia to become a Japanese City?
Tub Japanese city of Yeddo was lor centu
ries shut up from the world. The jhips and
steamers of other countries never ruffled the
waters of the Bay of Yokuhama. In the
words of a Japanese author, the following
, reasons are given lor this seclusion : (iCos
- Fvcres never spoke of gain, wishing to
check the lust of it in its source. This also
was the reason why my ancestors cut off all
intercource of foreign nations with Japan."
We are to infer from this that commerce is
supposed, even by the ignorant Japanese, to
be a source of wealth.
We are ashamed to write it. but no citv in
. the world with as magnificent a harbor, as
great a population as Philadelphia possesses,
is as much like Yeddo. At this day, with the
Delaware spreading its deep and broad waters
.the whole length of the city, with eight hun
dred thousand people crowding its shores,
we are literally without direct communica
tion with the other ports ol our own country.
A few lines form the exception, but this is
the rule, and New York and Baltimore con
trol the steam coastwise trade of the Union.
This disgrace is the greater, because Phila
delphia at one time was as far superior to
New York in commerce as ehe is now in
manufactures. How we allowed the power
we possessed to pass away into weakness, it
would be useless to inquire; the question
lorcei upon us is whether we can regain it.
' Certainly, if we would follow ths Japanese,
and, like Confucius, cheek the abuse of
wealth by dispensing with it altogether, we
had better continue the indifference of the
past ten years ; but if we believe that the city
would be made happier by more prosperity,
we had better make sure that the present
effort to establish lines of steamships to South
ern porta is successfully can led out. A num
ber ot our leading merchants have declared
that Philadelphia must lose her manufacturing
superiority, and cannot be developed In pro
portion with other cities, unless she has ade
quate means of transportation to accommo
date and Increase her business. They have
held meetings, and appointed committees to
raise subscriptions, and have alreidy obtained
upwards of $400,000, for the purpose of cre
ating lines to the principal ports of
. the South. They are workinc for the
good of the entire community. We believe
they have set themselves to this work as
shrewd busines. men, who want to make a
good investment; but we also eive them
credit for public spirit and civic pride. Their
plan is before the public, and it only remains
to see whether merchants and manufacturers
TITO DAILY KVKN1KG TKl.KGUAI'U 1'HH,AI)KU1HA, TUICSDAY,
will sustain it. The argument in its favor is
irn sistible. Tg it not plain that Philadelphia
cannot successfully continue to compete as a
seller with other cities that surpass her as a
sender? Merchants abroad prefer to buy in
New York or BaMmore, because thence they
can (ret direct transportation for their goods,
while here we have no steam lines, and, at cost
of money and fme, must send our manufac
tures to rival cities for exportation. And this,
too, at a time when the South is.becomlng the
great customer of the North ; when her people
want everything, and the competition to sell
is increasing evory day! There never was
such an opportunity offered to Philadelphia to
recover her lost trade.
But now we are locked up. The waters of
the Delaware are wasted in the ocean. And
while we are idle the wharves of New York
are crowded with steamers, and its whole
river-front is a scene of ceaseless activity.
Baltimore has four steamships to Liverpool ;
she contemplates a line to Hamburg and to
Bremen ; her steamers run regularly to New
Orleans and Savannah. We alone are Idle.
Vessels with their rich freight pass Delaware
Bay as if it were the mouth of a creek, and
we are not unlike the inhabitants of Yeddo,
who wondered when they first beheld a fleet.
Are we then to continue to degenerate, and
to become at last a Japanese city in America?
Mexican l'eonnue How Southern Slavery
will be Re-established.
Theius are many ways ol affecting an object
by other than direct means. It is easy (or an
insolvent debtor to retain his property by
making an assignment of it to his wife ; so also
is it easy or a people to accept the universal
freedom declared by the victors, and at the
same time continue slavery under a more
euphonious title. The spirit which has been
evinced by the South is such as to clearly
indicate that were it possible the blacks would
continue in a servitude as degrading as that
from which the force of Northern valor has
rescued them. It is, therefore, not the ab
sence of the de3lre, but of the opportunity,
which prevents its re-establishment. Yet with
this knowledge before us. we are gradually
giving into the hands of the Southern planters
the power U make any provisions relative to
the future ot the blacks, relying on our law
forbidding slavery to checkmate any oppres
sion, and render illeeal any attempt at human
bondage. From letters we have received, and
from the tone adopted by the Southern papers,
we can entertain no doubt but that at the
earliest opportunity the system of peonage,
which is a characteristic of Mexico, will be
transported into the Southern States.
The empire of Maximilian his set us an
example as to how a Government, while it
has forbidden slavery, can establish a system
as conducive to tyranny and oppression as
any cede of servitude existing at the time of
Saxon serldom, or anions; the captives of the
Bey of Tunis. How this can be done is
shown by an able message Irom Secretary
Seward, in reply to a resolution of the Sen
ate. We will see how ihe plan which was
adopted in Mexico worked on the 10th of Sep
tember. Hon W. H. Cobwjn, acting Charge
d' Affaires of the United States to Mexico,
lorwarded to the Secretary of State a series
of decrees from Maximilian relative tothe
status of the black emigrants who should be
induced to emigrate to that country. The
following regulations are the most important,
as they form the framework for the establish
ment of peonage. Although it is declared
thut every person, upon touching Mexican
soil, becomes free, yet the succeeding provi
sion rendered null the original assertion.
Each "laborer" is bound to Join himself to a
master, and to contract with him for a series
of years, not less than five, nor more than
ten. In return for his labor he is to receive
wages," one-fourth of which are to be de
posited in a bank of the employer. If he (the
"laborer") should become Indebted to his pro
prietor during these ten years, he can be held
in bonds until the amount of indebtedness is
cancelled. By such an ariangement it is evi
dent that with but little difficulty the whole
life of the servant could be made one long
bondage. ;
The feudal system has been transplanted to
our times. The serf is compelled to attach
himself to some lord, who agrees to give him
a miserable pittance, and finally, in a fit of
starvation and need, he Bells his birthright of
freedom for a mess of pottage. The same
system against which the Government ol the
United States is protesting because of its
establishment in Mexico to-day, is being
gradually brought Into full force within the
bounds of our own territory, under. aggra
vating circumstances.
The South, with that ability which has
always characterized its leaders, immediately
upon the failure of their Ik be 11 ion determined
to be victorious, not by force, but by fraud,
deceit, sycophancy, and unscrupulous false
hood. In this they have been successful.
'J he Freedmen's Bureau compels the blacks
to hire themselves to some master, to contract
to work for him at a rate of wages totally in
adequate. Should they fall In debt, which
they undoubtedly will, then It is the duty of
the State Legislature to make all needful
laws. Of course the white contractor should
not be Injured by loss of money, consequently
the black will have to work off his debt. As
the rate he receives is not sufficient to support
him. his burden, like that of Atlas, will be
constantly Increasing; he will never once reach
to freedom, but see it gradually receding from
him, despite all his efforts. In ten years the
whole black population will be wcrking off
their debts, under the power of the employer,
for either he must continue to labor and
be oppressed, or else be arrested for debt, and
spend his days in a county jail.
. Thus will we have the accursed system re
established over all the South. We may call
it peonage, or indebtedness, or justice, or
whatever soft sounding name may be desired,
but it Is slaveiy, as iniquitous and as unjust as
that of Barbary or South Carolina ten years
ago. Though Sa'an appear in the guise of an
angel of light, yet is he as evil and as power
ful as when his costume is the traditionary
hoofs and horns. Because human servitude Is
disguised, it is only the moie dangerous, for
if it appears in its native hldeousncss, then
the Christian scntimnt of our country would
kill it, but when masked and sugar-coated it
may be endured.
The action of the State Department In
protesting against th; establishment of
peonage in Mexico ; Is proper. Is worthy of
a free and liberty loving people but let charity
begin at home. Let us not only save Mexico
from such a curse, but be careful that while
we are endoavorlng to cure another we get
not the disease ourselves. The cunntng and
darkness with which the leaders of the late
inwuryent States commenced their efforts,
would, had it been persevered In. have secured
their triumph. But drunken with their (first
successes, they laid aside the veil of hu
utility, and claimed as a right what they
might have got by supplication. To-day we
see their designs, and warn our authorities
against them. We have guaranteed freedom
to on ignorant and helpless people. Let us
make good our word, and not, having re
deemed them from slavery, give them over to
the curse of peon servitude having dragged
them from the jaws of Charybdis, dash them
on the jutting of rock Scylla.
Let Jrstice be Done t
The recent conviction of young Ketchum,
charged with the commission of a gigantic
crime, and the inconsiderable punishment
which a jury ot bis countrymen have meted
out to him, indicates a leniency upon the part
of the people that Is neither praiseworthy nor
commendable. We have arrived at. a nnrtnA
when unscrupulous rascals who have means
at their command, are licensed by law to act
almost without control and ireed from any
responsibility. In the L-etchcm affair, a fast
youth is permitted to peculate a vast sum
from bis own father, and the offended law
visits upon blm four years and six months :
while in a neighboring city a poor man, with
a family to support, was sentenced to the
county jail for eight months lor the frightful
crime oi appropriating a nam i in our own
city, a vounir centleman connected both with
the bar and the military service has been
twice convicted o( manipulating bounty
papeis to his own advantage, and twice par
doned; when every day the dock of th
Quarter Sessions is crowded wl.h poor
wretcnes only guilty ot taxing feloniously
something to eat. 'lhere have been within
the past year or two immense bank defalca
tions. frauds, and swindles in this r.itv. th'nt
' - . 1
have been most mysteriously covered up.
One of the clerks ot a prominent bank
departed the city, and, after being arrested,
If 1 .1 -
ms case nas quieuy suDsiaea, ana sank from
public vuw. An olllcer of one of our public
institutions takes out of the vaults a conside
rable amount of coin, and the matter Is hushed
up by bis principal refunding the sum and
f .. a
quasnme inaicimenis. a prominent brnk-nr
absconds with $20,000, and is never heard of
more.
These are a few of the delightful uncertain
ties of the law. If the poor go astray and are
overtaken in a iault, it is essentially important
that an example should be made, not in a vin
dictive spirit, but for the benefit of others who
may contemplate treading like, devious paths.
1 hey are the Pariahs, the Ishmaels of society.
Their hand is against every- man's, and every
man's hand is against theirs. But if a kid
gloved and brown-atone Bcoundrel Insinuates
his hand and abstracts from your safe the
hard earned results oi a life of toil and indus
try, a benevolent and magnanimous public
sentiment grows maudlin over youthful indis
cretions, and charges the fault to an overflow
of animal spirits. Not many years ago a scion
of Kentucky murdered a poor schoolmaster,
and a Hardin county jury excused the unfor
tunate act because Matt. Ward was a man
ol mettle and of fiery temperament.
The faith of the people is beginning to
waver, and many are beginning to doubt
whether trial by jury Is really a public benefit.
A rich rascal scarcely ever receives the just
reward of his guilt ; there are too many loop
holes in the mebhes of the law through which
the moBt obese and bloated blackguard can
escape from punishment. There is great need
Jor an example, and we have an idea that a
million-dollar thief sent to the penitentiary
for twenty years would be more beneficial to
the morals of the community than the con
viction of a thousand shoplifters and pick
pockets who lack the wherewithal to make
their crimes appear venal.
The typhus fever has broken out among the
animals in the Jardin d'Accliuiation, Paris, Bad
two gazelles and six yaks died oi the disease.
They were buried twenty feet beiow the surface
ot the ground.
There are not churches enouarh in Yorkshire,
Eucluud, to uccoinuiodute the increasing popu
lation, al.houKh one hundred and eiphty-six new
ones have been erected in the diocese ot Kipon
during the last tweutv-seven jeaw.
A few weeks aco tha vestry room of Christ
Church, Watney short, London, was broken into
by thieves, and all the drawers broken open, as
well as the cash box in which the communion
alms were kept. The money was taken, but the
box was left behind.
Au arm-chair of Voltaire's has lately been
sold in Paris lor two thousand francs. It U of
highly varnished wood, square-backed, and
covered with velvet, which wes once ween. To
the arms are fixed two movable desks in Japan
lacquer, which join In front and form a little
table containing two drawers.
The Princess of Was latelv passed her
twenty-nrst birthday, and the eve.it was duly
colebrafd at Sandinixliam, her coumry seat, by
a dinner to the peasantry of li e vicinity, at
which the Prince of Wulea pro-osed his wife
health. He presented the lady also on the oeca-
hlOIl With a lllliriit KV.r.H..,l V.f .
gift. The Queen sent to her duiightcr-ln-law au.
i5 vivutp Rtatuo 9 tue iTuice vousvrv
John S. Rorey, the famous horse-tamer, In
ufferinz from a severe attack of psrnlysis. He
resides at (irovtport, Ohio.
In MinneBota.for a low days past. the railroml
trains have stopped running, tho tliermomeUr
indicating 24 degrees below zero.
The Dishop of Lincoln has come out aeainst
the pew-renting nyetem. Ho thinks that the pos
sesion ol pews, "leavens devotion with selflHh
ncss." tSIl
A merchant named Westfield. of t'onncil
Rlutls.llowu, was frozen to death near Boone, on
the 13th. A stnpe driver and a telegraph
operator had their limbs frozen at the same
ti&e.
Hcnlamln Thlnnev, wealthy farmer, at Rock
port, 111., wa rcct ntly poisoned t dea'U with
strychnine by bh fifth wife, a pretty girl, whom
he mairird blx weeks ao.
Henry Giles' lecture on the Compensations
of War, was rea.' before a la'e Doston audience
on Tuesday evtnlne, by Mr. P. C. Nichob, of
England, who in reading Mr. Giles' lecture for
his benefit.
T ;e Leavenworth papers say that the Direc
tors of Euttertiold's Overland' Despatch Com
pany have decided to place a strona force of r
selute, well-armed men on their Rraoky Hill
route, for the protection of their coaches, trains,
passengcra, stock, etc
Among the hard-workina; officials is General
BpiDner, United States Treasurer, who Is at his
(leek early and late, often eating hw meals in too
TrcsBury, and always sleeping there. The Gen
eral has addressed a circular to the heads of
Dnreaus, complaining that errors of clerks often
occasion such delays to the persons presenting
the incorrect accounts, besides much labor in
his office .or their correction. He has permission
to commence on the 1st of January to keep a
record in his office of all errors, embracing all
the particulars in regard to thetr concurrence
that can be ascertained. A report will bo made
up at the close of each month for the Inspection
ot the Secretary, aud the head of each Bureau
will be totiflod ot the mistakes made by the
clerks of that Bureau.
A bill favored by the regulars Is to be intro
duced in Congress. It provides tor an army of
100,000 men. Regimen's, infantry and cavalry,
to be three battalions, 800 men each, 2400 maxi
mum strength. .Artillery to have 12 batteries to
each reeinient. This bill provi-les lor a reor
ganization of the staff. The heads of four chief
bureaus Adjutant, Inspector, Quartermaster,
and Con-missary to be major-generals; the
others brigadiers. Staff vacancies to be filled
from the line officers having the right to apoly
for such, and'passing, as In the French service,
through a certain period ot service in each arm.
The grand staff in to consist of one general, tour
lieutenant-generals, and four major generals.
The army to be divided Into four corps. The
territory Into tour divisions. Of course these
latter to be commanded by the liewnHnt-eene-lala.
Brevets of this grade to be limited to two.
The pay is to be arranged so that all allowances
be merged in the pay proper. The general to
receive a salary equivalent to that now received
by Grant. $13,000. The lieutenant-generals
about $80ro. The maior-generals. $5000. The
brigadier generals, $H500. Colonels, $3000, and
so on down to second lieutenants, whoe pay Is
to be $1000. Staff officers will receive add!
tional pay of Irora $50 to $200, according to
grane ana rank, huch is the outlmo ot the pro
3 Vlll
puneu mm.
COPARTNERSHIPS.
IIMITED PARTNERSHIP OP CHARLES
J U. IIAMRH K W. the nndenlened have inrmed
a l.nnted or special part nenihlp under tlie provisions of
ine wtverai acta oi Anemu.y oi .rer.nsvivama relating
thereto, upon the rol'owiuK terras and conditions :
First The said pannorstilp is to be conducted under
the name ot CHARLES fl. B&MBK K.
Recond. The tmcial nature ot the business to be
cornea on i mat or importing, buying, ana se ling by
wnoiesaie, tiosiery. utoves. ana ?auov uoous, ana me
nUce of buslnens to be wlthio the city of Pbiladeluhla.
'Inlrd. The general partner is CH A KLEs H. 11AM-
RICK reslutngattto wl a. abVEriTIl street, city ot
rniiaaeipnia.
Fourth, fhesncclnl onrtner Is ITAKT A. LEWI IT.
residing on West Walnut lane. Otrmantown, Twenty
second Ward of the city of Phllade. nhla. who has ac
tually contributed and pu- Into the common stock of
said pariuorsmp twenty thousand dollars In goods and
mcrcnaiKime, consisting o Hosiery . uioves. anuir ancy
Goods, appraised at said value br an appraiser duly
appointed and quulltled for that purpose by the Court
oi i ouiuion 1'ieus oi rntiaaeipnia county, according
to law.
Fiith. The said partnership Is to commence on fho firxt
day ol January eighteen hundred and sixty-six (:8HB),
and to terminato on the thlrtv-flrst day of December,
CHAH. H HAMRIOK,
Genera' Partner.
H. a. usAvrrr
1 2t"6t BpecMI Partner.
DISSOLUTION.
XJ The firm of HAMRICK B LEAVI lTls this day
dissolved by mutual consent.
Hettleuents will be made by either partnor, at the old
BiaUU, JU dVA.EUUHlU Bireei.
CHARLES H. HAMRICK,
, Ha R l A. LEAVUX
Philadelphia, January 1, lHtitt. i 1 3 3t
TVTOTICE. JAMES II. WII.SOV AND ED
WAKD HUTCHINSON have thla day been admitted
ai partners In onr house. The firm name will hereatter
be EVANS , H ASS ALL & CO.
We have connected a Dress Trimmings Department
with our Military Business, and will open a bow stock
of goods about February 1.
1 1 t EVAKS fc HAlSiLL.
"NOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVEN, THAT THE
X Partnership heretofore existing between WIL
DER AlKiXSON and C. P.BAitTLKSO.V, under the
nuroe of WILDER ATKINSON & CO., is hereby Dl.-t-bOLVED,
by mutual consent. All accounts oi the Arm
lobe settled by WILM KB ATKINSON, wb will con
tfuue theNEWSPAft.R ADVERTISING AGENCY, at
No SUUltSNUT btreot, Philadelphia.
.January i, looo. 1 1 3t
riHE SUBSCRIBERS HAVE THIS DAY"
.a. iormea a i opartnersnip, under tne nrra ot
MILLWARK A WIfcKBRENElt.
lor the purpose ot conducting the Mauutacturers' Find
ings Business, at No. 11H MAitKET Btieet.
WILLIAM A1ILL WARD,
DAV1K . WINEBUfcNf.R.
Philadelphia, January 1, 1868. HJt
C COPARTNERSHIP. THE UNDERSIGNED
J have this da aaanrlalad with them R" T.SIHKAK r
Jr., aud will continue the mots and lioilowwara Dual-
ue uuuer we tame name as heretofore.
Ll.lliRAM & MCDOWELL.
January 1, 1PG8. 1 1 Si
PHILADELPHIA, JANUARY 1, 18i6. WE
have this day admitted EDWARD R FELL to an
interest In our busluest. which will bo continued nmlr
the name ol
11 t REESE D. FELL BON8.
SPECIAL NOTICES.
ri5r OFFICE OF "THE COMMERCIAL
-X-' AGENCY." No II I'nrih 1M1S1I Kln.1
'I HI CtllflfKRCIAL GESCT RKCOHD, lor 1H9. will b
published early In January, and can ha fumlnliail tn
sut scrlbcrs In ompie il ne lor the rprlng traue.
The liECOUD has been reiralarlv huiued lor a numhnr
ot years, aud Is now regaidcd as the most rtuubm aud
txtentw book ol ratings published.
Our lorthvonilnK boos, will contain the names of Mer
chants, Bankers, and Manuiactunrsln every city, town,
and vlllaue thioushout tne North, and tlm Mrrha..,m
in ihe vrittct'tial times nnd tau)m.m tn 1A Mntiii. tail A
fuiy rtpurUd.
a ne omn erciat Agency has been in successful opera
tion since IHU.
A branch office hss reoently been opened In this city,
where a full reoort can be bad ot almost ever hnalnnaa
man la the United 8tnte and British Provinces
xieri'hams and itaouiacturars, doing a credit oualneaa.
ate reuuested to coil and examine the ri'imru in tin.
ottlce belorc subscribing elsewhere.
tj. Lr.nLi r. ttr.iL.Lti.
, .... Mo li North IHIRI Btroet.
1 1 6t Phlladophla.
tr G1RARD NATIONAL BANK.
r Pun nKT.pttii TtoA a iua
The Annual FlAAtlnn t.. Tkimctira wilt I, licM mt .h.
Baukhiu liouae, on WtDNlfJllAY, the luthdar of Jau-
uoij, looa. ueiween toe hours oi IV A. at. and 1 r. ax.
A Uievtlnu ot tlia Hml.lililarn will ha ha it al ilia u nl
Place alld l,n ibe aama ilav. at I'lo'nwk M lur tlin Diir-
de "I taking into tonaluerallon the general Interesia el
.MW II1B IIUUUII W. 1 NrHAI f f.a.
riDstuthtl Io Cashier.
tT FARMERS' AND MECHANICS' NA-
PiiiLADKLPHiA. December. 18G5.
Ill Annual Flfi,H,, tni- hlnu'lunnl thU lUnk rt
be bo d at the BANKING HOU-E, on WKDN KhDAV.
lue nun cay oi Jauuurv next, betweou the noun ot 10
O'clock A. M. uuU3 o'C oi kl1 M.
l'i tuibl4t
W. KOKHTON. Jr., Cashier.
IfW SECOND NATIONAL BANK, 1'IIIL Y-
J DELPHI 4
Pbakkforp. December 81. 1SBV
lhft AnnilHl MoHKn ... l.l.(.Vl.itl,liiM ... it. id It an Jr
, v mi.ii tn mreciors, wm vi nrra at iu unuuug
llOUPU D 1 til Klit V iu.....w U lMKi. hi.w.un .a
tioiirtt in l'i anil a
v It i Utl WILLIAM H. KUAWN. Cashier.
JANUARY 2, 180G.
SPECIAL NOTICES.
rW. OFFICE OF THE MAHONING COAL
LUMfAN v, No. 300 WALNUT Btrest, rhllesol-
ohla.
At IhA Annual Maallncr nf ha BIm,wi..mam f t. if.
nnnlng ( oal Company, the following ofUoors were
i.iwivu ii'k uia tjtutuujg ;vt.ri
rHKHITFHT.
C. F NORTON.
V.. K. NORTONr80""'
F A. GODWIN.
HARRY WALTER,
D. K. HIOEM AKl'.R, of Maucb Chunk,
CHARLES PA RRlt.H of WUkeabarte.
trcasi brh
FRANK. WALTER.
. . FBAa'K WALTER,
1 1 lutnstt Reore-i err.
ri5f OFFICE EVANS FARM OIL COM-
' l-ANT.NO. llj Houth THIRD Street.
l'llll.AItai nun .Lflniwl 1RA1.
Ihe Annual Met ting of the - tockho dprs o the fcvass
F,rni ' o'Pnr will be held at their ofnoe. No. 11 J
.n.ln" e,trw"' n vrrviiN r.H DA Y.January lltn.
ISW. at 9 O'dOOk P. M.. at Whlrh lima a nmniulllnn will
be subml led to reouce ihe capl at stock to (f!)0,000)
tt . oitt, a v p- CUBBERI.EY, President.
P V. CLAY I ON. Directors.
F MILLa. IT. 1 tu at
OFFICE OF THE MAYOR OF THE
V1TI OF PHILADELPHIA.
Ii.nin. 1 aea
Pronnaala Will ha aanalvaH a V 1. n . I . . tr
DAY next, the 8th Instant, for the oonveyanre of prison
ers by VAN from the several POLICE STATIO tlS. iroui
January It, 186, to December 31. 1H66. In accordaooe
wiiu me prnvuuonaor an ordinance approved Deoeiaber
21. 18M entitled "An ordinance to make an appropria
tion to the Department ot Ponce :or the vesr IBM." Par
ticular IkiotmaUon of route, and regulations of service,
can be obtained by application at this ottlce.
Ay oruer oi in Mmjtt.
SAMUEL O RDOOLER.
Chlei of Polloe.
OFFICE OF THE UNION PASSENGER
RAILWAY COMPANY, No. SOS 8. FOURTH
PnttlllVIDBIl TlMM-Ki,.tA 1IUI
The Coupons of the Bonds ol this Company falling due
r .V "AZ " ." '""Oi win or pain on presentation
Oft.ce of JACOB E. RIDUWAY, Banker No. 67
i iiV otr8""- W. O. JLEMBLK,
1 1 1" Treas u rer.
KgT" PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD COM-
rAfl i,
Tbxasubib's DiFUtTlriirr, I
"ii.aRui-fiiA. noTcmDer I, iwK I
. - " oiwau.iuiwi.iBg Doaru oi Aire-
l".illI..V!L S,' declared a seml-annuai dividend ot
""1 BUte t"e"' Wrtl. on and after
Blank powers ol attorney for collecting dividends can
be bsdatt the Officii ol the Company, No. 238 . THIRD
it I cnt THOMAS T. FIRTH,
11 1 60 Treasuier.
fc&F' PHILADELPHIA AND READING
RAILROAD COMPANY, Office No, .27 South
cut niu outlet.
fnn.inftnTi ttip.mhn. 1 1 ta
DIVIDEND NOTICE. The Transier Books of this
(ompanv will be closed on Haiuraay. December 16. and
rcope ned on Tuesd at, Jan uary t, IHtiA,
A Dividend of IEN PER CENi. is hereby declared
on the Preierred and Common stock, clear of National
and btate taxes payable In caxh or Comm. n stock at
pat. at the optlen of the holder, on and alter the 30 h
IiihH, to tne holders thereof as Ihey shall stand regla-
uua uie kompan on tne itiih lnst. All
li.'nuic at IU1B VlllUO.
! 12 17t 8. BRADFORD, Treasurer.
Ir-mF A PlIYSIOI.OfilPAT. VIRW fV Mm.
I3 RIAC.E: Containing nearly S00 pages, and 130
fine Plates and Engravings oi the Anatomvoi ihe Human
Organs in a State ot Heuliii andDlaease, wilb a Trea ina
nn V.rl h rmra It Ttjinln 1,1- i . .
. , ' . "".""'v . .'.n,,tu.:iiur!i upon we
ajlnd and Body, with tne Author's 1 Unoi ITeaiinent
tuo wuij latitiuat aim auuctutaiiu moae ot cure, as shown
J , 1 V a uumiiui lurmtr Id 1119
ruarrli d. and those iconteuiplating marriage, wboenter--
.miu uvwu.o w. iuoii yujatvm UUUUIIIOU sent 1TOQ OI
yvwr,v w ""J Kurnr.., vu reuaii, til CCIlUt m BlamPS
11 r nnatal riirratii.v h a.lHMaalnA T T 1 . .
SI S AIDIN I ma Ailiativ 1 V
The author may be consulted upon any of the diseases
upon which bis book treats either ptri-nal'w or by mail.
and medicines tent to any part ot tho world. 11 8 8ta
TTT' DINING-ROOM F. LAKEMEYRR.
a CARTER'S Alley, would respect lul'y In.orm the
Pnbllc seneially that be has Icitnt thing undone to make
turn pioue t ouiiuiiauie in every respect lor the accom
modation oi guests. He has opened a large and com
modious Dlnlng-Room in the second s ory. Hit 81DK.
iv.'iai' m lurnio'ieti wnn UKAJNLIIKS, WINKS
WHISKY, Etc.. Etc. ot SUPERIOR BRANDS. JJIJ '
BT JUST PUBLISHED
aj tne rnvBicians of the
NEW YOUK MUUEUM,
the ninetieth Edition ot their
.nulled- FOUR LECTURES,
PTTTT ClfMXVTlT A a urt a
TO fee btd free, ior tour eUn.ps, by addressing Sccretan
RiaaM V nrk Mlianiim r f Ann.
a" " waa (uiwvHIU J A II Dttl H I J ,
1 17 It No.filH w ROADWAY. Wow York.
CHKIriTMAS AND NE V YEAR'S
l xtb&xNTS. A useful, valuable, nnd de
lightfully acceptable preeont for Christmas would be
a bottle of that flagrant Ilair Tonio and ltcautlflor,
Jtctrouvey's Turkish Bandolenian. What can be
more acceptable than anything that will beautify t
that will restore nature's decay by stopping the hair
from falling out, restoring its natural color malting
it to grow in luxuriance and beauty, asist in putting
up according to the present style and fashion and
1 p it in place f This, Jietrouvey's Turkish Bando
lenian Hair Tonio will do, and for proof we refer
you to any person who has tried it. It Is acknow
ledged to be the beautifler of the age, the only Hair
Tonic and Restorer worthy of the name. In Turkey
in Vance, in England, in America, everywhere
where tho Bandolenian is known, it is pronounced
the "neplut ultra" of Hair Preparations. Ilomomber,
it is free from all metallic poison?, that are contained
in most Hair Colors aud dressings. It is the extract
of many flowers and herbs, bcautiiully put up, an
ornament to the Toi'ot.
For sale by all Druggists and Perfumers.
Wholesale,
JouxBToir, Hollo way & Cowden,
Dyott & Co.,
Principal Derot ior United States and Canadas.
Ja-xs Palmer & Co.,
Ho. 189 Market street,
12 S tuths3m Philadelphia.
1
Si
B
o
S3
o
OS
CO O
O
W
a
CO
S3
S3
o
en
w
P
S3
Hat
a '
-
IT
O
H
0
0
-9
gfyrSTj CABINET ORGANS, f-J"r3f?
nTl l CABINET OKOANa, ' tfttii
CAItlNBl' ORQANW,
imni.l unutatl.
These trn'y heautiiul Instruments (mads on If by
Varon A Hamlin) ale Inlmltal.la in tnair fluto-llka
quality of tone, and have attained a oelehrtty In thin
country and Europe ucver equalled by any ether reed
liiairuuit-ut.
r or sale only ty J. K. 'lOLTLD.
IMPORTANT
TOtUKt
KTOCKHOLDE1W .
OF THB
REYENUE EXTEWSIOiXS
SILVER 'MINING C0MPANT
or
i k v r v.
CAPITAL S500.000.
DIVIDED INTO 50,000 SHARKS.
Par Value and Subscription Price,
$10 Per Share.
The Director having secured the following valo-
ble properties situated upon LANDER HILT,, Lao-
dor County, Nevada, to wit:
ON LANDER HILL,
RICHARDS LEDGE 2000 FEET,
W. K. JOHNSTON LKDOE 20W
COPrKR HABBOR .' 2000
N. 8. PEN NOCK 200O
VALLEY YilS " 2000
TAYLOR 2000 '
FARBELEL ' 2400
11 SON 9iw
MACKINAW ' " 2400 u
MINER'S JOY 2400 "
CHLORINE " 2400
fcULPfi TJRET amn
UNION IRUSr " 2400 "
MARQlEflE " 2400
HOC G ETON 2400
QUAKER CITY ' ,2400 "
ASSOCIATED 2400
A1SN A SWAN 2400
40.100 "
Consisting ol Eiuhteen diffMmn 1
' . v-. mvus;uo VI AU.lUrjQf
and amounting in the aggregate to about 40.000 fait.
togotbor with the
HOPKINS TUNNEL,
Which is already opened about 200 feet. Work UDon
this Tunnel is now being prosecuted with the utmost
vigor, and will CUT IN ITS CO0B8K ALL THE
ABOVE-NAMED LEDGES, and also the Jievsnue.
Provident ia, Savage, Morgan and Muncey, Hooker.
North Star, and in. fact aU Ledges situated upon
Lander Hill. Ihese properties hare been secured
from the original locators, and only could be done
by giving them a large interest In the Company.
Uniting these pioportJcs With the Aoronuo Exten
sion without increasing the Capital Stock, or the
price per share, stamps this as one of the best enter
prises ever offered to the public
Samples of the Ore and Maps of the Property, and
for further particulars, apply at the Oflloe, No. 66 8.
THIRD SI REET. 12 29 4c
JOHN C. CLARK & SON,
PEWTERS AXD STATIONERS,
No. 230 DOCK STREET.
A LARGE STOCK OP FIRST QUALITY"
ACCOUNT 13 OO KS,
Constat tty on hand. ' '
BLANK BOORS ofevorv description Fuliul anil Krtnn A
to order.
Cap, Letter, aud Note Paner. Official
Envelopes, Copying Tresses. Canoelllnn Htamn. .
full assortment of
Office and Counting-House Stationery.
Lithographic Checks, Drafts. Notes. lriiH.i ,
Stock, etc., done to order.
Custom Bouse and Commercial Blanks.
IK8CK4NCB, BAKE, AND MERCANTir.P pnrapw
INl'.
A. T. LANE,
Oi FEB i FOR SALE
DOMESTIC FLEECE WOOL,
DOMESTIC TUB WOOL,
CALIFORNIA WOOL,
MESTIZA WOOL,
CAPK WOOL,
No. 126 CHESNUT STREET
ll6,P 1'Bir.inyri.n.:
1,
uia.

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